Verbal gaffe will cost Gingrich

Thinking Right’s weekend free-for-all. Pick a topic:

● Assuming Gov. Nathan Deal gets to appoint — or voters elect — one more Supreme Court justice in the mold of the two former Gov. Sonny Perdue appointed, Georgia will have a majority whose interpretation of law is more pleasing to conservatives — and decisions like this week’s 4-3 ruling on charter schools will go the other way. While that one was not strictly left-right, the majority bought the arguments of the old-line education establishment that has bitterly resisted parental choice — and effectively gutted charter school competition. For those who favor choice, the task now is to fight for vouchers and for the principle that public money follows the child to the education provider parents deem most suitable.

● The dissenters in the charter school decision were Presiding Justice George H. Carley, a 1993 Zell Miller appointee, and Justices Harold Melton and David E. Nahmias, both Perdue appointees. You have to read the dissent by Justice Nahmias, accessible through the Georgia Supreme Court’s website. (First read the majority opinion.) If Nahmias does not wind up on the federal bench at least at the circuit court level, if not the U.S. Supreme Court, I’ll be surprised. If you read one opinion this year, it ought to be Nahmias’ superbly researched, reasoned and argued dissent. Give the veteran Justice Carley another conservative of the Melton-Nahmias mold, let them play off each other’s intellect, and this court will be smoking.

● In commenting last week on the poor performance of HOPE recipients, I noted that at some colleges fewer than 20 percent of freshmen kept the stipend until graduation — and that at the University of West Georgia the rate is 8.3 percent. Because of a dropped digit, that number reflects more poorly than warranted on the preparedness of West Georgia students. The actual rate is 18.3 percent.

● Of 204 Obamacare waivers approved by the administration in April, almost 20 percent of them were to businesses in one California congressional district, reports The Daily Caller. You had to ask which district? Nancy Pelosi’s, of course. Do as I say. Meanwhile, the Las Vegas Sun reports that Nevada, home state of Pelosi’s Senate counterpart Harry Reid during the Obamacare cram-down, “had secured a statewide waiver from certain implementation requirements of the Obama administration’s health care law, because forcing them through, the department [Health and Humans Services] found, ‘may lead to the destabilization of the individual market.’” Waive the whole country, as Mitt Romney suggests.

● What do Newt Gingrich and a student belonging to a group calling itself Georgia Undocumented Youth Alliance have in common? On Sunday’s “Meet the Press,” Newt referred to U.S. Rep. Paul Ryan’s Medicare reform as “right wing social engineering,” prompting Ryan to declare, “With allies like that, who needs the left?” Newt apologized and called Ryan to explain himself. Said the student, speaking for illegals, upon Deal’s signing of House Bill 87: “We have a right to remain in this state … We will not obey a law that is unjust, that is meant to drive out our families and criminalize our community.” Knowing when to shut up is a real virtue.

● I listened to a low-key Gingrich at last weekend’s state Republican convention — the result, perhaps, of a battle with allergies — and thought: This guy could be president, despite the fact that lefties hate him as much as they do Sarah Palin and did George W. Bush. Then came “Meet the Press” and the alienation of the Republican Right. What seemed possible Friday night became distant and probably unattainable by the weekend’s close.

145 comments Add your comment

hsn

May 19th, 2011
6:42 pm

Why are so-called “freedom-loving” conservatives mad at Gingrich for expressing the obvious?
Must Gingrich tow the party-line all the time?
Must Gingrich not dare disagree with the “honorable Ryan’s” positions?

Newt became a disappointment when HE CAVED IN to pressure from his con supporters and “apologized” to Ryan. For a man of his political experience, education, and clout, why he had to “apologize” to Ryan for calling his plan what it is — “right wing social engineering” — is beyond me. If democrats similarly treated a democrat for disagreeing with the party leadership on an issue, cons will be yelling “tyranny” at anyone who rebuked him/her. You cons will always be the joke in politics.

