House GOP is now getting it right

It’s no secret. Watching Republicans under the Gold Dome try to be more creative and clever than Democrats were in planting little tax bomblets throughout government has been frustrating.

It’s been frustrating because each came with a cock-and-bull story about how the imposition of a “fee” or “add-on fine” would achieve a social good. A $200 fine on “superspeeders,” for example, would subsidize a proposed statewide trauma network. The connection is that speed leads to wrecks and wrecks lead to injuries and injuries require trauma centers, so therefore …

Truth is, however, that ladders, guns, knives and broken pavement can fill emergency rooms, too. A $10 “fee” on auto tags, a hidden “fee” on hospitals and health-insurance plans, and a $1 “fee” on telephones — all proposed as a funding source for the estimated $75 million trauma network advocates wanted, are specialty taxes.

The state has 15 trauma-care hospitals. A million Georgians live 50 miles or more from one. If the general good is served by funding a trauma center quickly accessible to all, a straightforward, general purpose tax is the honest and transparent way to go. No games. No deceit.

This session, for the first time since they came to power, Republicans are getting it right.
Though they’ve temporarily abandoned a timetable for ending the corporate income tax, the public declaration by House leaders that elimination is a goal is cause for cheer. Declare a goal consistent with a conservative agenda. Then, by a thousand little steps if necessary, move there.

Learn from the left. Eventually, we’re likely to have taxpayer-provided universal health care. How? A step at a time, drawing the circle of those who are covered by private-sector medical insurance smaller and smaller until, politically, it’s possible to sweep them onto the government rolls.

Score one, then, for Republicans doing something that constructively changes the status quo.

Another reason to cheer is the legislation that passed the Georgia House on Thursday to eliminate the so-called birthday tax on cars and trucks.

An impassioned Larry O’Neal (R-Warner Robins), chairman of the tax-writing House Ways and Means Committee, took the floor last week to praise the proposal to eliminate the sales tax and the annual property-tax levy on vehicles and replace it with a one-time registration fee of 7 percent.

“When we take the ad valorem tax off of our automobiles,” said O’Neal, “I can actually own my own car without the government having the first lien on it.”

Here again is an instance where eminently desirable conservative outcomes are advanced.
As O’Neal noted, the yearly risk that government can come and “take” your car for nonpayment of taxes is eliminated. It backs a potentially threatening government out of our lives. Plus, it doesn’t add on a new tax while employing semantics to deceive.

A third benefit, temporarily useful, is that when it takes effect next January, it will stimulate new-car sales. After paying the 7 percent, up to a maximum of $2,000, the purchaser never again pays the “birthday tax” levied when tags are purchased. The tag fee remains, but not the tax. Georgians will continue paying the ad valorem tax until they register another new or used vehicle.

The change is expected to bring in an additional $496 million in the next fiscal year, to be split between state and local governments. It will also produce at least $150 million in new revenue that can be used for other purposes, including funding a trauma network.
The new money comes not from new taxes, but from bringing the shade-tree used-car sales into the system.

A sales tax on those transactions, rarely paid, will be replaced with a registration fee. Failing to register a car within 30 days brings a $2,500 fine for dealers and a percentage-of-price penalty for individuals.

It’s not a new tax. It’s a more appealing substitute for the law-abiding and is a penalty for evaders. It brings integrity to the tax code. With HB 480, the House gets it right — and moves the tax code in a direction that should be appealing to conservatives.

No games, no gimmicks. No deceit. No clever marketing by those in training to be tax collectors for the welfare state.

97 comments Add your comment

Churchill's MOM

March 17th, 2009
8:18 am

Rep Vitter’s appointment with his Lady Friend ran over,

“Senator David Vitter Louisiana Republican arrived Thursday evening at his United Airlines gate 20 minutes before the plane was scheduled to depart, only to find the gate had already been closed. Undeterred, Vitter opened the door, setting off a security alarm and prompting an airline worker to warn him that entering the gate was forbidden.

