How Ga. Republicans might hold off a demographic decline

The shrinking white vote that doomed Mitt Romney on Tuesday has sparked a sobering national debate over who should be allowed inside an expanded Republican tent – and what the invitations should look like.

According to exit polling, white voters made up 72 percent of the U.S. electorate, another step in a well-documented decline.

We won’t have a racial breakdown of the statewide vote for several weeks. But among all those registered, white voters for the first time made up less than 60 percent of the Georgia electorate.

With the right candidate, some Democrats think Georgia can be a player in the 2016 presidential contest. Realistic contention in a race for governor could require more time – though not much.
Georgia, like the rest of the country, is quickly entering a period in which every demographic group will have to form an alliance with another if it is to succeed politically.

So what can be done to extend the 10-year Republican reign in Georgia? Curiously, the first move goes to 60 Democratic members of the 180-member House, who gather Monday at the state
Capitol to select their officers. Stacy Abrams of Atlanta will remain House Democratic leader.

Party elders are worried that the caucus, now comprised of a large African-American majority, won’t recognize the need to include white lawmakers in its leadership.

It is a subtle question – the public does not care. But those who still finance and otherwise prop up the beleaguered party understand that when Democrats put on a segregated face, they allow Republicans to do the same.

The second move may belong to Gov. Nathan Deal. But don’t take my word for it. This comes from Ben Jealous, president of the NAACP, who on Thursday unveiled a poll of 1,400 African-Americans in four states, taken in the days leading up to the election. Georgia was one of those four.

President Barack Obama earned 45 percent of the Georgia vote on Tuesday, only a point or so off his 2008 performance. According to the NAACP poll, enthusiasm for re-electing the country’s first black president accounted for about 5 percentage points in Georgia this year.

Democrats “must quickly figure out how to motivate these voters who – if Obama is not at the top of the ticket – simply go away,” Jealous said.

Republicans in Georgia, on the other hand, must find a way to appeal to a significant number of black voters if they’re to thrive long-term.

That may sound futile. When it comes to issues such as civil rights and equality, 87 percent of African-Americans polled declared that GOP concern was either “just talk,” or simply didn’t exist.

But Jealous pointed to one chink in the Democratic armor. When it came to reducing the “mass incarceration” of black men in America, only 30 percent thought Democrats were putting much effort to the issue.

This is the Republican opening, Jealous said, pointing out that two governors, Deal in Georgia and Rick Perry in Texas, have taken the lead in this area. They prefer to call it “criminal justice reform,” and have approached it largely as a cost concern.

The problem, according to Jealous: “The Republican party hasn’t done a very good job of talking about an issue on which they’ve led.”

If you talk to Democrats in Georgia, what keeps them awake at night is the possibility that Republicans might have time to snatch victory from the jaws of demographic-driven defeat.

Deal stands for re-election in 2014. Odds are that Democrats will be unable to offer anything more than token opposition. Once he’s past a Republican primary, Deal would be free to maneuver – and Democrats fear that he might take aim at their African-American base, and skim off enough black voters to stave off GOP decline for a few additional years.

It is a topic that makes Deal aides nervous. The governor’s close relationship with Atlanta Mayor Kasim Reed has already become a source of conversation within the GOP base.

But Deal appears to recognize the possibilities of 2014. “There are things that are considered to be important by the electorate that do not necessarily hinge on whose idea it was. For our state, criminal justice reform is a classic example of that. It certainly bridged the party divide,” he said Thursday. ”I’m going to encourage the [Republican] party at the state level to do that.”

By itself, whether called “mass incarceration” or “criminal justice reform,” the topic isn’t a barn-burner likely to change 50 years of voting habits among black voters. But add education, and you may have the start of something.

On Tuesday, Amendment One passed with an ease that surprised even Deal, taking two out of every three African-American votes in metro Atlanta. This despite official opposition to the charter school measure from the state Democratic party and stalwarts like the Rev. Joe Lowery.

That has the makings of a new wedge issue. Look for Republicans to use it.

- By Jim Galloway, Political Insider

For instant updates, follow me on Twitter, or connect with me on Facebook.

63 comments Add your comment

mountain man

November 10th, 2012
9:32 am

“On Tuesday, Amendment One passed with an ease that surprised even Deal, taking two out of every three African-American votes in metro Atlanta. This despite official opposition to the charter school measure from the state Democratic party and stalwarts like the Rev. Joe Lowery.”