WHY CAN’T NEWT DISAGREE WITH RYAN?? Newt, you should have stood your ground! Your con supporters, call it “having a backbone.”

By the way, Jim, does the below bother you? When will you blog about it?
Would you have stayed silent for this long if the “guvnor” were a democrat?

http://www.myfoxatlanta.com/dpp/news/local_news/FOX-5-Reporter-Not-Allowed-at-Immigration-Bill-Signing-20110513-pm-sd

jconservative

May 19th, 2011
7:31 pm

Newt has been a big government “Republivcan” from day one. The years have not changed him.
If you prefer a small federal government. Newt is not the answer.

Wooten's Shootin' Craps

May 19th, 2011
7:43 pm

Newt is such an enigma. At times his rhetoric and passion make him a compelling character. Other times, he embarrasses himself and his party with his obtuse and convoluted remarks. Factor in dubious decision-making in his personal life and one can’t help but want to distance oneself from his influence.

The only way that Newt could even hope to prevail within the party would be to re-invent himself as a tea party darling. He could adopt positions he doesn’t believe in, and spend the next year and a half living a lie, staying on message, and placating the huddled masses with meaningless pandering.

Go for it, Newt. It’s your only hope.

uno

May 19th, 2011
7:49 pm

In a rare moment of lucidity; Newton Leroy spoke the truth, and here come the “thinking right” pitchforks.

Michael H. Smith

May 19th, 2011
8:00 pm

Newt can hold whatever opinions he desires, agree or disagree with whomever he wants but voters have that same right. The problem for Newt is, that too many of the people he will depend on to get elected to anything, just so happen to completely disagree with Newt.

Newt may as well face the facts as he made them. He is finished.

Michael H. Smith

May 19th, 2011
8:05 pm

Obamacare waivers… Waive the whole country, as Mitt Romney suggests.

Hmm… Mitt might be on to something. :)

jmiles

May 19th, 2011
8:18 pm

Newt, hated by as many right wingers like myself as by left wingers, continues to self-destruct. He is a miserable human being with delusions of grandeur and would be a poor president. As for charter schoools, here is a radical idea-let’s make the hard decisions as a society and make all schools better.

Michael H. Smith

May 19th, 2011
8:19 pm

For those who favor choice, the task now is to fight for vouchers and for the principle that public money follows the child to the education provider parents deem most suitable.

And that, Mr Wooten, will require an amendment to the State’s Constitution as I have been calling for recently in advocating for school choice.

What say ye State legislators: Shall a “School Choice” amendment be placed on the next ballot which allows for public education money to follow the child to the education provider parents deem most suitable?

DawgDad

May 19th, 2011
8:53 pm

It’s vitally important to affirm Obamacare is unconstitutional. Merely waiving its provisions or defunding it leaves the legislation in place as a marginal precedent-setting victory for the hard left. Our forefathers have fought and died for less. All the evidence needed exists in the mandate and in the form of waivers. Prosecute the people arranging waivers – this is blatant corruption (influence peddling) in my book.

I’m a conservative, but public Charter Schools existing even partially outside the control of local school boards are a horrible idea. No compromise. Given that we have public schools I’m an advocate of 100% local control of public schools; get the Fed out completely and keep the State influence to a minimum except to police corruption or to fund basic education in impoverished regions. Better yet, privatize the schools.

Newt never had a chance to begin with. Conservatives I speak with about politics respect his past accomplishments and his voice on the issues of the day, but mosgt wouldn’t vote for him to be dog catcher in a primary election.

Certainly in this nation there are plenty of conservatives who have demonstrated leadership qualities, sound positions on the issues of the day, and who have not left a trail of corruption or irresponsible behavior in their wake. When they run for office let’s tune out the mainstream media and stand firmly behind them. Certainly no man or woman is immune from media attacks, but their attacks are only effective to the extent we allow. An attack from the MSM or the left should be viewed as an ENDORSEMENT.

