TV ad for charter schools puts a young lady in uniform

Here’s the TV ad that supporters of the November ballot issue on charter schools are riding with, starting today:

Autumn – we don’t have her last name – is wearing an Ivy Prep uniform and is a student there, campaign spokesman Bert Brantley confirmed.

The Ivy Prep connection is important, as my AJC colleague Nancy Badertscher explains today:

But nowhere is the amendment debate being more closely watched than in Gwinnett, where one in 10 Georgia public school students are enrolled and where, arguably, the dispute began a few years ago.

Gwinnett school officials filed a lawsuit in 2010 challenging the constitutionality of the Georgia Charter School Commission, an independent body created by lawmakers in 2008 and given the power to approve charter school applications that local school boards had rejected.

The suit, which cost the district $300,000, followed the commission’s approval of an application from Ivy Preparatory Academy in Norcross that the Gwinnett school board had rejected in 2007. The commission also redirected about $1 million annually from the district to the school. The suit included six other school districts that had seen some of their funding redirected to charter schools they had not approved.

- By Jim Galloway, Political Insider

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70 comments Add your comment

Georgia

October 25th, 2012
1:11 pm

Where are the truant officers? Where’s the supervision?

Get Smart?

October 25th, 2012
1:16 pm

When do these kids go to school? They’re at the capitol, at every press conference, taping radio spots and now doing TV commercials. Just another example of what this out of state money will do, in addition to permanently changing our constitution and putting control of our schools in the hands of a few. Ivy Prep students may not be in school but voters, get smart. Vote no!

Mitch

October 25th, 2012
1:31 pm

Hey “Get Smart?” (which you obviously still have a ways to go before getting there), maybe the ad was not filmed during school hours. I know you guys want all the control and power and money, but now you want to control what kids do while they’re not in school too? Your time would be better spent telling GAE and PAGE to stop using school resources to spread your vote no propaganda.

SayWhat?

October 25th, 2012
1:56 pm

@Georgia and @Get Smart? You all ever heard of videotape? Do you think because you watched the video during school hours that the student is over at the studio taping live? You are just jealous that these young students at Ivy Prep are knocking the tops out of student achievement tests–besting the Gwinnett district. And, yes, those students and their parents care about keeping their school open! Just like John Barge and Alvin Wilbanks, they have a right to free speech and to let their views be known. Where are you? In front of the computer all the time?

Happy Democrat

October 25th, 2012
1:58 pm

I am shocked at my own party for the denomination of these children, parents, and schools. If we as a society are incapable of doing better in public K-12 education, most especially for those who are economically challenged, then who are we attempting to serve?

I do not care about who delivers quality, so long as there is quality. Where have we seen the fewest examples of quality in public education? APS, DeKalb, Clayton, Bibb, Chatham, and Richmond school systems come to mind. And these areas are high minority, high democrat areas.

I say vote “YES” and lets add another possible avenue for kids to succeed.

FairLady

October 25th, 2012
2:11 pm

As a parent, this ad gives me hope for our state. I donot understand all the opposition.
This is such a small percentage of the educational budget, and it may actually help some students struggling in their current schools It may not be the answer to ALL the problems we have in education in GA, but I voted YES to a step in the right direction. All the positive things that we can do to provide quality educational choices in GA sounds good to parents like me. And if Gov Deal and 2/3 of our GA House and Senate think this amendment is good for GA, then voting YES is supporting them too.

Public School Parent

October 25th, 2012
2:40 pm

What a manipulative use of cute kids! Despite the rhetoric of “Autumn” and those supporting Amendment #1–we don’t need the amendment to have good charter schools in GA. Current law allows local school boards and the state school board to create charter schools. Amendment #1 IS about funding new state charter schools at the expense of local charter schools and local public schools. The proponents’ (particularly the for-profit companies looking to get rich in GA) need to find another way to pay for their government expansion without taking money from MY kid’s charter school! Reject this pathetic money and power grab parents! These folks are selling snake oil.

GaBlue

October 25th, 2012
2:49 pm

“As a parent, this ad gives me hope for our state. I donot understand all the opposition.”

Well, DUH! The ad was paid for by outside interests who will profit from this. If you base your opinion on the ads, or on the prejudicial wording on the ballot, it’s going to sound like an awesome idea! See, that’s the expertise $$ buys from advertising professionals. D’OH!

