Your morning jolt: Nathan Deal to sign bill to require drug tests for welfare recipients

Georgia Public Broadcasting quotes state Sen. John Albers, R-Roswell, as saying that Gov. Nathan Deal today will sign into law his bill to require drug tests for welfare applicants.

A lawsuit to block enforcement – which recently happened in Florida – is likely.

Most, but not all, district meetings of the Georgia GOP came off smoothly on Saturday. GOP activist Vikki McReynolds posted this account of deliberations in the 13th congressional district (David Scott, D) on Facebook:

”I just got kicked out of the 13th District convention because I called for a point of order because they did not seat our delegates and were seating alternates instead. … Police tried to carry me out and I laid on the floor !”

The meetings chose the bulk of Georgia delegates who will attend the Republican National Convention in Tampa. We’ll try to assemble a complete list this afternoon.

***
Speaking of the gentleman from the 13th: U.S. Rep. David Scott, D-Atlanta, on Saturday accused Republicans of attempting to re-segregate Georgia politics at an annual fund-raiser for Cobb County Democrats. From the Marietta Daily Journal:

“The Republicans used this redistricting to re-segregate the political parties and now we’ve got only one white Democrat left standing in the South, serving in the Congress of the United States,” Scott told the packed crowd at the $100 per person event.

Scott not only defended U.S. Rep. John Barrow, D-Savannah, but also spoke up for state Sen. Doug Stoner, D-Smyrna, whose Smyrna district has been draw into Republican-dominated Buckhead.

In the same report, Stoner confirmed that he met recently with U.S. Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz of Florida, who chairs the Democratic National Committee. But he offered no details.

***
In a weekend op-ed in the Washington Post, Georgia GOP strategist Ralph Reed seemed to be warning Mitt Romney of a reassertion of evangelical strength in the Republican party, advising the likely GOP presidential nominee to channel Rick Santorum:

From John C. Fremont to William Jennings Bryan in the 19th century to Barry Goldwater, Eugene McCarthy, George McGovern and Ronald Reagan in our time, losing presidential candidates have previewed the ideological trajectory of their parties — and often of the nation.

Romney would be wise to remember this in his general-election campaign. Of course he can’t neglect independents, or women, or Hispanics, or other nontraditional Republican constituencies. But his immediate task is to consolidate conservative support and unify the party. The best way to do that is to appropriate the best parts of Santorum’s message.

Santorum follows the trailblazing evangelical candidates Pat Robertson and Mike Huckabee, who personified the rise and the maturation of social conservatives as a critical component of the Republican coalition.

***
At the beginning of the weekend, the Daily Beast had this update of Washington’s most popular scandal:

The GSA’s deputy administrator, Susan Brita, emailed agency officials last July that the inspector general found no substantive agenda for the conference. She said that expenses for a clown suit, bicycles used for a team-building exercise, tuxedos and a mind-reader didn’t lend themselves to the claim of a substantive conference.

Brita also questioned why a regional administrator in charge of the conference received only a disciplinary letter that “is not even a slap on the wrist.”

A major concern in the memo was how The Washington Post, with thousands of readers who are federal employees, would report the story.

…The email was sent to Robert Peck, then the head of the GSA’s Public Building Service, with copies to his deputy, David Foley, and another top agency official, Stephen Leeds.

Leeds is an Atlanta attorney and an influential Democrat in Georgia. He’s a former candidate for chairman of the state Democratic party, and was a close ally of Max Cleland when he was U.S. senator. The first of many congressional committees to come meets today – and is expected to result in the first assertion of Fifth Amendment protection. So far, Leeds hasn’t been invited to appear at any of the scheduled hearings.

***
Herman Cain will celebrate Tax Day early today, with a rally at the U.S. Capitol that he’s characterizing as a “patriot’s summit.” Ralph Reed and Alveda King are expected to attend.

***
The AJC’s Politifact Georgia today takes a look at U.S. Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas’ defense of his practice of not asking questions during hearings before the high court.

***
Finally, the Athens Banner-Herald reports this:

Renowned adventurer, author and naturalist Fred Birchmore died Sunday morning at age 100.

Birchmore, known for riding a bicycle around the world and walking down the steps of the Washington Monument on his hands, also gave generously to the community.

- By Jim Galloway, Political Insider

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154 comments Add your comment

Tom

April 16th, 2012
9:43 am

On some blogs, I would type “First!”….not here.

