Study: Most public school students in Georgia are poor

school-povertyThe South may rise again, but it likely won’t be because of increasing levels of income or educational quality.

A new study concludes the South is the home of poor public school students.

The Washington Post lead pretty much sums it up: “A majority of students in public schools throughout the American South and West are low-income for the first time in at least four decades, according to a new study that details a demographic shift with broad implications for the country.”

To be considered poor, a student must be eligible for free or reduced lunches. Eligibility varies according to household size, but a family of four would have to have an annual household income below $43,000 for a child to be eligible for a reduced lunch, $30,000 for a free lunch.

Mississippi has the greatest percentage of poor students (71 percent), according to the study by the Southern Education Foundation. Georgia is ranked 6th (57 percent). Thirteen of the 17 states that have majority poor students are from the South.

Maryland and Virginia are the only Southern states that do not have majority poor student populations, maybe because of those states’ large population of federal workers.

For the first time ever, students from Western states (California, Nevada, Oregon, New Mexico) are majority poor, according to the study.

Nationally, the population of poor students has grown 5.7 million since 2001. As a result, the national rate of low income students attending public schools moved from 38 percent of all students in 2001 to 48 percent in 2011, the study says.

Educational spending has increased too, 14 percent from 2001 to 2011. Southern states spend about $9,200 per student. Public schools in the Northeast spend almost twice that, $16,000 per student.

Low income students are more likely than students from wealthier families to have lower tests scores, fall behind in school, dropout, and fail to acquire a college degree, the study says.

The study’s writers don’t come out and say it, but someone at Gawker suggests the solution is to outlaw private schools.

Is the assumption that rich kids will help make the poor kids smarter? Though public school systems could likely boast higher average standardized test scores, I don’t think it would be because of an improvement in the worst performers.

Maybe lumping all students together impedes the education of richer students? Is that fair?

It’s a complex problem and there may not be a solution, though I am sure some educators will suggest the ever-popular “throw money at it.”

What do you suggest?

More news you may find interesting:


113 comments Add your comment

PlainTruth

October 18th, 2013
8:32 am

According to an AJC article there are 133,262 illegal immigrants in Georgia’s school system costing the state 2.4 billions a year. I bet 100% are getting free lunches. The answer seems simple to me..

John

October 18th, 2013
8:33 am

The real question is what # defined a “poor” student in 1950, 1960, 1970, 1980, 1990, and 2000. Then, did that # rise in conjunction with cost of living, etc. My bet is we are now considering a child to be “poor” who would not have been considered poor (even accounting for inflation, etc) 20+ years ago.

Darryl Singleton

October 18th, 2013
8:33 am

Well I’ll be!!!!!! I would have never guessed that. Thanks Washington Post for this groundbreaking information.

USC-69

October 18th, 2013
8:46 am

Middle class and Upper class parents are removing their children from public schools – not because their fellow classmates may be poor, but because their fellow classmates may be disruptive, have no interest in learning, and, in fact, be threatening or attempting to teach the behaviors of an alternative culture. Public education can only be saved by removing these students (perhaps an alternate school or alternate classes). TRACKING – attacked in the 60’s as discriminatory – provides an intense education to the motivated (poor or not) at the level for which they are prepared. Consideration of reintroduction of this method would, in my opinion, be preferable to the current Charter School approach. This may improve the motivation of some from poor families and provide training in areas unavailable in the standard academic curriculum for those who detest history, mathematics, foreign languages, science, etc. (e.g., auto shop, wood working, home economics, etc.).

Jeff

October 18th, 2013
8:47 am

Nothing new here. I would be curious to know the ratio of “undocumented” alien students in the poorest states relative to the richer states. More alarming to me is the suggestion that outlawing private schools is somehow seen as a solution to the problem. Socialism and Marxism is right out in the open these days. It is sad to me that a large segment of the population seems to believe that government is the only answer when government has clearly ruined everything that it has touched in the past 60+ years.

JB

October 18th, 2013
8:48 am

No, it won’t work. The schools in the DC area spend almost $14,000 per student……As much as most private high schools in the south….and it’s not working. It’s the breakdown of the American family, generational poverty. You could spend 50,000 per student in DC and see little improvement. It’s a two parent home, who happen to have an education, holding children accountable. Without that, you have failure. Dr. Ben Carson’s are one in a million.

some sense

October 18th, 2013
8:49 am

Public school educators are like a bunch of alcoholics, just taking it one day at a time, throwing another brick on the pile and hopin’ it stays up there. Discipline among lower income students is abysmal. Their teachers and coaches often are the only people in their lives who provide structure. Probably the best solution to the problems referenced here is to stop mainstreaming all students; this practice holds back the smart ones and confuses the ones who struggle. Nothing wrong w/ taking a more basic approach w/ slow learners. Lots of success stories among those who are committed to serving this sector.

woodrow

October 18th, 2013
8:52 am

This is what happens when you move all the jobs overseas. Good luck with that.

blazerdawg

October 18th, 2013
8:55 am

“…South may rise again, but it likely won’t because of…educational quality.”

Just because a school is poor does not mean a school offers a low quality of instruction.

Just because a region features a larger portion of lower income students in public schools does not mean that a large number of students are not well educated in great private schools.

The media focuses on SAT scores, a test that GA students take in greater numbers than almost any other state. Dig deeper (National Center for Ed. Statistics) and most people will be surprised to find that GA students rank very well by race/state.

Not soon enough

October 18th, 2013
9:00 am

Given our political impasse and the likely consequences to this nation and the world from our debt-fueled, bankster-run economy, I am personally routing for the asteroid.

LydiasDad

October 18th, 2013
9:02 am

It’s simple. There are two major problems:

(1) Discipline
(2) Overwhelming influence of illegal alien adults, and their children.

Far too many resources are dedicated to both. But political correctness impedes the solution.

Hidden agenda

October 18th, 2013
9:06 am

Just remember, some of the first things Hitler and the Nazis did to ensure their control over society and their ability to eliminate their opposition and the “undesireables” were:

1. Banning of all gun ownership
2. Banning of all private and homeschooling (the homeschooling ban continues to this day in Germany)
3. Imposition of nationalized healthcare (where tens of thousands ‘disappeared’ during their hospitalization)

Private schools are not the problem. Parents and the government run monopoly bureaucratic system are the problem. Everyone wants to socialize the cost of their children but nobody wants to take any responsibility. That goes for the entire middle class as well as the poor. That goes for most of the parents reading this too.

RedNeck

October 18th, 2013
9:08 am

Are southern states not spending much on public schools because only poor kids go to public schools,
or are only poor kids going to public schools because states don’t spend much on public schools?

T-Man

October 18th, 2013
9:11 am

Simple – A states poor educational system = Lower income state. Not hard to understand the numbers. Folk’s until we get someone in the Gold Dome that is willing to put education first and make parents accountable the numbers will never change.