If you’d do your research and base your opinion on the entire body of information available, you might have a more comprehensive understanding and come to a different conclusion. Or is that too much trouble to undertake for the children of Georgia?

honested

October 25th, 2012
2:58 pm

Or we could do the only thing that repeated, replicable research shows an overwhelming improvement in educational outcome which is mandate and fund SMALLER CLASS SIZES.

Of course, that costs more and doesn’t pander to any artificial ideology.

The Facts

October 25th, 2012
3:06 pm

. If you were ranking Gwinnett middle schools, Ivy Prep would be tied for last in terms of students exceeding standards.

A look at CRCT results…
6th Grade:
In Reading, Ivy Prep was ranked 8th among Gwinnett’s 28 middle schools in terms of students “exceeding” state standards.
In English/Language Arts, Ivy Prep was tied for 12th in terms of “exceeding”.
In Mathematics, Ivy Prep was 16th in terms of “exceeding”.
In Science, Ivy Prep was 8th in terms of “exceeding”.
In Social Studies, Ivy Prep was tied for 10th in terms of “exceeding”.

7th Grade:
In Reading, Ivy Prep was 16th among Gwinnett’s 28 middle schools in terms of “exceeding”.
In English/Language Arts, Ivy Prep was tied for 17th in terms of “exceeding”.
In Mathematics, Ivy Prep was 15th in terms of “exceeding”.
In Science, Ivy Prep was tied for 18th in terms of “exceeding”.
In Social Studies, Ivy Prep was tied for 22nd in terms of “exceeding”.

8th Grade:
In Reading, Ivy Prep was tied for 16th among Gwinnett’s 28 middle schools in terms of “exceeding”.
In English/Language Arts, Ivy Prep was 14th in terms of “exceeding”.
In Mathematics, Ivy Prep was 24th in terms of “exceeding”.
In Science, Ivy Prep was 26th in terms of “exceeding”.
In Social Studies, Ivy Prep was tied for 23rd with two other Gwinnett schools in terms of “exceeding”.

Happy Democrat

October 25th, 2012
3:11 pm

You are the exact person I am talking about GaBlue. You cover your eyes and do not see the tens of thousands of minority children failing all across our state. If you did, you would not give a damn how they are educated, you would only care that they ARE educated.

FairLady

October 25th, 2012
3:45 pm

As a concerned parent, i am more than aware that parents have few choices in Ga if their children are trapped in failing schools based upon their zip code or if their children are not thriving in their current situation. Most of us in my situation cannot afford private schools or can easily move. I cannot wait for these failing schools to get it together. I personally do NOT care about the WHO benefits financially or politically; I care about the success of my children today. This is a great opportunity for a new tool in the tool box to help rebuild GA’s struggling schools. I have done my research, and I am very excited that on election day the voices of concerned parents like me will be heard. Please exercise your right and your children’s right to more school choice and opportunity in GA. Please vote YES for Amendment One We deserve it. Parents are the ultimate local control and our voices will finally be heard. It’s about the children and my children matter!

RAMZAD

October 25th, 2012
4:04 pm

Yes, is the logical vote. If someone kicks you in the face once you don’t ask them to put on some construction boots. You disconnect his knee.

RAMZAD

October 25th, 2012
4:10 pm

Probably; the most curious variable in the Amendment One controversy is African Americans.

We have a long and sometimes bloody history of distrust for local authority. The local police, zoning board, chamber of commerce, PTA, local judiciary, and local school board. We have never been shy about taking matters to the state or federal constitutional deliberation or administrative adjudication, because we have always felt that local authority was up to no good, and frequently we were right- until this nonsensical switch-aroo.

It does not make sense, because African American children are the most likely to be failed by local public academic systems- smallest SAT scores, smallest graduation rates, smallest amounts of academic scholarships, smallest matriculation to college, most likely to wind up in an alternative school, most likely to be murdered during school pursuits, most likely to graduate to prison, most likely to be a baby momma. You name it and we are going to be distinguished for being the worst at what local public school systems say they do or offer. So; you would think African Americans would want to run to the state for refuge. Not this time!

Selfishness; a treasured classic in our race, is at work here. I will explain. Education is one of the few endeavors where African Americans have a foothold. It it not medicine. We are not regularly doctors. It is not the judiciary. We are not frequently lawyers. It is not science and engineering, because we are not frequently scientists, but every African American alive knows a black teacher or school administrator. The public school house is an African American preserve.