Vitter, our spy said, gave the airline worker an earful, employing the timeworn “do-you-know-who-I-am” tirade that apparently grew quite heated.

That led to some back and forth, and the worker announced to the irritable Vitter that he was going to summon security.

Vitter, according to the witness, remained defiant, yelling that the employee could call the police if he wanted to and their supervisors, who, presumably, might be more impressed with his Senator’s pin.

But after talking a huffy big game, Vitter apparently thought better of pushing the confrontation any further. When the gate attendant left to find a security guard, Vitter turned tail and simply fled the scene.”

Churchill's MOM

March 17th, 2009
8:20 am

Sorry , it should have been Senator

Ragnar Danneskjöld

March 17th, 2009
8:22 am

Happy St. Patrick’s Day to all of our Irish friends, of whatever nationality or ethnicity. I respectfully disagree with our host on the virtues of the new trauma care funding.

My first point of disagreement is with the need for trauma care funding. I find nothing meritorious in dedicating taxpayer funds to the impoverished health care industry. A smarter course would be for the state to assume all tort liability for mal- or mis- or non-performance by any trauma care center, and to define all values as in workers compensation claims.

There are at least deceits in the sales pitch for the legislation:

(1) The deception that a tax is abolished. No tax is abolished for any payer. The birthday tax remains forever for those who keep their present cars.

(2) A one-time $2,000 tax on a vehicle does not stimulate automobile sales, except to the extent that new tax is less than presently charged, i.e., not at all. Any tax is a disincentive on sales. There is not a soul who declined to purchase a vehicle over the past 20 years due to the birthday tax.

Admittedly there are surely many who declined to title their vehicles in Georgia due to personal property taxes. I’m not certain why a new 7% title tax will eliminate that economic reality.

I respectfully dissent from the wisdom of the Gold Dome on this issue, in every element.

Ragnar Danneskjöld

March 17th, 2009
8:24 am

Having properly addressed the topic, I offer my diversions. Dr. Sowell has an unusually partisan essay this morning, although brilliant as always, urge all to review. As the return of John Galt approaches, we review the latest government outrage, on AIG.

The AIG bailout yesterday revealed the first suggestion of the normal government incompetence arising from the massive recent government spending spree. A dust up arose from “bonuses.” It is an issue that divides conservatives – Stephen Moore, one of my new favorite economists, reflecting the more common populist “disgust” at the judgment to honor contractual obligations, contrasting with Rush Limbaugh and other traditionalists who affirm that “a deal is a deal.” And The Wall Street Journal offers a third well-researched and brilliantly-argued perspective, which intellectual property I will not abuse here. My argument is simpler – Obama inexperience/incompetence.

Much of the AIG agreement is online. I do not pretend to have done a lot of research, mostly relying on summaries. I found this news item from November 10:

“(CEP News) – The U.S. Treasury has revised its loan agreement with U.S. insurance company AIG, adjusting the terms of the loan to function under the Troubled Asset Relief Program. ‘These new measures establish a more durable capital structure, resolve liquidity issues, facilitate AIG’s execution of its plan to sell certain of its businesses in an orderly manner, promote market stability, and protect the interests of the U.S. government and taxpayers,’ said a press release from the Fed.

“According to the new terms, the Fed is loaning the firm $60 billion rather than the original $85 billion and the Treasury Department will purchase $40 billion in the firm’s shares under the TARP program.”

The controversial bonuses were mostly in sellable units, albeit those with the greatest problems to be “unwound.” A service company has only two elements of value: (1) whatever great and unique idea it sells, and (2) the talent of the people delivering the product. The bonuses are primarily necessary to minimize further losses (to unwind the complicated derivatives,) and secondarily keep the sellable units intact, and thus sellable.

If a company repudiates its contracts with employees, the employees are well-advised to seek employment elsewhere. When a company repudiates employment contracts, normally the best and brightest are the first to obtain new positions. If government wishes to minimize its losses and to sell AIG components in an orderly manner, AIG was obliged to honor its agreements with its employees.