Curious

May 19th, 2011
8:54 pm

Vouchers.
Can’t wait to see the new private schools open all over the State. Hopefully they won’t have to be certified so every scam artist in the world will have the chance to provide an alternative.
There’s no private school in my county; I’m confident Westminister is eagerly awaiting the new influx. If you can’t afford the tuition there, there will soon be a new school at that old abandoned convenience store on the corner.
We will rise from number 50!

Dabir Dalton

May 19th, 2011
9:23 pm

School choice is an ENTITLEMENT SCHEME for the upper middle class and above who can afford to send their children to private school. I thought that conservatives were against ENTITLEMENTS? Oh that’s right your conservative in name only. My bad!

Barry

May 19th, 2011
9:45 pm

Hey, education voucher supporters: If I’m unhappy with my local tax-funded law enforcement, can I get a voucher to pay for private security? You know, let my tax money follow me where I want to take it?

UNaffiliated VOTER

May 19th, 2011
10:08 pm

Get YOUR children OUT of government screwls as fast as you CAN!!! They will thank your for it
exponentially as they age!

Tom

May 19th, 2011
10:25 pm

Georgia private schools are principally for Christer wackaloons who want to wave their Bibles around and pretend its science.

Glenn

May 19th, 2011
10:34 pm

Fitfully I’ve been interested in our Newtie. The things others dislike about him, I too dislike. I admire him most for two things: his sitting down with Clinton to rework Welfare, and his long-running autopsy on Detroit. As to his verbal suicide, colleagues have recounted to me over the years his flights of fancy in the classroom. I don’t know. I wasn’t there. But an imaginative historian is a terrible historian. Our whole discipline is founded on fidelity to the record. We’re like journalists that way. It’s too bad, as he has much to offer. He should quit now, at the present peak of his popularity. I’m sorry for the people who sent him money in these hard times.

Glenn

May 19th, 2011
10:35 pm

Tom, What are you saying? That the adults are a bunch of ignorant Texan , or that the pupils are hungry for nonsense? Or both?

Hurst

May 19th, 2011
10:40 pm

“Knowing when to shut up is a real virtue.”

Isn’t it about time you took your own advice to heart?

Glenn

May 19th, 2011
10:46 pm

Sorry, Tom. Evidently copy editors yet live, because one of them just now eleted my noun, without which the second sentence makes nonsense. The noun was “Christers”. Since evidently this offends the AJC’s computers, suffer my explanation, as a devout Protestant and former chaplain, that we must have recourse to a name for a certain kind of determinedly ignorant Christian– all blow and no understanding.

Glenn

May 19th, 2011
10:49 pm

Um, Hurst, no. You just made a mistake. No biggie. Don’t get up all about it.

Black Conservative

May 19th, 2011
10:52 pm

Though I will never support Newt because of his historical need for race-bating (which Wooten has never called him out on, thus Wooten must support Newt race-bating). The Repugs have become quite predictable and boring. If you are an individualist or a free thinker, please do not apply to be a Repuglican. Funny how cons and tea party folks always preach individual freedoms, but just don’t try to be an individual! Run Newt Run!!! LOL!!!

Glenn

May 19th, 2011
10:56 pm

Seriously, what can anyone who wants Americans to understand Physics do but to cordon Texas and try to keep its anti-intellectualism from reaching here?

Ragnar Danneskjöld

May 19th, 2011
11:00 pm

Good evening all. Surely Mr. Newt’s comments will draw the most discussion here. I, for one, have no idea what “right wing social engineering” means. Conservatives believe in little more than freedom, with the rare exceptions of protecting the truly helpless (e.g., abortion) – are we now to infer that freedom movements are “social engineering?”

