Tax bill a rush to future taxes

Thinking Right’s weekend free-for-all:

● The real flaw in the tax revision proposal that’s moving much too quickly through the Georgia General Assembly is that it does something small-government conservatives should never allow. It opens the door to a widespread service-by-service sales tax without actually eliminating the income tax. Sure the top rate is reduced from 6 to 4.5 percent on the income tax. But the grow-government crowd to rule Georgia in the next decade or so can do what they do best: agonize about “tough-choices” and “profile-in-courage votes” — and then raise the rates back. Meanwhile, the proposed legislation is salted with the word “services” in opening the door too new sales taxes. Future legislatures will penny-ante us to death on implementing them, one or two services at a time. Today, it’ll be a tax on auto repairs and next year it’ll be the services utilized by “the rich.” On and on. Democrats have wanted this opening for years. And it’s the party of smaller government that will latch on to a buzzword — “consumption” taxes — and deliver that Trojan Horse.

● The task in winnowing down the $24 billion metro Atlanta transportation wish list is to include just those projects that can stand on their own merits — that is, those that live up to honest cost-benefit analysis. The problem with this kind of shopping list is that the empty calories jump on to the shopping cart leaving too little money for essentials.

● President Barack Obama, delivering today’s truth and today’s agenda, vows to reduce oil imports by one-third by 2025. Meanwhile, the Interior Department reports that more than two-thirds of the offshore leases in the Gulf of Mexico that may hold 11 billion barrels of oil and 50 trillion cubic feet of natural gas are idle — not producing and not being actively explored. There is often a truth-a-meter gap between this President’s TelePrompTer and his policies. To Brazil: drill, baby, drill; we’ll buy. To us, drill, baby, drill; just not there. Or there.

● If politicians and the voting public allow this moment of fright to pass without taking action to cap and control public employee pension systems, we will be as irresponsible as those old folks and politicians who virtually destroyed Social Security over the past half century. The AJC’s Russell Grantham has done a superb job laying out the Georgia problem — which is admittedly not as deep and threatening as the California public pension problem. Our attention cannot wane without taking action. The public pension system model is seriously broken. It invites politicians to quiet today’s workers by passing the buck forward. There once may have been a salary-for-benefits trade-off between public and private plans. No more.

● Another reform for the statehouse GOP majority: Get rid of the practice of exempting state legislators who are in the insurance business from the annual continuing education requirements mandated for others. You own the inherited practices — and the culture — you don’t change.

● Good advice from LBJ to a young political science student who asked: “Son, never pass up an opportunity to go to the bathroom.” Good advice that could be given by U.S. Sen. Charles Schumer of New York, coordinating Senate Democrats’ talking points — proposed cuts are “extreme” and driven by the tea party pushing House Republican leaders too far right, he advised all to say. Good advice for the political moment, perhaps. But Schumer has better advice for young political science students: “Know where the reporters are.” Unbeknownst to Schumer, they were already plugged into his conference call with four Senate Democrats, reports The Washington Examiner.

56 comments Add your comment

Madison

March 31st, 2011
7:21 pm

Jim, I’m more interested in what can be done about Superior Court Judge Robert Flournoy III. How can he be removed? Cobb county doesn’t deserve a low life like him as a judge.

insider

March 31st, 2011
7:47 pm

the Georgia Republican legislators are being coached in the same way the Democrat senators were coached by Schumer.

old timer

March 31st, 2011
7:56 pm

Vwey disappointed in Republicans, both in Ga and congress. Something has to change.

BW

March 31st, 2011
8:27 pm

Not bad for you Jim for once

Lawrence

March 31st, 2011
8:59 pm

I agree with you, Jim

Cobb Woman of Color

March 31st, 2011
9:02 pm

The legislators dropped the ball on the bill addressing the illegal invasion, HB 87. Will it pass? Probably not! Plus, it has been changed and companies are not held accountable for their hiring practices.

LB

March 31st, 2011
10:51 pm

There is nothing wrong with consumption taxes in general only how they are implemented. A consumption tax combined with income tax is a recipe for disaster, especially long-term as incrementalism chokes us to death. Further, it kills us with federal exemption filings. Thanks republicrats.

On another note, I have noticed that statewide the education on the issues of our representatives and senators in the state legislature has indeed shown a dumbing down over the years. These people are completely short-sighted and mostly just damn ignorant of the consequences of their legislation. Does this correspond to cuts or federal mandates in education over the years or just that the people in charge are often idiot scions of wealthy influentials from years gone by?