A quick analysis of the summary suggests the “hurry-up” deal was improperly structured. “Structure” would be the responsibility of the most financially-sophisticated proponent of the deal on the government side. While many of our leftist friends would affirm that President Bush was the most sophisticated financial thinker in the government of last November, I would assign that title to the Secretary of the Treasury, Mr. Paulson.

A proper structure of the deal – assuming bankruptcy courts were not competent to the task, for which judgment I lack capacity – would have broken up the firm immediately. Spin off to shareholders those portions of AIG that were to be on-going, and that portion that was “too big to fail,” for whatever reason, would be taken over by government immediately. I’m a helluva Monday morning quarterback.

My broader conclusion is that The Empty Suit mishandled yet another economic issue here, again due to his lack of managerial experience. He would claim benefit of the services of those induced to stay under their contracts, and then abrogate the agreement. Not that it would be unusual for the Obama government to engage in such a fraud. Our leftist friends would affirm that it is ok to beat the slaves so long as only the government does the beating.

Churchill's MOM

March 17th, 2009
8:44 am

Face it the taxpayer is being shafted by the legislature, but we have important news from the AP:

“Republicans are still pushing Sarah Palin’s star power.

Palin will deliver the keynote address at the annual Senate-House GOP dinner to be held on June 8 at the Washington Convention Center, National Republican Senatorial Committee Chairman John Cornyn (R-Texas) and National Republican Congressional Committee Chairman Pete Sessions (R-Texas) announced today.

“Gov. Palin has quickly emerged as one of the most popular and recognizable faces in the Republican Party, and we are honored to have her deliver the keynote address at the Senate-House dinner,” Cornyn said.

The dinner is one of the marquee events for the campaign committees each year, and Republicans are hoping that Palin’s presence will be a huge draw.

“Gov. Palin’s conservative values, commendable achievements in Alaska and the sheer energy she personifies make her one of the most compelling visionaries of our party,” Sessions said.”

MacArthur O. Means

March 17th, 2009
8:50 am

I agree with Ragnar. Sounds like they rearranged the oranges in the produce section to me.

Ragnar Danneskjöld

March 17th, 2009
8:50 am

While we are on the subject of Obama’s total incompetence, let us explore the implications of the Obama proposal to charge war veterans for treatment for service-related injuries.

Observing that treatment of war-related injuries is often costly, the VA proposes to charge veterans and/or their private health insurers for those treatments. VA has always charged for non-service-related treatments, and the proposed change is an extension of that long-standing policy.

The government view is understandable. As soldiers are nothing more than mere cannon fodder, it is unreasonable for them to expect their government to stand behind them when injured in service to their country. If Mad Max is stupid enough to get blown up by a hand grenade, why should the government pay to put him back together?

And think how much we could save by letting them die instead of putting them back together. If a brave soldier is gravely wounded taking a critical hill, we could simply let him die and save all of that medical expense.

Truly this is the genius of the democrats at work. How fortunate we are to have such a brilliant and patriotic leader.

Curious Observer

March 17th, 2009
9:08 am

The GOP-dominated state legislature is working hard to shaft Georgia property owners. What’s not mentioned in Wooten’s discussion is that the elimination of the birthday tax will largely hit counties, not the state. The ad valorem tax on automobiles makes up a substantial portion of county budgets. I’ve seen no discussion in this debate about how counties are supposed to make up the difference. Falling real estate values already threaten to squeeze counties hard by reducing the basis upon which property taxes are levied. The elimination of the ad valorem tax on vehicles would draw even more blood. The only recourse for counties will be an increase in ad valorem–real estate–tax rates, since they have no real control of the school budget, which eats up most of the county tax revenue. Thus, property owners will be hit hard so that Redneck can drive his new Ford F-450 without a worry about paying further taxes on it.

