Fancy (and expensive) swimwear? Disgusting

  

  Well, I just finished reading this story by our Ken Sugiura on how those involved with the men’s swimming team at Georgia Tech have become the latest to make their sport an absolute joke these days.

  Have you heard? It’s not about the swimmer anymore. It’s about the suits they wear . . . or don’t wear.

  It’s about the Speedo LZR Racer suit that carried Michael Phelps to his Olympic fame this summer in Beijing. According to Ken’s story, 79 of the 108 world records broken in 2008 were reportedly set by swimmers wearing these suits.

  Hello! Two things here: High-tech suits such as the LZR Racer should be banned by the NCAA, especially since only a few schools can afford them in this tough economy at $550 a pop. Second, schools should do the right thing in the meantime and refuse to wear them.

  So much for daydreaming. According to Ken’s reporting, those involved with the Tech men’s team are so obsessed with wearing these suits/trying to win an ACC championship that they’ve often slept three swimmers to a room in cheap hotels to save money to buy the suits.

  I mean, there is a reason why the use of performance-enhancing drugs has been rampant at all levels of sports and at all ages. That motto of “by any means necessary” has spread from the pros to everywhere else. We’re back to this LZR Racer silliness.

  The folks at United States Golf Association get it more than most. They are in the process of mandating a limit on the effectiveness of grooves on clubs. They also are discussing a ban on wedges with lofts of more than 60 degrees.

   Swimming is going the other way. Swimming is going the way of sightings of Big Foot and sluggers from the steroid era, where you can’t take it seriously.

131 comments Add your comment

Texstinger

February 25th, 2009
10:54 pm

Mr Moore,

Is this really the best you can do to attract more readers? I am sorry your career has turned in such a bad way.

The paper you are working for will soon be out of business. Don’t you think you should grow up and try to do something of worth with your miserable life?

real life swimmer.

February 25th, 2009
10:53 pm

Oh, and since when did Phelps cheat?

Weed just feels good… it doesn’t make you faster.

real life swimmer.

February 25th, 2009
10:50 pm

1) LZR racers are used by EVERY team at high level meets.

2) Georgia Tech doesn’t need to budget themselves with cheap hotel rooms. They’ve got enough money to run the CRC… Tech can afford to suit a team.

3) The swimmers at Tech are a fine exhibition of talent. If you throw a suit into a pool, it’s not going to set ACC records on its own. Have you considered the swimmer in the suit at all? Maybe the hours they put into their sport?

4) You should probably ACTUALLY go to swim meets. If you’ve ever seen a kid in a LZR that can barely make state, it becomes obvious that the swimmer makes the times, not the suit.

GT @ GT

February 25th, 2009
10:36 pm

TM,

Were you an athlete, ever? Do you know the dedication that it takes to succeed in an endurance sport like swimming and track? Clearly not, I doubt you could even swim to save your life.

Swimmers give up countless hours, working as hard as the can, only to drop the slightest amount of time. However, sometimes people drop seconds instead of tenths. It happens all the time in the swimming world with and without next generation suits. All this hard work is second nature to them and what they stive on, just like ignorance is to you.

I am ashamed and embarrassed for you. How dare you. You clearly are just slandering those that accomplished what you never could…success in sports.

Anxiously awaiting your resignation,
Simply Disgusted

Casey

February 25th, 2009
10:34 pm

I’ve almost stopped reading the AJC altogether because every time I do, I see moronic drivel. This is especially poor journalism, and I’m officially finished helping the AJC with my mouse clicks and website hits.

AugustaJacket

February 25th, 2009
10:32 pm

Mr. Moore,

Despite my desire to fall right in with many of the comments here on your column, I’ll do my best to be respectful. However, I admit it will be difficult. Well, who am I kidding?

Did you retract the original headline? I ask this since there is no mention of the word “cheating” in the version of the column I read here. It appears that many of the responders on here are referencing not only an insinuation of cheating by the swim team at Tech, but also an explicit headline and, perhaps, wording in the article that accuses the Tech swim team of outright cheating. I didn’t see that so I am forced to assume you edited it. Good for you (or your editors) for taking the first step. However, what you should do especially in this day and age of the electronic media is explicitly apologize for your accusation(s). My apologies if my assumptions are incorrect.

I realize that columnists like yourself attempt to make their living on the “controversial, hard-hitting” topics. This one was controvsersial, but hard-hitting? Please accept my apologies, but this was a huge swing and a miss.

It’s columns and apparent attitudes like this (and too many other examples to mention) that are the reason that many of the people out here in the real world view the media as arrogant, elitist and, apparently, “less than educated.”

- AugustaJacket
GT, Class of ‘97

Randy Randolph

February 25th, 2009
10:26 pm

Cancel my subscription now and I will use the money I save to buy you a set of water wings. You’ll need the support because you have ventured in way over your head with this cesspool of lies your spreading on the GA Tech swim team. You owe the team and school a retraction and an apology for earlier comments…. Not some sneaky edit to your pre-print byline, 10 hours after posting it on this blog.

Analogies is not you T

February 25th, 2009
10:14 pm

Wearing swimsuits that glide through water better than others does not equal steroids. If you had a brain, you would know the big knock on steroids in the pros is that it is dangerous and encourages or forces high school athletes to use the same to compete. These swimsuits are not dangerous, but would be analagous to a team having an indoor facility or better aluminum bats. Please TMoore, take the next early retirement package and leave the kids or should I say white kids alone.

Katherine

February 25th, 2009
9:54 pm

Did anyone notice that the article’s title changed this afternoon in the midst of all these comments? Funny thing is, the URL address did not… :)

Economist

February 25th, 2009
9:49 pm

Everytime I waste my time (that I will never get back) reading a article written by Moore, I understand why the AJC and other newpapers are failing. Seriously, where is journalistic integrity?? Cheating? What rule was broken?? If you did research, you would know that many of uga’s swimmers wear the same thing. I know that I’m just upping your read and vlog count, but man, this is rediculous to slander 18-22 year olds for using something perfectly legal to compete. I guess swimmers with hair shouldn’t be allowed to wear swim caps?