Archive for August, 2009

Cries of sabotage (and free beer) in Atlanta mayoral race

The mayoral campaign of Lisa Borders had a block party this afternoon near downtown Atlanta on Marietta Street.

But the Borders operation is saying that a rival campaign — no name mentioned — tried to sabotage the event by flooding it with homeless people and the promise of free beer.

This from the Borders web site:

[Campaign manager Stacey] Abrams said the campaign made a donation to the Gateway facility, a downtown Atlanta homeless service center, when people began coming to block party with a fake flyer that promised free food and beer.

“We are deeply saddened that another campaign would use the most vulnerable members of our community in an attempt to disrupt our event to say thank you. By misusing our logo and handing out these flyers, they misled men and women who have faced more than enough difficulty. We were glad to work with the Gateway Center to feed and shelter those in need.”

For instant updates, follow me on Twitter.

Continue reading Cries of sabotage (and free beer) in Atlanta mayoral race »

Sonny Perdue, Roy Barnes and small-ball politics

Travis Fain, who writes the Lucid Idiocy blog for the Macon Telegraph, was at Hartsfield-Jackson on Thursday evening, waiting for the Warner Robins girl softball team to return from their World Series championship a continent away.

Also there was Gov. Sonny Perdue, and Fain hazarded a few questions:

I spoke to Gov. Sonny Perdue about his game plan once his second term is up.

He said he has no plans to seek political office. He said term limits are “for a purpose,” but stopped short of saying he wouldn’t run for governor again if he could.

“I’m going to be citizen Sonny,” he said.

He said you leave office and live under the laws passed while you served.

“So you won’t be speeding,” I said.

“I won’t be ‘super speeding,’” he replied.

On the same topic, the Telegraph this week also documented a clear case of poaching:

Little League is a popular rallying point for Houston County residents, and one of the program’s ardent supporters also happens to be the area’s most widely …

Continue reading Sonny Perdue, Roy Barnes and small-ball politics »

The thawing of a face once frozen in time

William Calley, the U.S. Army second lieutenant, was convicted on 22 counts of murder in the infamous 1968 My Lai massacre in Vietnam.

At right is the Calley we remember. This Associated Press photo was taken in November 1970 as his Fort Benning trial began.

At left is the Calley who this week, for the first time, apologized for his actions during a question-and-answer session with the Greater Columbus Kiwanis Club. He’s no longer the young man who was imprisoned in that black-and-white picture.

The new photo and the following text come via the Columbus Ledger-Enquirer:

“There is not a day that goes by that I do not feel remorse for what happened that day in My Lai,” Calley [said]. His voice started to break when he added, “I feel remorse for the Vietnamese who were killed, for their families, for the American soldiers involved and their families. I am very sorry.”

Calley now lives in Atlanta with his son. He remains stripped of some of his civil rights:

“No, I …

Continue reading The thawing of a face once frozen in time »

DeKalb commissioner Lee May mulling congressional run against Hank Johnson

DeKalb County Commissioner Lee May, 33, is contemplating a primary challenge to U.S. Rep. Hank Johnson (D-Decatur).

According to Crossroads News, word of May’s possible candidacy leaked out during a church meeting:

News of May’s interest in the congressional seat surfaced this week after he asked the ministerial team at New Birth Missionary Church, where he is an elder, to pray for him.

May said it was a private meeting of deacons and elders at the Lithonia church, but he knew once he uttered it, it would get around.

“I didn’t want it out, but I wanted the prayers more,” he said.

In the last several decades, the 4th District has changed hands more than any congressional seat in Georgia. Said Johnson:

“I can’t expect to keep being returned unopposed,” he said. “I am preparing for opposition. I will be running on my record.”

For instant updates, follow me on Twitter.

Continue reading DeKalb commissioner Lee May mulling congressional run against Hank Johnson »

Oxendine still leads a frozen GOP race for governor

Regardless of the heat, Rasmussen Reports is out this afternoon with a statewide poll that shows the Republican race for governor to be largely frozen in place.

According to the survey firm:

John Oxendine, Georgia’s fire and insurance commissioner, continues to hold a commanding lead over all other Republican gubernatorial hopefuls in an early look at next year’s state GOP Primary.

A new Rasmussen Reports telephone survey in Georgia shows Oxendine with 31% support among those likely to vote in the state’s open Republican Primary. That gives him a 18-point advantage over his closest competitors. Georgia Secretary of State Karen Handel and Congressman Nathan Deal each attract 13% of the vote.

However, it’s clearly a very open field. Thirty-one percent (31%) of potential voters are not sure which candidate they prefer.

State Senator Eric Johnson has three percent (3%) support, while State Representative Austin Scott tallies two percent (2%).

Conservative businessman Ray …

Continue reading Oxendine still leads a frozen GOP race for governor »

An actor’s talking point: ‘Is Obama creating civil war?’

On Saturday, every Republican candidate worth his/her salt will be in Gwinnett County to attend the Faith and Freedom Coalition’s Freedom Rally with Sean Hannity — and, no doubt, a resurgent Ralph Reed, founder of the FFC.

