Sex dooms burglar couple’s outing

The worst-laid plans often go awry.

Pepper spray, a bad way to end a date, criminal outing ... or both.

Pepper spray, a bad way to end a date, criminal outing ... or both.

Such was the case in Hillsboro, Missouri, where a burglary duo’s purloinment of power tools and DVDs was interrupted by carnal passion.

The female cat burglar must not have appreciated the amorous advances — she elected to pepper spray her cohort and flee in the homeowner’s car, according to an article by NBC affiliate KSDK.

Two miles down the road she ran the car into a pond.

The man was caught running down the road wearing nothing but a raincoat and lugging a bag of stolen goods.

It makes you wonder what kind of DVDs they found hidden in the garage.

Jefferson County police did not respond to emails and phone calls.

Sadly, there are no booking mugs online.

56 comments Add your comment

Darcy

July 1st, 2011
1:51 pm

Purloinment …really??? Really showing off your higher education, aren’t you? Too bad you would have failed journalism class. Remember, you have to write at the 8th grade level or you’ve lost most of your readers.

Mr. C

July 1st, 2011
2:00 pm

I am with you on this article Darcy! He lost me and I have a higher education. I believe that he thinks that he is better than the average person. I learned that in Psychology 191!

C, no relation

July 1st, 2011
3:22 pm

Mr. C & Darcy, please read more. I thought it was written well with a good sense of humor, especially compared to the typical newspaper articles that are so dumbed down your mind turns to mush. I hope this author got a few serious news pieces to write as well.

A couple of longer words shouldn’t throw you, and if it does, just use the context. It’s disturbing that you are complaining about this and criticizing the author for attempting to throw in a few less-frequently-heard words.

d

July 1st, 2011
3:38 pm

I do agree that introducing new vocabulary can be a good thing, but I also agree with the two above that “Purloinment” seemed a little out of place in there :) When first reading it, expecting it to be about them getting frisky during a burglary, I was thrown by the term and had to read the sentence twice as I recognized that sex with powertools and DVDs can be dangerous, and this was probably not what the author was trying to say :) I do feel it was a good article, maybe just that when using an obscure word, you have to make sure your reader knows what to expect to be reading. (haha, here i am critiquing and I’m sure my sentence structure is quite horrendous!)

It means theft

July 1st, 2011
4:20 pm

Very funny story George, where do you find this stuff?

I personally like the challenge of the big words. Time I finish reading one of these blogs my IQ has gone up by at least 20 points, and I feel like I’m ready to go on Jeopardy and challenge Watson.

Cristine

July 1st, 2011
4:28 pm

I thought he used purloin as a play on the sexual part of this story. Get it “loin”.

Tad Jackson

July 1st, 2011
4:35 pm

Making up new words? Read “Blood Meridian” and “The Road” by Cormac McCarthy. He’s the master at it. Funny thing is … his made-up words sound about right.

http://www.adixiediary.com

vedette

July 1st, 2011
4:40 pm

Purloinment is not a word. But I still enjoyed the article and applaud the author for livening up the story-telling a little bit.

Bobo

July 1st, 2011
4:47 pm

If words like “purloinment” are foreign to you, or if articles like this raise your IQ by 20 points, then you didn’t start out with much.

the_dude

July 1st, 2011
4:54 pm

George Mathis must be one sad loser to use words like that in a “filler” article.

no way

July 1st, 2011
4:57 pm

Brian

July 1st, 2011
5:19 pm

“Purloinment” is a newly coined word in this article. The accepted word is “purloining.” But, I like the new word.

The bigger problem is this: “The man was caught running down the road wearing nothing but a raincoat and a bag of stolen goods.” Why in the world was the man wearing a bag of stolen goods? Wouldn’t he have been wearing just the raincoat and carrying the bag?

Shawn

July 1st, 2011
5:25 pm

Poor article.

Purloiner

July 1st, 2011
5:48 pm

@vedette

What are you talking about? Purloinment is most certainly a word. It means to steal. Why on earth would you say it was not a word

Joe

July 1st, 2011
8:01 pm

Mr. C, it is YOU who think you are better than others, touting “101″ bologna and then judging others with it. The article isn’t full of uncommon words, just 1. So the people who are reading at 8th grade level have been given a small lesson, if they choose to pursue it. Personally, I appreciate seeing a new word or 2 in context. Definitely not overwhelming.

Liam Biamself

July 1st, 2011
11:42 pm

I, personally prefer a good facesit to a face spray! Am I right?

Ben

July 2nd, 2011
2:17 am

This article contains several puns: The first is “worst-laid.” “Purloinment” plays on the word “loin”, and the “pur” refers back to the woman cat burglar. Brian is right that the man should not be understood to be wearing a bag of stolen goods.