P.S. I am a common-sense libertarian not an anti-everything.

Evelyn

March 31st, 2011
10:51 pm

What a waste of power on all fronts!

retiredds

March 31st, 2011
11:33 pm

Jim, I thought you would have figured it out by now …. there is no such thing as a small-government conservative. It is a figment of your imagination and wishful thinking (sort of what dreams are made of).

Mid-South Philosopher

April 1st, 2011
5:05 am

Good morning, Jim,

When I was a young school teacher many decades ago, working for near slave wages, the “powers that be” kept telling me how fortunate I was. You see, while I didn’t make any money, I was receiving generous benefits. That was true, because in the 60’s and early 70’s benefits were much, much less expensive for state and county governments than pay raises.

Now, in the words of Reverend Wright….”…the chickens have come home to roost.”

The pension programs in Georgia…like those across these United States need to be reformed. And NEVER under any CIRCUMSTANCES should there be a public pension for any elected official. That is what IRA’s are for!!!

Clanmack

April 1st, 2011
6:27 am

Of course-the Republicans are on the verge of ACTING to open the door to more government through the Tax Reform bill, but the “Democrats have wanted this opening for years.” It is more agregious to want than to act?? Sheeeees! There is no bridging the divide and working together with you.

Cobb Woman of Color

April 1st, 2011
6:27 am

Americans continue to have difficulty finding jobs and we want to protect jobs for illegal immigrants? Can we get our priorities straight?

http://www.ajc.com/business/metro-jobless-rate-down-893051.html

Buffalo Guy

April 1st, 2011
6:57 am

Can someone please tell me why I no longer see Cynthia Tucker on the AJC website. Thanks.

BitterEXdemocrackkk

April 1st, 2011
7:10 am

How can we OUTLAW the democrat party as a CRIMINAL organization? In fact, maybe we need to OUTLAW both dominant ‘parties’ of evil…NEITHER is a Constitutional requirement!

seabeau

April 1st, 2011
7:23 am

Buffalo Guy!! Maybe we’re just Lucky!!!

insider

April 1st, 2011
7:46 am

@retiredds

there ARE small goverment fiscal conservatives but they are unable to sell votes like the current “leadership” under the Gold Dome.

The “leadership” can not trust the fiscal conservatives to vote for a tax increase.

Buzz G

April 1st, 2011
7:52 am

Jim, Here’s a deal we should be making. We will help the Japanese with their nuclear power problems is they promise to help us get our southern border under control.

findog

April 1st, 2011
9:04 am

Jim,
It truly is a sad state of affairs within Georgia and the Union that honest men and women cannot be found to set our taxes to meet the minimum required public services and pay down our debt. It is a shame that we have to have blue ribbon committees to provide cover for our red state read my lips and blue states feed the poor delegates of legislative bodies. What level of depraved indifference must we reach before these ships of state are righted? Thank God for prayer or many would blow their heads off…

BW

April 1st, 2011
9:08 am

findog

It’s the times….no one can handle the truth….there’s no convenient entity to scapegoat and so the spotlights turn back onto our ‘leaders’….I have no problem with the state being in favor of Republicans but I expect them to act to actually address our issues in a thoughtful way….it’s a bunch of children on the playground right now under the Gold Dome

findog

April 1st, 2011
9:19 am

T-Grants, those pedestrian and bicycle paths will be the death of this grand experiment in alternate transportation funding. That and whiny minor fiefdom overlords who felt slighted by the process. I don’t care if it is for a Jesus and Mom’s Apple Pie museum I will never vote for another penny sales tax again, never, ever, and I mean it dangumit!

Energy independence was a lost cause when President Bush let Governor Bush keep all that energy off the West Florida coast as requirement for both their reelections

Any public entity that does not embrace the 401(a) method of retirement benefits for their workers like Hall County lacks the wisdom [insert stupidest thing you can think of here]; start with a pay for performance model so politicians don’t need these carrots to make it through tight budgets, they’ll either have to cut staff or raise taxes

I say I am shocked that an honorable member of the senate would even care what the fourth estate cared as they are of that most noble breed, the true public servant…

findog

April 1st, 2011
9:23 am

BG@6:57
Just lucky I guess

Lee

April 1st, 2011
9:35 am

Jim says “The real flaw in the tax revision proposal that’s moving much too quickly through the Georgia General Assembly is that it does something small-government conservatives should never allow.