Tom

April 16th, 2012
9:46 am

Have read several accounts of the 13th CD GOP convention. Sounds like Sahar Hekmati decided to throw out Robert’s Rules and just make up her own on the fly.

Marlboro Man

April 16th, 2012
9:52 am

Ralph Reed is a crook.

Tom

April 16th, 2012
9:52 am

Every time I see Ralph Reed’s name I see Rob Lowe’s character in “Contact” (”Richard Rank”….an obvious parody of Reed).

John Tudor

April 16th, 2012
9:59 am

Sue Everhart stood by Sahar during the Chairman’s race last year.

Not a big deal back then, but it is interesting that the GAGOP remains silent on Sahar’s trampling of the rules throughout this convention cycle.

Frankie

April 16th, 2012
10:00 am

Aren’t the representativs and senators of Georgia paid out of tax payer funds…so in essences shouldn’t they also be required to take drug tests. IF they already are then great but I have not found any info that says they are required prior to taking office and on a regular basis… i’m just sayin.

I don’t disagree with the legslation but think that it should be a state wide mandate…..

David Klepinger

April 16th, 2012
10:02 am

Jim,
I have an answer to this dilemma: Legalize drugs and tell the government to get the hell out of our lives. And while we’re at it, let’s abolish the IRS and get the government the hell out of our wallets. You know the majority of people agree with me. Have a nice day!
David Klepinger
Lawrenceville, GA

IHateRepublicans

April 16th, 2012
10:12 am

I really do not get these people. They scream limited govt at the top of their voice but….then they start slinging their personal beliefs on others.

I don’t use drugs, but I hate hypocrites. Do the Republicans not understand that their hypocrisy is what’s getting them thrown out of other regions? They’re on their way to being minimalized like RSA Nationalist Party. It only has angry old white men in it.

The world has moved on. Why can’t the state have two governors: one for the dumb, stupid & country and another for the civilized and urban.

Tom

April 16th, 2012
10:18 am

IHate, I actually (still, somehow) consider myself to be a GOP voter….seeing as how I’ve voted almost exclusively GOP for over 30 years.

But….like you….I’m tired of the nanny-statism and hypocrisy of the social conservatives.

How can anyone spend so much energy railing against the insidious legislation that is Obamacare on the basis of how it injects government into the doctor-patient relationship, and in the next breath support nonsense like “ultrasound bills” which basically is nothing more than a bunch of anti-abortion bureaucrats mandating a procedure that may not even be indicated as medically necessary by the attending physician for the sole purpose of trying to harass/intimidate both the physician AND the patient?

Don't Tread

April 16th, 2012
10:19 am

The People’s Republik of Kalifornia called…they want IHateRepublicans back.

Aaron Burr V Mexico

April 16th, 2012
10:27 am

Amendment XVIII

Section 1 – No elected or politically appointed official within the United States, or its protectorates, shall have immunity from any regulations, laws, policies, procedures or orders which they shall draft, influence or vote upon.

Section 2 – Any restriction, test, fee, tax, mandated search or any other qualifying or inconveniencing law, policy, procedure, order, or regulation shall be imposed upon all appointed or elected officials within the jurisdiction pursuant to which said regulation, policy, law, order, or procedure is enacted.

Section 3. The majority of the several states shall have the power to enforce this article by legislation for the Federal government. The Congress shall have the power to enforce this article by Legislation for the States and all non federal jurisdictions within the United States.

Lynn43

April 16th, 2012
10:31 am

As a threat to our freedom, I fear the evangelical conservatives more than I fear what we call “terrorist”. I am a Christian and on the staff of a church, but their (evangelicals) thinking is very scary.

sam

April 16th, 2012
10:31 am

It is about time we tested welfare recipients for drugs. I don’t want my tax dollars spent on supporting someone’s drug habit.

Southern Comfort

April 16th, 2012
10:37 am

“Georgia Public Broadcasting quotes state Sen. John Albers, R-Roswell, as saying that Gov. Nathan Deal today will sign into law his bill to require drug tests for welfare applicants”

“The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized.”

–4th Amendment to the United States Constitution.