What happened to the Republican insistence on protecting property owners from tax increases? First, we have a governor who wanted to eliminate the state property tax subsidy for counties, with the implied assurance of county tax increases. Now we get a bill that will virtually guarantee a tax increase for anybody who owns real estate in the state. It’s all very easy for the Republicans to cite “local control” as a way for taxpayers to minimize county taxes. But the simple fact is that counties can cut their budgets only so much before tax increases are necessary.

I suggest that we not celebrate the elimination of the “birthday tax” too much. The bill is coming later–from your county and schools. That’s OK with our legislators: they’re not the ones who will have to increase tax rates.

Big Bucks GOP

March 17th, 2009
9:20 am

A group including the billionaire financier Carl C. Icahn says it plans
to bid for the Tropicana Casino and Resort in Atlantic City, N.J., in a
bankruptcy court auction.

Big Bucks GOP

March 17th, 2009
9:21 am

Kurtzman Carson Consultants, a bankruptcy claims noticing agent, has
agreed to sell itself to Australia’s Computershare Limited for at least
$97 million, in a deal that signals how attractive the restructuring
field is to outsiders.

Big Bucks GOP

March 17th, 2009
9:23 am

Goldman Sachs, which accepted billions of taxpayer dollars last fall,
is offering to lend money to more than 1,000 employees who have been
squeezed by the financial crisis.

Big Bucks GOP

March 17th, 2009
9:24 am

JPMorgan Chase must allow shareholders to vote on measures that would
tie executive bonuses to the bank’s long-term stock performance,
federal regulators have ruled.

Big Bucks GOP

March 17th, 2009
9:25 am

Anticipating restrictions on bonuses, officials at Citigroup and Morgan
Stanley are exploring ways to sidestep tough new federal caps on
compensation,

Jackie

March 17th, 2009
9:25 am

As usual, the Repubs are always “forced” to act upon those needs that will help the people. The movement toward universal health care in the state is something that is required if we are to survive economically.

Our health care system is based upon PROFIT, no more, no less. How does one explain if an individual without health insurance goes to an emergency room and pays cash for the services rendered, they are usually charged TRIPLE for what the insurance company pays for the same service?

The question is, when will the so-called conservatives begin to call what is required for the well-being of all of us “socialized medicine?”

Big Bucks GOP

March 17th, 2009
9:25 am

Wells Fargo’s chairman, Richard M. Kovacevich, assailed the government
for imposing new restrictions on financial institutions that receive
federal bailout money and called a federal plan to subject big banks to
stress tests “asinine.”

Big Bucks GOP

March 17th, 2009
9:26 am

Citi disclosed that it gave its chief executive, Vikram S. Pandit, a
compensation package valued at more than $38.2 million in 2008.
Adjusted for Citi’s recent stock price, though, the package is worth an
estimated $2.9 million.

Big Bucks GOP

March 17th, 2009
9:27 am

Robert L. Nardelli, Chrysler’s chairman, told The New York Times that
the struggling car maker is in “survival mode,” but had high hopes for
its recent tie-up with Fiat.

Big Bucks GOP

March 17th, 2009
9:28 am

Goldman Sachs is asking investors in its $15 billion private equity
fund for approval to shift much of its remaining uninvested money into
distressed debt, as traditional buyout deals remain tough to get off
the ground,

Big Bucks GOP

March 17th, 2009
9:29 am

Mr. Ackman also said he may join the board of General Growth Properties
and foresees a bankruptcy filing for the struggling mall owner.

Big Bucks GOP

March 17th, 2009
9:31 am

Alcoa, the aluminum producer, said Monday that it planned to cut its
quarterly dividend by 82 percent and sell $1.1 billion worth of shares
to build up a cash cushion.

Big Bucks GOP

March 17th, 2009
9:31 am

With backing from three entrepreneurs, staffers of the recently
shuttered Rocky Mountain News plan to start an online news publication
if they can get 50,000 paying subscribers by April 23 — what would
have been the News’ 150th anniversary,

Big Bucks GOP

March 17th, 2009
9:32 am

Federal prosecutors filed a notice in federal court Sunday evening
seeking the forfeiture of a wide swath of property owned by Bernard L.
Madoff and his wife, Ruth.

