Roads are less sexy … and still unloved

Thinking Right’s weekend free-for-all. Pick a topic:

  • The economy’s hit bare bottom. Another beside-the-freeway restaurant advertising “We Bare All” closes. Lack of business. This one was on I-95 at Darien. Last year, one on I-85 at Lavonia was bought and closed by city officials, who held a bonfire in the parking lot with the Cafe Risqué signs. In both cases, officials thought they were snookered into issuing business licenses. Don’t know about truckers, but the risk I want to take when dining on the highway is that I’m seeing too much fatback in the pole beans, not a bare back toting them.
  • Little did I expect that I’d live long enough to find those who use cloth diapers described as “smart, eco-responsible parents” who “make the world a better, safer place.” The Earth Day will come where we realize the real environmentalists and conservationists were those thrifty waste-not, want-not ancestors who were responsible stewards of their space because it would pass to their descendants.
  • Terrell Starr, who died Sunday, was a good ’un. Gave politics a good name. One of the smartest things Lt. Gov. Casey Cagle did after he was elected was to surround himself with advisers with good sense. I’d put Starr, a 38-year state senator from Clayton County, at the top of that list.
  • America was a rotten place before President Obama came along. Ask him. Not here. When he’s abroad.
  • Asking those connected with the Georgia Budget and Policy Institute, a group that thinks Georgia spends too little on social programs, whether the state can “afford” any tax break is like asking Libertarians whether we’re undertaxed and under-regulated. Why bother? We know the answer.
  • Headline: “Neighbors lukewarm about new expressway.” Neighbors are always lukewarm or downright opposed to anything that alters the status quo — one reason to put in roads and infrastructure before they get there in numbers.
  • Said more in exasperation than condemnation: Dang, can’t Grady ever get its act together? It’s paid a consultant $785,000 since July 2007, at $1,600 a day .
  • Grady, meanwhile, once again identifies a solution to its problems is to charge those from counties other than Fulton and DeKalb for non-emergency care. Do. Please. But the collections are likely to be less than the PR value of the claim that other counties are dumping their poor. Georgia Hospital Association analysis two years ago found that indigent and charity patients from Cobb, Gwinnett and Clayton account for less than 1 percent of Grady admissions.
  • Dunwoody demonstrates why earmarked taxes are a bad idea. It has a 5 percent hotel-motel tax. Dunwoody keeps 3, but is required to spend the remaining 2 on tourism-related activities. Not being a tourist destination, Dunwoody funds a low-priority service — at the expense, surely, of something that matters. Never earmark public money.
  • My band of right-wingers wants President Obama to hire former UGA basketball player Tony Cole in 2012. Cole demonstrated again in Chicago what he’d demonstrated in Athens: He’ll get the boss fired. In Chicago, where he worked a patronage job, his former boss, the county’s chief financial officer, was asked to resign after it was revealed that she’d twice bailed him out of jail for violating protective orders involving an ex-girlfriend he’d punched in the face. At UGA, he got the head basketball coach and his assistant-coach son gone.
  • I’m a 100 percenter with U.S. Sen. Johnny Isakson on a new federal spending program for high-speed rail. “Projected ridership and fares have to be able to carry the costs of operation.” Love the idea, though, if as he says, it’s “operated privately and without subsidies.”

97 comments Add your comment

gt7348b

April 23rd, 2009
9:33 pm

“Never earmark public money” – Really, does this mean we can spend the gas tax on commuter rail now? Or health care?

roadie

April 23rd, 2009
9:33 pm

DOes Isakson believe that highways should be operated privately and without subsidies. They do not now come even close. The gasoline tax pays for less than half of the government spending on highways and the rest comes out of the general fund. Even toll roads don’t make it. I don’t disagree with Isakson but I think he should be consistent. The situation with airports is as bad as the roads.

jt

April 23rd, 2009
9:35 pm

If there was a chance of a photo op with Edward Kennedy, Isackson would lay the track with his tongue.

jt

April 23rd, 2009
9:36 pm

Why can’t he get some VOLUNTEERS to lay the track. He just spent 6 BILLION on them.

JT

April 23rd, 2009
9:38 pm

Spoken like a true right-wing hypocrite… the status quo is just fine when it comes to thinks like denying people equal rights because it goes against your fundamental upbringing and long held beliefs (a.k.a. status quo)… but when your type wants to make a change… it’s always “for the better.”