Glenn

May 19th, 2011
11:13 pm

Dabir Dalton: you’re semi-right. There’s a classist trade in school choice schemes. The Middle Class gets release from assigned schools in exchange for which some poorer parents get to move a kid from one outhouse to a newer one. It’s cynical. What I think the state Supreme Court is getting down to with the charter ruling is basically that if it’s good for the goose it’s good for the gander. The whole Charter concept, circa 1983, was experimental, and it was inevitable that, as it institutionalized, the court would be left to shut it down.

Glenn

May 19th, 2011
11:20 pm

Hi Ragnar. Funny. I wondered the same thing. I can’t personally conceive of my conservatism if not as a radical rebellion against social engineering. Perhaps Newt’s envisioning the Party as constructive–that’s what Lincoln did–but I’m not getting it. I mean, for more than five years after he fled Georgia in something like disgrace, this ideas-man, this futurist, this imagineer comes up with what? A cheap attack on one of his own.

eatmotacos

May 20th, 2011
12:07 am

Georgia has a half million defiant illegal aliens thumbing their noses at our rule of law, and everyone is focused on Newt, who should have been filed away in the irrelevant washed up nobody folder years ago.

Glenn

May 20th, 2011
2:20 am

That mat be. Me, I mistook the movie “The Lincoln Lawyer” for a biopic about Sorensen, or his father. Silly me, I thought “Hey, good idea!”. Effing Hollywood. Screwed us again.

Glenn

May 20th, 2011
2:27 am

If the way you have it is half a million, let me ask you to put the children and refugees to bed until we try the rest fortheir crime. This is half the problem.

Will the last Democrat in Georgia please turn off the lights?.....

May 20th, 2011
2:41 am

eatmotacos, 12:07 am-

Actually the illegal alien population is closer to AT LEAST 900,000 as the 2010 US Census puts the number of illegal aliens in Georgia at about or over 880,000. Those who are against and even those who are supposedly “for” tougher illegal immigration enforcement are all downplaying the actual extent of the problem because they have no intent of actually doing anything more about the problem. The illegal immigration enforcement crackdown is just nothing more than a bunch of increased overheated rhetoric intended to do nothing more than make Georgians think that they’re doing something about the problem when in fact the only thing that was passed and signed into law was a bill full of humongous loopholes and constitutionally-suspect laws designed to be voided in court challenges with little or mostly no set aside funding to actually enforce them. Anybody who thinks that a bunch of corrupt legislators and politicians in bed and in love with big-business were going to seriously do anything to cut-off their endless lifeblood supply of highly-profitable cheap labor is a real naive fool. Hasn’t anyone noticed how strangely quiet Governor Deal and legislative leaders have been about this bill since it passed the House? The only thing that can put a dent in illegal immigration in Georgia is a severe economic downturn in which an almost total lack of demand for overbuilt new homes and real estate effectively dries up the demand for an endless supply of cheap illegal migrant labor, sorta like now. If and when the economy recovers and reaches full-steam again, the overwhelming demand for cheap off-the-books cash-paid labor will once again put Georgia back on the fast-track to being the next Texas, Florida or, better yet, the California where you wake up and you’re living in a Spanish-speaking Hispanic-dominated society and short of the federal government militarizing the border, there’s nothing that anyone can do to stop it.

Will the last Democrat in Georgia please turn off the lights?.....

May 20th, 2011
3:28 am

As for vouchers, the whole big deal that Conservatives like to play up about vouchers is truthfully no more than populist rhetoric designed to make the middle class and much of the public think that they will all have unlimited access to a private school education when in all actuality the rhetoric sounds better than the actual truth which is that their are very few available spots in private schools. Most private schools have much smaller enrollments compared to public schools as it’s rare for even the largest private schools to have Pre-K thru 12 enrollments of more than 2,000 students. Private schools because they’re just that, PRIVATE, can and will continue to be as selective as they want in accepting the relatively few students that they want.