What is says to me, and this a very good thing, is that people are studying the issues and voting with their MINDS and not just following the party line. Votes such as the T-SPLOST vote and this amendment vote make me trust the political system again.

Don Abernethy

November 10th, 2012
9:35 am

I my opinion Republicans (conservatives) will never be in the White House again. We are out numbered by the liberals and they are growing and we are not. I am in favor of a new party. The Republicans and Tea Party are no match for the Democrats. Someone needs to start a new party.

morn

November 10th, 2012
9:39 am

What scares liberals is the fact that we are not represented in congress or in the state halls. Our voices go unheard because of gerrymandering by a white conservative majority that plays upon the fear and hate of the white population; when Democrats put token candidates only up than that state has become a one party state and that is not what was intended by the founders. The gop may as well rename the party to the Dixiecrat because their message is the same, and we have the most corrupt congressman in history as governor now after 8 years of fee hikes and tax hikes by a man who was just as corrupt.
We, liberals, should have representation for our views but as long as you have rethuglicans in the state house it won’t happen, they play on the fear and hate of the common masses who are uneducated and believe that the bible is literal truth

Pete

November 10th, 2012
9:52 am

The GOP must broaden its base if it hopes to become a national party again. Here is a breakdown of the vote for President that Obama got: women 55%; blacks: 93%; Asians 73%; Hispanics 71%; Jews 71%. People vote their self interests, so the GOP needs to work on their party platform to be more welcoming to these groups.

Pete

November 10th, 2012
10:07 am

And he got 60% of the vote of the millenium generation (ages 18-29) which doesn’t bode welll for the future of the GOP.

Ministry of Truth

November 10th, 2012
10:10 am

Hyperinflation is the only way to pay for the debt created in the last decade – rapidly rising interest rates as well as food and fuel prices. The fiscal cliff will come with or without the actions of Congress. We have to repay the bank bailouts, bad mortgages, auto industry, etc.

The Democrats will own that economic legacy in the next two election cycles. That is what should keep them up at night.

Bullseye

November 10th, 2012
10:44 am

Democrats don”t own the debt in total Mot; however, they will clean up what the Chimp and the credit card republicans created. Own that.

John

November 10th, 2012
10:58 am

There’s nothing the Republican Party can do about the ignorance of the other half of the country. Sure, they need to tweak around the edges (immigration reform, etc.), but for the most part Republican principles are time-tested and true: lower taxes, self-responsibility, freedom, etc. The ignorant half of the country will need something to run TO when their plan doesn’t work out. At that time, the Republican Party should be waiting with unwavering principles.

If your kids are misbehaving, you don’t change your parenting style to accomodate them. Adults know what’s best for kids. Usually, kids come to understand their parents were right all along, it just took them touching the hot stove a few times.

Same analogy.

double

November 10th, 2012
11:20 am

The amendment (1)passed from lack of understanding what it would change.Not all read,study these amendments.As some never give thought to their vote other than the President and others representing their district.

Mary Elizabeth

November 10th, 2012
11:26 am

Thomas Jefferson: “I have sworn upon the altar of God eternal hostility against every form of tyranny over the mind of man.”
——————————————————————————

The demographics of diversity will continue to grow in Georgia, as in the nation. There is no going back. As minorities gain power in Georgia, I only hope that they will transcend the human tendency to gather self-oriented power, unto itself, that usually promotes smallness of vision. I wrote a day or so ago on this blog, regarding the passage of Amendment One, that “the penchant for looking after #1, instead of the common good, is not limited to any race or ethnic group.” Likewise, the thirst for power is not limited to any race or ethnic group.

I ask – whoever is in power, or whatever coalition of groups will hold power in Georgia in the future – that that governing body consider carefully my thoughts below, regarding the securing of freedom of thought in the education of all of Georgia’s students, indefintely. Freedom of thought must remain the core of education and of our democratic republic.

Please be aware of what can happen to freedom of thought and speech if public charter schools become unduly influenced by those corporations that may manage them, just as workers in various corporations were unduly influenced by some managers to vote a certain way in the presidential election of 2012. Take a moment to reflect on that possibility’s happening to public education, if safeguards are not set up against the intrusion into freedom of thought in public education, especially as may occur in some charter schools managed by those for-profit companies which promote ideological views.

