Prom dress shopping perilous for plus-size girls: Where are the best places to look?

Leanne Italie of The Associated Press took a look at the difficulties plus-sized young ladies face when trying to find an appropriate prom dress (not old lady) that fits! Interestingly she found that nationally David’s Bridal and an online site Sydneyscloset.com may be some of the best resources for these young women. I am wondering where you have found good plus-sized prom dresses in Atlanta. She also points out that there is a definite need for donations of plus-sized prom dresses. So if you have one stashed in your closet, some young woman might really be able to use it.

Here’s the story in full.

From The Associated Press:

“NEW YORK (AP) — Maria Giorno has nothing against long gowns with high waists and flowing fabric — dresses that are designed to camouflage curves on plus-size women.

But the New Jersey high school senior had no interest in buying a loose-fitting style for her senior prom, even though it was all she could find in a size 16 or so at nearby stores. So many stores, Giorno said, “never have anything that’s a little more sexy or a little form-fitting, or anything like that for my age.”

Clothes shopping for plus-size teens can be frustrating in general, but shopping for a dream prom dress can be a tear-inducing, hair-pulling morass of bad design and few options — especially for girls who want a dress that hugs the body instead of tenting it.

“It’s like people kind of assume that’s what I want and that’s what I like. I’m 18. I really like the way the tight dresses look,” said Giorno, who plays roller derby and hopes to study music education in college.

She finally found one that didn’t make her look like a bridesmaid — or worse, mother of the bride — at a boutique: a V-neck black lace “fit and flare” style with an open back and pleats above the knee for dancing ease on her big night.

Consignment shops and organizations that collect donated prom dresses for girls in need also say they can’t get enough plus-size gowns. Shop owner Kristen Harris went on a mission to collect them after a teen left her store empty-handed and in tears. Harris was tagging stock at her just-opened Designer Diva Consignment Boutique in Abington, Mass., when a plus-size teen shyly approached the ball gowns.

“I said, ‘Hey hon, what size are you looking for,’ and she said 22, and that’s when I felt like someone had just kicked me in the stomach, because I knew I didn’t have anything that size,” recalled Harris, who desperately pulled some smaller sizes in stretch fabrics for the girl. Moments later, the teen was crying in the dressing room.

So Harris began begging on social media for plus-size consignment and hunted down her young customer through Facebook, offering a private appointment and free dress from about 40 she’d collected. “She was so sweet,” Harris said. “I just couldn’t get her out of my head.”

Operation Prom, which offers free donated dresses to girls in need in eight states, has also had to hunt for plus-size dresses. Noel D’Allacco, founder of the decade-old project, took in about 7,000 gently used dresses and new ones from corporate partners last year, but only about 700 were size 18 and up, she said. The shortage of donated plus-size garments forced her to purchase some.

“We are going crazy trying to get plus-size dresses,” said D’Allacco, in Bronxville, N.Y. “We have this problem, unfortunately, every year. A lot of times we get plus-size donations and they’re not appropriate for a 17-year-old. They’re for your grandmother to wear. It’s difficult.”

Online options for plus-size prom dresses have proliferated in the past decade. But shopping that way for an already difficult fit, along with restrictive return policies, can feel risky. Giorno was not comfortable searching for her dress online, yet many retailers carry few to none in stores and on trend for teens. Many designers don’t bother making them in larger sizes, prospective customers say.

Sixteen percent of women’s clothing sold in the U.S. is size 14 and up, according to the market research group NPD. But the plus-size women’s business has “pretty much been ignored by the big stores,” said Marshal Cohen, NPD’s chief retail analyst.

The shop in Pine Beach, N.J., where Giorno found her dress, called New York City Glitz, makes it a priority to stock trendy plus sizes. “There’s not that much made,” owner Cat Hutton said. “I have companies that I deal with that only carry up to a size 16.”

David’s Bridal, with about 300 stores around the country, estimates half of the company’s prom-worthy choices come in sizes 16 to 22, with interest in those sizes growing every year, said Marissa Rubinetti, a senior buyer.

“They do struggle. They may fall in love with something they see online and they don’t have the opportunity to try it on and buy it,” she said.

A decade ago, the company carried a fraction of prom dresses up to size 22, Rubinetti said. Southern stores, particularly Texas, have a higher demand, she said. Stephanie Mekhjian, manager of David’s Bridal in Fort Worth, Texas, estimated 20 to 25 percent of her prom customers wear sizes 18 to 22, including some who travel 100 miles or more to shop there.

J.C. Penney sells plus-size prom dresses online only and offers just three styles. Target does not sell, in its brick-and-mortar stores, dressier styles appropriate for prom in any size, but the company does sell them online. Other retailers restrict all plus-size clothing to websites.

“Manufacturers are starting to create more plus-size prom dresses but they are just not as readily available as traditional size prom dresses,” said a Penney spokeswoman, Sarah Holland.

Phyllis Librach in St. Louis, Mo., knows the heartache of the dress search as both a mother and a dress designer who specializes in plus sizes for special occasions. She started her business 10 years ago after her daughter, now 29, was that curvy girl in tears in search of the perfect prom dress. They finally had one custom-made after the teen refused to buy a white wedding gown and dye it for prom.

