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City & State or ZIP Tonight, this weekend, May 5th...
City & State or ZIP
City & State or ZIP Tonight, this weekend, May 5th...
City & State or ZIP

Atlanta Public Schools’ Twitter feed, at least, shows candor

What a rough week to be doing PR for the Atlanta Public Schools system.

The governor has just released an extensive report describing a prolonged, widespread pattern of  cheating and that “accuses (former Superintendent Beverly) Hall and her aides of repeatedly tampering with or hiding records that cast an unflattering light on the district.”

The school system’s official Twitter feed, by comparison, has been a ray of sunshine. Its followers are noticing.

“Kudos to @apsupdate for gutsy social media transparency during what must be an exhausting time for (communications) staff,” a tweeter named Erin M. Crews posted this afternoon.

In response, the schools feed posted, “Sigh. (You) have no idea. Following 12 Twitter search streams at this second. Many of us are parents here too. Pushing forward.”

A Tweeter named Adam Hall also noticed the candor coming out of the school system’s feed and posted, “Keep it transparent (and) this may be a moment of growth for an entire nation dearly in need of a reality check.”

The response: “Your tweet is music to our ears. We are truly standing in a moment of truth today. No excuses here.” The tweet ended with three hashtags: #transparency #aps #community.

Indeed, as the story unfolds, instead of offering defenses (or silence) the school system’s feed has steadily retweeted links to news coverage posted by the AJC and other media outlets and has consistently engaged with followers. The feed posted live excerpts from the news conference Gov. Nathan Deal held to deliver the report, in which he said there would be “consequences” for educators who cheated, and one interim Superintendent Erroll Davis later held during which he said those who cheated would not work in front of children again.

The employee who mans the feed isn’t publicly identified and hasn’t been there long.

“I believe this is week #4,” the employee told us via message. “Important to me that parents get all the info, so while today is brutal, it’s worth it.”

- Jennifer Brett/The Buzz/jbrett@ajc.com

43 comments Add your comment

carla roqs

July 6th, 2011
2:44 pm

this is a really sad time for the children of Atlanta. the most important thing to be said though, is this: regardless of where your child is in school, you have to teach them at home as well, otherwise you are depending upon someone else for your child’s success. i have many friends as teachers and principals in aps and dekalb county, so i have followed this rather closely. for beverly hall to go out on this note is…something else, as the old folks say. best wishes to the person handling the tweeting, hopefully their honesty will not cause them their job.

Swaga1

July 6th, 2011
2:59 pm

you are exactly right Carla, the parents should be accoutable just as much as the Teachers. The teachers were caught between a rock and a hard place. do what u were told or risk your kids failing the test and you get fired. The teachers’s job were dependent upon these kids going home and continue to learn via help with their parents. As you all know the parents that resides in these districts are low income households whos parents couldn’t give a damn about their child’s education much less their own. So lets stop pointing the finger and see how we can resolve this issue. Maybe we’re asking too much of these teachers in these low income areas to compete with the Dunwoody’s and alpharetta’s of the world. The kids in the suburbs have less to worry about that a kid in Atlanta. Seems like everyone is out for a witch hunt

Swaga1

July 6th, 2011
3:03 pm

Its easy to say the teachers should be fired but u have to understand the situation. Some kids could care less about learning as well as the parents so what are u to do?….we need to come up with a solution to this problem rather than firing everyone because it’s only going to happen again with the new teachers and administration if these same mandates are in place. If these kids are not learning the material maybe they need to be left back a grade in order for them to grasp it plain and simple. some children need to be left behind. the education system as a whole is dysfunctional.

LA Brown

July 6th, 2011
3:35 pm

I do not agree with firing all of the teachers involved. They followed “other duties and responsibilities” as told by their administrators. Yes, flag their certification for a 2-5 year period and provide professional development in ethics and testing expectations. Now we know what the REAL pressure of “No Child Left Behind” has brought on us as a community. Everyone loves to point the finger at the classroom teacher but no one points the finger back to themselves. Teachers no longer teach to enrich but we teach to pass a test! I ask that Governor Dean and Interim Superintendent Eroll Davis teach for THREE full months in an urban school district (not the Buckhead schools) and their minds and considerations will change as soon as “Student A” comes to school with no paper, no bookbag, no contact number, no homework, and can not write his first and last name. I want to see them teach to read on grade level.