Until the GOP can come up with their “Constitutional” justification that signing up for public benefits constitute a fact that a drug search of a person is reasonable and justified, they are doing more damage to the Constitution than they claim Obama is doing with the ACA. Hypocrisy, thy name is Georgia GOP!

hnbc

April 16th, 2012
10:43 am

Sam, so tell me how many welfare recipients do you know who spend their money on drugs? How many did any GA legislature know who spends their money on drugs?

This is so typically Republican … a solution to a problem they don’t even know exists. It’s an underhanded way NOT to help those who need help while they continue enriching themselves at our expense.

Tom

April 16th, 2012
10:44 am

Comfort, is employer-mandated drug testing also “reasonable and justified”? Many employers have even made being a non-smoker or non-user of tobacco products a condition of employment.

Aaron Burr V Mexico

April 16th, 2012
10:49 am

The constitution is a worthless piece of paper. What the drug war didn’t do, the DHS did later.

Mosell

April 16th, 2012
10:49 am

It cracks me up all this “Forgetting Robert’s Rules of Order” I dare say I am no expert on Roberts Rules of Order. I will say this. Those screaming about the disregard of Robert’s Rules of Order probably know about as much as me about the intricacies of the rules. I’m sure I’ll get comments. Don’t care. I was at the 13th convention for about an hour. I saw some of the yelling and screaming. It was stated several times at the beginning “The Credentialling was still ongoing” Some of the things done during this “lull” time had no bearing on “The business” of the convention. It seemed to me (A guest) that the real agenda of these Robert’s Rules folks (At the beginning) anyway was to derail the process. Since I only statyed an hour I can’t say about the rest of the day. Why were they (The delegates) there. To make sure Robert’s Rules were enforced OR trying to find qualified delegates to DEFEAT a socialist President.

Aaron Burr V Mexico

April 16th, 2012
10:51 am

Tom – While *I* agree that protections in the bill of rights and other rights agreed to in the Universal Declaration of Human rights should apply to private employers, the only amendment that restricts individuals and not governments is the 4th amendment.

All of the restrictions in the the bill of rights, per the 14th amendment, now apply to the STATES (ie a state cannot restrict the right to bear arms), but an employer is not bound by the 4th amendment.

Not that any of this matters, since, as I said, the constitution is a worthless piece of paper.

Government does what it thinks it can get away with, not what it should. Then again, so do most employers, especially large corporations.

Aaron Burr V Mexico

April 16th, 2012
10:53 am

And that’s the 14th in the first paragraph on my last statement, not 4th.

spotore

April 16th, 2012
10:57 am

They need to add language to loose your voting rights if you fail. Personally if you get any assistance from any government agency, you should never be allowed to vote.

Will

April 16th, 2012
10:59 am

Untold amounts of taxpayer dollars will be spent by the state of Georgia defending the illegal search via drug testing if Governor Deal signs this legislation.

I woulld hope each legislator and the governor who supports this illegal law of warrantless searches will also pledge to reimburse the state for legal expenses relating to this ill-advised statute. They have been warned and know full-well a successful legal defense of this law is unlikely but have moved along anyway because of the political popularity of this matter.

JD

April 16th, 2012
10:59 am

Tom is incorrect about the ACA injecting government into the doctor-patient relationship. That was just a piece of misinformation the GOP and their communications wing (talk radio + Fox News) spread to scare voters. In fact, the closest the ACA comes to altering the doctor-patient relationship is the new disclosure requirement that doctors disclose kickbacks they receive from pharmaceutical companies for prescribing their products.

And, Tom, don’t pretend you do not only listen to those people. The parroted rhetoric in your first post says it all…particularly your use of that marketing term “nanny state.” There is no nanny state, there never has been a nanny state, and nothing appears to be headed that way.

My one question about the drug testing of welfare applicants has to do with funding. Where is the money coming from? and…aren’t there better ways to spend that money? This last is rhetorical…of course there are better ways to spend that money, but the makers of the drug-tests would not make as much money and then they could not contribute as much to these GOP campaign coffers. Never mind that GA has a high school grad rate of 69%, our transportation infrastructure is not only underdeveloped it is deteriorating faster than repairs can be financed, and we lag behind the rest of the country in job creation.

Eli

April 16th, 2012
11:01 am

Spoken like a true authoritarian, spotore. Why don’t you go the next step and suggest they be rounded up and forced into labor camps.

Becky

April 16th, 2012
11:09 am

I would wager that Deal has his fat fingers in the drug testing pie and stands to make money off the tests the state will perform.

