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Nine memorable ‘Larry King Live’ moments, courtesy of the Daily Beast

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The Daily Beast posted nine notable “Larry King Live” moments, including interviews with Tammy Faye Bakker, Frank Sinatra and Marlon Brando.

Here are four of them:

In 1994, Brando gets all cutesy and kissy-poo with King:

His interview with Mark Felt, the infamous “Deep Throat.”

“Do you know who I am?” Jerry Seinfeld said with exasperation after King wondered if NBC cancelled “Seinfeld” when in fact, he left on his own accord.

Former Miss USA pageant contestant Carrie Prejean gets peeved when King pushed her about a settlement with the pageant she wouldn’t talk about, then threatens to walk off after a caller asks about gay marriage.

7 comments Add your comment

dan

June 30th, 2010
4:05 pm

WAAAAY past his time to go…he did enjoy one helluva run though. Last time I saw any of his show was the Seinfeld debacle…Jerry was incredulous and spared no quarter…great carnage!

Eddie Cook

June 30th, 2010
5:33 pm

Larry is and was truly one-of-a-kind. I listened to his latest book on CD, and he is a wonderful story teller.

All of us lose some of our skill and desire as we age, sometimes consciously, sometimes unconsciously, and sometimes both.

I don’t think Larry is aware (nor are most of us aware (myself included) when it is time to hang it up.

He used to be a wonderful and very prepared interviewer and conversationalist, but in the last several years, he has had a tendency to interrupt and talk over people he interviews.

The Marlon Brando appearance was outrageous but I’m not sure how lucid either one of them was.

I am a big Jerry Seinfeld fan, but I thought he was just pompous and rude. It is quite possible and maybe even likely that Larry did not know the answer to the question he asked. However, it is also possible that he did know that answer and was just easing into a conversation.

Carrie Prejean. Well, she is one very beautiful lady. I’m not sure if they talked beforehand about what could and what could not be discussed during the interview. I’m not sure if she understood the questions Larry was asking.

The most significant TV moment with Larry for me was the O.J. Simpson episode. I was actually watching the episode and talking to a friend when the coverage began. It was riveting TV.

Larry was one of the best (maybe the best) interviewer of all time.

Patrick

June 30th, 2010
5:33 pm

Hands down, his best interview was with Demon Kogure, a Japanese rockstar (think all of Kiss rolled into one person, plus Ozzy tossed in, plus satan) during Larry’s week in Japan specials.

Here is this horrible scary evil mean rocker, renowned for being the embodiment of evil… reduced to quivering nervousness by Larry King. It was awesome classic stuff.

The King show quit doing stuff like that literally a decade ago and lost its edge at the same time.

Lawrence

June 30th, 2010
5:56 pm

My memorable moment will be when he retires. I will be glad.

Doug

June 30th, 2010
6:06 pm

The Ross Perot and Al Gore interview… is pure comedy. Hell, so was every Perot interview that followed, as Perot sunk deeper and deeper into paranoid dementia.

As for Larry, he is completely past his expiration date as a broadcaster and has been for a good ten years.

He has gone from the most over-rated, softball tossing interviewer in the business, to a complete clown and buffoon, as witnessed in his Seinfeld interview… BUT that is what happens when you PRIDE yourself on NEVER PREPPING for an interview.

I’m still laughing at his Lou Farrigno interview following Micheal Jackson’s death, where it was obvious Larry had no idea who Lou was when he introduced him to the audience as “Lou Farragamo.”

Ted Striker

June 30th, 2010
6:25 pm

I’m sure it’s easy for some folks to criticize King’s occasional missteps over the years. However when you make your living as a talk show host — dancing on the edge of controversial topics and trying to ask the questions a diverse America wants to know — that comes with the territory. I’ll miss the guy.

Henry D

June 30th, 2010
7:34 pm

The day he announced he was leaving the air.