Ahhh, here’s the rub, he said small-government . The very nature of politics is to expand your power by taxing those who didn’t vote for you and giving it to those who did (or who may).

The ugly, economic truth of taxes is that they always flow down to the individual consumer. Always.

“Democrats have wanted this opening for years. And it’s the party of smaller government…..

Republicans? Party of “smaller government”?!?!?!?! Neither party is the “party of smaller government.”

Continuing education requirements, aka, find a seminar at a beach location, load the family up in the SUV, and a) let your employer pay for it or b) write it off on your taxes. A fun time is had by all.

WHY? RNC is Y

April 1st, 2011
10:10 am

” There is often a truth-a-meter gap between this President’s TelePrompTer and his policies.” Hollow criticism from a vacant mind.

WHY? RNC is Y

April 1st, 2011
10:12 am

“Good advice that could be given by U.S. Sen. Charles Schumer of New York, coordinating Senate Democrats’ talking points — proposed cuts are “extreme” and driven by the tea party pushing House Republican leaders too far right, he advised all to say”

Another gem. I dare anyone to translate that sentence.

WHY? RNC is Y

April 1st, 2011
10:13 am

” Our attention cannot wane without taking action”

Oh, your attention waned.

WHY? RNC is Y

April 1st, 2011
10:15 am

Has anyone checked out the Gulf Oil Spill damage lately? How about a revisit? How about some professional reporting?

morons.

WHY? RNC is Y

April 1st, 2011
10:16 am

“The problem with this kind of shopping list is that the empty calories jump on to the shopping cart leaving too little money for essentials”

Sounds like Wooten put the shopping cart B4 the Trojan Horse.

Whinney..

Juan Uvmeni, just "One of Many"

April 1st, 2011
10:29 am

RE: 3rd para about drilling. Please inform your readers which Oil companies currently have U.S. territory leases, and are authorised to drill, but are not pursuing the opportunity to put drill pipe in the ground. I’m sure there are a few, and probably a dozen or more. Additionally, how many wells are there that are capped, although capable of producing oil? Then, lets talk about changing the laws so that any oil discovered, developed and produced in the U.S. can not be exported to any other country, regardless of the ownership of that oil (i.e. a well drilled by Royal Dutch/Shell on U.S. territory does not belong to the Dutch to export from the U.S. to Europe, it can only be sold to U.S. users). Mark my words, the next world conflict will be for resources, not ideology or territory. It’s too bad that you have to take territory to access the resources.

Buffalo Guy

April 1st, 2011
10:44 am

Wow…the AJC just gave me a link to all of Cynthia Tucker’s recent columns. Glad to find her again as she is so perceptive and right on the money with her writings. What a treat !! Hope she keeps that great stuff coming.

redneckbluedog

April 1st, 2011
10:56 am

Alright…employment is up, unemployment is down…things are picking up…let’s see how we can ruin the economy again purely for idealogical reasons…..let’s not compromise…..We now Friedmanomics doesn’t work, but let’s push it on the American people as hard as we can anyway…..Let’s claim to be for smaller government, but shoot a straight path to women’s uteruses…and let’s say the government can dissipate any muncipality it wants to if the governor doesn’t like it…..and let’s get into all kind of legal and corruption trouble and get elected as the governor of Georgia….all we have to say is “Obamacare” and these crackers will eat it up…!!!!

Halftrack

April 1st, 2011
11:47 am

Jim,
Most changes in laws & government begin with a cover “blue ribbon type” commission that has a preconceived goal or end result before they start work. Also they don’t have enough vetting process by the general public on the Bill(s). It should be against the law to pass such a bill the same year it is introduced and last minute changes not lawful either without a 3/4 majority vote on the change.
Public Pension systems have been set up adequately & fairly in the past. Legislators just can’t keep their hands off of them. These funds should be in a locked box so they can’t be touched by manipulating legislators. They also attempt and pass sweet heart bills that favor certain individuals,lobbyist, or minor groups. This has been an abuse of the systems in the past as well. Also, Public employees need to be respected and treated fairly by any system that is set up.

carlosgvv

April 1st, 2011
12:23 pm

Big corporations love Republican plans for tax reforms. Once the middle class sees thru all the smoke and mirrors, they will not like it.