Hiram

November 10th, 2012
11:32 am

Obama, 2012, Hillary and Bill in 2016 and 2020, Chelsea, 2024 and 2030…

Kris

November 10th, 2012
11:53 am

GA Governor Ballot 2014

Shady DEAL..(D)(R)….0

Charles Darwin….(?)….1xxx

Micky Mouse. (I)…. .5

Repukes…..0

Democrats 10000000000

Conscious

November 10th, 2012
12:01 pm

With the changing demographics in Georgia, Governor Deal is one of the last GOP governors in Georgia. Between 2020 and 2024 when all of those “anchor babies” whose parents Georgia’s GOP has mistreated through its harsh stance on immigrants come age and the children of the ignored Asian small business owners will be adults and voting reliably for Democratic candidates. GOP in Georgia enjoy your last days and times in Georgia. A new more inclusive and fair political system is on the short horizon and you can’t stop it!

yuzeyurbrane

November 10th, 2012
12:04 pm

Demographics are indeed the big factor in Georgia as elsewhere. I doubt the base of the Ga. GOP has the capacity to bury their hatreds (plural, it is not just against blacks). But Georgia had the lowest percent for Romney of any state he carried. It was close enough to make you wonder what would have happened if Obama had put any resources into Georgia. 4 more points and it would have been as high as North Carolina where Obama placed a lot of chips. Jim, you did not place enough emphasis on the Hispanic demographic. You only have to look at public school attendance in counties like Gwinnett and Hall and cities like Dalton to know that all of these kids are U.S. citizens who will start having a big electoral impact when they turn 18. Therefore, the current black leadership of the Democratic Party must also make a decision to look beyond the interests of their own racial group and more actively groom budding Hispanic leaders for a role in the Party. If they do so, and the GOP continues its anti-Hispanic policies at the state level, in about 10 years (or maybe even less) demographic changes will start materially impacting Georgia politics. Think Democratic control of Gwinnett and Hall Counties, significant Hispanic turnout in many other counties and real challenges to sitting Tea Party Congressmen in north Georgia.

SBinF

November 10th, 2012
12:08 pm

“There’s nothing the Republican Party can do about the ignorance of the other half of the country. Sure, they need to tweak around the edges (immigration reform, etc.), but for the most part Republican principles are time-tested and true: lower taxes, self-responsibility, freedom, etc. The ignorant half of the country will need something to run TO when their plan doesn’t work out. At that time, the Republican Party should be waiting with unwavering principles.”

GOP voters label everyone who disagrees with them a stupid, lazy moocher. And you wonder why you lost the election on Tuesday?

Ironic that the GOP are the party of personal responsibility….they’ve been blaming everyone but themselves for Mitt’s drubbing.

honested

November 10th, 2012
12:09 pm

Is there any truth to the rumor the gop will offer tax incentives to encourage an influx of individuals from AL, MS, KY, and W.VA into Georgia?

Long term, that would be their only hope. Then those other states would ting Blue, and we could maintain our ‘last place’ position.

todd h

November 10th, 2012
12:10 pm

another solution to the republicans demographic decline is nominating marco rubio in 2016. solves several issues all at once.

Corey

November 10th, 2012
12:14 pm

Could it be that after 30+ years of the “Conservative Movement” the country is in no better shape? However, said movement has created the likes of Limbaugh, Hannity, Boortz, Ingram et. al. who spew venom daily which causes blacks, Jews, Hispanics, gays, Asians, people with graduate degrees and single white females to recoil. …just sayin

M

November 10th, 2012
12:16 pm

If they change their stance on immigration reform, it won’t be too long before they tell us that they’ve ALWAYS favored a path to citizenship and various forms of amnesty, and only the Democrats shamelessly pander to minorities for votes.

LMAO

November 10th, 2012
12:17 pm

All you have to do is read the comments of those on the right. They are generally devisive and hate filled. The reality has not set in. Own your future at your peril. They have been conditioned with lies and half truths from their own “conservative entertainment complex” as David Frum described it. Limbaugh, FOX, Rove, talk radio has doomed the conservative movement. The rank and file conservative has gone far right as they “purchase” values from those who play upon their fears of one day being in the minority.

Look at the 2012 Election Map for President and the Slave States Map. The differences are minor. I hold fast to my thought that Barack Obama is President of the United States because its God’s Will. Our journey as a nation has to be taken as one under God hand in hand as fellow human beings regardless of race.

Dunwoody

November 10th, 2012
12:24 pm

Nationally, Asian Americans voted for Obama by a 3:1 margin. Clearly, the GOP’s message of workers vs. moochers isn’t working.