Big Bucks GOP

March 17th, 2009
9:33 am

Advisers to bondholders of General Motors said on Monday they have
presented a framework plan to President Barack Obama’s autos task force
and the ailing automaker that provides the company’s best chance for an
out-of-court restructuring.

Big Bucks GOP

March 17th, 2009
9:33 am

A federal judge is allowing the government to go after at least $226.6
million in back taxes, penalties and interest that it says are owed by
Robert Allen Stanford, the Texas financier who has been accused of
conducting an $8 billion Ponzi scheme through an offshore bank.

Big Bucks GOP

March 17th, 2009
9:35 am

Six Flags, the operator of theme parks, said on Monday that one major
bondholder would not meet with the company, hindering its efforts to
negotiate with its lenders in order to stave off a bankruptcy.

Peter

March 17th, 2009
9:36 am

Has Jim ever thought that the two parties should really work together ? Or is he going to take his Us verse them to his Retirement home ?

Republican’s…….. basically Anti American at best !

Ga Values

March 17th, 2009
9:44 am

I am with Raghead and Curious Observer this is certainly not good for the average taxpayer. To me this looks like a big tax increase. As soon as the taxpayer finds ot that he has to pay $2,500 to give his child the old family car, there will be hell to pay.

My wife wants to know why there is a cram down on GM but it is just business as usual for AIG. I can’t give her an answere other than the banks paid a lot of money for TARP and we are paying for it now. I am NOT angry with the current President of AIG he is doing this as a public service and is being paid $1.00 per year.

Gregg

March 17th, 2009
10:01 am

Ragnar Danneskjöld wouldn’t is be a little shocking that you found that on November 10 (before Obama took office). I bet you don’t know that this deal was actually brokered by the Bush Administration and not the Obama admin. So all of the things you are saying my friend should be attributed to the Bushonomics.

Dusty

March 17th, 2009
10:01 am

Look, folks, we are not trying to establish another Wikipedia here, just your ideas on Wooten’s subject.

Ragnar, we appreciate your expertise but could you make it a little less in its longevity?

Churchill’s Mom and super snooper, we do not need to know every personal family item, speech engagement and toothpaste brand from Governor Palin. Please do your lib lollygagging at your Bridge Club.

Big Bucks GOP, could you limit your bucks to one little deer of info and not the whole herd of bucks. Most of us are capable of reading news items on our own.

As to Jim’s subject, I doubt that I will be able to notice much difference after decisions are under the Gold Dome. Jim says it is “Right”. Ragnar signifies “Wrong”. I will be alert about which to complain. Right now I can only say “No more taxes!!” (Rpublican battle cry!)

Horrible Idea

March 17th, 2009
10:08 am

The vehicle tax is a horrible idea. Assume a car worth 25K- 7 percent would be 1,750. What if someone wanted to sell the car before 5 or 6 years were up? They would then end up paying MORE money to the state than if they paid ad valorem each year on the car.

Ragnar Danneskjöld

March 17th, 2009
10:08 am

Dear Dusty @ 10:01, I acknowledge the validity of your complaint, but verbosity burns strongly within my being. Per your closing line, would you describe “The change is expected to bring in an additional $496 million in the next fiscal year, to be split between state and local governments” as a “tax increase” or as “not a new tax?”

Gregg

March 17th, 2009
10:09 am

It seem crazy how the our rightist friends are tearing up this administration that is in it’s first couple of months. First of it was the Republicans that wanted to bail out the private industry while the Obama Administration is focusing more on local and state governments. Everyone of the companies were bailed out during the Bush administration yet you lay the blame at new adminstration’s door step. I don’t think Ragnar has heard about the level of care that was given to our service men and women during the administration that SENT them to war. It was so horrible that not one but two generals were forced to resign because of the scandal, Please be sure to see for youself before you let other TELL you what to believe.