Hillbilly Deluxe

April 1st, 2011
12:30 pm

Get rid of the practice of exempting state legislators who are in the insurance business from the annual continuing education requirements mandated for others.

I’m one of those pie-in-the-sky dreamers who believes members of the Legislature should be treated the same as those of us in the Great Unwashed, that they supposedly represent. Silly me.

captguitarman

April 1st, 2011
12:33 pm

It is beyond comprehension that the Republicans are setting up a mechanism that will literally print all of the money the state government will ever want in order to maintain its size and to secure its future, unfettered growth — all disguised in the murky smoke and mirrors of “tax reform.” How I hate those two words –they are right up there with that other four letter word, “entitlement” as far as I am concerned. More and more, I see the battle lines being drawn — not between the parties — but between those of both parties who have a hugely vested interest in ever-expanding government — not just the moocher class — but the modern day government “career professionals” and the people they are supposed to represent. Career professionals who move back and forth from elected office, to agencies, to lobbyists, back to government, etc. and who gain enormous wealth and profit and benefits from government service, or working with the government. They grow accustomed to a very nice lifestyle — see free European family vacations, golf vacations, sporting event tickets, drinks, dinners, gifts, etc. stubbornly being clung to despite he obvious ethical issues. This is not a new idea, I know, but I think we are in the very early stages of how the American colonials felt at their treatment by the British government. A bit of a stretch, I know, but not implausible. Wooten hit it on the head. They are opening a door that will serve them well, and the Dems when they come back into power, well into the future. Just like the pledge to end the toll of Georgia 400, the lower 4.5% income tax rate will be repealed “for very good reasons” or for “courageous reasons” once the dust settles. Then once the tax on comsumption of goods and services is in place, additional goods and services can be easily added piecemeal, as needed, in the future with “courageous votes.” No more brain damage or political trauma increasing future revenues with smoke and mirrors tax reform bills. This will turn out to be an enormous tax increase if it is passed, and it will hurt the state of Georgia, that has to compete with states like Tennessee, that has no state income tax. Intellectually honest people who promote the consumption tax, are quick to add that it would replace the income tax entirely. Our good old boy and gal “government professionals” want the best of both worlds — no surprise there, I’m afraid.

Glenn

April 1st, 2011
8:33 pm

Right on, Jim Wooten and guitar man and others.

Mr. Wooten, because I’ve always agreed that the emerging tax initiative increasingly promises to open a new scope of invitations either (a) to boost taxation or else spending; (b) to disjoin the two irresponsibly and detrimentally [the revenue mandate off season and the vote-buying expenditures in the holiday seasons of electoral politics]; or (c) worst of all to spike both taxes and spending anytime, anywhere, on an front hurting or benefitting anybody. To me the initiative resembles nothing but politicians seeking to harden every means of maintaing incumbency. Over the years I’ve come to expect such caucus maneuvers from a party other than the GOP. This proves what a pack of unreconstructed Democrats the Georgia Republicans really are still. I look to Gov. Deal for a reality check, and still feel that it’s tactically prudent of him to defer pension reform until late in the year.

@captguitarman,

However, I think you’re right to raise in this context the strange issue of “entitlement law”. As you may know that “feat of nomenclature” was invented to justify constitutional property works by inverse logic, the logic being that as a citizen enjoys a fiduciary benefit over time, eventually that benefit becomes an expectation and a dependency, such that a denial of the benefit becomes unconstitutional deprivation of property. The Constitution itself, however, forbids only deprivation “without due process of law”, which the higher courts generally have defined as public “notice and hearing” and the opportunity to redress. Simply, in the absence of Draconian measures to prevent these pretty basic rules of American public conduct, a duly elected legislative body may give or take, quite irrespective of takers having a property entitlement, an expectation of–an equation with– their public gifts as their personal takings.

I wish I could’ve shouted this out two months ago to Wisconsin’s public employees, just as I wish I could explain it right now to Georgia scholars and their families in receipt of HOPE benefits. Alas, I lack Ragnar’s capacity for putting this across: that’s the law; the law makes sense; it’s perhaps unfortunately not on your side in hard times when you but everyone may need it most.