USC-69

October 18th, 2013
9:11 am

Actually JB – speaking from experience – the DC area (specifically Montgomery County) has the best public schools in the country. I would put many of them up against the best private schools in Atlanta. And, also – speaking from experience – private schools are corrupted by the need for tuition paying parents and may accept, and pass along, disruptive and poor learners, in order to keep wealthy parents happy. This is where standards and government rules (JEFF) have played an important role and kept us informed (as in this article) regarding the U.S. population’s educational accomplishments and deficiencies.

Devil's Advocate

October 18th, 2013
9:13 am

Before people come here poo pooing “the poor” let me ask why there is often such a negative perception of impoverished people? I’m a strong believer in the free market system and capitalism. I’m also a strong believer in logic and math that supports telling the story of financial matters.

As for the distribution of wealth in a society, if everyone were middle class wouldn’t that mean the top would have to send wealth to the poor to balance things out? It seems that people don’t want that so isn’t the alternative that there will be a small percentage of people with massive wealth, a larger percentage of people with moderate wealth, and a substantial number of people with low wealth? Isn’t this what we signed up for with our economy and way of life in America?

I ask these questions because we as individuals cannot continue to sing the praises of things while ignoring the negatives. Everything comes at a cost in life. The sooner individuals accept the realities of the world, the sooner we can move on to making this a better place.

Unfortunately, most of the same people who push the virtues of attaining wealth ignore that uncapped earning potential means someone else isn’t earning much at all. There is only a finite amount of money out there despite our government’s effort to keep printing more money to supplement what we borrow from other nations. Further, those of climb the highest tend exponentially gain more wealth which is why the top is so small and the bottom is so large. But that’s what we want right? We all want the opportunity to make as much as we can earn which means someone else won’t be able to earn that value from the greater pie.

There are only so many successful businesses that can exist at one time relative to the size of the population. If too many desirable businesses exist at once they would have to lower prices to compete for patrons and in turn wouldn’t make profit and so you wouldn’t have wealthy owners. At varying points in a market’s life cycle top earners emerge while those who “failed” slip down the scale.

Now, I’d suggest that a society is only as good as its weakest components. If I were in a financially advantageous position it would seem to me that rather than pooping on those beneath me I would do something to drive them to a positive life situation (not welfare) rather than casting them off to potentially become a menace to society.

So instead of complaining about people all the time (because human nature means we’ll always have something to complain about) how do us successful people come up with ideas to pull more people out of the doldrums of society to make future generations desire a better life and work towards positive? And yes, it does require “pulling” because people without motivation are not going to magically decide to be motivated without a life changing event of some sort.

Do we sit back and wait for random events to occur that jump start a few people’s lives or do we get active and do something to create life changing events to give these people a new perspective, if not just for their children?

T-Man

October 18th, 2013
9:26 am

Illegals aren’t the issue. Sounds like some of you are looking for a scape goat rather than the real problems. Always a race game with some of you. Poor Education system = Lower income folk’s.

Lynn43

October 18th, 2013
9:27 am

The only thing to cure this ailment is a huge emphasis on BIRTH CONTROL. With middle and high school unmarried, uneducated, uncultured girls producing hugh amounts of children who will grow up as weeds, what can you expect? The Republicans are “shooting themselves in the foot” with all their efforts to curb birth control. They should be be supporting and singing the praises of Planned Parenthood and giving out free birth control in all forms and information. It is not an honor but a disgrace to produce an illegitimate child or a child that you cannot afford to support.

Charles Hannum

October 18th, 2013
9:34 am

Could the newly discovered high percentage of low income students in Georgia public schools be “une impression fausse?” Perhaps the absolute number is about the same as before. The difference is that more and more high income kids attend private schools, these days. So, it might well be the ratio that changes instead of the absolute numbers.

Bernie31

October 18th, 2013
9:41 am

Well the Good Ole Boy’s Going thinking and Plan has been to Keep them DUMB and on the FARM!

lexi3

October 18th, 2013
9:45 am

T-Man October 18th, 2013 9:26 am “Illegals aren’t the issue. Sounds like some of you are looking for a scape goat rather than the real problems. Always a race game with some of you. ”

Actually, they are a large component of the problem. ESOL students cost twice as much as regular students to educate in the public school system. Illegals also have, on average, less education, fewer skills and lower incomes than the general population, and their presence can and does swamp many school systems.

East Cobb Parent

October 18th, 2013
9:46 am

Actually the state of Georgia does allocate additional funds for schools in Low Income areas in the form of Title 1 Schools. The problem is not poverty, teachers or funding. The problem is a lack of involvement by parents. Many of the Title 1 schools offer free tutoring before and after school; however, the participation rate at some locations is minimal. Also, 99% of the children of undocumented foreigners living in this country are US Citizens and are just as entitled to public schooling as every other child in this country. If your child fails or succeeds in life it is your responsibility and not because of “Illegals”, the teacher or poor government funding.

Bernie31

October 18th, 2013
9:47 am

You must understand Georgia Political Leaders HATE EDUCATION. They see it as waste of time and Ruining America and South. All the kids all mixed UP together is NOT gOOD!

They Must be SEPARATED by Color…They don’t ALL Learn the same WAY!

Also the future plan is school parent vouchers. Give mom and dad a check if you will and tell them to find their own school of their CHOICE. This means blurring the line of Church and State with State Education Dollars going to the MEGACHURCH of Pastor BOB. issues of prayer in school. No more public schools as we know it. but business, corporate and religious run schools of education in Georgia.

Not GONNA WORK!

S

October 18th, 2013
9:49 am

If the wealthy want to pay for their kids to go to private schools that’s fine by me as long as they still pay their share of school taxes (usually through property taxes). This helps the revenue numbers for the public schools while also keeping the class sizes down. Additionally, NO ILLEGAL immigrants should be allowed to attend, let alone get free lunches!

lexi3

October 18th, 2013
9:49 am

USC-69 October 18th, 2013 9:11 am ” Actually JB – speaking from experience – the DC area (specifically Montgomery County) has the best public schools in the country.”

Quite sure the earlier poster was writing about the public schools of Washington DC proper which do spend extravagantly on their students with no discernible positive effect on the vast majority. So, naturally, the public education establishment and race mongers want to eschew vouchers which might improve student outcomes.

abbysenia

October 18th, 2013
9:53 am

I noticed the comments about Virginia and Maryland… Now why is it that people always look at the federal government for being WRONG for paying people decently and there is not out cry over private industry UNDERpaying people?

DeezNuts

October 18th, 2013
9:54 am

Not much new info here. I already knew that the South have more poor than the rest of the country. Stands to reason that the schools would reflect that. The only interesting tidbit is the fact that the national average percentage has increased by so much from 2001 to 2011. The reason for the increase can be any number of things and I’m sure that we’ll have lots of guesses here in these comments. My guess is income inequality, corpratization of farming, weakend unions, a lower bar for what’s considered poor, inflation and of course Obama/Tea Party anarchists coalition to destroy us all.