Babs

July 6th, 2011
3:44 pm

Maybe this no child left behind should be left behind. I think it has put too much pressure on teachers. This is a shame and a black eye for Atlanta schools and teachers.

RGB

July 6th, 2011
3:44 pm

Many dozens of people in the APS system should go to jail because they violated the law. Period.

It’s appalling that 2 of the 3 bloggers above have already created excuses designed to deflect this willing violation of the law:

EXAMPLE 1: “As you all know the parents that resides in these districts are low income households whos [sic] parents couldn’t give a damn about their child’s education much less their own. So lets [sic] stop pointing the finger and see how we can resolve this issue.”

EXAMPLE 2: “Its easy to say the teachers should be fired but u have to understand the situation. ”

There is no excuse for cheating and lying. Blaming your own cheating and lying on parents who don’t care won’t work. That you people would attempt to deflect your own malfeasance by blaming other people for your own lying ways speaks volumes about your own honesty, character, and integrity. Perhaps children who “learned” under these teachers (sorry, you people like to be called “educators” because “teachers” isn’t good enough) and principals should file charges against these miscreants for child abuse.

So tell me once more why taxpayers should “invest” in public education? Hmmmmm?

RGB

July 6th, 2011
3:47 pm

EXAMPLE 4: “Everyone loves to point the finger at the classroom teacher but no one points the finger back to [sic] themselves.”

Perhaps someone will suggest that these people have the civilian equivalent of PTSD and be given a lifetime medical discharge–with full pay and benefits of course.

RGB

July 6th, 2011
3:48 pm

Or it could be THREE.

Ha.

Clo

July 6th, 2011
3:54 pm

shame on you RGB. i’m going to take a wild guess here that you are not in the city of Atlanta. public school is not an investment, it’s a responsibility of every taxpayer. stop treating basic public (free) education as some kind of privilege that inner city schools have to fight for and start treating teachers with the respect they deserve. i’d like to see any of the APS naysayers do the job of a teacher at the salary we pay them. file charges of child abuse? really? please remove your head from your a$$.

Jennifer

July 6th, 2011
3:58 pm

All anyone can ask for is transparency – that’s all that parents need to make a difference in their communities. Keep it up APS, you will find that parents do care – every last one of them.

playsoccer

July 6th, 2011
4:07 pm

Some kids were meant to be left behind – pure and simple! On that note, some were meant to be ditch diggers, pure and simple as that. Give the students a shovel.. They’ll figure it out. The APS is full of them. Lots of illegals being sent home so there are plenty of job openings. Maybe they should just teach “agriculture” in the APS. You know – pick the peach… put it in the basket….. Surely they could handle that.

doh

July 6th, 2011
4:07 pm

Oh please, this has been going on since at least 2005-06 in some cases, the AJC has been reporting on this for about two and a half years and it finally hit the fan. Now we all act shocked and saddened. The ONLY reason why this has been allowed to go on is because people don’t care about education in this state. We finally see the working conditions and pressure teachers have been under? If this is the first your hearing about the pressures and the damage NCLB has done then your a dope. Teachers have been complaining for years about a lack of a real union and working conditions in this state. Lets not all act surprised about the obvious. The tragedy isn’t the scandal, the tragedy is that no one wants to do anything about the underlying causes of the scandal. In the inner cities in the state (not just Atlanta) school means only three things to the majority of parents… 1. The start of football season. 2. The start of Basketball season. 3. I get my free day care back.

Paul

July 6th, 2011
4:11 pm

I have a question. Since the primary job of the Board of Directors of any organization is to provide oversight, direction and ensure accountabiity to shareholders, how is it that the clown show known as the APS Board of Directors is still largely intact? Worse yet, they’re being allowed to pick Hall’s successor. What a travesty.