Librach now designs and manufactures her own styles, including prom dresses sizes 14 to 40, which she sells on her site, Sydneyscloset.com, and through about 125 boutiques. She started out in the business buying inventory from others, but switched to producing her own after contacting a company that planned to knock off a gown worn by Queen Latifah at an awards show.

“I wanted to place an order, a very nice order, and they said, ‘We’re not making the dress in any size larger than 14,’” Librach recalled. “I said, ‘Let me understand this, you’re going to knock off an evening gown worn by a plus-size celebrity and you’re not going to make it for plus-size women?’ So I got angry, I got frustrated and I said, ‘Damn it, I’ll make it myself.’ That dress sold out.”

Have you encountered this problem looking for a dress for your daughter? What sizes to the department stores generally go up to? Do private shops like Cinderella’s Closet (a.k.a. Cinderella’s Gowns) in Lilburn offer more plus-size varieties. (I checked their website. The store had seven brands under their plus-size label with multiple pages of gowns in each category and some of them were very va-va-va-voom!) Where are the best places that you have found for plus-sized young ladies to shop in Atlanta?

57 comments Add your comment

motherjanegoose

April 2nd, 2014
7:42 pm

No experience here. My daughter is a size 8, She also did not go to her Senior Prom as she had started a new job and the date was MANDATORY ALL HANDS ON DECK on the calendar before she even knew it was the date of her Senior Prom.

Night all!

Chris

April 2nd, 2014
8:38 pm

Shopping for a plus-sized dress is difficult for prom dresses because very few girls 18 and under are plus-sized. The ones who are should try diet and exercise before complaining about the lack of selection of dresses. Put down the McDonald’s, and stop eating Twinkies. It’s not OK to be fat as a child.

Chris

April 2nd, 2014
9:04 pm

Professor and Ginger,

It’s prom season and obesity is an epidemic. This blog has to do with current events and health issues. Talk about the topic, stop whining, or don’t post at all.

Mother of 2

April 2nd, 2014
9:24 pm

Who would have thought that asking for recommendations for prom dresses would elicit such judgement.

Dresses come in all shapes, sizes and colors. Larger sizes are tough to come by because of supply and demand. I would recommend second hand shops and eBay for the best prices and selection.

DB

April 2nd, 2014
10:14 pm

You know, the more I read some of the mean comments on here, the more I really start to hate people. I’m sick and tired of supercilious asshats who have nothing better to do than play “Bash the Blogger”. If she does write a blog that is based in personal experiences, T gets reamed left and right for “poor parenting.” If she moves toward current events and writes a blog eliciting opinions on current parenting topics, she’s accused of being lazy. There is no way the AJC pays this woman enough to take this kind of gratuitous abuse. Even if it was only $2 a column, the fact that she opens up her life to perennially mean-spirited, obnoxious and downright rude people makes me ashamed of people. I think the only problem with her blocking power is that she doesn’t use it enough, to block those who have no intention of contributing to the topic, but just want to smack her around again. None of us have perfect children, perfect marriages, perfect jobs and perfect homes.

We get to a topic of parenting that parents have to deal with more and more, given the rate of obesity in this country: Overweight girls and prom dresses — or, hell, ANY kind of dress. Or pants. Or, really, any kind of clothes, since all clothes made today seem to be trying to be symbiotic with your skin and clings to every single bulge or curve, wanted or unwanted. And many of the responses are judgemental and cruel — “She should lose weight.” DUH. You think she doesn’t know that? You think she hasn’t been told that all her life? You think that every time she watches TV and sees the size 0 actresses on screen, she doesn’t feel marginalized? Or when an actress is mocked when she hits a size 10 instead of a more svelte 2 or 4? Suggesting that a 250 lb. girl to lose weight a month before a prom is not helpful. And, no, it’s not a problem my daughter has, for those who are getting ready to sharpen their knives on me. (BTW, the overweight guys don’t have a similar problem — a tux is a tux is a tux.)

By the way, many colleges call faculty such as T. “adjunct professors” — which doesn’t require an advanced degree. Sometimes the teacher has a masters, but often, it’s the result of targeted experience in the topic. The teachers are often called “professor” by students who are unaware of the intricacies of academic name-calling. “Professor” can be used as a courtesy title, as well as a specific academic rank. If you have a Ph.D, then you get to be called “Doctor”, which beats out “Professor” any day.