“Headline: “Neighbors lukewarm about new expressway.” Neighbors are always lukewarm or downright opposed to anything that alters the status quo”

neo-Carlinist

April 23rd, 2009
10:49 pm

you had me (somewhat) until you blamed some dim-witted jock for the demise of a couple of secod rate pimps who sold the kid a “hoop dream”. that’s not to say kids don’t make choices, but when a kid makes a bad choice, he has the rest of his life to recover – or not. Harrick and his clown son are sleeping in the bed they made – and they got a “buy out”. you might know politics, but you don’t know college sports.

Wooten is Still Mailing it in

April 23rd, 2009
10:51 pm

Lets put that expressway in Wooten’s neighborhood out in Cobb. Face it Wooten, your time is up and these last three months have been horrible for you, with having serious difficulty making crap up. You don’t want to use public money for rail, but you’d use it to maintain our roads just for some corporation to come swoop in and privatize 285. When this happens, will the gas tax go down? Building more roads isn’t the answer, but if you’re open to having 8 lanes running through your backyard I’m all for it.

Davo

April 23rd, 2009
11:28 pm

How about this JW… Instead of opening a casino in Underground, we let Cafe Risque and We Bare All re-apply their business license as state operated brothels? Sin tax…can’t beat that! And your just profiting from what really is going on anyway.

See what you can do to get the state GOP on this JW…this will get some votes.

Republitards are irrelevant

April 24th, 2009
2:06 am

Impeach Bubbah Bybee–say buh buh to Bybee.

Republitards are irrelevant

April 24th, 2009
2:07 am

How about we bring in Hooker Vitter to run the brothels with retired JW? Give the Republitards the jobs for which they are qualified.

Republitards are irrelevant

April 24th, 2009
2:07 am

I like Dimwit Handel as Madam.

Republitards are irrelevant

April 24th, 2009
2:57 am

The DOJ scum now members of theStevens Six have hired very high priced lawyuhs and n’congratulations ’cause you are gettin’ out your wallets and payin’ for them lawyuhs.

Gold Bars Luskin fat little Rove’s lawyuh is one of ‘em.

From Mucky Mucky Republitards are always Muckers:

Nicholas Marsh, one of the public integrity prosecutors, has hired Karl Rove’s lawyer, Robert Luskin, of Patton Boggs.

Joseph Bottini, one of the Alaska-based assistant US Attorneys, has teamed up with Kenneth Wainstein, a partner at O’Melveny & Myers, who is a former U.S. Attorney for the District of Columbia, and most recently served as a homeland security adviser to President Bush. Wainstein is said by Legal Times to have “close ties” to Mary Patrice Brown, the new head of DOJ’s Office of Professional Responsibility, which is also probing the conduct of the Stevens Six.

William Welch, who heads the Public Integrity section, has hired William Taylor III, a partner with Zuckerman Spaeder. Taylor successfully defended the former president of the Salt Lake City Olympic Committee against federal bribery charges.

Welch’s deputy, Brenda Morris, who was the chief prosecutor on the Stevens trial, has been talking to Hogan & Hartson’s Chuck Rosenberg, who last year stepped down as served as chief of staff to Deputy Attorney General (and whistle-blower) James Comey, counselor to Attorney General John Ashcroft, and counsel to FBI Director Bob Mueller.

The two remaining members of the Stevens Six — Public Integrity prosecutor Edward Sullivan, and assistant US Attorney James Goeke — are also said by Legal Times sources to have been in discussions with “prominent Washington attorneys”.

Ga Values

April 24th, 2009
6:55 am

U.S. Sen. Johnny Isakson voted for TARP & refuses to sign the no earmard pledge. Georgia deserves a Conservative senator not a socialist like Johnny.

Ga Values

April 24th, 2009
6:57 am

that’s the no earmark pledge.. but we still need a conservative senator. Johnny needs to resign.

Poultry

April 24th, 2009
8:31 am

Railroads. The Union Bank of Switzerland stands ready to provide ample financing for high speed rail projects in the populated regions of the U.S.A., provided that the rail systems are not operated by AMTRAK. UBS has spawned popular, profitable HSR systems in several countries, and I bet they could do it here, if given access to the right corridors.

An irksome fact about high speed rail. Many of its constituent technologies were developed in the United States, usually at federal expense. Yet it’s other countries than ours which see the benefits of ultra-modern rail derived from American ingenuity.

