Archive for the ‘Jim Marshall’ Category

Sonny Perdue takes himself out of 2014 race for Senate

Former Gov. Sonny Perdue has declared himself out of a 2014 contest to replace U.S. Sen. Saxby Chambliss, but placed himself on the side of Republicans who believe the party has become too rigid in its approach.

In a statement e-mailed this morning, the governor declared himself “flattered” by the support that has been offered, but cited his reasons for avoiding the contest: A dozen grandchildren, business obligations and “a loving and devoted wife who has absolutely no interest in living in Washington.” From his statement:

Gov. Sonny Perdue has removed himself from the long list of Republicans considering a 2014 run for the U.S. Senate. Curtis Compton/ccompton@ajc.com

Gov. Sonny Perdue has removed himself from the long list of Republicans considering a 2014 run for the U.S. Senate. Curtis Compton/ccompton@ajc.com

“Our country deserves more than the current dysfunction in Washington D.C. and our party needs to return to problem-solving conservatism. We have an opportunity, led by the examples of Republican Governors across the nation, to prove to the country that we are the party that can rise above the dogma and …

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Jim Marshall to head up U.S. Institute of Peace

Former Georgia congressman Jim Marshall of Macon, a Democrat ousted in 2010 by Republican Austin Scott, has landed a job as presidency of the U.S. Institute of Peace.

Currently lecturing at Princeton University — he was once a law professor at Mercer University, Marshall will assume the job on Sept. 14. He succeeds Richard H. Solomon, former U.S. ambassador to the Philippines, who has led the institute for the last 19 years.

Former Georgia congressman Jim Marshall of Macon/AJC file

Former Georgia congressman Jim Marshall of Macon/AJC file

And what, you may ask, is the U.S. Institute of Peace? From the press release:

Created by Congress in 1984 as an independent federal agency, the Institute is now the leader in training, educating, and implementing programs that help manage conflict through nonviolent means and that create structures to maintain peace in post-conflict situations. Current President Richard Solomon oversaw the expansion of USIP from a small educational and analytical organization into an operational agency with …

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Pinning the future of Democrats in the South on John Barrow

Shannon McCaffrey of the Associated Press has turned a quick profile on the largest Republican target in the redistricting session that just wrapped up in Atlanta:

SAVANNAH, Ga. — Nearly 50 years ago, every congressman from the Deep South was a white Democrat.

Now the U.S. House has just one white Democrat from the five states that comprise the region: Georgia’s John Barrow.

U.S. Rep. John Barrow, D-Ga. at a 2006 forum in Vidalia/AP

U.S. Rep. John Barrow, D-Ga. at a 2006 forum in Vidalia/AP

Barrow last year survived the Republican tide that wiped out 20 white Democratic members of Congress from the across the South, yet his toughest battle may lie ahead. New political maps approved by the Republican-controlled Georgia legislature leave him politically homeless, placing his residence outside the 12th District that he now represents and stripping away the base of his Democratic support — largely African American — along the coast.

His precarious fate raises a larger question: Can white Democrats chart a course back in the Deep South — …

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Jim Marshall, John Linder handed out bonuses as they exited

Former U.S. Rep. Jim Marshall, a Democratic casualty of a GOP surge last November, gave his staffers hefty bonuses on his way out of office, according to today’s Macon Telegraph – as did retiring U.S. Rep. John Linder:

According to an analysis by LegiStorm, a nonpartisan organization that tracks congressional money matters, after losing his re-election bid, Marshall doled out more than $230,000 more in salary than in previous quarters — money that was then divided among 17 departing staffers.

In some cases, the staffers had taken leave to work on his campaign.

Marshall’s was one of the largest percentages of payroll increases of all outgoing members of Congress.

“This is common practice for representatives,” said Doug Moore, a former Marshall spokesman. “When people lose an election and it was not something they were expecting, they have to let their whole staff go. Jim was always very clear with regard to salary. He never paid top of the line for salary even for Capitol Hill. …

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Your morning jolt: A first look at Austin Scott’s divorce papers

The Macon Telegraph this morning has a first look at those 2001 divorce records of Austin Scott.

Keep in mind that these papers were sealed not to keep Democrat Jim Marshall from peeking at them, but in the midst of a Republican primary challenge faced by Scott while he was still a member of the Legislature.

Austin Scott of Tifton was a state lawmaker until his election to Congress in November.  Hyosub Shin, hshin@ajc.com

Austin Scott of Tifton was a state lawmaker until his election to Congress in November. Hyosub Shin, hshin@ajc.com

From the Telegraph:

Formerly sealed court records from Rep. Austin Scott’s 2001 divorce from Anna Leigh Jordan contain charges and countercharges but provide little evidence to confirm or support those claims.

Scott, R-Ga., who represents the 8th Congressional District, took office in January. Local Democratic party activist Amy Morton filed a request in September 2010 to unseal the documents during Scott’s successful campaign against former congressman Jim Marshall.

