Sunday sales bill blazes a new, perhaps faster, path

The bill to permit Sunday sales of beer and wine in Georgia was just introduced in the Senate, and immediately hit a set of greased skids designed to increase its chance of passage this year.

In past years, Lt. Gov. Casey Cagle has assigned the measure to the Senate Regulated Industries and Utilities Committee, chaired by state Sen. David Shafer, R-Duluth, where it has sometimes languished.

This morning, Cagle chose a new direction. SB 10 is now under the wing of the State and Local Government Operations Committee – nicknamed “Slo-go” – chaired by newcomer Butch Miller, R-Gainesville.

As did previous versions, SB 10 would allow local communities to hold referendums on whether to allow Sunday sales of beer and wine in grocery and convenience stores. “It’s a local matter for local government to offer local referendums,” explained Cagle spokesman Ben Fry.

- By Jim Galloway, Political Insider

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22 comments Add your comment

David A. Staples

January 25th, 2011
10:59 am

It’s about time. I can’t tell you how many times I’ve been grocery shopping on Sunday and happened to see a bottle of wine that looked good but couldn’t buy it. There are those who say I should stock up on other days of the week, but I don’t typically go shopping specifically for alcohol. I consider it just another grocery along with everything else on my list.

Tom

January 25th, 2011
11:01 am

Interesting. Will this finally be the year we join the wondrous new world of electricity, indoor plumbing and horseless carriages?

Joel Six Pack

January 25th, 2011
11:02 am

I can not believe it has taken this long to simply provide communities an opportunity to have a referendum on this. Or maybe I mean … I can;t believe how long it has taken state politicians to figure out they can pass the buck on this.

Hazel

January 25th, 2011
11:13 am

I’ve always found that I wanted to buy beer on Sundays more times than I wanted to buy a gun. This would seem to be the nannystate at its worst.

The General

January 25th, 2011
11:16 am

Ditto to the above comments. I’m tired of the fundies telling me how I must live my life. You take care of yours and I’ll take care of mine, and keep your religious superstitions the he77 out of my affairs.

J

January 25th, 2011
11:22 am

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Cutty

January 25th, 2011
11:35 am

About freakin time. These so called conservatives howling about their liberty and freedom, until it comes to liquor sales on Sunday.

DJ Sniper

January 25th, 2011
11:41 am

I’m no fan of Nathan Deal, but I will give him credit for saying that he’s in favor of letting local governments decide on this issue. Now all we need is for the religious nutjobs to stay out of this one, but we know that won’t happen. Haven’t these yahoos figured out that pushing your religious beliefs onto others is NOT the way to go? I really want to talk to some of these people about how they don’t want alcohol sold on “the Lord’s day”. Are they not aware that alcohol is sold on the Lord’s day at restaurants, bars, and club? Somebody please explain the difference, because I sure don’t see it.

Jeff Sexton

January 25th, 2011
11:41 am

This is certainly a very interesting development… one that also shields one David Shafer from any blow back if (when?) this one passes, thus giving Mr. Shafer a potentially easier route to Statewide office, as he could rally the Church crowd on the fact that he “protected” them from the “evils” of Sunday Sales.

It is looking more and more like this one will FINALLY pass through the Senate, though the House could potentially be another road block, and until Governor Deal signs it NOTHING is a done deal.

Intown

January 25th, 2011
12:20 pm

This is a good start. It gets to the most annoying thing for consumers about sunday alcohol sales … not being able to buy beer and wine on Sundays on their regular trips to the grocery store. Though, out of fairness, I would like to see the complete end to the Sunday ban on alcohol — liquor too … at least in my area. If south Georgia folks want to ban sunday alcohol sales in their communities, let ‘em.

J Throckmorton Malcontent

January 25th, 2011
12:23 pm

If there’s any day a man truly needs a drink, it’s Sunday.

Tom

January 25th, 2011
12:28 pm

Intown, SB10 actually DOES include allowing local municipalities in which malt beverages, wine and distilled spirits to hold a referendum to extend those sales to Sunday hours (12:30p-11:30p). The bill has separate subsections……one for just the municipalities with beer/wine, and one for thsoe that have beer/wine/liquor.

http://www.legis.ga.gov/Legislation/en-US/display.aspx?Legislation=32118

LMAO

January 25th, 2011
12:40 pm

How ’bout parimutual betting? Free country you say?

Remember

January 25th, 2011
1:23 pm

Remember the Sabbath Day to keep it holy, except by majority vote in a local referendum. Nice revision there Senator.

Keith

January 25th, 2011
3:55 pm

Interesting column I stumbles acoss over the weekend that put the GOP on notice that personal freedom comes first when it comes to this alcohol stuff: http://www.BackroomReport.com

DJ Sniper

January 25th, 2011
4:11 pm

Keith, that is a great article you posted.

Thomas

January 25th, 2011
7:14 pm

Georgia is so far behind!

Tom Lowe showed his colors

January 25th, 2011
10:37 pm

Toms quote ” he’s not sure how he would vote. He agrees with allowing Sunday sales in restaurants, but alcohol bought at stores is often drunk behind the wheel or walking down the street, ”

Now what Tom really meant was, I would rather YOU go out on Sunday to a bar and or restauraunt have too much to drink and get a DUI. Rather then sit in your own home like a resposible adult and buy some alcohol and go home and be responsible.

All these politicians against this, for their so-called relgious views or more like it, we get money off others peoples PAIN. better get it thru their head, Deal is not going to be the fall guy for this, they are and if they DENY it, they better start looking for a job, because they will be the most despised person in their county and the next guy will approve it in a second.

There are only 3 states in the US that do not sell alcohol on Sunday and GA is one, they want to be like New York, Los Angeles, and all these other progressive places, Well Quit being SO backwards. Let Adults be adults, don’t worry, there are still plenty of people that will go to bars.

Independent

January 26th, 2011
6:31 am

The head of the Georgia Christian Coalition says we should have one day a week where you cannot buy alcohol. I vote for Friday.

Tom

January 26th, 2011
9:56 am

Actually, Ga Christian Coaltion head Jerry Luquire said we need one day when we don’t have to by alcoholic products.

I don’t drink very much, but next time I need some booze I’m heading to Jerry’s house. I’m guessing he has built quite the cache after being FORCED to buy some every day.

ga female

January 26th, 2011
7:36 pm

This State is so backwards. I grew up in New York State, we could always buy Beer in the grocery store after noon on Sunday. But then again our local grocery store was owned by the Maffia. The grocery store which is owned by the Maffia also has deli price which is about $2.00 per pound less than what the Publix and Kroger Deli prices are on say Ham, Turkey and Roast Beef.

Lets see you bought local beers, like Geneese. You just had to wait until after church hours at 12:30. In the Maffia owned grocery store where I worked my way through high school, to save up for college. We all had to join the Retail Clerks Union, we were still paid minimum wage, but we got time and a half for over time, sundays, and double time for Holidays. Which you don’t get down here. You might get a few cents more. Also, I noticed at Christmas, this grocery store had no illegals employed, it was still a place where the neighborhood kids could get a job to help them save up for college. The full time employees get benefits because the belong to the Retail clerks union.