Real Athens

April 16th, 2012
11:11 am

Jason Deal is the Governor’s son and a Hall County Superior Court Judge who sits on a Drug Court there. The drug testing law and the insertion of $10 Million into Georgia’s accountability courts creates a cottage industry where the government supplies “customers” to the addiction industry — a court ordered mandate for addiction treatment if you will.

Is the Fourth Estate looking into how invested the friends and family of Nathan Deal are in this burgeoning industry?

Fred Birchmore was truly a great man and will be dearly missed in this community. From Wikipedia regarding the term “Fred” to describe bicyclists:

“The roots of the term “Fred” are unclear, though some believe it originated from a touring rider named Fred Birchmore from Athens, GA. In 1934-35, Birchmore rode around the world on a bicycle he named Bucephalus. Birchmore and Bucephalus traveled approximately 25,000 miles. Bucephalus is now on display at the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C. In one famous incident while touring in Italy, Birchmore passed a bunch of racers during a race he had crossed paths with by chance. And despite going up hill on his loaded 50 pound non-racing bike, he passed the finish line well ahead of the racers. The cheering crowd at the finish line assumed him to be the winner of the race. In addition to the Birchmore origin idea for “Fred,” there also is a vague idea that there was an old grumpy touring rider named Fred (but probably not Birchmore) from which the term derived.”

td

April 16th, 2012
11:20 am

IHateRepublicans

April 16th, 2012
10:12 am

“Do the Republicans not understand that their hypocrisy is what’s getting them thrown out of other regions?”

Do you not realize that after the 2010 elections the Republicans have gained more state legislative seats, governorships and county commissions then anytime in the history of the party? It is not the Republicans that are getting run out but instead the Democratic social welfare state mentality that is getting thrown out in droves all across the nation.

Real American

April 16th, 2012
11:20 am

How many are aware of this?
http://www.reuters.com/article/2012/04/12/us-column-dcjohnston-report-idUSBRE83B0XQ20120412

Georgia is one of the states that allows this practice….wonder what the fine legislatures would say if asked about this.

GaBlue

April 16th, 2012
11:21 am

John Albers likes to spy on people. Ask him about the time he was caught RED HANDED hacking the emails of his former employer to steal client business for himself. Go ahead and ask him! He admitted guilt when he had no way to deny it.

Also, check the claims on his bio. Albers knows that all he has to do to succeed in Georgia is put an “R” by his name (and lifts in his shoes), and blame the poor people for all the woes of the mistreated, unappreciated folks in his district. He knows he can count on the citizens of Georgia neglect their duty to pay attention. He’s not getting rich on the $17K he gets for “representing” GaSen 56, but BELIEVE that the sneaky little backroom deals that put money into the pockets of drug testing companies will benefit him down the line.

Go ahead! ASK HIM.

Real American

April 16th, 2012
11:24 am

td, your feelings are going to be so hurt this November. Public Enemy said it best years ago in an premonition about 2010 – but that fear will not stop sane “working class whites” outside of the confederacy from voting in their best interests in 7 months.

bigbill

April 16th, 2012
11:25 am

Arthur Blank, the billionaire owner of the Atlanta Falcons is seeking hundreds of millions of dollars of taxpayers funds to build a new football stadium even though the current Dome stadium works just fine. Words are so important. Taxpayer funds paid to poor people in need are “welfare.” Taxpayer funds used to enrich Arthur Blank and his private for-profit professional sports business corporation are simply never, ever considered or referred to as “welfare” by people like Governor Nathan Dean who supports this form of welfare for Arthur Blank and his business. Moreover, you will never hear Governor Dean refer to government subsidies to Arthur Blank called “socialism” which by any definition it most certainly is. This obvious double standard will hover over Governor Dean’s shoulder as he signs a mean spirited, punitive bill into law imposing drug testing requirements on poor persons in need who seek tax payer funded welfare but not on Arthur Blank, the billionaire, who also seeks tax payer funded welfare.

Refugee from Dikkksie (Thank God We Escaped)

April 16th, 2012
11:26 am

Ralph Reed and other losers of the religious right just want to keep their name in the greed/power/politics game. Both sides can afford to ignore Gooberstan/Dixieland as of “Toothless Tuesday”.