Don't Tread

October 18th, 2013
9:58 am

“Is the assumption that rich kids will help make the poor kids smarter?”

No, it’s more of an intent to give government more power and limit freedom of choice in schools today (and all the rest of individual freedoms later), and to create absolute government dependency and control. It has nothing to do with helping anyone but themselves.

This is not the America my father and grandfathers fought for – they risked their lives serving our country and fought AGAINST people who would take our freedoms away.

MTer

October 18th, 2013
10:09 am

Just because a child gets free lunches at school does not mean the family is poor. Just like people can beat the system with food stamps, section 8 and the like, do you not think it possible to do the same with free meals for the kids? I laughed when I read Lydiadad’s statement about the illegal immigrant and their children. I have a friend who is not legal and she has 4 children, all US citizens. These are probably some of the smartest kids I have ever ran into and I have grandchildren myself. Her 4 and 5 year old sons are computer geeks, can upload to Youtube and the like, know how to hook your equipment up including cameras, etc. and her 11 and 9 year old girls win all kinds of awards in school leading their classes in achievements for excellence. The father and mother both work and only want to contribute to being here. I am so proud of my “grandfriends.”

Bumper

October 18th, 2013
10:14 am

The prospect of legions of poor, illiterate people coming of age does not bode well for Georgia and the United States. The primary beneficiary, of course, will be the Democrat Party.

MTer

October 18th, 2013
10:17 am

To Lexi3: You should know the Hispanic family I know and then you could eat your words about their being undereducated. Their mother taught kindergarten when she was in Mexico and their father is a very hard worker, working to help support his family. You need to find a family such as this and educate YOURSELF.

Lucio

October 18th, 2013
10:18 am

Poor students do perform better when attending mixed schools, while better-off students maintain their academic performance. Several good and affordable books lay out proof, including “The Future of School Integration: Socioeconomic Diversity as an Education Reform Strategy” and “Hope and Despair in the American City: Why There Are No Bad Schools in Raleigh”. Quality reform becomes more tricky in Georgia where we start with a high poverty rate and so many better-off students go to private schools, but this reform (socioeconomic mixing) would be implemented on a district-by-district basis as practical. For example, Cobb County could do it.

suga

October 18th, 2013
10:27 am

Georgia Schools have problems because……we have a lot of single MOMS w/ 4 or more kids, no Dad in the home, NO VALUES to learn from. Grandmothers are NOW 28YRS., GREATGRAND MOTHERS IN THERE 40. We have a lot of uneducated mothers & dads today. Teachers have a hard time trying to teach these kids when they are at school, a lot of these problems start at home. No respect at home at school in streets, never seen so much disrespect from kids in all my days. If you whoop your kids the police can lock you up, or if pop them one good time you can be locked up. I tell you the government started a whole lot of mess, now it has back fired. The whole school systems is out dated.

Chris

October 18th, 2013
10:29 am

So, how many of these students also have the latest iPhones or newest game system?

kb

October 18th, 2013
10:36 am

Free vasectomies – truthfully, we need to find practical ways to reduce babies born into poverty.

Sandy

October 18th, 2013
10:36 am

Families need to be responsible for instilling educational values. My son did not attend one of the best school districts in the metro Atlanta area, in fact they had very few AP or honors courses, but he attended a top notch university on full scholarship. We took advantage of everything the school had to offer, including extracurricular activities like science club and Beta Club. I’m a first generation college student and he is second generation. It is family values and choice that determine whether or not we are well educated. My parents placed a high value on education and/or learning a trade. I received the Pell grant and made my way through college, while my brother actually went to a technical college. Yes, the road was filled with lots of hard sacrifices, but I think our decisions have a lot to do with our individual economic situations. We need to take responsibility for our individual situations. And yes, federal government programs helped me through the tough times in my life. I received WIC and also the Pell Grant to attend college. These government programs helped me through tough times, but now I’m able to give back! I know the value of government programs because they helped me, but I also don’t think they should be a way of life for people. At our national parks, they tell you not to feed the animals, because then they stop foraging for food and become dependent on others. What makes people so different???

Think through the stats

October 18th, 2013
10:41 am

What a crock. Low income students are more likely to drop out, have lower test scores, etc… Yet California has some of the best schools in the country leading into one of the best college systems in the country. Yet they are only 3% behind Georgia. Perhaps it isn’t “poor” that’s our problem.

Also to Lucio – “Poor students do perform better when attending mixed schools, while better-off students maintain their academic performance.” I don’t want my smart kid maintaining. I want my smart kid excelling. That’s why your supposed fixes don’t work. I’m not going to sit around while my smart kid teaches the low-performing kid.

MiltonMan

October 18th, 2013
10:45 am

Poor students make great democrats who control the poor school disticts. Endless cycle but the democrats need a dumbed down electorate to keep them in power..

MiltonMan

October 18th, 2013
10:53 am

“…including “The Future of School Integration: Socioeconomic Diversity as an Education Reform Strategy” and “Hope and Despair in the American City: Why There Are No Bad Schools in Raleigh”.”

Wake County (Raleigh) has forced busing that takes kids from the suburbs and places them in inner-city schools. Residents were sick of this and recently threw out board members who adopted this policy.

yaj@yahoo.com

October 18th, 2013
10:55 am

The data isn’t accurate. Many people lie on the lunch application.

Why Not?

October 18th, 2013
10:58 am

Ok,

Who can fault anyone who could afford to send their kids to private school?

I sometimes don’t uderstand these types of studies (they only seem to point out the major advantages of the rich folks).

We need to accept that we have folks in our society that were born with silver spoons and it is what it is. The policy of everyone should have the same chances is crazy – life does not work that why.

Unless we become a nation of CLONES (i.e. Stepford Wives)….there will always be folks that are smarter, wealthier, and better looking that someone else.

That’s life – IT IS WHAT IT IS.

Give Thanks to Private School Families

October 18th, 2013
10:59 am

Thank you to families that send their kids to private schools…their kids will thrive as adults and pay more taxes so the poor buy electronics while living on entitlements…Section 8 housing, EBT, SNAP, social security, medicare, medicaid, future single-payer healthcare, etc.

Everybody’s happy and we’ll all avoid speaking Chinese one day.

James Jordan

October 18th, 2013
11:00 am

Well hell’s bells, just take the rest of my money and give it to them. Most of these kids are poor because their momma’s, (most don’t have daddy’s) are slaves to the welfare system. Uneducated free-loaders created by the federal government and manipulated for votes…!

Kinda shameful ain’t it ???

Why Not?

October 18th, 2013
11:04 am

P.S.

There are a lot of people who have pulled themseleves out of the slums and trailer parks – who have earned there success.

Why not take advantage of the “best” things life has to offer.