In fairness to AMTRAK, they are obstructed and retarded by their dependency on roadbeds owned by freight companies. AMTRAK’s basic problem is that it is and always has been half-arsed. In most cases they have to rely on easements, and get shunted whenever the rails are required by freight. It makes their trips fitfull, slow, and unpopular. In corridors built anew by public-private partnerships in which AMTRAK cooperates, AMTRAK has performed well. The point is that HSR (especially maglev) is by definition based on a dedicated line.

As Atlanta is largely the product of a grand confluence in the 19th Century of the Southeast’s five greatest rail lines, it would be wonderful to see Georgia play a role in establishing HSP in the U.S. Imagine the Crescent running at 200-300 mph from the Big Easy through Atlanta to DC. Wow!

Poultry

April 24th, 2009
8:43 am

No county is an island unto itself. Cobb will be the last to get this news.

retiredds

April 24th, 2009
8:54 am

Jim, Regarding your comment about Obama saying “America was a rotten place…..”. My work consists of helping people resolve conflict and leading toward healing. Here are the steps of the program (borrowed from a pre-marital program I use).

1. Set a time and a place for discussion of the conflict.
2. Identify the conflict(s).
3. Prioritize the issues and only tackle one at a time.
4. STATE HOW I CONTRIBUTE TO THE CONFLICT.
5. Explore and throw out past methods and solutions that haven’t worked.
6. Explore new options that might work.
7. Pick one and try it. If, after a short time, the solution is not working, try another, or combination until you find the best solution.
8. Periodically review your progress.
9. When the conflict is resolved to your MUTUAL satisfaction, celebrate.

If the persons are truly committed to resolving the conflict this works 100% of the time. Jim, this process works primarily because of # 3, my taking responsibility for how I contribute to the conflict. All failures to resolve conflict are rooted in the “blame game”, “God is on my side”, “your just a (put your own word here, usually derogatory or demeaning), “your evil (remember the Axis of Evil stuff), implying that I am good, etc., etc. Resolution eventually comes through hard work and commitment BY BOTH PARTIES to the notion that I am part of the conflict not just an innocent bystander. Jim, this is true for groups, political parties, states and nations. If you don’t take responsibility for your part of the conflict, there is no resolution, period.

If our leaders, in this case Obama, take that responsibility seriously, it might look like weakness on the surface. If the other party doesn’t take the process seriously then he/she/they must accept the burden for the failure of the process.

While you and other conservative persons may not like the fact that many of our leaders are saying to the world that the U.S. hasn’t behaved responsibly in many areas the last several years, the fact of the matter is our global standing is improving. People can once again connect the dots between what we say as a nation and how we behave.

Dusty

April 24th, 2009
8:55 am

OK, libs, you have now called names, insulted the GOP and Jim, vented all your DNC propaganda (except Churchill’s Mom and Saxby complainers who have not posted yet), and shown your ignorance in general. Could we get to one of the subjects put here for debate?

Boys and girls, be nice and say something sensible. Thank you!

Hey, I must get busy and go down to Grady to apply for a new job. $1600 a day? I could manage just fine on that if I skimp a bit..Yes!!

Diogenes

April 24th, 2009
8:59 am

Good morning, Jim,

I think Mr Obama’s election attests to the fact that “America was a rotten place before President Obama came along.” We’d all gotten fed up with a President who condoned torture, invaded sovereign countries on a whim, failed to aggressively protect the environment or combat global warming, failed to get adequate gun controls enacted, sought tax cuts for the wealthy, and so on down the long list of damages he wrecked upon American ideals and values. Bush proved uncontestably just how rotten power without principle can be.

Poultry

April 24th, 2009
9:06 am

@retiredds,

Do you actually believe, in a post-9/11 world, that your good work informs America’s relations with nations and factions bent on encompassing our undoing?

Dusty

April 24th, 2009
9:10 am

retiredds

Send your program to Obama. He has not connected the dots as well as you seem to think. A few handshakes and bows mean nothing. I can’t think of anything that has changed in foreign relations since Obama took office except freeing Americans to send more money to Cuba. I do see countries still calling on the USA for help just like they did with Bush.

You ignore all the Bush accomplishments which is symptomatic of a liberal. How can you ignore a protected America and two nations free to become even better with freedom included? Perhaps you should add an opthamologist to your program list so you can see better.

Tom

April 24th, 2009
9:16 am

Dusty is exactly right: all glory to GWB for making Iraq free. In Iraq these days, women are free to wear the veil. Christians are free to be persecuted again. Children are free to be blown up in the street on their way to school. Iran is free to dictate Iraqi national policy. Ah, sweet freedom!