Personally I hew to what legal faculty would term a more adaptive, Holmesian approach. But these aren’t the times for that, not even in beautiful Madison, Wisconsin. Were O.H. Holmes alive today he would’t be America’s most distinguished jurist and jurisprudentialist but almost certainly would be our new Emerson, transplanted however from Concord to Manhattan. He might be Editorial Editor of the New York Times, would that were so. His likely disagreement with you couldn’t beat you or the courts who have moved beyond him until now. It’s even possible that he might agree with you–though I doubt it–because of his deep respect for fair wages never defined as more than the employer could conceivably afford. He’d have to balance that concept against the notion of massive “municipal” bankruptcies–in federal law that includes the bankruptcy of a state–and given his history, almost certainly he would have found some convenient but ostensibly baffling tesseract to harm or benefit any parties whatever to prevent any dissolution of the Union entire.

Glenn

April 1st, 2011
9:45 pm

Anyway, Why the new GA tax project if not to find a way out of Georgia’s never-ending transportation growing pains that continue to limit life, liberty, the pursuit of happiness here? If we want to (continue to) address transportation problems, then why not leave it to the people who know instead of appealing to plebiscite? We have anew Governor and legislative leadership. We have the GDT and several commissions–each with its own outside consultants–to advise on this stuff. So why not let them come up with their own statewide transportation plan and put the plan to a vote of the People in the next scheduled interim or general election and just let voters decide whether to adopt the plan? With sufficient face time–given that the plans are developed trustworthily in consultation with the public and in consideration of public notions of costs supportable by objectives–then float the thing and let the bosses on the ground vote it up or down. Let the people have the benefit of instruction from and consultation with elite specialists. Let the elite specialists feel the awkwardness of conversation with the broad spectrum of frustrated Georgians. But don’t waste the wisdom of either with the two passing as ships in the night. That’s political lunacy and it’s also embarrassingly retrograde in engineering and policy design. As a specialist in one other, salient area of state policy I respect the special expertise of transportation planners, but I respect also the special wisdom and aspirations of transportation consumers. Let the financiers take the hindmost, and politicians stand or fall upon their implementation of priorities identified by constituents working with helpful, not dictatorial, builders of transportation systems.

This is the nicest way I can think to express my anxiety, as a relatively new Georgian, about the dominance of statewide policy, especially in transportation policy, expressing itself as Us/Them, centrifugal/eccentric, rich/poor, urban/rural. This disturbs me as I still construe greater Georgia as a fairly cohesive organism historically and cohesively organized into ultra-modern GA. As I live in East Cobb, as my family fled here from Fulton in recent times, as both my elders and my successors were Georgians and were schooled here since colonial days my first apprehension is that this fiduciary scheme foments intra-sectional defeat, not the shrewd collusion that would continue to solidify Georgia, across all boundaries within, as the thinking person’s Capital of the South.

Don’t any few have-nots pay for the platinum-plating of a few, but don’t a few have’s pay for gold-plating the many. Let the densely-populated and the suburbanites understand how they depend upon the rural counties and tourist edges, and vice versa. As someone moved me so greatly to say, in an earlier debate, “Let us all fly a clean flag!”

joey hennesy

April 2nd, 2011
12:31 am

Glenn: you are way too thoughtful, bright and erudite to cast those pearls before these swine.

Glenn

April 2nd, 2011
12:53 am

Thank, joey, now I fell so much less than before. No seriously I meant what I’d implied abbot imparting the Law to atone not ready for it, because it should be a People’s bridge and not a barrier of any kind excepting the Bar for it’s respect of the Bench. Otherwise it belongs to everyone ane it really bums me that I can’t translate worth, um, macadamias. I imagine you’d agree that we need more people coming on who know better than I do how to coach the Law to the uncoached wherever we find them. (In this regard I sometimes think of collegiate star athletes and the time I spent revising the NCAA Handbook.)

Sometims the cleverest folk can spend the most time doing the foolest work. Why? Love? Money? Continuation? Participation? Tradition? Belonging? Exclusion? Thrill? Belonginging? Shame?

Do I repeat myself?

Cowardice.

Glenn

April 2nd, 2011
1:15 am

Let’s GO! Let’s ask everyone now, and never forget to ak them now and again as their most critical days approach, to attend their plannining secessions or chareetes and never to forget–to vote–the outcomes of their decisions laid down thoughtfully as possible for those after theme, until those grew to have the aspirararation to reinvent Geoorgia ever, ever anew in the public trust of its raw youth.

WHY? RNC is Y

April 2nd, 2011
8:06 am

Retardo-rama

Tommy Middlefinger

April 2nd, 2011
9:13 am

Glad to see ‘liperalefty grew up and went away… Maybe he/she ventured in to the North Georgia night in their ‘hooptie’ and thought he/she was tough.