So, in order to stay on this preserve African Americans will go to the mat for this local control we always abhor- this time. It is not concern for our students. We were willing to cheat our own out of an education to keep our rank in and our checks from the school house. So, for African Americans, this has nothing to do with the quality of education for black children. The waves of “local control” cheating scandals in predominantly African American districts all over the country proved that eminently well.

It is about the loss of control that will be a necessary condition of passage of Amendment One that blacks fear. We saw what happened to the incumbent mayor and to Michelle Rhee, DC School Superintendent when African American school hegemony was challenged in Washington DC about four years ago. We saw what happened in Chicago last month when attempts were made to tie teacher advancement to student performance.

Amendment One is necessary to break this African American dictatorship in local public school control. We have seen the results of this dictatorship, and it is horrible.

Are people really aware

October 25th, 2012
4:33 pm

Question… Do parents pay for the uniforms???

GaBlue

October 25th, 2012
4:36 pm

Happy Democrat,

(1) I’m calling BS on you being an active Democrat in the State of Georgia. First, we are not all that happy. Second, we know that the people pushing this amendment are a buncha crooks.
(2) Your assumptions are wrong. I believe that ALL the schools should be good, not just schools in more socioeconomically-advantaged neighborhoods. I am all FOR the formation of charter schools when done in such a way as to provide more opportunity, not to exclude students who need more attention from their educators. I believe teaching should be a respected, decent-paying profession, not the scapegoat for all our problems as a society. Newsflash: require more and **compensate** more, and you’ll get better teachers who stick with it longer instead of bailing when they realize how futile it is to make a difference under our current, “do more with less every single year while we blame you for everything” system.
(3) Amending the Constitution to take away local input does nothing to solve the problems. It only creates an appointed board that does not have to answer to anybody but those who appointed them, and can make decisions about where the money goes in Georgia. Taking the communities OUT of the equation entirely is not a solution.

Public School Mom

October 25th, 2012
4:40 pm

honested

October 25th, 2012
4:46 pm

There is a minor elevation in the discourse in that the amendment supporters are no longer bellowing about the influence of the imaginary unions.

Vote for Education, Vote NO!

Georgia

October 25th, 2012
5:19 pm

Charter Schools. There’s a tidal wave of money behind it. Do you really want to discourage the entrepreneurial mutations of our educational revolutions?

East Cobb RINO, Inc. (LLC)

October 25th, 2012
5:42 pm

Considering that a Charter school may or may not physically reside in the zone where a child would attend a public school, how would the poor and disadvantaged children get to/from the Charter school? Public school buses? I can see the logistical and cost nightmares that would be. Do the Charter schools have their own buses? I can see the logistical and cost nightmares that would be. So if there is not bus service, how do kids get to a Charter school? Wealthy & upper middle class parents have more flexibility to drive their kids to/from school than lower class families. So if the lower class cannot enroll their kids in a Charter school due to transportation issues, who is left to fill these slots? All the white children (pictured above with 1 token black) from wealthy & upper middle class families.

Eddie Hall

October 25th, 2012
5:50 pm

EC RINO, Thank you, my point exactly. Even if the schools are racially diverese, just hide and watch while they become “seperate but equal” based on socio-economic status. There are problems with the system, but THIS is not the solution! VOTE NO!

CHARTER MOM

October 25th, 2012
6:06 pm

East Cobb Rino, Inc – Where there is a will there is a way. Yes, buses would be great, but we do not have them so we work with what we have. We have a great carpool system set up with our parents.

My child has more diversity in her Charter School than she ever did in our public schools.

GA Blue – The existance of Cherokee Charter Academy has already forced the Cherokee County BOE to offer CHOICE within their county, Cherokee Acadamies. Something they have fought the 25 years I have lived here. Competition is good and will force other schools to compete to be better.

Many Boards of Education don’t want the scutiny that Charter Schools have. If a Charter does not produce they close. With successful charters parents will begin to question to question and investigate why their local school does not perform as well. If it were not for the State approving CCA there still would be no Charters in this county and no Cherokee Acadamies.

Vote yes

crankee-yankee

October 25th, 2012
6:35 pm

Mitch
October 25th, 2012
1:31 pm

You are sorely misinformed if you think the NEA and PAGE receive public school funding. Please share your source for proving that statement.

