Archive for the ‘stem cells’ Category

Roy Barnes: On stem cells and another run for governor

Roy and Marie Barnes, as many of you know, have built themselves a grand house on Whitlock Avenue in Marietta, complete with a bronze replica of the state seal set into the floor of the foyer.

This at the same time the former Democratic governor, ousted in 2002, has shifted from “hell, no” to something close to “maybe” when it comes to the 2010 race for that other mansion on West Paces Ferry Road.

This morning, my AJC colleague Rachel Pomerance took a tour of the new Barnes abode, for an upcoming Private Quarters feature.

Talk about home design eventually gave way to politics. Again, Barnes pointed out that the past six years mark his longest respite from 26 years of public service. “It’s been very pleasant,” he said.

And yet. Pomerance reports that Barnes continues to look askance at Republican rule at the state Capitol. For instance, on Wednesday, Barnes worried about S.B. 169, a bill to restrict embryonic stem cell research in Georgia. The measure comes up for …

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UGA researcher on embyronic stem cell bill: ‘I never said I could live with it’

In Monday’s Senate committee debate over S.B. 169, which would would restrict embryonic stem cell research, bill sponsor Ralph Hudgens (R-Hull) told of a conversation he had with Steve Stice, a University of Georgia researcher who specializes in stem cells.

Through lectures and regular visits to the state Capitol, Stice has become a respected voice on the topic — not in part because of the millions of dollars in research funds he’s attracted to UGA.

On Sunday night, Stice called Hudgens to discuss the measure.

Hudgens gave his version of the conversation the next morning. “We talked about it, and Dr. Stice told me — he said, ‘I don’t particularly like the bill, but I can live with it.’ That’s his direct quote,” Hudgens told his Senate colleagues.

The senator said the researcher expressed one concern that research on something called induced pluripotent stem cells — defined in the bill as “human cell reprogramming, other than a gamete, by the addition …

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Your morning jolt

This morning on ajc.com:

Elsewhere in Georgia:

  • IA: Perdue may address House Republican caucus on transportation.
  • SMN: Savannah Democrat confesses to owing IRS $15.78.
  • And the nation:

  • WSJ: An opinion piece on credit cards as the next thing to crunch.
  • WP: Who will decide what on stem cell policy.
  • WP: Howie Kurtz on Comedy Central’s Jon Stewart.
  • NYT: David Brooks on the misguided GOP response to the recession.
  • For instant updates, follow me on Twitter.

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    The stem cell debate and when life begins

    Late this morning, the Senate Health and Human Services Committee passed out, on a 7-6 vote, a bill that would declare an embryo to be a human being — and would prohibit the creation of embryonic stem cell lines from eggs fertilized in Georgia, or at least while they remain in Georgia.

    Critics declared that passage of S.B. 169 would shatter the foundation of science and biotech development in Georgia, and that the legislation was purposely timed to answer President Barack Obama’s lifting of federal restrictions on embryonic stem cell research.

    Proponents of the legislation called the timing “providential,” and declared it a good first step.

    (Read a CQ transcript of Obama’s remarks on the topic here.)

    With little warning, state Sen. Preston Smith (R-Rome) late Friday removed much of the bill’s contents — all dealing with restrictions on the number of fertilized eggs a clinic could create during the invitro process. The measure was originally intended as an answer to …

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    Your morning jolt

    This morning on ajc.com:

  • Georgia ‘octuplet’ bill morphs into a first reaction to Obama’s lifting of federal ban on stem cell research.
  • Georgia colleges embrace Obama’s stem cell decision.
  • Legislators under personal economic pressure.
  • Peanut inspection system filled with holes.
  • Will Atlanta’s casino gamble pay off?
  • Rush to e-file one reason for state tax revenue drop.
  • Elsewhere in Georgia:

  • MDJ: Who needs the Governor’s Mansion? Barnes’ new foyer has a bronze inlaid state seal.
  • And the nation:

  • WSJ: Dow 5000? A bearish possibility.
  • NYT: Stocks set to open lower after Merck deal.
  • WSJ: Florida highway upgrade goes private, and Spanish.
  • WP: Obama says ‘hola’ to a more inclusive press strategy.
  • And here’s that “Saturday Night Live” skit that had everyone talking:

    For instant updates, follow me on Twitter.

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    Georgia ‘octuplet’ bill morphs into a first reaction to Obama’s lifting of federal ban on stem cell research

    The state Legislature will likely greet President Barack Obama’s Monday decision to lift federal ban on embryonic stem cell research with an attempt to impose restrictions of its own in Georgia.

    State Sen. Preston Smith (R-Rome) said Friday that he has performed some radical surgery on S.B. 169, which was originally drafted as a reaction to the California “octuplet mom” and would have limited the number of fertilized eggs created by clinics.

    My AJC colleague Mary Lou Pickel posted the details last night:

    Smith said he has removed from the bill everything to do with fertility clinics and how many embryos can be transferred into a woman, but he has left language that deals with cloning and embryos used for scientific research.

    The bill as amended would prohibit cloning and chimera experimentation — crossing human genetic material with that of animals — which Smith called “creepy.” It would prohibit creating a human embryo for the purposes of scientific …

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