Oh yeah – I am going to send my kids to the best schools (because I know what’s its like to go to a school where you always have to worry about drugs and gangs).

Yeah I am going to wear the finest clothes and drink the best champange….

I don’t need Obama Care I can afford to pay my own health cost… yeah I am blessed and I don’t feel a bit guilty.

I got it the hard way – know you go out and get yours…..

Like I stated earlier —–IT IS WHAT IT IS.

WHY NOT?????????????????

Why Not?

October 18th, 2013
11:25 am

You will notice my grammer and spelling errors in my previous posts. I do apologize.

You see I did not have the education that I can afford to provide for my kids. But to be honest it’s not so much the money but it’s the parents.

Regardless of the income level – parents need to get involved in their kids education.

If the school is not teaching them – then you take the time to teach them – change schools – bottom line is you find a way to give your kids things that you did not have.

Tha’ts the solution – but some of us need to stop looking at what someone else have or don’t have. Don’t hate….find a way to get your own success (whatever you define it to be).

Why not???

Deanna

October 18th, 2013
11:38 am

Slavery was brought about by businesses trying to get the most amount of work for the least amount of cost. What are businesses doing today, wanting the most amount of work for the least amount of cost. Is it any wonder more and more people are becoming poor?

DeezNuts

October 18th, 2013
11:58 am

No man is an island. We can live in a country that treats it’s poor like trash or we can live in a country that treats it’s poor like humans and is willing to accept the fact that a percentage will game the system and accept it to help the ones who are willing to help themselves.

MTer

October 18th, 2013
11:58 am

Since when did social security become an entitlement when you pay in it all your working life? Just wondering…

DeezNuts

October 18th, 2013
12:12 pm

Exactly, MTer. I always hear SS being tossed around as an entitlement, which it’s not. I like it though because it identifies uninformed folks I’d rather not waste my time trying to educate.

Joel

October 18th, 2013
12:17 pm

What I don’t understand is why these students are getting free lunches, but their parents are picking them up in brand new BMW’s, Cadillacs and Benz’s. Something is wrong here in Gwinnett!

Oldtimer

October 18th, 2013
12:28 pm

The south has been the poorest part of the country since the civil war…..

Oldtimer

October 18th, 2013
12:31 pm

As a retired teacher, I will also say income verification is never checked for correctness.

Oldtimer

October 18th, 2013
12:36 pm

TedNeck……we spend a ton on education, especially in the poorest school.

DeezNuts

October 18th, 2013
12:38 pm

Could be any number of things. They could be gaming the system. It could be someone besides a parent picking up the kids. Or it could be that people in this country are still free despite what we keep hearing from the Right. Free to make choices we think are stupid. Could be that driving a Cadillac is more important to them than owning a house or paying for food and electricity. The free lunches are our elected government’s effort to minimize the impact on the children of parents making stupid decisions. It’s similar to local statutes making it illegal to abuse your children.

DeezNuts

October 18th, 2013
12:39 pm

My comment was in response to Joel’s question regarding free lunches and the cars their parents drive.

Roach

October 18th, 2013
12:45 pm

It is a new kind of “separate but equal.” When black kids were segregated into their own schools, those schools were neglected and underfunded. Now, with better-off families having fled to private schools, state legislatures neglect the public schools altogether. This explains why legislatures feel free to turn their backs on public education–ain’t their kids.

lexi3

October 18th, 2013
12:52 pm

MTer October 18th, 2013 10:17 am ” To Lexi3: You should know the Hispanic family I know and then you could eat your words about their being undereducated. Their mother taught kindergarten when she was in Mexico and their father is a very hard worker, working to help support his family. You need to find a family such as this and educate YOURSELF.”

Couldn’t have been clearer. At 9:45 a.m. I wrote: “Illegals also have, on average, less education, fewer skills and lower incomes than the general population, and their presence can and does swamp many school systems.”

Meeting this special family isn’t going to teach anyone about the averages. Further, the fact that the father is a hard worker doesn’t indicate anything about his education or skill level. If the facts I recite are foreign to you, it is not likely you are in a position to educate folks about these matters. Bon appetit.

Paul

October 18th, 2013
1:07 pm

I wonder, and this is a serious question, if everyone who requests free or reduced lunches actually has their income verified. It’s not inconceivable that a whole lot of people are getting free or reduced lunches that don’t actually fall below the required income levels. If all you have to do is fill out some paperwork and nobody actually verifies the numbers then it seems to me people might take advantage of that. Do you have to provide a copy of an income tax return? It seems like simply using the number of people on free or reduced lunches to label students as poor might be a bit misleading.

Hidden agenda

October 18th, 2013
1:53 pm

Clearly the most important thing for most parents in America is that someone else beside them MUST pay for their child’s education. Values like personal responsibility are fine when we talk about everything else, but everyone in society, every business in society, etc. MUST be forced to pay taxes so that parents don’t actually have to pay the full cost or take full responsibility for their children’s education. Sure, this is the essence of Socialism, but conservative parents love socialism too if it means that the neighbors without kids are forced to pay for their kids’ education. Conservative parents love socialism too if it means that somebody with a big expensive house and 1 kid pays way more than they do with a smaller house and 6 kids. I mean this is the essence of American values right??

But a “free” education is a right you say (really, must have missed that in the list of natural rights). An uneducated society is something we cannot afford you say. I guess being in 48th to 50th place nationally and way down the list internationally thanks to the government running education is working out real well. But hey, who am I to point out the inherent immorality of having the government steal money so your kids can get an education although it would be immoral and illegal for you to do the same individually?

Conservatives accurately point out how government intervention into the medical system (they currently control 50% of every dollar spent – and that is before Obamacare) has caused prices to rise and quality to decline. But hey, the fact that government controls nearly every aspect of K-12 education in this country certainly couldn’t have done the same here right?? Effective, quality education that was affordable for even the poor could never be available if we got the government out of the way could it? The free market is a great thing unless it threatens the socialist education system that I exploit on behalf of my children right???

T-Man

October 18th, 2013
2:13 pm

lexi3 October18. There are 1,639,077 public school students in Georgia. How many would you say are illegal? Do you really think they are a big reason why we have poor kids in public schools? Really. Just a Race thing leave it out. We are talking people here.
. We need to drill down to some of the real reasons Georgia has a high number of poor.. How about. Education =money. One of the worse education systems in the US has a high number of poor public school students. maybe just one of the contributing factors

Jake

October 18th, 2013
2:55 pm

Intelligence is related to genetics. Most (of course not all) poor people have lower IQ’s. This nation is doomed.

Thor

October 18th, 2013
3:01 pm

MiltonMan: And Republicans don’t depend on a dumbed down electorate here in Jawja to keep them in power? Who else but a dumbed down electorate would put a Nathan Deal in the governor’s mansion. I’m an independent middle of the roader and have no great love for the Dims but the Repubs have proven this past week that they will plunge this country and by extension the rest of the world into economic chaos to satisfy their narrow demands. Are you suggesting that we look to them for our answers and salvation?