GaBlue

October 25th, 2012
6:51 pm

CHARTER MOM,

I appreciate your commitment to education in your community and this state. I do not disagree that alternatives are necessary to force people to take notice, compare, make choices, and get involved.

However, I believe that amending the Constitution is a serious, sober undertaking to be done ONLY to correct extreme wrongs (ending slavery, enabling women to vote) and should NOT be what it is now: The go-to method of changing the laws for legislators who are too lazy and self-absorbed to do their jobs effectively.

Fixing the problems Georgia’s school systems does not require taking power away from citizens in their own communities and giving it to outside corporations, which is exactly what this amendment would do. The notion that there is no better solution than this is insulting, IMO.

momoftwo

October 25th, 2012
6:52 pm

I watch ad the black caucous fights against amendment 1 along with other white and African American people. I ask myself why are they fighting this. The African American children in this state are the main ones who need this. I think I know the answer, lord I hope I’m wrong. An educated black man or woman is a powerful thing. If the community at large were to become better educated then these other people wouldn’t have a use. Our African counterparts would have a great education riveling the northern communities thus giving them the tools they have been lacking in for a long time to challenge the white community for jobs, housing etc… so the leaders don’t want it for fear of er don’t need you anymore and the whites don’t want because we don’t want you taking our jobs or moving into our neighborhoods. Hummmm this is a horrible thought!

Ginerva

October 25th, 2012
6:52 pm

I felt so sorry for that girl while I was watching the commercial. She doesn’t know only .39 of every dollar her school received last year actually went to instruction.

double

October 25th, 2012
6:57 pm

More goverment,more money,more appointed.More favoritism.My vote is no to the state taking more control,and to long term leases/Rents.

a reader

October 25th, 2012
7:28 pm

I’m not sure how much I support charter schools, but I do know that I’m not particularly happy with the local school board in our county. That said, I agree with the commenter above who noted that amending the Constitution should be reserved for serious issues. This issue should have been taken care of in the legislature but for some reason it couldn’t be. That plus the amazing amount of private profits that may come as a result of this (without actually knowing if children will be well served) makes me skeptical. I will be voting no.

CharterMom

October 25th, 2012
7:30 pm

Feel sorry for what? For a child that is able to attend a school where every day she goes through the front door, she enters a supportive environment with happy, engaged teachers and administrators that listen to their parents. Maybe you should visit a charter school sometime.

cc

October 25th, 2012
7:50 pm

I have already voted, and I voted YES on the Charter Amendment. Just for your information double, I also voted for the next president of the United States, Mitt Romney.

Get used to it double: President Mitt Romney! It does have a nice “ring” to it, doesn’t it?

Look at the bright side of it double, you will have a vice president who can at least identify the state he is in!

n

October 25th, 2012
7:54 pm

A bunch of ostensible “concerned moms” & new posters here tonight.
And they all want us to vote “yes.”
Strange, isn’t it?

I smell corporate $$$$ talking.

LarryMajor

October 25th, 2012
8:02 pm

The irony here, is that Ivy Prep is a State Chartered Special School that was approved only six months ago. This school’s very existence is proof that we don’t need to change our Constitution.

cc

October 25th, 2012
8:15 pm

Get ready, double, it’s coming! Election day and your “new reality” is upon you!

Charter Parent

October 25th, 2012
8:30 pm

A bunch of ostensible “concerned moms” & new posters here tonight.
And they all want us to vote “yes.”
Strange, isn’t it?

Coming from someone whose screen name is “n”?

Charter Parent

October 25th, 2012
8:39 pm

Here’s why DeKalb and Gwinnett parents support Ivy Prep:

http://int.ivyprepacademy.org/why-ivy-prep/

cc

October 25th, 2012
8:55 pm

Charter Parent:

I am in agreement with you, and voted YES! I feel confident that the Amendment will pass . . .

Congratulations for your support of real education!

Buckhead Boy

October 25th, 2012
9:34 pm

cc, I surely do hate to see your kind of conviction go to waste. Join those of us who are prepared to walk-the-walk, not just talk-the-talk, and open an Intrade account. Tonight you can buy Romney (to win) shares at $3.80 — that’s $3.80 will yield you $10 in just twelve days. How can you resist such a return on a sure thing? Besides, the odds there are better than FiveThirtyEight gives Romney to win, 29%. Regrettably, though, I won’t be selling to you. I’ve already maxed out my account selling Romney shares short to people like you; and that’s all I plan to wager this year, because I don’t believe in sure things — just the odds.

td

October 25th, 2012
9:42 pm

cc

October 25th, 2012
8:55 pm

FYI: Eric Erickson (redstate.com) and one of the biggest advocates of this bill said on the radio yesterday morning that the amendment would be defeated by a coalition of Dems, Public school staff, rural Republicans and metro tea party.