Mary Elizabeth

November 10th, 2012
12:34 pm

Overall, middle and south Georgia counties that voted for Gov. Romney did so by a 60% margin for Romney to 40% margin for President Obama. However, north Georgia counties (in the mountain areas of Georgia) voted for Gov. Romney by a 80% margin for Gov. Romney to a 20% margin for President Obama. The far north area of Georgia, it appears, remains a rather “closed society.” I believe residents, there, are probably reinforcing one another to think in the same way. I saw that kind of “peer pressure” of acceptance manifest itself during the Jim Crow era of Georgia. I hope that the 20% who are in the minority of thinking in north Georgia will voice their opinions to their friends and neighbors, and that newspapers in north Georgia will present editorials from different perspectives.

DLink

November 10th, 2012
12:54 pm

Lowering taxes after starting a later proven unjustified 10 yr war. The Patriot Act, limiting personal freedoms while enlarging the role of government in peoples personal dealings (Patriotically, apparently). Fondling children at the airports (might be wearing a suicide bomb vest). So much, so wrong. – Republican

No child left behind, how did that work out? Not just Atlanta, but all over. CIPA, PIPA. and many others. Health Care, but not single payer, just make every fight it out for insurance, maybe that’ll work out right? I’m sure I’ve left out a few, I’ve listened to the people complain. – Democrats

Many good ideas, protection from terrorism, educate the people, ensure a healthy work force etc. Lousy implementation of the ideas. We should take what we have and reform and refine what we’ve be given to work with by a further and further divided Congress. Government controlled private prisons are bad business. Government controlled private schools for general education, again bad business. Listen closely to the needs of the local people and needs. Government is not a business and should not be run by them. Government is not by the business, it is for the people. Business is mostly Monopoly for the wealthy looking be wealthier, not for the people. Just my thoughts on the matter.

B. Thenet

November 10th, 2012
1:02 pm

The state Democratic Party is an embarrassment. While the demographics look promising, the incompetence of the party will hold the Democrats back.

The only thing that could change the course would be a massive intervention from the DNC to toss out the bums and modernize their operations. Seeing how Georgia could be a swing state in the next two elections, it would be well worth the effort.

GaBlue

November 10th, 2012
1:06 pm

Amendment One passed because the wording on the ballot in no way explained or resembled the actual situation created by the amendment. If the proponents of this quasi-privatized system were HONEST, the wording on the ballot would have read: “Would you like to create another bureaucratic agency in our government, appointed-not-elected, to make decisions about your community but not answerable to you in any way?”

Truth does not serve Governor Shady nor the interests of the ruling-class Republicans in Georgia. My advice to them: Keep doing what you’re doing. Don’t change a THING.

ABC

November 10th, 2012
1:24 pm

John, you sir are the precisely the reason why the GOP lost. And probably the reason that unless you stop your hate and fear mongering, the GOP will never occupy the White House again.

There are MILLIONS upon MILLIONS of fiscally conservative Americans that are scared to death of your hatred. I would love to vote for a fiscally conservative candidate just as soon as they STOP trying to sell me their “values” on things that are none of your business (i.e. my uterus and who I sleep with)

Been Around-Done That!

November 10th, 2012
1:28 pm

Amendment One passed…not because of Nathan Deal or his cronies. It passed because parents and grandparents wanted better educational opportunities than public shools are currently providing. Until educators and PTA leaders put more emphasis on excellence than on their own personal concerns nothing will get better…at least as far as public education is concerned. Our country has fallen behind other countries in the quality of education and it reflects in the loss of technical supremecy. I had a better education at the end of the sixth grade than many of today’s high school graduates have today. At least I was able to read, write, and do math. And that wasover 70 years ago! Get real educators or move over and tlet private schools do the job!

Truth Squad

November 10th, 2012
1:32 pm

The truth is that Senator Rubio is not going to help the GOP win with Latinos or other people of color. Those who do not understand that Cubans are different than Mexicans who are different than Puerto Ricans are in for a big surprise.

It’s not the messenger, it’s the message!

The voter base of the GOP has managed to pull the last two nominees far to the right of who they truly were. There is no reason to believe that shift will not happen to the 2016 nominee who will also suffer the same fate as McCain and Romney.

The money base of the GOP got taken for a ride and are going to have a harder time beating up on a Democratic nominee who cannot be said to be a “Kenyan, Muslim, anticolonist”.

Also, Obamacare will have been instituted and people will see that it is the right direction to go and the Republicans will have no suitable answer for the issue of health care (a huge issue with people of color at every income level).