Ragnar Danneskjöld

March 17th, 2009
10:11 am

Dear Gregg @ 10:01, it would be false and foolish for me to affirm that there are not idiots within the bureaucracy in every administration. However, competent management reins in the idiots. I think the management change on January 20 was from competent to incompetent.

Rush Limbaugh for President

March 17th, 2009
10:12 am

Jim Wooten logic; a fee on an auto tag or your telephone bill is a “hidden tax”, a regisration fee (created by a private sale)for the transfer of title is a registation fee not a hidden tax. This is ths problem with numnuts like Wooten. He is so partisan he can’t see that they are all the same thing done for the same reason, to raise revenue. Jim, you are small minded.

As for my uber-conservative friend Rag, I agree with his first post completely and disagree with his second post completely for the following reasons; he is advocating paying bonuses (to the best and the brightest) for reporting the largest loss in U.S. corporate history in the 4th quarter of last year (Money for nothing and your chicks for free); Then he somehow makes the same stupid leap of logic he makes every day to tie the problem to President Obama.
On the other hand I agree with him (although he again twists the facts and seasons his comments with hyperbole for maximum partisan effect)on whose insurance should cover the injuries of war veterans. That proposal will be DOA.

Ragnar Danneskjöld

March 17th, 2009
10:12 am

Dear Gregg @ 10:09, while Hank Paulson – just what is his party affiliation? – undoubtedly pushed for the wasteful TARP, a larger percentage of republicans voted against it than did democrats. Please re-examine your premise.

Ragnar Danneskjöld

March 17th, 2009
10:13 am

Dear Rush @ 10:12, perhaps you feel yourself being spun by me?

Gregg

March 17th, 2009
10:21 am

Ragnar how can you possibly call Bush competent when the majority of his own party seeked to distance themselves from him. He was possibly the most ineffective president we have ever had. You call Obama unqualified yet everyone (Bush, Palin and McCain) are all more challenegd than he. Why is he so unqualified because he went to Harvard Law instead of Yale? Because he was the editor of the Law review rather than crashing planes and graduating 232 out of 235 students. Tell me what makes him so unqualified?

Ragnar Danneskjöld

March 17th, 2009
10:25 am

Dear Gregg @ various times, I now realize the core of what I am seeing in Obama. He has that same maddening capacity as President Carter, there is no circumstance so bad that he cannot make it worse. Note the difference between Obama and Clinton – when Clinton ran into political objections to the leftist agenda, he pulled back, governed as a conservative over a fundamentally pro-liberty government, and emerged generally successful (ignoring the minor matter of impeachment over perjury.) Obama, in contrast to Clinton, follows the Carter course of ratcheting up the agenda despite the wavering support in the public. I think The Empty Suit maybe rode the short-surf board to school.

Ragnar Danneskjöld

March 17th, 2009
10:32 am

Dear Gregg @ 10:21, fair questions, much of which I anticipated in my 10:25 post. Bush waged a competent war in Afghanistan and in Iraq – two potential quagmires, and victory is certainly within reach in each, and at much less human cost than any comparable wars in history. Conservatives do not distance themselves from Bush the Warrior.

Conservatives validly objected to Bush the Spendocrat from the beginning – the Kennedy education bill, the Daschle agricultural bill, the steel quotas, even (to some extent) the hugely expensive and misdirected albeit successful-in-its-mission Homeland Security.

I will not consciously disparage Harvard Law, due to my respect for sometime correspondent Southern Democrat, but neither will I suggest that an affirmative action graduate of same is “competent.”

I don’t recall using the term “unqualified” for The Empty Suit, but that is a good choice of terms. He is a PoliSci major in a world crying out for Economics competence. He is a law major in a world crying out for an MBA. Unqualified is good, I’ll use that.

Glenn

March 17th, 2009
10:33 am

Ragnar,

While I appreciate your two astute points of analysis @ 8:22, I also appreciate the greater transparency and honesty that Jim describes. Perhaps when voters feel the “sticker” shock more honestly, they’ll then militate for reduced car taxes. At present it’s death by a thousand cuts.