Afterwards, at the nearby Gwinnett Arena, Hannity will host his Freedom Concert, featuring Billy Ray Cyrus, Charlie Daniels, Lee Greenwood, and Oliver North.

Tickets to the concert range between $46 and $136.

According to today’s Washington Times, also attending the concert will be Hollywood veteran Jon Voight, who may repeat what he told the newspaper:

“There’s a real question at stake now. Is President Obama creating a civil war in our own country?” Mr. Voight [asked.]

“We are witnessing a slow, steady takeover of our true freedoms. We are becoming a socialist nation, and whoever can’t see this is probably hoping it isn’t true. If we permit Mr. Obama to take over all our industries, if we permit him to raise our taxes to support unconstitutional …

Continue reading An actor’s talking point: ‘Is Obama creating civil war?’ »

Democrats — and men — approve of Michael Vick’s return

Michael Vick passes during a quarterbacks drill in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Michael Bryant/Philadelphia Inquirer/MCT

Michael Vick passes during a quarterbacks drill in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Michael Bryant/Philadelphia Inquirer/MCT

Public Policy Polling of North Carolina has been looking into some pretty strange corners this week.

On Wednesday, it was a national survey on the Obama “birther” phenomenon. Today, it’s a poll on politics and reformed canine abuser Michael Vick.

Nationwide, 49 percent of Americans favor the former Atlanta Falcon’s reinstatement in the NFL, and 34 percent do not. Another 17 percent are unsure. The partisan, racial and gender breakdowns are significant.

This from Tom Jensen of PPP:

I was curious how this issue would break down along party lines. Democrats tend to be more into second chances but they also tend to be more into animal rights. It turns out there is a pretty big schism on that front, with Democrats supporting reinstatement by a margin of 56-26 while Republicans oppose it 45-39. Who knew Vick was such a partisan issue? Independents support …

Continue reading Democrats — and men — approve of Michael Vick’s return »

William Calley apologizes for My Lai massacre

Nearly 40 years after the fact, William Calley, the former Army lieutenant convicted on 22 counts of murder in the infamous My Lai massacre in Vietnam, has apologized for the incident.

This from the Columbus Ledger-Enquirer:

“There is not a day that goes by that I do not feel remorse for what happened that day in My Lai,” Calley told members of the Kiwanis Club of Greater Columbus on Wednesday. His voice started to break when he added, “I feel remorse for the Vietnamese who were killed, for their families, for the American soldiers involved and their families. I am very sorry.”

In March 1968, U.S. soldiers gunned down hundreds of civilians in the Vietnamese hamlet of My Lai. The Army at first denied, then downplayed the event, saying most of the dead were Vietcong. But in November 1969, journalist Seymour Hersh revealed what really happened and Calley was court martialed and convicted of murder.
0821

Calley had long refused to grant interviews about what happened, but …

Continue reading William Calley apologizes for My Lai massacre »

Your morning jolt: Behind closed doors, talk about the implications of state-owned reservoirs

Late Thursday afternoon, David Poythress e-mailed his supporters an account of the bipartisan meeting he and seven other candidates for governor had with Sonny Perdue to discuss a court ruling that threatens to cut most of metro Atlanta from the water of Lake Lanier.

Wrote Poythress:

The direct message of the meeting was that this crisis will impact the entire state and that our state’s leaders need to present a united front. The meeting had a serious and collaborative tone, and seven of the eight candidates who attended asked polite questions, generally seeking more extensive answers from the staff.

Secretary of State Karen Handel, it seems, kept her counsel to herself. Poythress continued:

The heart of the presentation was the discussion of Perdue’s “Four-Pronged Strategy:” the appeal of the federal court ruling, contingency planning, negotiations and congressional reauthorization.
The indirect message of this briefing was that Perdue knows this crisis won’t be …

Continue reading Your morning jolt: Behind closed doors, talk about the implications of state-owned reservoirs »

‘I’ll see your Civil Rights vet, and raise you seven clergy’

Earlier this week, Atlanta mayoral candidate Kasim Reed snared the endorsement of former congressman, two-term mayor and U.N. ambassador Andrew Young.

Who, when he was a mere civil rights lieutenant to Martin Luther King Jr., was always called the Rev. Andrew Young.

Consider Lisa Borders’ press conference tomorrow to be her answer to Young’s endorsement.

On Friday morning, the city council president and mayoral candidate will assemble several prominent, African-American members of Atlanta’s clergy for a group endorsement.

The location is important: Wheat Street Baptist Church, where Borders’ grandfather, William H. Borders Sr., was pastor for 50 years. “I am honored to accept this support in the very place, where as a girl, I witnessed Maynard Jackson announce his candidacy for office,” the candidate said in a press release.

Here’s a list of who’ll be there:

— the Rev. Gerald Durley of Providence Missionary Baptist Church;

— the Rev. Darrell Elligan of True …

Continue reading ‘I’ll see your Civil Rights vet, and raise you seven clergy’ »