Lastly, most voters are women. They like to make their own decisions about their bodies. They do not believe in different levels of rape. Most moms believe in science and mathematics and want their kids to be taught accordingly. The GOP is on the wrong side of all of these issues and will continue to suffer for it even if the GOP adds a female to their ticket (just ask Mrs. Palin).

David Hoffman

November 10th, 2012
1:48 pm

The Georgia GOP does not have the ability to lead when it is needed. Take alcoholic beverages sales. If the Georgia GOP had been truly forward looking and respected individual responsibility as much as they say they do, the Georgia legislature and the governor would have passed a statewide law that mandated alcohol sales being allowed 7 days a week by any business that could gain a liquor license, which would be expanded to include grocery stores and convenience stores. The same as Arizona, Louisiana, Missouri, Nebraska, and Nevada (24hrs/day, 7 days/week). It is sad when Missouri and Nebraska are more forward and mature about alcohol consumption than Georgia. This results from the GOP pandering to religious conservatives in Georgia, who think everyone should be a fundamentalist Southern Baptist. Oh yes, they allowed local voting on the issue. They did it only because the bad economic times pushed them to do something to help the tourist industry in Georgia a small amount. To truly increase price competition in ALL alcoholic beverage sales, by eliminating the licensing differentiation between beer/wine and hard liquor was too difficult for the free market supporting Georgia GOP. Why support a bunch of hypocrites?

Ray

November 10th, 2012
1:49 pm

All the republicans have to do to expand their base is to listen to the paid entertainers on Fox news and do the opposite.

cc

November 10th, 2012
2:08 pm

“With the right candidate, some Democrats think Georgia can be a player in the 2016 presidential contest.”

That’s a hoot!

There won’t be enough left of this country to even bother with a presidential election . . . if there is even the possibility oh having an election in 2016.

Kris

November 10th, 2012
2:27 pm

Hello cc….Cheer up Big Bird is safe. Big bird will stay away from GA, just to be safe

cc

November 10th, 2012
2:40 pm

Hi Kris, I still have plans of my own for Big Bird come Thanksgiving!

[...] told the Atlanta Journal-Constitution that Democrats “must quickly figure out how to motivate [...]

td

November 10th, 2012
3:27 pm

The white vote is split in the north due to the unions and this is one of the main reasons Obama won the election. Georgia has no such strong unions (nor does the south) and the vast majority of whites remain Republican.

Republicans have to reach out to Hispanics on social issues to split the vote more along the lines of 50/50 and do a better job of messaging to them that their is a difference between legal and illegal immigration.

[...] told the Atlanta Journal-Constitution that Democrats “must quickly figure out how to motivate [...]

Truth is

November 10th, 2012
3:42 pm

2014 is the year of the first Libertarian governor in Georgia because Nathan Deal will not be re-elected.

cc

November 10th, 2012
3:58 pm

td:

After giving the matter considerable thought, I think it impossible for a true conservative to completely divorce the fiscal and social issues facing us as a political entity. ObamaCare, taxpayer-funded abortions, open borders as we have now via enforcement, the vast expansion of welfare, commitment to “green” energy to the exclusion of oil, gas and coal and an ever-expanding EPA figure greatly in the fiscal affairs of our nation. $1.5 trillion dollar annual deficits and a ballooning national debt are issues that must be reckoned with, if the opportunity to do so again is ever offered. Frankly, I don’t think the opportunity will ever be available again. By 2016, there will be nothing left to salvage, if indeed elections are even held in 2016. Despite the belief that everything will continue as normal, it will not. A weakened military, secret deals and “leading from behind” makes us all too vulnerable. Failing to understand this is ignoring the obvious.

Georgia , The "New Mississippi"

November 10th, 2012
3:59 pm

The Georgia GOP is dominated by men with low morals and mis-guided value systems. The redrawn districts will make it easy for them to maintain control of the state . They will continue to gut it until people move away and let them have it ALL BY THEMSELVES.

luangtom

November 10th, 2012
4:06 pm

It is not so much Liberals outnumbering Conservatives. It is that Conservatives within the Republican Party did not offer anything to young voters or minority and female voters. This most recent vote should tell the Republicans to keep Church and State separate. Pandering to the extreme-right religious groups does not bring in enough votes to be worthy of the effort. Why did over 3-million Republican voters not vote this time? The party did not offer them something they felt worthy of their vote. Period. Pandering to the extreme in any direction only alienates the vote of the middle or center of the voting block. If they do not feel there is anything to support, why vote? Many did not pick the lesser of two evils, so to speak, they chose to not vote at all. They had better tell the Republican Party alot.

cc

November 10th, 2012
4:08 pm

Georgia , The “New Mississippi”:

So . . . when are you leaving?