Bernie31

October 18th, 2013
3:09 pm

I love how my lord and savior Obama and his minions in the media can blame everything on the Republicans and the Tea party. My fellow undocumented democrats are ruining this country but if you disagree we can call you a racist and get away with it. I love politically correct America where my lord Obama can do nothing wrong.

Honey Boo Boo (D)

October 18th, 2013
3:13 pm

I am poor and from Jawja and I supported Marack Obama. I plede my allegiance to the man that promises to give me and mama june freebies.

@ T-Man

October 18th, 2013
3:17 pm

“Just a Race thing leave it out. We are talking people here.”

—————————————————————

The feds break down poor into three races: Black, Caucasion, and Asian. This is by design so that lationo can be dumped into the caucasion category.

Race means everything to the feds. They don’t care if you are human.

Irishmafia116

October 18th, 2013
3:45 pm

What a crock! I did a research study of “eligibility for Free lunch” in grad school. Some shocking results. Schools “eligible” for Free lunch also get an array of other federal dollars, so it is in the best interest of the school to sign up every child.
Like we are told with the new ACA the schools depend on honesty when people declare they are eligible. The SCHOOLS are supposed to be the police, in checking. so they want to cut off their own funding? there is NO PENALTY under federal law -other than losing the Free lunch if you somehow ? How? Caught. A study conducted in NC where people were voluntarily interviewed-with no fear of retribution-whose children were receiving Free lunch (and in many cases FREE breakfast as well) found that 42% were not eligible to receive the benefit. Shocking I know, kinda like finding out people lied to get Free cell phones. Then the government uses these bogus stats to come up with crapola like this article. Reminds me of a fiend who was an in management with the census bureau. Here is a question they used to determne hunger in the USA (still used today BTW).
1. In the past year have you ever been hungry for more than 24 hours? WHAT? They use this to determine that people are hungry and starving!

Bernie31

October 18th, 2013
3:46 pm

Bernie31 @ 3:09 pm – Ya gotta Love the GOOBER Ghosting….:)

A Conservative Voice

October 18th, 2013
3:49 pm

Close ‘em all down. They ain’t no good no ways……didn’t teach me nothing :) Seriously, we’ve got a big problem and his name is Arne Duncan. Of course, I know he’s only carrying out the orders given to him by his boss. Truth is, our public schools are in the mess they’re in because this is exactly where the party in power wants them to be. The more poor people there are, the more people on welfare, hence the more people that will vote democratic. And that’s the truth folks, believe it or not.

MARY BETH

October 18th, 2013
3:56 pm

wow is their anything good about living in Georgia anymore???seem like their is always something negative about the state and the south…..are the negatives starting to outweigh the positives??is it because so many from the slums of the north and northeast have moved here??aka Detroit,st,louis,chicago,cleveland new york??

MARY BETH

October 18th, 2013
4:13 pm

REPUBLICANS HAVE RUINED OUR COUNTRY..after 16 days of their very hateful attitude..and causing severe damage to our economy they have proven that they will do anything to get what they want even if they have to shut down the great country they claim to love..they will never get another vote from me..they are unpatriotic

South Cobb Parent advocate

October 18th, 2013
6:35 pm

I reside in the Six Flags Drive are in Austell, Georgia. The elementary school for the area is 90 percent free or reduced lunch. The School College and Career performance Index Score was a 59 on a scale of 100. The feeder high school graduation rate is 59 percent. The school has 18 apartment/rental communities that attends the school. The average rent ranges between $500-$800 a month. Less than 20 percent of the rental communities receive Section 8 vouchers. I say this to state that most of the residents, that reside in the rental communities either work low wage jobs, live off of child support, or other assistance (SSI, school financial aid, unemployment) to get by. The apartment community I reside in has 144 apartments, Only half of the lease holders have high school diplomas, less than 5 lease holders have attended or graduated from a 4 year college or university.The parents have done the math if their income increases, then they would lose their government benefits, free lunch, medical insurance. The parents are very creative when it comes to their finances. They either just have accepted the fact that just getting by is enough for them or just floating on until they can do better. How can we encourage them to do more???

another comment

October 18th, 2013
6:46 pm

The real culprit is the free and reduced lunch fraud in Georgia. The supersized districts push the filling out of the Free and Reduced Lunch Applications. They know that they can easily get black and hispanic parents to fill them out. They throw special parties and events for Title one families. They hand out forms for free Sports Physicals, they receive free tutoring for their children. All sorts of bennies.

They are encouraged either to write in amounts below the limit, or just leave the amout of income blank. The schools receive almost twice the funding for Free and Reduced lunch students as for non. So in order to support their 12,000 to 18,000 adult jobs for 100,000 students they must encourage as many free lunch students as possible.

A whisle blower suit needs to really be done to investigate this massive fraud. Who wants to join me. Federal Whitslerblowers get a substantial percentage of the savings. I know it is their. Another person and I turned in a Soviergn Citizen to the IRS. Too bad we did it Anoumously, they recovered over 6 million dollars and the couple got 20 years in jail. But then this crazy fool had tried to run me over with his car in a parking deck. The US Marshalls did catch him attempting to flee to S. America with Gold Coins in large quanities on his person, with the lattitude and longitude for a port, with out extradition.

Tiltle 1 teacher

October 18th, 2013
6:46 pm

As a teacher, I can tell you that there seems to be a great deal of fraud in the free lunch/breakfast program. The parents can put whatever household income they want on those forms. I saw kids with gainfully employed parents, nice clothes, and shoes getting free lunch. It makes me sad that our country allows this to go on. I think the government wants to keep as many people possible depend on them. As some of the previous posters stated, many on the free lunch program are children of illegals.

MrLiberty

October 18th, 2013
7:12 pm

Mary Beth – I was here for the entire 16 days and I can assure you that the republicans did not “shut down the great country they claim to love.” The country was running like a dream. It always does. It does not REQUIRE the intervention of the totalitarian state to operate. Businesses actually know where to by raw materials, how to get them transported, how to convert them through a manufacturing process into stuff people want, and how to get it to those people. They know how to make the products safely without someone telling them how (or at least someone from the government, that’s for sure), they know how to keep customers happy and how to address their concerns if they are not.

Maybe the magical world of state benevolence that you live in was “shut down” for 16 days, but all I noticed or heard about were some national parks that could easily be operated by the states or private conservation groups like the Sierra Club, the Nature Conservancy or similar in a manner that is equal to or better than the feds, a bunch of granite slabs that had to be protected from veterans who funded their constructions, and a slew of other government offices that appeared to be hand selected to inflict the maximum amount of misery on the general public. Now of course if there were market alternatives to these federally-monopolized services, the US citizens would have had a choice, but no such luck. And we even hear from several park rangers that they were told specifically to make things as miserable as possible for the tourists who were caught up in the vindictive response to the financial impasse.