Ruthie

July 6th, 2011
4:17 pm

Huge disservice to children. Appalling but I am not surprised. The public education system has needed to be revamped for quite a long time. The entire staff who are responsible for this needs to be fired, the ones who threatened especially so. It’s a shame that we blame parents for this as some excuse for bad teachers and administrators. Parents are equally culpable for children’s low achievement, but, they did not cause the teachers or admin. to cheat. It’s all about money….and the children lose out.

Swaga1

July 6th, 2011
4:20 pm

@ doh, not to mention these single mothers having a bus load of kids and can’t take care of them laying back having sex all day and doing drugs living off of the system while i get up early and go to work trying to make a decent living for myself and they can’t do their part and be involved in their child’s education. this just makes me sick how teachers are being blamed when they spend their OWN money to provide the necessary supplied for their kids because the parents fail to do so yet people are bitching for them to be fired? are u people serious? @RGB u obviously live in a vacuum no one is makin excuses these are the realities so maybe u should come down off your perch in Forsyth county and live in reality for a change.

doh

July 6th, 2011
4:31 pm

Really? The children lose out? What exactly do the children lose out on? This stupid 60 question test per subject measures nothing. Its not given at the very end of the year (so in fact you may not have taught everything) It is NOT a reliable marker of achievement, remember 4 years ago when they had to scrap the social studies CRCT test for three years running because it was bad. Or how about the wrong formulas printed in the math test and the department of education saying “Its no big deal” Well if the Dept. of Ed, doesn’t care why should you. When you get the results back you never know what questions you answered correctly or not, you get some crappy breakdown by category. Take Social Studies again. There are over 300 topics in the 8th GA course for just history alone that a student needs to memorize. The CRCT asks about 35 questions on history, out of 300 topics. IS that an accurate measure of your child’s comprehension of GA history? Are you allowed to see (beyond the stupid CRCT guide that the state gives out) what questions were given…If the test means so much why do only reading and math count and why in only 3rd, 5th and 8th grades? Did you know a kid could start at one school, transfer to another..take the CRCT at that school, and that kids scores would count at the originial school he/she started at. So teachers and schools are held accountable for kids they don’t teach! Why does a minority special ed student count more for reporting and AYP than a non special ed–non minority student?

Please, these cheats did these students a favor. If you only knew half of the crud that goes on, and half of what the CRCT is really about you would cheat to.

RT

July 6th, 2011
5:32 pm

APS has been poorly ran for a long time. Going back to the E-Rate days where the school district wasted millions of dollars on technology they had no idea how to support. At the time I was working as a contractor reimaging pc’s at elementary school and middle schools for APS. The office workers has some of the most expensive computer equipment you could find. Every desk had a blackberry on the charger, but probably 5% of the folks actually knew how to use a blackberry. Some of the servers I saw at a middle school could support an entire school district, but it was used at only 1 middle school.

They should clean house at APS from top down. It will take years to undo the damage to the children of that school district. The No Child Left Behind legislation should scrapped because it’s doing the direct opposite. You simply can’t tie funding to the result of test scores w/o having the proper oversight.

SABoy

July 6th, 2011
6:28 pm

Whoever broke the law should be indicted. The kids of Atlanta have already been cheated out of an education…do you really want to teach them non-accountability too?

Impervious Pearl

July 6th, 2011
6:30 pm

Please those teachers weren’t caught in between a rock and a hard place, they knew what they were doing was wrong. At Gideons Elementary, one of the teachers caught cheating said they had been cheating for years….she, by the way, got caught for 2008 and 2009. In the report it mentioned how the veteran teachers were cheating and when they felt the younger teachers could be “trusted” they brought them in….that doesn’t sound like someone struggling with their decision to cheat. Let me ask this question, what were the consequences of a child caught cheating in one of these teachers’ classes? I’m sure those students weren’t allowed to say, “I cheated because my parents would be angry if I flunked.” I am so appalled that many people are blaming the areas where these children come from and their parents. Give me a break. The comment about the bus load of children and the parents not caring….please, many of the parents care, but they are treated badly when they do show up and talked down to by the teachers. You don’t know what that parent may be struggling with, some work 2 or 3 jobs to put food on the table for their children and cannot make teacher conferences, it is not for the lack of not caring about their children, it is they don’t know. Their lack of knowledge because of the way they were brought up. Those teachers changed those test, not one single parent did.