Charter Parent

October 25th, 2012
10:42 pm

One only needs to look at this: http://dekalbschoolwatch.wordpress.com/
to see why the Amendment is needed!

East Cobb RINO, Inc. (LLC)

October 25th, 2012
10:50 pm

We have a great carpool system set up with our parents. – CharterMom

If that great carpool system is in the affluent northern suburbs or any other affluent area of town, I rest my case. I doubt that great carpool system is anywhere near MLK Jr Drive or south of I-20.

Charter Parent

October 25th, 2012
11:14 pm

@East Cobb RINO, actually it is…Ivy Prep Kirkwood, I’m a single low income working parent and my kids get to school on time every day.

td

October 25th, 2012
11:17 pm

Charter Parent

October 25th, 2012
10:42 pm

One only needs to look at this: http://dekalbschoolwatch.wordpress.com/
to see why the Amendment is needed!

Can you guarantee that these elected charter school boards are going to be any better then traditional school boards? Is an appointed commission at the state level better then an elected State school superintendent?

Vote YES!

October 25th, 2012
11:22 pm

To @Are people really aware: The answer to your question is the PARENTS PAY for the uniforms. Believe me I know. I paid $100 at Buckhead Uniforms and another $100 at a used uniform sale. But we love the uniforms. I also pay for transportation too. @LarryMajor: Ivy Prep in Norcross has been around for 5 years (grades 6 – 10.) The school in Dekalb is the newer one. Both successful AND both schools are majority minority (African-American) so the claim that charter schools are for white kids is debunked.

So why go charter? The Gwinnett Middle school that I’m zoned for is a great school in an affluent area (I moved to this area for the schools) but MY CHILD (with special reasons) was lost, not academically challenged and unhappy at this school. I (and many other Charter parents I’ve met) would rather be at the local school. But the school was not a good fit for our kids. Thank goodness we had a CHOICE called parental choice in CHARTER SCHOOLS.

I find the comments about “State Control vs Local Control” laughable. I think “Local Control” is the worst version dysfunctionism and favoritism within a school system (recent examples being APS, Clayton and soon to be Dekalb). When my child was at a Gwinnett County Public School (elementary), I never saw Superintendent Alvin Wilbanks or my “elected” Education Commissioner visit the school (and I was at the school a lot). They were distant, detached, and unreachable. My principal (who was great a person) did the best she could but was pulled in 4 million directions. When I would meet with her about my child, she apologized but made it clear she was bound by GCPS rules (that she personally did not like). I would have to jump hoops, appeals and paperwork.

I ALWAYS FELT I FIGHTING AGAINST THE SYSTEM, IT WAS EXHAUSTING AND, MOST IMPORTANTLY, MY CHILD WAS NOT HAPPY. (I KNOW I’M NOT ALONE IN THIS EXPERIENCE.)

The principal was shocked when I unrolled my child. (What do you MEAN you are leaving US? You can’t leave US. Where else could you GO?)

At my charter school, it’s not the STATE that runs it but the Charter superintendent (who founded the school). I see her on a regular basis along with the Dean of Students and Principal. I’ve have personally talked and emailed comments, questions, suggestions to all of them, received answers and seen action because of that. I feel that both my child and I are appreciated and valued. I see academically what she is learning and I’m pleased with it. I finally have CONTROL over my child’s education. Most importantly, my child is happy and is receiving a GREAT education. Don’t you want that for your child?

I’ve had enough of this so called LOCAL CONTROL…I WANT PARENTAL CONTROL. Having a CHOICE has made all the difference. Please Vote YES and give yourself and others that choice too.

Lynn43

October 25th, 2012
11:54 pm

From the way they are composed, many of these “pro” comments seem to be made by the same person. For most charter school parents, having their child in the school is nothing more than a bragging point. “I can’t afford or don’t want to afford a private school for my little darling, so I will just let the taxpayer foot the bill.”

BehindEnemyLines

October 26th, 2012
12:23 am

@td — There are really no “guarantees” for much in life … but charter boards & a state level appointed commission would be hard pressed to be any worse than traditional school boards and an elected superintendent. They have already failed with great consistency over many years, at least new options provide some hope for improvement.