Poultry

April 24th, 2009
9:19 am

I suspect that yours is a tough sell in Bagdad, Tom. Perhaps you’ll be the last to proclaim the failure of the Surge. Enjoy that distinction, then, while ye may.

Dusty

April 24th, 2009
9:22 am

Diogenes,

You don’t think much of freedom, do you? Bush was determined to keep it for us and he did. That freedom includes you, whether you appreciate it or not.

Churchill's MOM

April 24th, 2009
9:31 am

Have you been laid off?

**************PALIN MCCAIN 2012*******************

Dusty

April 24th, 2009
9:31 am

Tom,

You don’t appreciate freedom either, do you? We gave countries the chance to perfect their society, not subjugated by dictators and religious extremists. You don’t see the difference, do you? Hate makes you blind.

Bush was never glorified. That description seems more apt for swooning Obama supporters who brought him success when he had neither experience nor expertise.

Big Bucks GOP

April 24th, 2009
9:32 am

Fiat is considering an acquisition of General Motors’ Opel division in
Europe, and has discussed a potential deal with government negotiators
in Washington, executives at G.M. and representatives of the German
government,

Big Bucks GOP

April 24th, 2009
9:34 am

The New York Times Company Chairman Arthur Sulzberger Jr. reiterated
Thursday that the media will remain publicly traded, despite “brutal”
conditions that threaten the survival of newspapers.

Big Bucks GOP

April 24th, 2009
9:36 am

Nomura Holdings, the Japanese brokerage that bought pieces of Lehman
Brothers last year, on Friday posted the biggest annual loss in its
history, casting a pall over what was a bold and risky bid to build up
a world franchise.

Big Bucks GOP

April 24th, 2009
9:37 am

Fifth Third Bancorp says it posted a loss in the first quarter
including preferred dividends, as rising losses on commercial loans
hurt the large Midwest regional bank.

Tom

April 24th, 2009
9:39 am

Poultry, I know that facts don’t make any difference to right-wing wackaloons, but the BBC and NHK (Japan’s national TV network) conducted a poll of Iraqis in March and here’s what they found:

“Most Iraqis agree that things are going better there. At the same time, they seem to hate and distrust the U.S. more than ever.

Last year, 70% of Iraqis in the same survey said the American forces were doing a bad job there. This year that dropped all the way to …69%. And that includes the always more favorable views of the Kurds.

That means 90% of Sunnis are negative (remember, they are supposed to be “awakening” towards us), and two out of three Shiites — largely unchanged from 2008.

Nearly as many (64%) say the U.S. is hurting Iraq as Iran (68%). But the views of nearly every other country have improved quite a bit, including Saudi Arabia, Syria and the UK.

But here’s the key finding and the rejoinder to the constant call for war critics (and Obama) to admit that it was, despite everything, correct to topple Saddam: 56% now say the U.S. was wrong to invade, actually up (despite the cooling of violence) since last year’s 50%.”

But of course, under as under Dusty’s super-Freedom (TM), you’re free to continue living in your little Fantasyland.

Elephant Whip

April 24th, 2009
9:44 am

Re: Earmarked Taxes are a Bad Idea

The comment on earmarks reveals the Georgia Legislature’s technique for ‘cutting taxes.’ A truly conservative position would suggest cutting the tax altogether. But the position taken is ‘cut its ears off.’ That way, taxes collected for a specific purpose can be pulled into the general fund and allocated to make up for underfunding of other government projects due to ‘tax cuts.’ In other words, they just take your money out of your wallet rather than your paycheck.

Why don’t all you anti-tax people realize that, if you want the protections and support of goverment, you must pay for it. Sometimes taxes have to go up.

retiredds

April 24th, 2009
9:58 am

Dusty, looks like I struck a nerve with you. Glad to be obliging.

"Charles", The Original

April 24th, 2009
10:00 am

“America was a rotten place before President Obama came along. Ask him. Not here. When he’s abroad”.

Please don’t get it twisted President Obama. It’s not America that’s rotten. Take a critical look at Americans; specifically the so-called African American integrationist Negro leadership and their Negro minions. That combination infects the masses of Negroes and sometimes other people with an offensive putrefied odor. It causes the typical person to think that America has been and is a rotten place.

Here’s the thing. Any time you have a group of people, so-called educated integrationist Negroes and their enforcers, who’ve been begging Europeans for centuries to feed, clothe, shelter, educate, employ, and indoctrinate the black masses, there will always be the smell of decay coming out of America. And if you’re not endowed with the armor of God, demons can easily influence many people to get it twisted over here and over there like President Obama.