Also, government vouchers will only cover a LIMITED PART of the cost of tuition to private school, which can range into the TENS-OF-THOUSANDS PER YEAR at many private schools. So obviously vouchers aren’t the panacea that they’re made out to be by Conservatives, but the imagery in the populist pandering sure does sound good in making it seem that everybody will be have access to the most exclusive private school education available. The story that is often not told is that while they may charge high rates of tuition, private schools are heavily dependent upon monetary donations of all sizes from big and small donors alike which is why you see even the most prominent private schools heavily involved in fundraising drives just like at many public schools (whose would-be “tuition” is funded by property and sales taxes). Overall, education just isn’t that profitable of a business, but it is a VERY NECESSARY business, which I guess is why we have government-funded public schools.

Many charter schools (but NOT all) are on the right track of providing a better education than public schools, it’s just that the legislature went about creating them the wrong way. Even if’s a really good and effective concept (an great example of which is the Ivy Prep Girls Charter School in Norcross), existing law still has to be considered and taken into account when creating the concept which was the case when the Georgia General Assembly created the state-managed commission to approve charter schools despite the warnings from local school districts that doing so might be UNCONSTITUTIONAL at the state level. Now, because of the State Legislature’s continuing pennant for lack of attention to minor and major details alike (like constitutionality), a very good and effective educational concept is in severe jeopardy.

Glenn

May 20th, 2011
3:35 am

Thank you. That’s the straight skinny. As for Wooten’s difficulties in saying some of this, well…

Cobb Woman of Color

May 20th, 2011
5:51 am

HB 87…just words, no enforcement

Enforce the law, we can’t change the law for every individual situation.

Glenn

May 20th, 2011
7:13 am

Yeah. Imean, that’s why we require judges who have to futz with stuff. Is it you attacking my communications? Please stop it ir else years, costly years. With you at the clever, losing end.

You Know Who---TBO

May 20th, 2011
7:18 am

In 1997, You Know Who, TBO went to the Malcolm X Center for Self-Determination on Candler Road to hear what advice Geronimo Ji-jaga Pratt had for black people after serving 27 years in prison. Eight of those years were served in solitary confinement. Ji-jaga Pratt had been targeted by the FBI COINTELPRO for the purpose of neutralizing him and the Black Panther Party.

Even though the government’s evidence showed Pratt was 350 miles away on the night of the crime, he was charged, tried, and convicted of the kidnapping and murdering Caroline Olsen in 1972. The jury convicted Pratt on the false testimony of Julius Butler, a member of the Black Panther Party. Butler was also an informant for the government.

When the ceremony had ended, You Know Who, TBO approached the staging area to shake Pratt’s hand and ask questions. As I approached from the rear, Pratt whirled quickly taking a defensive position. He immediately apologized and said he had just gotten out of prison and learned never to trust your back to anyone.

I was honored to have a brief conversation with Pratt. He said “be aware of those crazy Mexicans. As punishment, prison guards would send me among them and they honestly believed I was there to kill them. I told Mexicans that I had no hostile intentions, but their minds were hard wired, fixated, and stuck on me being there to kill them.”

Forget about Jim. The minds of the illegal immigrants are hard wired, fixated, and stuck on having the right to remain in Georgia … and they are not going to obey HB 87 because they believe it to be unjust. And they believe that law is meant to drive out their families and criminalize their communities. Forget about Jim, forget about it.

Amen?

Buzz G

May 20th, 2011
8:04 am

“Georgia Undocumented Youth Alliance” ? What’s next? Georgia Association of Child Molesters?
Criminals banding together to promote their criminal activity as a civil right. Arrest and deport all the criminals. And then build the double fence, dig the moat and stock it with gators.

Woe is Me

May 20th, 2011
8:08 am

There is no more racist crowing than that of Jim Wooten’s antebellum education policy, in which he would create an elite class of little monsters who would grow up to be Jefferson Davis/Alexander Stephens clones: A hell so repulsive that we must thank ourselves every day for the zeitgeist that torpedoed the campaign.