As long as Romney doesn’t turn black (Kenyan Muslim Terrorist) he has Gooberstan in the bag. No reason for either side to cater to the sick desires of Gooberstan/Dixieland. Gingrich/Santorum have that covered.

Maybe the country will split (it should, and will eventually) and G/D can have Santorum and Gingrich as the Founding Fathers.

td

April 16th, 2012
11:30 am

The state drug tests its own workers as does many counties and cities governments so what is wrong with others that are receiving tax payer money getting tested? Welfare is a voluntary program and as such people can opt in or out of the program. The rules of the programs are established and drug testing is no more invasive then asking for citizenship, wage and rent verifications or asking a person to name the father of the child and forcing the father to get paternity test for setting up child support.

Becky

April 16th, 2012
11:30 am

bigbill-very much agree with your post!

Shar

April 16th, 2012
11:34 am

Ralph Reed was unable to get elected on his ’social conservative’ platform even here in conservative Georgia. If Mitt Romney were unwise enough to follow his advice, the election would be over before it has begun.

To be elected, Romney will have to convince women and independent voters that he will do just the opposite and function as a fiscal conservative while able to hold at bay those who want so desperately to control other people’s lifestyles. Reed, in company with the Congressional Republicans who just announced that they, not Romney, will be setting the Republican agenda and policy positions, will torpedo Romney’s credibility with those voters who will decide the general election.

td

April 16th, 2012
11:36 am

Real American

April 16th, 2012
11:24 am

I seriously doubt if my feelings are going to be hurt because I know that the US house will still be under Republican control, the Senate probably will be (very close) and it is way to early to determine if the White house will be or not. I am a realist. The real problem is you libs (especially the African American community) will go into a huge depression if Obama is not re elected.

#occupy my desk...

April 16th, 2012
11:37 am

TD – you are exactly right. I find it comical that Dems thing they have some sort of momentum going. The fact that Obama and Romney are neck and neck is not a good thing for an incumbent. The “undecided vote” always goes to the challenger on a ratio of 80/20. Obama would only be the 2nd Democrat reelected in the last 70 years. Not sure where this bravado comes from…

Refugee – why do you hang around ajc.com if you are done with gooberland and thankful? I also find it funny that you tear into Christians in your comments, yet give thanks to God in your alias. Your skinny mocha is getting cold…

GaBlue

April 16th, 2012
11:38 am

Refugee from Dikkksie,

Heyyyyy! Some of us have decided to stay on as resistance fighters. While your points (11:26) are solid, and while many of the goobers and goober-wannabe transplants have invited me to avail myself of Delta Airlines or one of the many interstate highways that leave the state, I have decided to stay.

You see, my roots and family are here, I like my dogwoods & azaleas & fresh summertime garden veggies, and I live for SEC football! So, despite that fact that the goober segments of our population — which would have been marginalized now if not for being validated by the carpetbaggers that continue to stream in from the wasteland nether regions of the post-industrial north and midwest — still reside here, there are indeed educated, progressive-minded people like me who will fight these fascist fuggwads to our last dying breaths.

Eli

April 16th, 2012
11:38 am

td, explain to me how drug-testing is less invasive that asking for citizenship, wage, and rent verifications.

By definition it is more invasive, but since your grasp of the English language is tenuous, at best, I will ask you to clarify. Also, should we be doing to same thing to Social Security recipients? After all, those are tax dollars.

td

April 16th, 2012
11:48 am

Eli

April 16th, 2012
11:38 am

All four is the government asking the individual to give up their private information and therefore are all equally invasive to the individuals right to privacy. Even companies that as for drug test do not ask the individual for their mortgage payment.

As far as Social Security, it is an insurance program that the individual has paid into to receive a benefit and not a program in which the individual is asking the government for a benefit that they have no sweat equity in.

Real Athens

April 16th, 2012
11:48 am

Social Security are not tax dollars. Geez. How many times? The first thing Congress (and people) need to learn is that Social Security and Medicare are not government funds. These entities are funded by the public for the benefit of the public with public funds directed specifically to those entities for allocation for specific purposes. They are not part of the federal general fund nor part of the federal budget and are not funded by citizen income tax dollars.

Every worker receiving a pay check since 1937 has contributed to Social Security with an equal amount coming from his/her employer. As a worker (since the age of 12) AND a business owner I have done both — gladly.

Social Security is not an entitlement it is the publics’ money. It does not belong to the government.