The last time I checked, one of our founding fathers railed against the dangers and destructiveness of the public debt. He did everything he could to eliminate the debt he inherited from his predecessor John Adams. The folks who stood up to raise awareness of the destructiveness of our current debt and the abomination of Obamacare don’t seem like America haters, they seem like government haters, and the guys who founded this nation were too, so that’s puts them in great company.

You need to get some perspective and smell the $17Trillion debt, the $1.3Trillion projected annual deficits for the next decade and the $250 Trillion in unfunded liabilities from SS, Medicare, and Medicare PartD that this country is facing. The government and this country will be shutting down soon if something serious isn’t done.

MrLiberty

October 18th, 2013
7:21 pm

The one thing this so-called shutdown should have shown every American is that we have unwisely allowed the Federal Government to stick its nose into far, far too many critical and important aspects of our lives and our economy. They are clearly incapable of doing a good job, and when push comes to shove, their fiscal irresponsibility jeopardizes the ability of everyday Americans to simply live their lives, run their businesses, etc.

Did you know that breweries have to get federal permission to change the recipes in their beer? They need permission to put the same recipe that’s in a 12oz bottle into a 22 oz bottle, they must have their ingredient list and even their label approved by the Federal Government. They even need FEDERAL permission to open a beer-tasting room at their brewery. Now I am no fan of the state over-regulation of alcohol and all the corruption that comes with it, but don’t all of these things seem like things the state or local governments should be handling?

What SHOULD the role of government be? Should they be our parents to watch over us and micromanage our lives and our economic situations from cradle to grave? Because that is exactly what they have become. It is not fiscally sustainable and is contrary to liberty and freedom.

Z

October 18th, 2013
7:46 pm

Some people are just full of Beans, nothing but hot air coming out..

another comment

October 18th, 2013
8:04 pm

The States with the low Free Lunch Rate also have mostly small one high school large districts. I went to one of these up North. We surely could have qualified for free lunch or even food stamps. But in small community based districts, where people live their whole lives you have pride and people don’t do that. My parents never would. The only assistant they every took was the Pell Grant, Work Study and Student Loans for us to go to college and graduate.

Even today, the school district I graduated from only has a 3% Free and reduced lunch rate. I worked in the local grocery store more than that % get food stamps. Especially in the winters when the dairy farms have a tough time and the heating bills of the old farm houses. But they never subjected their kids to the free lunches. They had more pride than that. They still do. We also had all but two girls who got pregnant in 9 th grade graduate out of a class of 367.

There is also a vocational school shared with the next school district, that teaches real trades. Their are multiple diploma tracks, because not everyone is college bound. Trades are needed and pay much better than dropouts.

another comment

October 18th, 2013
8:18 pm

@ Mr. Liberty the Government shutdown cost the public in excess of 24 Billion dollars added to the debt. Every single Government contract, which were highly promoted by the “W” administration had to be given a stop work. A stop work on a contract, entititles the contractor to seek payment for the cost of shutting down. They then 17 days latter have to be re-issued a new change order to start work again. That also entitles them to another change order for re-mobilization. Only the 1% at the top get the money. The the contract workers.

another comment

October 18th, 2013
8:24 pm

Another reason it is low in MD and VA where Federal Employees live, is because it clearly states on the form for Free lunch that it is a Federal Crime to commit purjury by signing. If you are a Federal Employee and you Falsely state your income on this form, you could be fired in a second. So if they ever did a verification, which is easiest to do with a Federal Employee, you have lost your job and retirement 30 days later. Although I have seen some morons steal cell phones and easilly traceable stuff from other Federal Employees and sold them. Their is stupid.
Of course, this was with the Welfare to work experiment.

Waheema

October 18th, 2013
8:24 pm

Public education stopped being about children a long time ago. Public education is about public educators and they don’t really care at all about the kids. Parents who care about their children are increasingly moving to other solutions. Guess what is increasingly left behind?

LHE

October 18th, 2013
8:35 pm

I retired from public education with 30 years experience and have taught the last nine years in a small independent school. The number one difference is ratio of teacher to student. It is really that basic. When I have a class of ten students, I get to know each one, can help them in the areas where they are struggling and spend extra time being sure they grasp each concept before moving on. All total today I teach about 60 students. When I taught at a large public high school my average class was 30, today it is 35 and each day I was responsible for over 150 students. That is simple math that anyone can understand, Until we value all children regardless of their background or economic status the south will never move forward, Sadly it takes money to create a small classroom. More classroom teachers are the solution. Central offices and supervisory positions need to be carefully evaluated. There are many who are on the payrolls who only shuffle projects and create busy work to justify their jobs. The state of Georgia has many dedicated teachers who are working long hours to try and improve the lives of students. I have loved every minute of my teaching career, but public and private.

FIGMO2

October 18th, 2013
9:12 pm

To be considered poor, a student must be eligible for free or reduced lunches.

I can assure you that the free or reduced lunch program is as abused as the vast majority of all government run programs.

CPS says 26 employees lied get their kids free or reduced-price lunches

A Tribune analysis in January highlighted flaws in the federal lunch program. School districts reap rewards for enrolling as many students as possible in the program, in part because those numbers are used to help determine poverty levels and contribute toward determining allocations of billions of dollars to districts.

At the same time, federal law restricts school districts from verifying the vast majority of the lunch applications they receive. At CPS, where 82 percent of the district’s roughly 403,000 students are receiving either free or reduced-price meals, fewer than 1 percent of all applications are vetted for accuracy, the Tribune found.

http://articles.chicagotribune.com/2012-07-14/news/ct-met-cps-free-lunch-investigation-0714-20120714_1_cps-employees-reduced-price-chicago-public-schools-employees

I wouldn’t count on those numbers being accurate.

retired teacher 12

October 18th, 2013
9:13 pm

For 22 years I taught in Dekalb County Schools in at risk schools. Every year 80 to 90 percent of all students qualified for free and reduced lunches. Many of the students really did qualify for the program. However, there isn’t an accountablility component to qualify for the program. You don’t have to show pay stubs, medicaid cards, or tax returns. The parent just makes sure that they put an amount down that is below the poverty level. Believe me, there is a lot of dishonesty that occurs. When Gingrich was in congress, he tried to implement some type of accountibility but it never got off the ground.

MrLiberty

October 18th, 2013
9:58 pm

The billions of dollars of contracts with the Federal government are just the tip of the iceberg. We have to ask ourselves with this much debt hanging over our heads and those of multiple future generations (over $250 Trillion in unfunded liabilities alone for just SS, Medicare, and Medicare part D), when are we finally going to stay STOP and start slashing government spending? We need $1.3 Trillion cut from the budget IMMEDIATELY just to balance it, let alone go after the $17 Trillion debt. Sorry, the W baiting isn’t going to work on me. I think he was an absolutely horrible president as is our current one. Both major parties are the only ones to blame for all of this. The other parties have never been given a chance at the Federal level. Seems now might be the right time.