While there are MANYgreat teachers out there working hard, struggling to help their students and doing the best they can, there are also some sorry teachers out there that don’t care about their students. While I agree teaching is a noble profession, don’t make it seem as if they are all noble people. Many of these teachers were not and are not!! I am so tired of listening to “you couldn’t do it” — “you don’t know what they deal with.” Leave the profession and keep it moving if you are that miserable.

Actions Reap Consequences!!!

Mr. Riley

July 6th, 2011
6:33 pm

Its funny how this “probe” is only done in distinctively minority occupied sides of town…why couldn’t it be done for the entirety of metro atlanta?? I guess the “affluent” sides of town don’t cheat at all, and all their kids pass the test ~sarcasm~…this whole “probe” is some BS until its down for every county…outside of that this is just another witch hunt..

Mr. Reality

July 6th, 2011
6:39 pm

@ Ruthie and @RGB u guys simply don’t have a clue. There are many great teachers in APS and other surrounding inner city school systems. However, I will be truthful and say they are some bad ones also. All you do is sit back and listen to media outlets like television and the internet and hear what system has performed poorly on tests. “HELLO” it doesn’t mean because your student performs poorly you are a bad teacher. Many people in education won’t touch a job at an inner city school because they know how difficult the situation is. The ones that do choose to because they know the obstacles these students face and want to be a positive in a child’s life. Hopefully you are aware that if a 3rd grade teacher receives a child who can barely write their name and by the time the test comes around in Spring they’re reading on a 2nd grade level a lot of progress has been made. Although they may not be on the correct level for their age thats an accomplishment. However you praise teachers in the suburbs whose students when they reach a certain grade they are already testing at that level or even higher. Before you make such bogus statements lets be realistic.The playing field is not level for all teachers or all students. If you took a teacher from APS/Dekalb and put them in say Forsyth County or North Fulton I’m sure the results you’re seeing now will not change.So before you go bashing how about you push for a plan in which the playing field can be more level. You, I, and everyone else knows that would be extremely difficult.

RealityChecker

July 6th, 2011
6:45 pm

How in the world could they think they could actually get away with it? The scope of this disaster is breathtaking!

SueR

July 6th, 2011
6:48 pm

yeah, a bunch of real bright brainiacs…wouldn’t want them teaching my kiddoes.

YoungDude

July 6th, 2011
7:20 pm

How much jail time will this Beverly chick do? And will she be in the same prison as that ponzi dude? Anybody know?

Change

July 6th, 2011
7:55 pm

As an educator (though not in Atlanta) I am embarrassed an appalled by the cheating scandal in APS. I’ve read all the previous comments where people are pointing fingers. I think that is the problem. “It takes a village” should not just be a proverb that sounds good, it should be one all of us take to heart. When a child fails, everybody loses out. There is enough blame to go around, but we should all take a look at ourselves first. As parents, do we send our kids to school mentally and physically prepared to learn? As teachers, do we approach our responsibilities with integrity, resourcefulness, and the conviction to do our jobs to the best of our ability? As business leaders, do we support the schools in our communities – not just financially, but with volunteers and tutors? As school leaders, do we support our teachers and make sure they have the kind of supportive environment they need to perform their job at peak performance? It is always easier to sit in judgement of others when we haven’t walked in their shoes. I hope, and really believe, that if my superior tried to force me to change answers and threatened my job if I didn’t, I would have the moral fortitude to standup to him/her and be prepared to walk away from my job. But like most people, I have a mortgage and other financial responsibilities. It may be hard choice to make.

Perhaps the biggest blame should go to the increased emphasis on high-stakes testing. I took a class in assessment when I was certifying to teach and my professor drilled into our heads a statement I have never forgotten, “Never one test, never one person.” She was referring to how students may be evaluated when special education was being considered, but the statement has larger implications. A child’s future, nor a teacher’s career should EVER hang on the outcome of one test. Whether it’s the CRCT or the HSGT, there are more comprehensive ways to evaluate progress than one fallible instrument.