Every pay check and every Social Security check issued since 1966 has included a deduction to fund Medicare. Public contribution to a designated entity for a designated purpose for distribution back to the public as determined by the publics’ need at a later date. The funds therefore are not part of the general fund or the federal budget. They are not federal income tax dollars paid to the government. Therefore they are not entitlements.

If citizens would hit the history books get this through their thick heads perhaps they can move on to finding practical, implementable and legal solutions to the budget and debt issues.

First of all, it must be understood that Social Security has never increased the federal deficit by a single dime. “Unfunded obligations” are a sleight-of-hand in federal accounting. Social Security has always, every year since its inception, taken in more money than it paid out. The problem that arose was what to do with this surplus of money. The answer has been to “buy” U.S. Treasury bonds – which are, in essence, government IOUs that pay interest. In the meantime, the real excess dollars go into the general fund and the politicians spend the real money, leaving the Social Security program with the bonds – the so-called unfunded obligations.

Intelligent people realize that politicians (on both sides of the aisle) have spent the excess Social Security money in the general fund on all sorts of things — including tax BREAKS!

Now SS is hamstringing business? Growth? Please.

In a stroke of “genius”, the Congress, led this time by Republicans, have seized on this accounting sleight-of-hand to try and renege on paying back the money to Social Security and end the whole program, as we know it, in one fell swoop, leaving America’s working people holding an empty bag in their old age.

To continue to insist that Social Security is increasing the federal deficit and bankrupting the country is extremely naive in the least, and an outright lie at worst. It should be corrected, not perpetuated, by the press — Fourth Estate my a@# — on opinion pages, blogs and slanted news networks.

The oldest form of warfare is divide and conquer. Quit thumping your chest for one party or the other and figure out who is conquering you and other mindless dilettantes here.

Look before I leap...

April 16th, 2012
11:49 am

The drug test law: Another stupid piece of legislation that accomplishes nothing and will get tossed out in the courts.

Was there ANY legislation passed in the session that actually does anything beneficial?
You know, like promote job growth, lower effective tax rates and do something about Georgia’s anemic housing market?

Or was this annual conclave of ninnies and numbskulls simply a waste of time and money?

UGA 1999

April 16th, 2012
11:50 am

Great JOB DEAL!!! Another fine example of Republican leadership! Love it.

Robert

April 16th, 2012
11:52 am

I am counting on a State Senator or Congressman who has the “Balls” and desire to do the right thing in this matter. These kinds of silly matters do nothing but fan the flames of racism in GA. Nathan Deal is a fool if he signs this kind of legislative “trash” and he will pay the consequences for his actions. The poor have suffered enough and this kind of crap makes me made as hell. The American People.

td

April 16th, 2012
11:54 am

Look before I leap…

April 16th, 2012
11:49 am

Did you not also say that Obamacare was Constitutional?

UGA 1999

April 16th, 2012
11:56 am

Robert, you are hilarious. If a company can drug test you for employment. Why do you want to give YOUR tax dollars for someone to buy drugs?

td

April 16th, 2012
11:57 am

Robert

April 16th, 2012
11:52 am

Where in the h3ll did the “racism” statement come from? There are more whites then blacks on welfare in Georgia. This has everything to do with if the people want to continue to support drug users with welfare. Throwing out the race card here is just another example of how much the rest of the country is ignoring the tired crap from the left.

UGA 1999

April 16th, 2012
11:58 am

td….because when they cannot win an arguement they have to throw in the race card. It is pathetic!

jd

April 16th, 2012
11:59 am

@Td – u r right — make a list of who wins no matter which party wins… they are the ones conquering us…

Refugee from Dikkksie (Thank God We Escaped)

April 16th, 2012
12:01 pm

Ga Blue, appreciate your sentiments. It is more important for young people to be reborn elsewhere, as they have lives ahead that will be very challenging at best, as the social and economic wheels fall off the corrupt system. I worked 30 years (pension handcuffs) before fleeing. My earliest memory of Jawja politics is Pickwick’s Lester Maddox waving guns at blacks who wanted to eat at his restaurant, and his stupidity, Christianity, and rabid racism propelling him to Governor of Jawja from 1967 to 1971. The mood darkens, the weather – and everything else- is much better elsewhere. James Howard Kunstler has valuable insight on this subject.

Take care.