Too,too bad. Bye ,bye………..

And what became of ‘Dr. Stan’ and Muffin?

They seem to have gone away also………….

Miss em………….

NOT !!!

the watch dog

April 2nd, 2011
9:43 am

Consumption taxes are good. It brings a more reliable, predictable and steady flow of revenue to the government. To be grandly vague is the way to get the this new steady source of revenue to the government. A meaningless noise is that which divides us least. Now the political machinery can be aggressively vague or passively vague. They can tout their proposals sublimely or in a forceful manner, but do not say anything that is precise and to the point. I have heard soooooo many political speeches and when they are all done speaking it has been so generalized and lacking in real substance that it leaves me shaking my head. It is the “stock in trade” of politics to be “grandly vague”.
All of the above being said, ask your political represenatives to be straight forward, give you the Facts and cut out their “grand vagueness” and be the forthright and honest person you want in public office.

J.B. Stoner-(the white one)

April 2nd, 2011
9:46 am

THE SOUTH’S GONNA RATTLE AGAIN !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

MikeC

April 2nd, 2011
5:16 pm

When it comes down to winnowing out transporation projects, we should pick the ones with the greatest payoff for the buck. But transporation projects are a excellent example of the difficulty in balancing the budget without raising taxes, tolls or fares.

Unless we increase taxes, tolls and/or fares on surface transportation, most transportation projects will increase the deficit. To not increase the deficit, the total taxes, tolls, and fares collected from the use of that project, (including taxes on fuel burn while using the road) over a 20 year period, would have to be sufficient to make the payments on a 20 year mortgage. I don’t think the public will tolerate tolls for longer than that. Even when we believe the GDOT estimates of the cost, and the GDOT estimates of the projected traffic, it is indeed a rare project that meets that criteria.

I don’t like the idea of raising sales or income taxes to pay for transporation projects. I think that encourages waste. I view it as a necessary evil, because I recognize that a penny sales tax is easier to legislate than tolls or increased fuel taxes.

Glenn

April 2nd, 2011
9:24 pm

Jim raised this issue in this good column, and now you’ve engaged it, MikeC: cost-benefit analysis in the formation of public policy. Me, I’m ambivalent about emphasizing cost-benefit calculations in the public sphere because I’ve seen such exercises miss the point by miles. While I tend to welcome the rigor, sometimes that rigor can be fraudulent and counterproductive.

It turns over to economists–some of them kind, some utterly dispassionate–the business of affirming a predetermination that even the fuzzy stuff can be quantified. Any anthropologist, looking on, would call this folly. Second, the economist’s job, in the cost-benefit exercise, ever is perceived as that of identifying the lowest possible bottom line. Usually the lowest figure is the one adopted because we are a money-loving and positivistic nation of philistines who, unlike the Philistines, can count only with our fingers.

Professional cost-benefit analysts will take whatever offal their employers put into the pipe and extrude the most marketable sausage du jour. They commonly pretend to have the capacity to account for the things that people value most, but really in this realm they are untrained shamans impersonating social psychologists, historians, social workers, and those sophisticated game theorists who labor with kriegspiels and algorithms even to begin to account for what really moves persons the most.

So usually if a public official commissions a cost-benefit analysis of a program or a proposed project, that can mean only one of two things: either a rubber stamp or a death warrant. Preconceived thumbs up or thumbs down What we should want instead is informed policy FORMATION, the foremost substitution for and counterfeit of which is cost-benefit analysis.

I say this as a radical fiscal conservative.

Muffin

April 3rd, 2011
9:46 am

Dr. Stan……….You in that “Black Hole?”…………

Glenn

April 3rd, 2011
2:57 pm

Twit, twit, twit, says the Twitterhound stumping on heavy animus…

WHY? RNC is Y

April 4th, 2011
7:12 am

Any Duh who still uses the word “ambivalent” in a sentence has a nonambulatory vocabulary, (and he’s most assuredly a moron.)

And that’s just a natural-borne fact, Jack.

Eric

April 4th, 2011
9:09 am

Can’t wait to get out of Georgia!

Not voting Republican again

April 4th, 2011
9:57 am

Governor Deal’s tax plan will increase taxes for those making 80-100K by 10% and lower taxes on those making $500+K by 12%. Once again the middle class is asked ot pay the way for teh wealthy. I am sick and tired of it.