Kathy K.

July 2nd, 2011
6:37 am

I am amazed at the negative comments. Perhaps those who are verbally challenged should invest in a daily calendar which provides a new word to add to their limited vocabulary.

Note to Dude and all the other Neanderthals: “Me thinks the shoe is on the other foot…….

8th Grader

July 2nd, 2011
8:01 am

whats amorous?

8th Grader

July 2nd, 2011
8:01 am

Enter your comments here

oh well

July 2nd, 2011
8:23 am

oh well

July 2nd, 2011
8:24 am

i’ve read this article three times …. did I miss something ?

liz

July 2nd, 2011
8:25 am

I’m selling raincoats if anyone is interested.

David Brentlinger

July 2nd, 2011
9:42 am

If the word “purloin” is foreign to some of you with “higher education”, it reflects the quality of education in this country. It is NOT an indictment of you personally nor your intelligence, but merely an indicator. Walt Kelly had it right in the cartoon series “Pogo”; “we have met the enemy and he is us”.

Jeremy

July 2nd, 2011
12:12 pm

Seriously? You clowns don’t know what “purloin” means? I learned that when I was 10…from comic books. No wonder this country is swirling the drain.

Josh

July 2nd, 2011
12:32 pm

Obviously none of the people complaining have read the story “The Purloined Letter” by Edgar Allan Poe.

xioulong

July 2nd, 2011
1:53 pm

8th grader:

amorous
am·o·rous
   /ˈæmərəs/ Show Spelled[am-er-uhs] Show IPA
adjective
1.
inclined or disposed to love, especially sexual love: an amorous disposition.
2.
showing or expressing love: an amorous letter.
3.
of or pertaining to love: amorous poetry.

Andre

July 2nd, 2011
3:38 pm

THe article was written by George for the sole purpose of his use of the word purloin—-! Christine, the ‘image’ would have been best introduced if the words were ‘ per loin’—- get it ??

fan of the abnormal

July 2nd, 2011
4:49 pm

I am a man of higher education & I pride myself in new and unique words…never heard purloin, so thanks for introducing it to me….my grandfather always said ridicule is the burden of genius, and no matter how u use purloin, if people don’t think ur genius, they will criticize

so here’s my 2 pennies worth:

01. I didn’t understand the word & therefore didn’t know what the sentence was meant, as i couldnt i took it in context & just figured it meant the love of power tools & dvds

02. I appreciate you trying to liven up the article, but the usage of wearing the raincoat & bag of stolen goods was a harsher crime, but not all caught that-

anyway, you taught me something & to err is human, everyone criticize you now, has erred in some capacity…no ones perfect.

fan of the abnormal

July 2nd, 2011
4:51 pm

fan of the abnormal

July 2nd, 2011
4:49 pm
I am a man of higher education & I pride myself in new and unique words…never heard purloin, so thanks for introducing it to me….my grandfather always said ridicule is the burden of genius, and no matter how u use purloin, if people don’t think ur genius, they will criticize

so here’s my 2 pennies worth:

01. I didn’t understand the word & therefore didn’t know what the sentence was meant to convey, as i couldnt i took it in context & just figured it meant the love of power tools & dvds

02. I appreciate you trying to liven up the article, but the usage of wearing the raincoat & bag of stolen goods was a harsher crime, but not all caught that-

anyway, you taught me something & to err is human, everyone criticizing you now has erred in some capacity…no ones perfect

Kat

July 2nd, 2011
5:48 pm

@fan of the abnormal: As a “man of higher education,” please do not write any more blog entries until you learn how to write properly. It was painful to try to get through your entry. (ahem)

This was a well-written, interesting article. The people in it are dense; but if they weren’t, I guess they would not be burglars.

Kat

July 2nd, 2011
5:50 pm

@Kathy K: Unfortunately, I think your reference will be misconstrued by many of the readers of this blog. Half will complain that it should be “I think…” and half will be confused by the structure. Oh well…

maro

July 2nd, 2011
6:51 pm

seriously… I thought purloinment was a pretty commonly used word, have I been under a rock?

Stuck in the sticks

July 2nd, 2011
7:01 pm

All you peoples comments are gay! Who even cares about a stupid word. You all just need to grow up and find something better to do with your time…

dave

July 2nd, 2011
11:59 pm

This is probably the worst written story I have ever read in since I learned to read 50 years ago.

Marcus Simpson

July 3rd, 2011
11:02 am

Actually….using the word “Purloin” shows ignorance of the English language. The crime of “Purloin” requires a breach of trust by a servant (employee). This was theft.

Jovin

July 3rd, 2011
2:34 pm

PURR-LOIN-more like it!