Steven Daedalus

April 24th, 2009
10:03 am

Wouldn’t be great to see Bush, Cheney, Rove and Rice walking around in orange jumpsuits.

Big Bucks GOP

April 24th, 2009
10:06 am

Attorney General Eric H. Holder Jr. said on Thursday he was considering
forming a financial fraud task force and advocated a “more
comprehensive” view of the causes behind the U.S. economic crisis.

Jake

April 24th, 2009
10:18 am

The consultant at Grady is a steal of a deal who has collected more than she’s paid. My lawyer bills $200 an hour too and he’s worthless!

Sam

April 24th, 2009
10:18 am

Too bad Tony Cole wasn’t your employee years ago Jim.

Poultry

April 24th, 2009
10:18 am

That’s very presumptuous of you, Tom, to take me for a “right-wing whackaloon” living in a “little Fantasyland.”

At the end of our Civil War, Georgians generally hated Tecumseh Sherman. After the war, when he served as Governor of this military district, he became the toast of Atlanta, as Georgia’s high society came to trust his earnest interest in the thoughtful reconstruction of the South. Similarly, at the close of WWII the Japanese hated Gen. MacArthur. Later, it was a different story.

Our methods are harsh and violent, but less harsh and less violent than the methods favored by those we oppose. And while their vision is dark, ours is not. As Dusty points out, their aim is subjugation to tyranny, the status quo ante in Iraq and Afghanistan, whereas our aims are safety, stability, democratization. Are these not considerable differences?

When I read your characterization of today’s Iraq as a land where “women are free to wear the veil…Christians are free to be persecuted…Children are free to be blown up in the street on their way to school…Iran is free to dictate Iraqi national policy”, I wonder whether you see a distinction between Liberty and Freedom. As others do, I distinguish the two this way: Liberty as the absence of tyranny, Freedom as a positive agency; that is, we are liberated from something, while we are free to do something. In Iraq the U.S. did serve, if somewhat self-servingly, as Liberator. But freedom will have to come to Iraq via the Iraqis themselves.

Finally, two points of dispute. Iran most decidedly is no longer free to dictate Iraqi policy, and neither is Saddam Hussein any longer free to do so. And as for schoolchildren, and veils, consider the American-made deliverance of schoolgirls in Afghanistan. It is very real.

Were I to take up residence in the Magic Kingdom, I should prefer Tomorrowland, thank you.

@@

April 24th, 2009
10:27 am

Pole beans deflated by the wayside? And yet “The Pink Pony” is still sitting pretty off I-85 in Clayton County due to a Grandfather Claus, Jim.

Disposable diapers down the dust bowl. Before we know it, the environmentalists will be requiring us to SAVE THE POO…..IT’S GOOD FOR YOU! I’ll get behind the green weinies on this one. Let them take the first step in humanure.

Eeewwwww…

RIP Senator Starr. He was a good man, Jim. A quiet professional whose only interest was in serving the citizens of Clayton County.

President Obama is naive in his perceptions. He lends his voice to those who would seek to jail their opposition. Hellooooo Hugo!

As long as votes reside in social programs, politicians will seek to exploit them for personal gain.

Putting in roads and infrastructure before they get there would, at least, allow the prospectives to know what they’re buying into. On the other hand, it would encourage urban sprawl, not the smart-growth liberals seek.

Say it ain’t so, Jim…..Grady persists in waste? What Grady’s administrators refuse to accept is that many moved to get away from “their services”, not exacerbate ‘em.

Dunwoody’s earmarked taxes best exemplifies how to feed the political pieholes.

Don’t know this Tony Cole, Jim.

Government subsidies are a high-speed rail to nowhere. Future destination unknown…just promised. Too many among us cling to the promises.

@@

April 24th, 2009
10:37 am

Day after day I come in here to see liberals determining who it is that should be without a job.

That’s a scary thought, to be sure.

Just routing out the liberal netrooters with a roto…

Daedalus

April 24th, 2009
10:50 am

So Jim says that neighborhood opposition to new roads is “one reason to put in roads and infrastructure before they get there in numbers.”

So lets look at this. Since building roads where people actually live causes opposition from nearby residents — we should only build roads were people don’t live and then, when they move there, they will have roads.

