Archive for the ‘Ray Boyd’ Category

Your morning jolt: Complaint alleging Casey Cagle affair headed for dismissal

The state ethics commission appears ready to dismiss the complaint lodged last October against Casey Cagle that accused the Republican lieutenant governor of having an inappropriate relationship with a campaign staffer and overpaying her with campaign funds.

Lt. Gov. Casey Cagle. Bob Andres, bandres@ajc.com

Lt. Gov. Casey Cagle. Bob Andres, bandres@ajc.com

Case No. 20010-0066 – a Cagle spokesman confirmed this is the one — is listed on the “dismissal” portion of the March 1 agenda for the Georgia Government Transparency and Campaign Finance Commission.

The complaint was filed by Ray Boyd, the real estate entrepreneur who last spring considered a Republican run for governor – but would not sign the loyalty oath required by the state GOP.

Boyd’s complaint offered no proof of the affair, which allegedly occurred around the time Cagle, then a state senator, was elected lieutenant governor in 2006.

Cagle called the allegation “absolutely false,” and declared the complaint to be the work of his Democratic opponent, …

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Your morning jolt: Ray Boyd withdraws from ethics alliance

The Georgia Alliance for Ethics Reform – that cross-ideological group that includes tea partyers, Georgia Common Cause, the League of Women Voters, liberals and Republicans – will hold its first rally at the state Capitol next Wednesday.

They’ll be pushing for, among other things, a firm cap on gifts to state lawmakers.

But they’ll be doing it without Ray Boyd, the former candidate for governor turned impatient Capitol reformer. He has formally resigned from the group, sending this letter to William Perry, executive director of Georgia Common Cause:

The desperate need for sweeping ethics reform in Georgia is obvious to everyone, but the best method to achieve this goal is not shared with the same unanimity.

There are differences of timing, such as whether we should strive for gradual incremental changes over time, or whether we need to make a hard push for immediate sweeping reform.

There are differences of style, such as whether we should plead with the leadership in …

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Your morning jolt: Senate banking chairman says he won’t step down

A cross-ideological alliance of tea partyists, good government-types and traditional Republicans in pursuit of ethics reform in the state Capitol will unveil its demands this morning.

Bob Irvin, the former state GOP legislator and past chairman of Common Cause Georgia will have the mike. Other groups include the Georgia chapter of Tea Party Patriots, Georgia Watch, and Ray Boyd, the former candidate for governor.

Jack Murphy, R-Cumming, chairman of the Senate Banking Committee. Jason Getz,jgetz@ajc.com

Jack Murphy, R-Cumming, chairman of the Senate Banking Committee. Jason Getz,jgetz@ajc.com

Timing is everything in politics. Look for a federal lawsuit alleging that Jack Murphy, chairman of the state Senate banking committee, to be a major topic at the 11 a.m. presser.

Murphy told the AJC on Wednesday that he has no plans to resign his spot as a chief advocate for banking legislation in the Capitol. He issued this statement, which we reproduce in its entirety:

“First, I must point out that I am limited in what I can say regarding my involvement with Integrity Bank …

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Oaky Woods at double the price in a down market

The Political Insider blog is on hiatus until the new year.

Here’s something to ask yourself today: Is your house, and the land it sits on, worth twice as much today as it was in 2004? Probably not.

In fact, odds are that your little slice of heaven is worth a good deal less. No matter what your mortgage says.

But the real estate market can be a tricky thing.

On Wednesday, the Board of Natural Resources agreed to pay $28.7 million for 10,015 acres of Oaky Woods wilderness in middle Georgia. Six years ago, the price was roughly the same — for the entire 20,000-acre tract.

By passing on the property in 2004, over the protests of environmentalists, the state allowed the pristine black bear habitat to pass into the hands of Houston County developers — whose plans to build a private city did wonders for local land prices.

The assessed value of 101 acres adjacent to the Oaky Woods property, purchased by Gov. Sonny Perdue a year or so earlier, more than doubled to …

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Your morning jolt: Oaky Woods at double the price in a down real estate market

Something to ask yourself today: Is your house, and the land it sits on, worth twice as much today as it was in 2004? Probably not.

In fact, odds are that your property is worth much less.

Even so, the state Board of Natural Resources today will agree to pay $28.7 million for 9,595 acres of Oaky Woods wilderness in middle Georgia — nearly double the cost when the state was offered the land and passed on it in 2004.

Instead, most of the land went to developers – a move that boosted the value of a nearby tract owned by Gov. Sonny Perdue. But plans to create a private city on the land went bust with the housing market. With the DNR purchase, at least the developers, Oaky Woods Properties LLC, will be able to recoup their investment – and still hold onto half their purchase.

You will be happy to know that, according to one board member, no corruption was involved. Just greed. From my AJC colleague Jeremy Redmon, who attended the preliminaries on Tuesday:

Dwight Davis, another …

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Your morning jolt: AG candidates don crime-fighting capes

The Democratic race for attorney general has kicked into gear, with both candidates donning their crime-fighting capes in a post-Fourth rush to the July 20 primary.

State Rep. Rob Teilhet was first on Monday with a 30-second TV spot trading on a quote that calls him the state’s “most forward-thinking crime fighter.” He emphasizes a proposal to expand the state’s DNA data base to include all those arrested on felony charges, and promised to established a unit aimed at prosecuting crimes against children.

See it here:

Former Dougherty County district attorney Ken Hodges continues to draw attention to his experience as a prosecutor – and Teilhet’s lack of same. Says his ad, which begins today: “You might want to choose the only Democratic candidate who’s ever prosecuted anyone. It’s a tough job, and it helps if you know how.”

See it here:

The Democratic TV ads could have repercussions on the Republican side with its three candidates – former Cobb County Commission chairman …

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Your morning jolt: Ralph Hudgens returns $106k

On Wednesday, virtually every candidate in Georgia was sending out e-mail pleas for donations to pump up their three-month contribution reports that ended at midnight.

State Sen. Ralph Hudgens (R-Hull)/AJC

State Sen. Ralph Hudgens (R-Hull)/AJC

But state Sen. Ralph Hudgens (R-Hull), a candidate for state insurance commissioner, was one of the few pulling money out of his campaign treasury.

From Atlanta Unfiltered:

Ralph Hudgens‘ bid for Georgia insurance commissioner has returned $106,600 in contributions that were transferred improperly last year from his state Senate campaign fund.

The State Ethics Commission has been investigating the transaction since January. Hudgens said [Wednesday] he has signed a consent order, agreeing not to violate campaign finance laws in the future, that assesses no financial penalty.
“No fines, no anything,” he said.

State law prohibits a candidate from transferring contributions directly between campaign accounts for different offices. Hudgens said a commission staffer had told …

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Competition is good for everything — except the Georgia ballot

Competition will solve any problem, according to the wisdom of the rubber-chicken circuit.

School systems would be sharper if they only had some competition. Widget prices would plummet and wages would skyrocket, if only the power of competition were unleashed.

Fox News’ Glenn Beck even wonders if competition from private armies might juice our national defense. “I’d like to give it a whirl,” he says.

The one place where increased competition can’t work — and in fact is too dangerous to attempt — is the Georgia ballot. Republicans and Democrats agree on this point. Over the last 70 years or so, both parties have conspired to make sure that they remain the dominant actors every election cycle. This one included.

Mary Norwood, candidate for Fulton County Commission chairman/AJC

Mary Norwood, candidate for Fulton County Commission chairman/AJC

Since 1988, a small piece of ground has been given up to the Libertarian Party, which can place candidates on the ballot by votes of its state convention. But Georgia law still places a …

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