Just_Sayin

July 3rd, 2011
2:39 pm

Whether or not the dictionary shows “purloinment” as a word, it has been repeatedly used by many others prior to the author of this article. How about just calling it a colloquialism and dropping it. You guys sound like a bunch of Mensa punks trying to throw your intellectual weight around. If you don’t like it, become a journalist yourselves and show him how it’s done with your boring discourse. Otherwise, save your narrow minded machinations for your next nerd meeting. Just sayin’.

Bill

July 3rd, 2011
3:12 pm

This was Journalism at it’s worst. The choice of words used in this article made it tedious to follow and understand !

Panties

July 3rd, 2011
4:06 pm

This is a great article. Very funny and interesting.

Lynn

July 3rd, 2011
4:45 pm

Wow! This article took all of about 15 seconds to read and there was not an unfamiliar word in it! Purloin is a very common word, perhaps not in every day conversation, but certainly in written word. Do you people not read much? How embarrassing for you.

Chris

July 3rd, 2011
7:23 pm

It probably takes less time to look up “purloin” or “purloinment” online than it does to complain about it. I thought it was a clever choice of words — it contains the word “loin” and it’s an article about sex.

kevin

July 3rd, 2011
8:15 pm

I would have to say, this is a very poorly written article. Despite showing off the big vocabulary, the author fails in grammar. How do you wear a bag of stolen goods?

Brian

July 3rd, 2011
9:02 pm

Bobo, I am not sure what world you live in. But in the 44 years of my life, I have never heard the word purlionment. Anyway
Brian Fronebarger

Doug

July 4th, 2011
6:51 am

This is a blog. Therefore, it is allowed a little more freedom than a hard news story. Hence, words like “purloinment” and the editorializing in the last three paragraphs. And the cutline on the picture, of course.

This Gets Old!

July 4th, 2011
12:58 pm

No you guys are the losers. Attacking a writer because of his use of the language? Because you don’t get it. Fine, then why comment? You write and then we’ll judge. The use of the word doesn’t matter in the content of the story.

Joe Brown

July 4th, 2011
2:56 pm

If we’re going to speak of the journalist’s grammar, how about this: 1. “…wearing nothing but a raincoat and a bag of stolen goods.” ? He was wearing a bag of stolen goods?And, 2. “…there’s no booking mugs…” ? How about, there ARE no booking mugs. plural subject-singular verb. Happens all the time if you notice.
Nevertheless, the article is a nice one.

kaebomb

July 4th, 2011
11:17 pm

Wow Darcy! Are you jealous? Not everyone’s an idiot. Maybe if journalists took advantage of our manifold language, people would become familiar with more locutions and rise above an eighth-grade scholarship.
Thanks, George, for the article. It made me smile.

George Mathis

July 5th, 2011
9:19 am

I’m just glad someone got the purloinment joke.

;)

Bobsbigbrain

July 6th, 2011
2:54 pm

“… best laid plans…” hahahahah

Lynne Krop

July 7th, 2011
2:13 pm

The word, “purloin” is a real word. The word used, “purloinment” is not a word recognized by any dictionary I use; therefore, “purloinment” is not a real word. To purloin is to remove something without permission and/or with ill intent. Having said that …

… the article was fun to read and the word, “purloinment” did not distract me from the true meaning of the article, which was, criminals are stupid.

Editor in Chief
The Write Well

Lynne Krop

July 7th, 2011
2:21 pm

As a matter of clarification; I did see all the mistakes in the article, including the one regarding the man wearing the raincoat and bag of tools; however, it is obvious that this particular blogger/reporter does not have an editor or his mistakes would have been found and probably omitted. Writers write and editors edit. A writer is a lousy editor and so an editor is generally a lousy writer. I am certain someone will find fault with my context or syntax.

Editor in Chief
The Write Well

Lillian

July 7th, 2011
4:13 pm

The anti-intellectualism in this country knows no bounds.

Robert

July 11th, 2011
10:35 pm

“Purloinment” was a word before any of you semi-literate morons were even born. If you do not enjoy reading, go do something else. But quit spreading misinformation on blogs, the public is already stupid enough.

Robert

July 11th, 2011
10:42 pm

Lynne Krop

July 7th, 2011
2:21 pm

As a matter of clarification; I did see all the mistakes in the article, including the one regarding the man wearing the raincoat and bag of tools; however, it is obvious that this particular blogger/reporter does not have an editor or his mistakes would have been found and probably omitted. Writers write and editors edit. A writer is a lousy editor and so an editor is generally a lousy writer. I am certain someone will find fault with my context or syntax.

Editor in Chief
The Write Well

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Yes, Lynn, you incorrectly used a semi-colon to separate a dependent clause instead of an independent clause.

Webster Is My Friend

July 12th, 2011
10:08 am

pur·loin : Steal (something)