Let’s all take a deep breath and try to figure out what we can do to improve education for ALL students, even the ones from low-income families.

No Solution

July 6th, 2011
8:06 pm

Thanks for the censorship there, Jennifer. What happened to my earlier post?

No Solution

July 6th, 2011
8:12 pm

It’s a value system problem. Why do certain groups of people achieve high academic awards and some do not? Could it be that it is being reinforced in the home? Say it isn’t so, Jennifer!!!

FUBU

July 6th, 2011
8:14 pm

This was a case of for us and by us! PERIOD!

Is that what tax payers can expect from MINORITY CONTROLLED GOVERNMENT entities?

Jennifer Brett

July 6th, 2011
8:17 pm

No Solution (8:06 p.m.) –

I have not removed any comments from this blog. If there was any profanity in your post it would have been automatically deleted by our filter, so you could try rewording and reposting if you like. Assuming it was family friendly I suppose it’s also possible that some glitch devoured your post and you could just repost as is.

Jennifer

bcusher

July 6th, 2011
9:04 pm

where are andy young, rev lowery, rev jackson, mlklIII and all the others that cry racism at the drop of a hat. the aps is a system for social change nand not education.

Change

July 6th, 2011
9:14 pm

Everyone should read the report on the APS cheating scandal at AJC.com, particularly Vol.3 Conclusions, the section on “Culture of Fear.” It might change some of your perspectives.

Swangirl

July 6th, 2011
9:44 pm

What part of the word “cheating” do people not understand?

I understand a “culture of fear” but that’s when you get out or call attention to the wrongdoing. That’s called integrity. That’s called having the courage to stand up for what you believe in. It’s called doing what is RIGHT. Is it easy or without consequences? Heck no. But you do it anyway!

If we let these APS teachers/administrators/staff off the hook, then how can we ask children to do what is right? You can’t. Making excuses will not solve the problem or bring about change.

It was APS who created the unrealistically high test score goals and kept raising them every year. Then cheated to meet them.

And before you tell me I don’t understand or that I would have gone along to keep my job, I can tell you there is NO FLIPPIN’ WAY. Even if I had to leave my job and flip burgers at Wendy’s, I’d do that before staying in a system that told me I had to change answers and lie to keep my job. NEVER.

LiberatePublix

July 6th, 2011
9:46 pm

Fire all the teachers involved. If not, you are telling a generation of Atlanta kids that cheating is okay. The rationalization of this behavior is almost as bad as the behavior itself. By the way, if you don’t like teaching, or you think that teachers are “between a rock etc.” then leave the profession.

Valerie Jackson

July 6th, 2011
10:08 pm

well the light have shine and what are we going to do help the children first parent need to be parent help with homework and if the parent need to take some classes than do that this is importance to everyone there are good Teachers and bad Teachers the problem in Atlanta School have been there for years. just because a child come from a low income households dose not mean that child can not learn parent that is working 2 and 3 jobs stop and look and the righting on the wall your child need you to sit down with a book and read with them math, helping your child to count,learn color these are what parent need to do meet with the Teachers and ask what can i do to help my child.The Teachers can not do it alone learning dose not stop when School is over if we do not wake up and stop looking for someone else to help us out problem will not go away.there is problem in many home childerns are not been taking care.APS cheating report this is so sad but glad it is out so we can get to work yes we can made the Atlanta School better for every childs

OedipusTax

July 6th, 2011
11:43 pm

There is no excuse for the unexcusable.

Criminals and liars belong in jail to be rehabilitated. Apparently a large percentage of Atlanta teachers and administrators qualify, unfortunately. For once, they need to take responsibilities for their actions, and stop blaming everybody else. They are criminals, nothing less.

No one else made them cheat. No one else man them into professional liars.

They are a disgrace to their profession, and at a minimum, if really sorry for their actions, they should give back their unearned salaries and ask for mercy on a humble bended knee and resign.

And every one of those cheaters would be saying exactly the same thing were the cheating discovered in some suburb. They would be the leaders of the witch hunt, you can bet. In their utter and complete hypocrisy and egocentric arrogance.