” What seemed possible Friday night became distant and probably unattainable by the weekend’s close.”
Any more proof that Jim Wooten doesn’t understand the national conscience. or his own. He’s a victim of his own delusional nostalgia, where a person remembers the past as it never were, and asks, “why not?”

Social Engineering

May 20th, 2011
8:35 am

Social Engineering is a negative term used to describe grift techniques both micro and macro. One could use the term to explain how a newspaper will hire a right editor and a left editor and then present news analysis as if there were only two sides. This gets the population to thinking the way the established tyranny expects them to think and then we get the America we have today, with a presidential candidate pool of fools and tools. That would be a macro social engineering at it’s most evil, (and most obnoxious to those who know what’s going on).

An example of micro social engineering would be using emails or phone calls to trick some silly old woman into giving her social security number.

How embarrasing was it for US when Donald Trump hemmed his way through his withdrawal from the race to the white house. The possibility that his franchise abuse would get the light of day was enough to stop him cold. The fact that he was talked into considering a run for the prez shows how delusional Trump is. Never believe your own press.

Guess what? Mr. Trump is getting that light now anyway. Oh, they are going to dig DEEP!

Trump is a social engineering meister. His show has been reduced to tears. Meatloaf was Meatloaf before it wasn’t cool to be Meatloaf. I never really liked Paradise by the Dashboard light even though all the dope smokers in America actually lived the lyrics with Jim Beam for years and years. I never got the whole Meatloaf thing. Now it’s obvious that he’s just a introverted schmoe who believes his own myth.

Obamacare waivers are necessary because of the eclectic nature of the states’ health care nightmare as it exists. of course there has to be fine tuning, moron. The mess we have now is such a total disaster that it’s a miracle Obama’s plan is as effective as it looks like it’s going to be. Ne’er-do-well Neanderthals like Wooten should learn the value of knowing when to stfu.

Bill Johnson

May 20th, 2011
8:44 am

Let’s see – which of the giants of the renaissance went to public schools? Which of the founding fathers went to public schools? Issac Newton? Marie Curie? Point being, public school is not necessary for the advancement of the world – just teacher’s unions.

I’m thinking that just as with nearly everything else, the government has ruined the idea of public education via implementation.

eatmotacos

May 20th, 2011
9:04 am

@ Will the last Democrat…….

You can more than double the 880,000 number when you add the hordes of amnestied Mexicans that followed the illegals, once they have established their beachhead. The language barrier is their catalyst. Just Google for “Mexican Immigrant Communities in the South and
Social Capital: The Case of Dalton, Georgia”, the seven year study on how they were able to colonize Dalton.

I agree with you on the uselessness of HB 87. It isn’t worth the paper that it is written on. It is a joke. Anyone who expected anything more than a fake bill hasn’t been paying attention. All you have to do is go to the ethics ga.gov website and see who pumped the money into Deal’s campaign. Prominently on the list, you will find the largest abusers of our immigration laws, e. g., Gainesville chicken processors, Dalton carpet mills,etc..

Glenn

May 20th, 2011
9:09 am

That’s brilliant to me. I get it. Let me tell you that my abhorrence of “social engineering ” was honed on two things: in graduate study of the strange history of the people Barack Obama grew up on, and then watching this stuff play out so mismatched to actual Life.

Once I happened upon the late Sen. Edward Kennedy. I found him happy, kind and capable. Still, I wish I’d beaten him half to death to disabuse him of his rhetoric in assumption of the absurd right to hasten the coming of the Kingdom of God. I’m sorry that the man is gone. I really think that that is what he thought to attempt.

The difference between the parties is that one will lie to you and tell you that it’s possible, whereas the other will break the disappointing news. I’ve always likened it to a choice between Mom and Dad. You can’t fault the voters for choosing, but either way it’s unfortunate.