Unit

October 18th, 2013
11:28 pm

I have been teaching 21 years, and the last 12 years in Cobb County. I have witnessed as another writer posted, many middle to upper-class parents pulling their kids from our school or schools in place of private schools. If legislators actually knew how many disruptions ( fights, hallway noise, disrespect, drugs, no planning time) to learning environment take place in a day, they wouldn’t be worried about spending thousands of dollars on worthless recycled learning strategies, more importantly; PUT DISCIPLINE BACK INTO THE SCHOOLS. We have a great admin team, but they too hardly have the time to even visit classrooms much less be seen during the day due to mounds and mounds of paperwork the state and county has pass on to them. What’s the answer? Well, unfortunately, nothing will change because we cannot go into the homes and fix what has been done wrong to a child for only God knows how long. Therefore, as one high school administrator said to me a few months ago, ” there are so many kids falling through the cracks that it’s unstoppable” .

lexi3

October 19th, 2013
5:20 am

T-Man October 18th, 2013 2:13 pm “lexi3 October18. There are 1,639,077 public school students in Georgia. How many would you say are illegal? Do you really think they are a big reason why we have poor kids in public schools? Really. Just a Race thing leave it out…”

In 2011 the AJC cited a statistic by FAIR declaring that there were 133,262 illegal immigrant students enrolled in the Georgia public school system. The AJC then used a US Dept. of Education figure of the average cost to educate a student in our schools in its effort to determine how much illegals cost Georgia taxpayers (though the AJC never did the math in its report). http://www.politifact.com/georgia/statements/2011/feb/18/federation-american-immigration-reform/georgia-pols-use-report-push-immigration-reform/

That number, $10,600 per student per year, which grossly understates the actual cost of educating ESOL students (because it ignores the extra resources such as translators, specialized and augmented instruction…) would yield a yearly cost to educated illegals at $1.412 billion per year. And, that is an unrealistically low estimate.

So, yes, I do think those children whose parents have well below average incomes, would pull down the statewide income average and, as I wrote earlier, in some school districts (In Gwinnett, DeKalb, Sandy Springs to name a few) the concentration of illegal immigrants is very high. No one said they were the only component of the low income average, but let’s not pretend that their presence here is a financial boon or the costs of educating, feeding and giving them healthcare is negligible.

USC-69

October 19th, 2013
5:39 am

What is it with this right wing obsession that someone may be getting free food? Get over it. Make free lunch for everybody. Corporations have sequestered trillions in cash and are paying millions to toady CEOs and Vice Presidents. Those people can afford to make public education in the U.S. the best in the world. Note the advice from experienced teachers above. More teachers. Reduced class size. Superb discipline. Removal of active disruption (and that includes the right wing adults who are stuffing their pockets, damaging society, and attempting to create a slave class to maintain their oligarchy).

Rick

October 19th, 2013
5:45 am

It comes as no surprise that GA puts football before education. In addition, some schools teach religion instead of science. Time for GA to enter the 21st century.

Greg

October 19th, 2013
5:52 am

The low poverty states have lower percentages of minority (Black and Hispanic) populations. Not that hard to figure out. Now, a more interesting study would be educational achievement by spending. Superficially people would conclude that higher spending per pupil results in higher scores, but those areas also probably have more parental involvement and richer parents. I think the solution is vouchers for every student, let the schools, public or private, compete for the students.

lexi3

October 19th, 2013
6:04 am

USC-69 October 19th, 2013 5:39 am “What is it with this right wing obsession that someone may be getting free food? Get over it. Make free lunch for everybody.”

Perhaps because many are getting it illegally, as described above repeatedly. About 47 million americans, 15% of our population, get food “assistance.”
http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/the-fix/wp/2013/07/11/the-fight-over-food-stamps-explained/

While we ought to help feed people who are unable to feed themselves, including the aged, the infirm and dependent children, there is much to be lost in creating and growing a permanent underclass beholden to a government for its sustenance and unwilling to work to support themselves and their broods.

The education establishment always argues they need more money to make things better. They get the money. Things get worse. They need more money…

Dirty South

October 19th, 2013
6:51 am

Interesting article and comments. If I take into consideration the opinions posted…then the general rational is that…”poor” kids are the criminals, public school teachers are loser drunks collecting a check and the illegals are to blame for anchor babying the school system…correct? My neighborhood must be abnormal…the kid growing pot in the basement lived in the affluent subdivision. The Public School teachers are professionals…much like those kids parents…that go to “private” schools. I always considered “private” schools more expensive babysitter…so mommy dearest could stay at home on her pills, get drunk and go to the gym…while Corporate Dad…took the secretary out to “lunch.” And the “anchor baby issue”…who employs these illegal parents…so we the “poor” parents of all these criminals in PUBLIC school can help you get you house cleaned, lawn cut, precious babies watched…LOL.

GB101

October 19th, 2013
6:52 am

If these numbers look a little odd, and it seems hard to believe that so many students are poor, the reason is the definition of poverty used by the study: eligibility for free or reduced lunches.

The census bureau’s definition of poverty for a family of four is 23,200 or so.

Keith

October 19th, 2013
8:05 am

The barrier to academic performance is not poverty. Many of us had parents or grandparents who were extremely poor but valued education. Their children did well in school and subsequently rose in income. The problem is an underlying set of attitudes that leads to both the poverty and the poor performance. Public schools have their hands tied because they are not allowed to address attitudes and values.

dalepues

October 19th, 2013
8:17 am

You’re a jackass George. I have suspected this for some time now, but this leaves no doubt:

“… though I am sure some educators will suggest the ever-popular “throw money at it.””

1. This has never been a popular or serious solution, but an idiotic right wing meme to slander their opposition.
2. You have insulted educators, who probably have the most difficult, under-appreciated, low-paying jobs in these U.S.A.
3. You reveal your own ignorance, causing one to wonder how you got this cush job.

Jack ®

October 19th, 2013
8:19 am

Being poor builds character. I still appreciate indoor plumbing.

from elsewhere

October 19th, 2013
8:28 am

if you send your kids to public schools and you have a choice financially to do something else do not be surprised later by the outcome. Public education is not free to begin with, but a nice house car or cruise is not remotely as important as your child’s education. Low parental investment (involvement as well as $) matches the bitter tyranny of low expectations. it will take a couple of generations of HOPE and completely overhauling public education system to turn that around. The public system is a proven failure. My kids are not a social experiment. It’s too bad that no one is really trying to fix the system because the system is in control, not the parents and students. Orwell was right- the animals are in control at the zoo.