Jon Lester

November 10th, 2012
4:19 pm

Actually, cc, you and td are perfect examples of a party that has been, in the words of David Frum, fleeced, exploited and lied to by the conservative entertainment complex. You should try to rehabilitate yourselves now, before more people mistake your gullibility for a severe lack of faculty.

[...] told the Atlanta Journal-Constitution that Democrats “must quickly figure out how to motivate [...]

Truth Squad

November 10th, 2012
4:39 pm

Merely “reaching out” isn’t going trick those not now voting Republican to change their minds. The idea that anti-choice, anti-gay is an in with Latinos demonstrates a lack of information about how the community feels about the issue. Most Latinos are for marriage equity and are for the freedom for women to make their own health decisions.

The Latino community, or rather, communities, are squarely behind Obamacare. They do not believe in the everybody for themselves, social darwinistic ideology that Republicans like to preach.

Latino voters heard what Republicans said this election cycle. They felt something other than “reaching out”. It is an insult to those voters for Republicans to pretend they didn’t mean what they said and are only playing nice to shrink the margin of loss in order to be competitive.

Republicans believe that the country has “lost” something because the minority population continues to vote and reject the policies Republicans offer. No amount of “reaching out” is going to alter that reality.

Kris

November 10th, 2012
4:47 pm

Truth is

“”2014 is the year of the first Libertarian governor in Georgia because Nathan Deal will not be re-elected.”

Ditto…he should be prosecuted. Libertarian…humm…The right person I might take a walk on the wild side.

cc….Bird good…Yellow bird just got pardoned….Please give him a chance.

td loser

November 10th, 2012
5:01 pm

td was talking about Obama will lose the race what happen scary old man..
Obama Obama Obama 4 more years.
Democrate senate 4 more years.
Georgia will turm blue 2014

ANGRY AS HELL

November 10th, 2012
5:49 pm

td — I predict that between 2016 and 2018, the Democrat party in Georgia will once again be a contender for statewide offices. Republicans (or should I say “conservatives”) have done a terrible job of opening themselves up and sincerely welcoming the changes in Georgia demographics. By the year 2030, this entire country will be “majority minority,” with whites trailing far behind. I heard Rush and Hannity the other day actually trying to convince their listeneres that because Condy Rice and Clarence Thomas are Republicans, that shows the GOP is wide open to minorities. That is just bull_ _t !! If you will recall the RNC this summer, it looked like a klan rally — nothing but white faces and mostly male white faces. The DNC, on the other hand, looked more like America looks today. You need to save all of your GOP memorabilia because it will soon be worth something as antique artifacts of a political party which ceased being relevant. I wouldn’t be surprised to see noted Georgia Republicans starting to jump parties and once again becoming Democrats by about 2018.

cc

November 10th, 2012
6:12 pm

ANGRY AS HELL:

“By the year 2030, this entire country will be “majority minority,” with whites trailing far behind.”

That means that we will be the minority, and as such we will be entitled to all the benefits of Affirmative Action, right?

cc

November 10th, 2012
6:14 pm

Kris:

“cc….Bird good…Yellow bird just got pardoned….Please give him a chance.”

Just for you . . . tell Big Bird he’s safe for this year, but he is on the calendar for Thanksgiving, 2013!

td

November 10th, 2012
6:15 pm

ANGRY AS HELL

November 10th, 2012
5:49 pm

Are you so oblivious of seeing what is actual going on in the country? Companies are laying off people left and right due to Obamacare and that we are heading towards another recession. More and more companies are making workers part time so they do not have to pay Obamacare. The Democrats insistence in deep military cuts will result in 100’s of thousand more people being laid off in the next year.

Republican’s are now in control of 30 governorships (largest ever held), totally control 29 state legislatures and control one chamber in another 6 states.

Republicans will not lose control of the US HOR’s for at least 10 more years due to Republican control of state houses and Gerrymandered districts. There were three of 4 districts in Georgia that the opposition party did not even run anyone because they knew it was useless. This repeated itself all over the country. In 2014, there are 7 US Senators up for re election in states that Romney won and there are no Republican Senators up for re election in states that Obama won.