When one comes right down to it, they don’t give a damn about their students..

And every one of those teachers and adminstrators will demanding more money at first opportunity, you can bet.

Meanwhile, Beverly Hall will lie with the arrogance of Chairman Mao and the conscience of Jack the Ripper.

OedipusTax

July 6th, 2011
11:56 pm

@Mr. Riley – you outrageous ignorance is appalling, The investigation, if you can read, was initiated because of the large percentage of erasures found at the APS. Any such erasures were identified in Georgia by similar techniques. But you’re too silly, too arrogant, and too biased to read anything except your own written stupidity.

Ruthie

July 7th, 2011
4:43 am

It’s amazing to me the excuses I have read here for the cheating. Cheating parties? 178 teachers on all levels? Again, we need to revamp the educational system, fire the administrators and teachers for cheating. I don’t doubt this happens a lot in public schools regardless of inner city, public, or private. What’s embarassing is how it reflects on the school districts who tout their excellent programs. The children do suffer the most. Why? Because they are kids. They are being taught below standard, passed through failing miserably, only to enter the job markets with little educational skills. They are put in the schools to be educated. We say it takes a village, but this time, the village has turned on it’s own children for money, greed, and power. I think the classes are way to big, teachers need a smaller class ratio. The wages for the administrators need to be cut, and there needs to be an independent transparent auditing board for all the public/private schools. Education and knowledge are power. What does it say about our society when we literally fail our own children?

carla roqs

July 7th, 2011
9:08 am

judging seems to be easy. resolution is the real issue here. no excuses, cheating is cheating. but, i agree with the person who stated they should not be fired if they are meeting/have met all other criteria of their jobs. do i feel “no child left behind” is the cause of this? i stick with no excuses. do i think these individuals were afraid for their jobs and that is why they behaved in this manner? probably. again, what/where is the resolution for this? the students are losing out, not the teachers. and to the people who are saying–the single parents are having sex, etc and do not care about their children? you are stupid, period. do you not realize the number of individuals who were raised by single parents that worked as many jobs as possible, then stayed up late helping their kids with homework or checking over homework and the success stories that have come out of such homes? yes, some people do not care. but do not stereotype. i was ptsa pres of a school with many white, well to do, professional parents. a lot of the families had both parents working and you would never see them at any events. on the weekends they were out of town and the kids had wild parties. during the week, the parents worked late and knew nothing of whether their children had homework or not. money does not dictate a good parent, a two parent home does not guarantee a great student. lack of money, lack of education, and most def race are not indicative of a bad parent. half of you responding either do not have children and if you do, i guarantee that you need to check into THEIR academic standings- if your grammar is any indication of what YOU are working with. APS has withstood many mistakes, they will make it through this one, but it has to be about resolving the issues that brought about this travesty of cheating.