RAMZAD

October 26th, 2012
3:16 am

Charter school is a gimme!

Charter schools are flexible. They can emphasize science & technology, the arts, social science, trades. The traditional public school is one big train taking everyone to the same destination whether they want to go or not.

Charter school can go out of business if they are not cutting the butter. Try putting a traditional public school out of business- even if it is very bad.

Charter schools can attend to accountability, learning, discipline, parental involvement, student progress. Try to ask a traditional public school to do something about bullying or gangs or accountability. In fact try to get a meeting with a public school official.

Charter school can set policy based on its curriculum, student body, its charter, its mission statement. Try to get a traditional public school to change policy or to define its mission statement.

Charter schools do not have to have all that security apparatus. Try attending a traditional public school without the school police roaming the hallways between class periods.

Public that are not educating students, that have high drop out rates, low graduation rates, poor disciplinary records should be closed or scrapped into government administrative buildings. A fire needs to be set to the traditional public school system. They are bad for national security.

FairLady

October 26th, 2012
3:19 am

Please VOTE YES!!!
This the first ray of hope for education in GA. Parents ARE Local control. Our voices and votes can make a difference on election day!!

RAMZAD

October 26th, 2012
3:22 am

Probably; the most curious variable in the Amendment One controversy is African Americans.

We have a long and bloody history of distrust for local authority. The local police, zoning board, chamber of commerce, PTA, local judiciary, and local school board. We have never been shy about running to the state or federal constitutional deliberations or administrative adjudication, because we have always felt that local authority was up to no good, and frequently we were right- until this hypocritical switch.

Resistance to Amendment 1 is nonsense, because African American children are the most likely to be failed by local public academic systems- smallest SAT scores, smallest graduation rates, smallest amounts of academic scholarships, smallest matriculation to college, most likely to wind up in an alternative school, most likely to be murdered during school pursuits, most likely to graduate to prison, most likely to be a baby momma. You name it and we are going to be distinguished for being the worst at what local public school systems say they do or offer. So; you would think African Americans would want to run to the state for refuge. Not this time!

Selfishness; a treasured classic in our race, is at work here. I will explain. Education is one of the few endeavors where African Americans have a foothold. It it not medicine. We are not regularly doctors. It is not the judiciary. We are not frequently lawyers. It is not science and engineering, because we are not frequently scientists, but every African American alive knows a black teacher or school administrator. The public school house is an African American preserve.

So, in order to stay on this preserve African Americans will go to the mat for this local control we always abhor- this time. It is not concern for our students. We were willing to cheat our own out of an education to keep our rank in and our checks from the school house. So, for African Americans, this has nothing to do with the quality of education for black children. The waves of “local control” cheating scandals in predominantly African American districts all over the country proved that eminently well.

It is about the loss of control that will be a necessary condition of passage of Amendment One that blacks fear. We saw what happened to the incumbent mayor and to Michelle Rhee, DC School Superintendent when African American school hegemony was challenged in Washington DC about four years ago. We saw what happened in Chicago last month when attempts were made to tie teacher advancement to student performance.

Amendment One is necessary to break this African American dictatorship in local public school control. We have seen the results of this dictatorship, and it is horrible.

seabeau

October 26th, 2012
5:22 am

My daughter attended private school(elem. and high school) ,for all of these years i’ve had to pay school taxes for something she never received! And it doesn’t bother me! Why? The public school here is terrible,with high teen preg. ,violence,and drop out rate and low grad.rate and low numbers of college bound students. Her private school, no teen preg.,no violence,no drop outs and 70% of students have started college! All of this in a basic agriculture type bldg.,hand-me-down computers,books,etc. Yes,education like it was 50 years ago,and it still works!

catlady

October 26th, 2012
6:49 am

Anyone care to guess what percentage of charter schools now open serve mostly low income, minority kids? And, should this pass, anyone care to guess what percentage of charter schols this commission would authorize would serve low income, minority kids? My guess would be less than 20%. ‘Cause that is where the money is–upper income kids are most likely to do well, to show positive “results” for the charter company. Think,, people!

And, anyone care to guess who would be named to the charter commission? I would bet we would see mostly friends and family of our current “leaders,” as well as large contributors to their elections. They would, of course, be “highly qualified” by either their bloodlines, friendship patterns, or history of financial support!