Well Jim GDOT has been doing that for years. They take tax dollars from metro Atlanta and build 4 lane highways in South Georgia that are always empty –why? Because there was no demand for the roads in the first place and people aren’t going to move there simply because there is a 4 lane road.

I thought ‘conservatives’ cared about wasting money. Well. Four-lane roads to nowhere are a huge waste of money and were not needed when they were built and are still not needed. But they sure benefit the wealthy who own the land nearby and the companies that do the work.

To create growth there has to be jobs, schools, universities and infrastructure. And for the millionth time –infrastructure is paid for by taxes. Roads, transit, the airport — all built with taxes and fees.

Republicans (at least the Southern variety) will never be able to create a great, livable cities, because they refuse to make the link between investing in infrastructure and increased growth and tax revenue.

Atlanta Mayors Hartsfield, Ivan Allen and Sam Massell saw that to create a vibrant city Atlanta needed to invest in the airport, MARTA and other infrastructure. If they had been Republicans we would have had none of that. We’d be like Birmingham, a hellish place with lousy traffic and no culture and no high paying jobs. Sounds like a GOP Paradise.

Jackie

April 24th, 2009
10:53 am

@Charles

You have to get up early to think of the load of crap you post.

Billy Bob the anti-THUG

April 24th, 2009
11:00 am

Tom,

You’ve identified a fundamental difference in what drives conservative and libtard policy: Conservatives view principle as a reference point for action. Saddam’s and Iraq’s failure to cooperate with U.N. weapons inspectors, his willingness to use chemical and, potentially, other WMD’s and Iraq’s willingness to invade neighboring countries left the Bush Administration with a clear decision in light of 9/11. That principle involved the right of this country to defend itself against an uncooperative agressor regime.

The Bush Administration didn’t worry that the Iraqis wouldn’t invite them to high tea afterwards. That would have been a libtard principle.

GayGrayGeek

April 24th, 2009
11:10 am

DustBuster @ 9:31: Bush was never glorified.

BWAHAHAHAHAHAHA! I’ll bet your next claim will be that Clinton was never impeached…

findog

April 24th, 2009
11:37 am

Jim,
Please pardon my lack of specific knowledge when it comes to the neighbor does not want a highway but I’ll use Sugar Hill as an example. They supported candidate Perdue to kill the northern arc that would slice through their town. Thing is they are named for a moonshine legend that was using an established path. They built around the path established by indigenous people before whitey showed up and now that they have easy access from the north, south, and east want to block traffic heading west. Well I say lets put giant speed bumps along every means of egress from their homes. They want to screw the rest of us traveling from Buford to Cumming let’s return the favor.

They’re the reason the right to condemn had to be established – NIMBY is just the local variant of Wall Street greed, I WANT TO BE THE LAST TO BUILD EVERYONE ELSE GO AWAY!

Poultry

April 24th, 2009
11:38 am

It’s unfortunate, yet understandable, that “smart growth” gets such a thumbs-down from non-liberals. I’m no liberal, but I do embrace most “smart growth” principles. I’m for infill, historic preservation, redevelopment, densification, intelligent city and regional planning, the protection of prime ag lands, environmentally sustainable landscape design, and user-oriented urban design. I hate sprawl, and I like sidewalks, bike lanes and physical environments friendly to seniors, children and the disabled. Yet I’m a traditionalist, not a liberal. Am I confused?

retiredds

April 24th, 2009
12:08 pm

Poultry: I agree with you wholeheartedly regarding “smart growth”. We’ve had “dumb growth” for too long and we now are seeing the results of that strategy in the marketplace. One final note, keep in mind that if you disagree with the conservatives you are automatically branded as a liberal, i.e. black/white, good/bad. They don’t seem to be able to negotiate the gray and seem to refuse to understand that there are many people in the USA who may be conservative on some issues but liberal on others. Their narrow focus is marginalizing them, however I am one who does not care that they can’t see “the forest through the trees”.

Poultry

April 24th, 2009
12:36 pm

Thank you for that, retiredds. You just treated me to a V-8 Moment, what the French call a “coup de tete”. It never occurred to me to flip the matter and look at the pigeonholes from the underside of the mental process that causes people to stereotype other people. You’re right: it’s not what I avow that screws me, but rather what I disavow.

That’s rather subtle of you, for a blog such as this, but I do appreciate it.

retiredds

April 24th, 2009
12:52 pm

Thanks, Poultry. I just think we might, as a committee of two, be able to clean up this blog mess ( oops their goes my grandiosity again).