KidCentered

July 7th, 2011
3:34 pm

Where do we start? Let’s start with the obvious that cheating for any purpose is wrong. Educaiton is the fiber of this great nation and we need to fix it quickly. Teaching in this nation should be considered a noble job and should be held in high esteem. We as a nation place little value on education but we expect miracles. Education is truly a top down initiative. I have been in public education for twenty plus years and the one thing I can truly say is that there are very few at the administrative level who has the courage and the stamina to really want honest,sustainable improvement in the educational system. The educational system is not unlike the business world in that both have employees who are simply there to receive a pay check. The difference is that in the educational system it is extremely difficult to get rid of an incompetent teacher (administrators can be displaced a bit easier because they do work at the pleasure of the superintendent). A major reason why it is difficult to rid the educational system of incompetent employees is because of the politics that are at play within the system. A principal for instance will be frowned upon as being incompetent if they recommend several teachers for nonrenewal. They will receive very little support from the district level administrators including school board members. If a principal is diligent in their job of documenting in writing the misconduct of employees, they could again find themselves in trouble because they will have created an atmosphere of low morale at the school and the district level administrators again will be looking at the principal instead of the incompetent teacher. It is easier to replace or move a principal than it is to replace or move ten to fifteen teachers. This is not to say there are not incompetent principals either, because there are. The APS school cheating scandal brings to light the belief that is known in public education and that belief is that as long as you stay out of the news, that as long as staff members are not complaining, and that as long as parents are happy…. the district level administrators will leave the school alone. Raising the bar of academic excellence in any school can be painful but it is a necessary pain that we as adults must bear in order for our children to be successful and competitive in a global market. In many cases, there is not a proactive diagnosis of the vital signs of the school. It is only when the school is almost in a comatose state that real assistance is given to the school and everyone is held accountable. Professional development does exist in schools but it is often fragmented and is generally given to the masses. It is in kind to a doctor treating all illnesses with aspirin. In most cases, professional development is designed around some initiative from the district office instead of being driven by the needs of the individual schools. Instead of mandating that teachers raise test scores at any cost, maybe we should simply target specific professional development and specific researched intiatives at the school and assist the school staff in improving their teaching strategies as well as management strategies so real learning will take place. Lets equip teachers and administrators at the school level with the tools that they need in order to be successful. Mechanics are even given the proper tools to diagnose your car’s malfunctions and the correct tools to fix it. Can we give the proper tools to our educators? I challenge every parent and community member to visit your community school this year and see what you can do to assist at your school. Remember, education is our most vital resource and we should treat it that way. I challenge every parent and community member to invest time as well as money into your local community school. We have had a cheating scandal in the APS system but this simply can be the catalyst that propels Georgia Public/Private education in the eyesight of all Americans as a model for how the community can take control of their schools and make them all schools of excellence. Remember, education is a state right with grass roots effots in every community.

JS

July 8th, 2011
9:01 pm

Indict Bev. Hall and PUT HER IN JAIL!!!!!!!

Lanay

July 10th, 2011
4:36 pm

If a child progresses any during a given school year, then that child is not left behind. The NCLB act should be revised. Teaching is not a one size fit all, but the test is. Teachers were taught to use all kinds of different strategies for different learners, but when it is test time they are all tested the same way. As a former educators the one size fit all test was one of the things I questioned. Maybe if the test was designed to measure real growth, then cheating would not have taken place! If some students are auditory, visual, tactile etc. learners then why is it the test wasn’t designed to measure them properly? That’s the biggest problem as I see it the test doesn’t properly measure students performance. I left the system because of the NCLB inequities. I didn’t think the test was designed to truly measure a child’s growth. Until the test is restructured all of the scores are lies! I do believe students in the urban areas can learn and can exceed expectations, but how are they being measured? Not the way they learn and that’s for sure!
I have friends in APS and I know they go beyond the call of duty to educate the students. It is so unfair to the students and the teachers who are caught up in this travesty. They spend many hours after school tutoring students, buying them clothes (I have even done it), trying to help these students succeed. I remember one year I took a group of first graders to the movies and one girl asked me, “What is that big white paper looking thing for?” She was referring to the screen. She hadn’t ever been to the movies. Exposure makes a difference also, so the students should never be compared to those students who went to Europe for spring break.

It’s always easy for someone on the outside to say what they would have done, but they didn’t have their jobs on the line. And by the way I have NEVER CHEATED on a test, EVER!!!

Jezel

July 11th, 2011
7:59 am

Am disappointed with the new APS leader who continues to chastise those teachers involved in the cheating scandal. Go after those who created the situation and those who failed to handle the situation.

Teachers notified Dr. Hall’s office early on and also the professional organization for teachers. Apparently they signed off on the cheating..they did not do anything about it.

If you have a mortgage, children and bills to pay…then you are going to do whatever it takes to keep your job…especially if your bosses are telling you to do something. Those teachers should have never been put in that predicament Those who put them there are to blame.

Some schools are going to do better than other schools on standardized test. Does not matter how good or bad the teachers are. So..get over it and quit trying to fool yourself and others. Teachers are not to blame. If you want to place blame…blame the parents. Kids belong to their parents. They do not belong to their teachers.

carla roqs

July 11th, 2011
10:54 am

come on Jennifer, give us a new one, pleaseeeee.