An initial review of the 268-page divorce file shows that Scott stated Jordan, referred to in …

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Austin Scott’s 2001 divorce papers ordered unsealed

The following is likely to take a news cycle or so to play out. From the Macon Telegraph:

Papers for Rep. Austin Scott’s 2001 divorce have been ordered unsealed by a Tift County Superior Court judge.

Judge Bill Reinhardt signed an order Thursday night releasing the records, which were sealed in July 2004 at the request of Scott, a Republican who represents the 8th Congressional District, and his former wife, Anna Leigh Gooch, now Leigh Jordan. Scott and Jordan withdrew their objections to unsealing the documents Feb. 4.

The documents were processed late Friday afternoon by the Tift County Clerk of Courts Gwen Pate.
“They are available for public viewing,” Pate said shortly before the office closed for the weekend. Attempts to obtain a copy of the records Friday afternoon were unsuccessful….

Local Democratic party activist Amy Morton and Macon attorney Carmel Sanders filed a request in September 2010 to unseal the documents, and after a delay in serving papers an initial …

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Your morning jolt: Rare agreement on the flaws of an illegal immigration bill

D.A. King, the illegal immigration activist, and representatives of the Georgia Association of Latino Elected Official get along like a house on fire.

If that house is also filled with kegs of gunpowder and roofing nails.

State officials have been known to insist that King and Jerry Gonzales, GALEO’s executive director, sit on opposite sides of the room at hearings.

So when the two sides agree on anything to do with immigration, we must pay attention. This morning’s topic is SB 40, state Sen. Jack Murphy’s attempt to require all businesses in Georgia to use the federal computer registry called E-Verify – or something like it – to make sure their hires are legal U.S. residents.

The bill includes this exemption, presumably intended for farmers:

This Code section shall not apply to any person or entity who has filed an H-1 or H-2 application, or similar type of application, with the United States Department of Labor.

Last week, King labeled the loophole “preposterous.”

“On …

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Your morning jolt: Discordant notes over Port of Savannah funding

This bipartisan effort to obtain federal funding for the dredging of the Port of Savannah has some serious messaging kinks to work out.

On Thursday morning, members of the metro Atlanta business community held a kind of rally to emphasize the need for federal funding of the $551 million project. The dredging, needed to accommodate larger ships passing through the Panama Canal, has been identified it as the most economically important infrastructure project in the state.

Mayor Kasim Reed of far-away Atlanta has committed to acting as a kind of liaison to the White House, dropping these details to my AJC colleague Dan Chapman:

Reed, in an interview Thursday, said he met four months ago at the White House with one of the president’s top domestic policy advisers to discuss the deepening. He brought along Alec Poitevint, a prominent Georgia Republican and the GPA’s chairman, and Curtis Foltz, the ports’ executive director. Reed will make another White House pitch in January.

“It’s …

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Your morning jolt: State cuts to unemployment benefits on the table in January?

Huge changes in unemployment benefits could be in the works when the General Assembly convenes in January. The state owes $418 million – and ranks 17th among a list of 32 debtor states – for money borrowed from Uncle Sam to cover payments to the jobless.

State Sen.-elect Fran Millar, R-Dunwoody, was interviewed by Lori Geary with Channel 2 Action News:

Millar said that total grows to $1.1 billion by the end of 2013 if the state does not make changes to taxes or how it pays benefits.

“Most of your elected officials, certainly in the General Assembly, I don’t think have a clue about the magnitude of this obligation,” said Millar.

“We need to be talking about fixing it; we need to be talking about fixing it right now.”

The fixes aren’t easy. If Georgia’s current 10 percent unemployment rate doesn’t improve then tax hikes for employers and benefit cuts for the unemployed must be on the table, according to Millar.

The video:

***
Kennesaw State University’s most famous student, …

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Your morning jolt: Cagle flies to Macon to put down revolt

Lt. Gov. Casey Cagle has flown down to Macon this morning to argue against an effort by Republican Senate leaders to strip him of his authority to control that chambers’ business.

Newly re-elected Lt. Gov. Casey Cagle. Bob Andres/bandres@ajc.com

Newly re-elected Lt. Gov. Casey Cagle. Bob Andres/bandres@ajc.com

The Senate GOP caucus has gathered on the campus of Mercer University to vote on an effort to return to a system first enacted under Lt. Gov. Mark Taylor, a Democrat.

Senate leaders of the chamber – including President pro tem Tommie Williams, R-Lyons, Majority Leader Chip Rogers, R-Woodstock, and Cecil Staton, R-Macon – want changes in the chambers rules that would give control over the flow to a committee of senators.

Cagle was initially not invited to attend the meeting. But Cagle spokesman Ben Fry said an invitation arrived at noon Thursday – shortly after the attempted palace coup became public.

We’re told that the vote, expected by 1 p.m. today, is close – and could hinge on newly elected members to the Senate.

The irony, of …

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