Rush Limbaugh for President

March 17th, 2009
10:35 am

No, not really. You are more than capable of being able to look at both sides of an issue and take a well reason position but you seem to prefer to come off half baked by making everything so blindly partisan. You are so obsessed with Obama I think you need some professional help.

Gregg

March 17th, 2009
10:35 am

Ragnar would you not admit it is far too early in this administration to claim it a failure? If a car is in a skid you are taught to turn into the skid until you can correct it. By that I mean, we are going to have to understand it is going to get worse before it gets better. While I am an Obama supporter I do not agree with everything he is doing however I feel as though somethings must be done. What baffles me that most is how you only pick out the things you disagree with him on to take your stand. We have guys who lost their jobs and getting unemployement but knock the fact that he approved a measure to give them an extra couple of bucks and extend their benefits. They say he is not doing enough for them. Do they even consider what hey were getting before they argue what they are now getting?
Many of the Rightist listen to Rush to get their opinions and that is how misinformation spreads.

Gregg

March 17th, 2009
10:40 am

Ragnar I have to go and run my business now so I can pay some more (un-Republican) taxes to help out. While I do not agree with you, I think I would love to have a conversation with you because you don’t take it personal. Good Luck to you kind sir.

Ragnar Danneskjöld

March 17th, 2009
10:42 am

Dear Gregg @ 10:35, will I admit “it is far too early in this administration to claim it a failure?” No. Among my many unused talents is my private pilot’s license. It is never too early to pull out of a suicide dive. The risk arises from pulling out too late. I will admit that Obama has not yet crashed and burned, but I affirm that his trajectory, unchanged, will produce that result.

As to Rush, I have long suspected that he reads my morning notes to fill potentially dead air for his afternoon show.

Ragnar Danneskjöld

March 17th, 2009
10:47 am

Dear Gregg @ 10:40, I hope you earn enough to suffer Obama’s most severe taxation. Have a great day.

Eric

March 17th, 2009
10:48 am

NO WAY WILL I PAY UP TO $2,000 PURCHASE FEE! Automobiles are already too expensive, and who can afford to finance this amount on top of the cost? A hardship to be sure! I’LL GLADLY PAY THE CURRENT AD VALOREM/BIRTHDAY TAX AS IT IS TODAY. PLEASE RE-THINK THIS GA GOV.!

Ga Values

March 17th, 2009
10:54 am

Ragnar Danneskjöld 10:32 am

Bush vetoes Saxby’s farm bill 4 times but Saxby, Pelosi, & Reid over rode the veto. Daschle was out of office when the last farm bill was written by your boy Saxby.

Jackie

March 17th, 2009
11:00 am

@Ragnar,

What evidence do you have the President Obama is an “affirmative action graduate” of Harvard Law School.

It appears to me that you and your degree could be deemed the same as surely your current intellectual disposition does not lend one to believe that you were the “sharpest knife in the drawer!”

I would hope that you are not one that ascribes to the legal opinions of John Yoo. If so, it would affirm the believe that your law degree is practically useless.

Jackie

March 17th, 2009
11:02 am

@Ragnar,

“I would hope that you are not one that ascribes to the legal opinions of John Yoo. If so, it would affirm the believe that your law degree is practically useless.”

Should have read “I would hope that you are not one that ascribes to the legal opinions of John Yoo. If so, it would affirm the belief that your law degree is practically useless.”

Glenn

March 17th, 2009
11:06 am

In the Fifth Century Pope Celestine I charged two of his priests, Augustine and Patricius, to defend Christianity and Western Civilization against pagans in distant outposts of the old Empire: Augustine, in Algeria; Patricius, in Ireland. The difference in the methods of these two men is rather interesting.

Besieged by Vandals, Bishop Augustine at first philosophized, and finally, as he prepared to die, he ordered his library buried.

Hemmed in by initially hostile Hibernians, Patricius sang and poetized, preached the Gospel and taught the art of bookmaking (arguably still a strong suit for the Irish).

Which man was the more civilized?