Mary Elizabeth

October 19th, 2013
9:17 am

To improve educational quality in Georgia, Georgia’s legislators and Governor should focus more upon programs and policies that will help the poor and working lower class rise into the middle class. Moreover, they should focus more upon building the middle class, outward and upward, so that the economy will grow from Georgia’s middle class outward. In addition, they should focus upon improving Georgia’s traditional public schools, which are already operative, by funding them adequately and by supporting programs that, and teachers who, will work to improve Georgia’s traditional public schools. They should take a lead in encouraging traditional school systems throughout Georgia to reach out into the communities surrounding their traditional public schools and educate those communities as to educational principles and strategies. They should reform the unacceptable poverty level of citizens in Georgia, first by expanding Medicaid in Georgia for those who fall into the 100% to 133% of poverty level, who are now falling through the cracks of medical insurance/medical care possibilities, and stop being so ideologically-based. The Governor and legislators should become more educationally-based, with a strong pubic school commitment to equal educational delivery for all students and for their families throughout Georgia.

lexi3

October 19th, 2013
10:12 am

Keith October 19th, 2013 8:05 am ” The barrier to academic performance is not poverty. Many of us had parents or grandparents who were extremely poor but valued education. ..The problem is an underlying set of attitudes that leads to both the poverty and the poor performance. Public schools have their hands tied because they are not allowed to address attitudes and values.”

That hits the nail on the head, but I don’t agree with your last sentence. “Educators” have been indoctrinating three generations of their captive audiences in collectivism, progressive misnotions and blame America pabulum, which, among other things, encourage the disintegration of the nuclear family and shifting responsibility for child-rearing to the state. The courts, in turn, have manufactured a series of due process requirements that impede the ability of schools to raise those near orphans by teaching their charges that violating social norms and behavioral minima of human beings have adverse consequences.

HarryCrews

October 19th, 2013
12:53 pm

All the fraud written about here, occurs at the local level — by your neighbors, co-workers, etc. The same goes with Medicare, SS, nearly all government programs. The problem lies here, but we blame Washington.

Would a better educated work force prevent this? How do you obtain a better educated workforce? Better public education. Public education is to be provided, by law in the Georgia Constitution.

Be a part of the solution or be prepared to be ruled by even bigger fools then are your leaders now.

“It took policy elites most of the 20th Century to figure out that poor children can learn. Now they need to realize that poor children can do other things, as well. Yes, they need smart teachers and strong content. And yes, their academic progress should be tracked to ensure that they are on course in developing core competencies. But more generally, poor children need access to the same kind of deeply human present and multidimensional future that we all wish for our own children. That should be our rallying cry. That should be our highest aim.”

http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/answer-sheet/wp/2013/10/18/what-poor-children-need-in-school/

HarryCrews

October 19th, 2013
1:10 pm

“Educators” have been indoctrinating three generations of their captive audiences in collectivism, progressive misnotions and blame America pabulum, which, among other things, encourage the disintegration of the nuclear family and shifting responsibility for child-rearing to the state. The courts, in turn, have manufactured a series of due process requirements that impede the ability of schools to raise those near orphans by teaching their charges that violating social norms and behavioral minima of human beings have adverse consequences.”

As a public school graduate from an 8 AAAAA high school in Georgia I can attest that this is the biggest bunch of paranoid, BS out there.

lexi3

October 19th, 2013
2:06 pm

HarryCrews October 19th, 2013 1:10 pm ” ” “Educators” have been indoctrinating three generations of their captive audiences in collectivism, progressive misnotions and blame America pabulum, which, among other things, encourage the disintegration of the nuclear family and shifting responsibility for child-rearing to the state…” ” “As a public school graduate from an 8 AAAAA high school in Georgia I can attest that this is the biggest bunch of paranoid, BS out there”

Interesting to hear about a public school grad who finished 8AAAAA high school in three generations. Might explain part of runaway costs of public education.

Bernie31

October 19th, 2013
6:17 pm

For The Most Part Georgia’s Public School Kids are Poor! but their is a sizable number of LUCKY GENE POOL CLUB Members, Too!

All they have to DO is Show UP and Smile……That is their JOB!

MARY BETH

October 20th, 2013
4:30 am

Georgia and Atlanta has been in a downward spiral since governor barnes was voted out…and republicans have taken over…we use to be a progressive southern state..now were an Alabama,wanna be

HarryCrews

October 20th, 2013
10:14 am

A real master of the obvious, as predictable as a NASCAR mullet. Attack the messenger, instead of the message with an incongruous retort; miserably designed to mask an asinine diatribe based in paranoia and demagoguery instead of citing said argument with example and fact.

Tool.

Rafe Hollister

October 20th, 2013
7:47 pm

Sounds like separate but unequal.

Yet, the Dems fight tooth and nail to keep the status quo. I’m guessing they have more loyalty to the teaching industry (unions) than they do to the underprivileged students.

Road Scholar

October 21st, 2013
7:26 am

How about boot camps for those who lack discipline?

Road Scholar

October 21st, 2013
7:32 am

Rafe:”Yet, the Dems fight tooth and nail to keep the status quo..”

Last time I looked, the repubs control every high office in State government and both Houses of state government. Throw on top we have at least 2 “doctors” who are dumb as dirt in Congress. Are you surprised that they are both repubs? And you blame the Dems?

You probably blame the UGA loss on the issue that they wore the wrong eye shadow!

joe

October 21st, 2013
9:36 am

Illegal immigration and our poor economy caused by Obama policies that result in job losses are 2 direct causes of poverty increasing everywhere. Expect more of this over the coming years until someone with the balls to actually cut government spending and taxes wins the presidency.

Rafe Hollister

October 21st, 2013
10:04 am

Road

Who opposes vouchers and charter schools, hint, it is not the GOP!

HarryCrews

October 21st, 2013
10:22 am

Off subject, the charter school issue is not solely divided by party lines. I believe it is fomented more by the “don’t tax me crowd” that is currently all the rage in the GA GOP. The act of implementing vouchers – according to the current GA Constitution – would no doubt face a challenge of it’s mettle.

Road Scholar

October 21st, 2013
4:44 pm

Is it painly obviously that I am a member of the jackazs (D) party

(the other) Rodney

October 22nd, 2013
6:57 am

I grew up poor or at the very least low middle class. Both my sister and I were able to pursue higher education after high school with the (minimal) help of our parents as well as loans/grants. She’s now a paralegal and I am a data analyst for a 42k+ employee company.

Our sucesses, I believe, were mostly due to our parents taking an active part of our education when younger and the discipline that came along with that. We were more than likely eligible for free lunches in school yet our parents were too responsible, or maybe just too proud, to go that route. Neither of us ever went hungry.

Part of the problem, in my opinion, is that far too few parents want to go the extra mile now to provide for their children. They choose instead the “free” breakfast/lunch option instead of budgeting around providing that at home. It’s almost as if pride has taken a back seat to “easy”.

[...] The Atlanta Journal Constitution: “Study: Most public school students in Georgia are poor” [...]