It’s all based on an insanely ignorant series of speculations both democratic and theological.

Glenn

May 20th, 2011
9:14 am

Maybe this is part of what ticks you off:the implied rejection of engineering itself. Not so. Not at all. If anything I think we need a John Dewey of ergonomics.

brad

May 20th, 2011
9:30 am

I love the smell of free-floating conservative anger in the morning.

Barry

May 20th, 2011
9:33 am

Hey, after I use those vouchers to send my kids to private school (if I don’t like my local publicly funded schools); and use another voucher to pay for private security (if I don’t like my local publicly funded law enforcement), can I get another voucher to pay for a private fire department if I don’t like my local publicly funded fire department? And can I get a voucher to use at Barnes & Noble if I don’t care for my local library? And another voucher for my kid to sign up for private Little League ball if I don’t like the local publicly funded recreation department? Run from this argument as fast as you can, voucher supporters.

Oh, and while you’re at it, explain why you’re so liberal that you advocate using tax dollars to set up a separate, parallel, publicly funded school system – which is precisely what vouchers will create. Like bureaucracy? You’ll love it when you’re funding two sets of them for the same purpose, with all of it siphoning more money away from the classroom.

Maybe then you can seek vouchers to pay for inkerneck connections for home-schoolers so they can live-stream Family Radio. That’ll give the little tykes all they need, right?

liberalefty

May 20th, 2011
9:46 am

JIM looooves to wax nostagic about the good ole days of JIM CROW……..

liberalefty

May 20th, 2011
9:52 am

CONSERVATIVES LOVE VOUCHER SYSTEMS BECAUSE THEY’re still angry about BROWN vs. BOARD OF EDUCATION that made segregation in public education illegal…they think by taking money from public schools , they can use that money to educate the white elite…

Glenn

May 20th, 2011
9:53 am

Already shot my bolt on vouchers. Sorry if you didn’t catch the joke. It was a good one, aimed at taking out charters in the same shot. I love these innovations, but at the end of the goddam day, innovations of WHAT?

Glenn

May 20th, 2011
10:01 am

Strictly for the reeked, I was weaned on Brown, by the ACLU itself. My complaints about current abuses of the First Amendment cannot help but derive from their rather kind leadership. Eric Holder is next to go.

Real Athens

May 20th, 2011
10:47 am

Bill Johnson:

Ah, the good old days. The mind only remembers the “good” of the good old days. The “good ‘ol days” are right, f#@%ing now. Here is an idea, raise a better human and you’ll have better public schools (students and teachers) … period.

And again, just to make sure facts do not get in the way of your argument: There is no collective bargaining agreement in Georgia for teachers — hence, no teachers union. The Georgia Association of Educators (G.A.E.) is no different than the A.A.R.P., the Christian Coalition or the V.F.W.

It must be a terrible thing to live in fear.

yuzeyurbrane

May 20th, 2011
12:55 pm

At least Wooten is straightforward. The state approved charter schools were always a stalking horse for vouchers and privatization of education. And it is OK to wait for a moderate Supreme Court Justice to die and be replaced by a righty. But wouldn’t it be more honest to have a constitutional amendment and referendum on charter schools and/or vouchers? Let the public hear the arguments as to just who benefits from privatization. Especially, whether it leaves us with a small educated elite and a large undereducated but hardworking and thrifty working class. And which approach is more likely to develop the well-educated populace we need to attract 21st century industries.

DannyX

May 20th, 2011
1:54 pm

“”Hey, after I use those vouchers to send my kids to private school (if I don’t like my local publicly funded schools); and use another voucher to pay for private security (if I don’t like my local publicly funded law enforcement), “”"

Nice job Barry!

Alabama Communist

May 20th, 2011
2:05 pm

More Breaking News On Newt graff…………….. Newt was informed today that he is on the no-fly Rapture list and will not be making the trip to the Republican Paradise this coming Saturday..