To the topic: I really wish formal dresses weren’t so clingy these days. (Heck, I wish most of the clothes weren’t so clingy — there are so many young girls who have no idea what is involved in proper fit.) I see some of the wedding dresses on “Say Yes to the Dress” and I’m saying, “Oh, God, PLEASE say ‘no’!” – the dresses are so tight and so low nothing is left to the imagination, and it makes them and so unflattering. But what else is left — a burka? There’s precious little in-between that’s affordable for these poor girls. At some point, it may be a good idea to find a good seamstress and have a dress made.

shs

April 2nd, 2014
10:20 pm

Wow, for several days I have read the whiny remarks about Theresa’s so-called lack of effort. What I feel like is the purpose of this blog is to introduce a topic for everyone to discuss–not that Theresa has to produce a dissertation on said topic. I enjoy when she talks about her family–but with some of the people on here I can’t blame her for not wanting to put her family members (and herself) out there for all those people to attack. Plus, I’m sure with trying to keep the house nice while it is up for sale with three active children and a husband who is away so much for work it is difficult to sit down and write a thesis every day. I am always amazed at people who do nothing but snipe and complain about any topic that is presented here. I’m not at all interested in American Idol–so I don’t read blogs about it. If you are not interested in contributing to the topic–why just write in to tear someone down? And on topic–a plus-size kid in high school has more problems than a prom dress. There is a health problem for someone overweight and so young. Hang in there Theresa. I enjoy this blog but I wouldn’t blame you if you just said to heck with it all and gave it up–but I hope you won’t do that. (And I hope the kids are helping out a lot while the house is up for sale!!)

shs

April 2nd, 2014
10:23 pm

DB–very well put! Thank you!

Gwinnett teacher

April 3rd, 2014
4:25 am

I have to chaperone prom. I wanted something prom-appropriate, but not too matronly. I found a beautiful gown @ Bravura in Snellville. (Size 18) for a reasonable price. The staff was VERY helpful, too.

A

April 3rd, 2014
6:17 am

Thank goodness I have a boy and he won’t be going to prom (if he chooses to go) for another 7 years, so hopefully getting a tux isn’t a big deal!

Touché

April 3rd, 2014
6:29 am

Don’t you love all the posters that hate and complain about all the “other” posters on the internet that hate and complain. Touché hypocrites.

Shopping Tip: Suzanne Sugarbaker bought her dress fabric from Georgia Tent & Awning. ;)

Seka

April 3rd, 2014
6:42 am

First, if you kid is fat have her exercise more and eat less.

SHS & DB – you exibit the same high school behavior and catty tendencies of clanish behavior for your friend. The quality of this blog has in face greatly declined over the last few years and its a direct correlation to Michae’s increase in income. You exucse the missed posts, the poor quality because she is a :”Mom” with three kids? Please – the three kids are in school full time and its obvious her life is a mess, her home is a mess and I’m sure the mini van is filthy.

All she does now is to do a Google search, scan the article, cut and paste followed by “What do you think?”…. and she teaches this crap? Look at some of her blogs from 2008 or earlier – they were witty, original and funny. Today her lack of effort is so obvious and the quality of her blogs has decreased greatly. She can’t even post a daily blog for three weeks straight – something always comes up and for whatever reason her boss at the AJC buys into it so she keeps pushing it. I can’t miss my work like she missed posting her blogs. If the quality of the blog improves, the comments will decrease – its that simple. For so many people to comment on the poor quality of her blogging – there must be something going on.

Kids, make a living by Google searching, scan the article (it also helps if your hubby sends you articles from the AP – reduces Google time!) – cut & paste, then go back to the couch folding laundry while searching for a home in Jersey.

MissMary

April 3rd, 2014
6:44 am

Mine are too young to worry about prom yet, but I read on FB last night that Back By Popular Demand, an amazing consignment shop in Lilburn, has found a consigned who is bringing in prom dresses size 22 to 28 this week…
As far as the continual negativity on this site, hang in there, TWG! And as far as a high schooler needing a plus size, it happens. Let them have their moment,too, and save the negativity for another day.

Mom of 3

April 3rd, 2014
7:06 am

Sadly, the difficult issues these plus size girls will face/are facing go way beyond helping them find a prom dress to fit their bodies. I’m concerned that the demand for big dresses is on the rise. Either the girls are getting fatter or more fat girls have decided to go to the prom. When I donated my daughter’s last two prom dresses the first question I was asked was how big is the dress(size 0). My daughter had a time when she ate emotionally and gained 10 pounds. She worked hard and lost the weight. It wasn’t easy, but she did it. I hope these girls find the dresses they are looking for and then get serious about losing weight.

Real Life

April 3rd, 2014
8:10 am

I began reading this blog quite a while back and have to agree that it has declined in quality. Some criticism posted is mean spirited but a lot of it is spot on. And those that hammer at the critics are displaying quite a bit of the same mean spirit that they are protesting.
I also taught journalism for a number of years and any student cutting and pasting from other stories (even with substantial attribution) would not have been well regarded in my classes unless circumstances warranted that type of work in a piece a student was writing. But such a situation would be rare and not used on a regular basis. I realize that this is a blog, but by nature a blog is original, based on thoughts and activities of the writer. Cutting and pasting should be rare.
I read an article last week in the AJC about the difficulty of finding plus size dresses for the high-school prom. And I read a wire-service article on the same topic the same week. Maybe this is a timely topic for this blog or maybe it is simply a poor effort. That is up to individual readers to decide.

But talking about the obesity epidemic is called for with this topic, as is talking about the plethora of admiration for those who are a size 0.
We are more than willing to heap scorn on the overweight while turning a blind eye to those whose body weight might to too low to consider healthy.
Our society has become obsessed with being critical of the overweight while admiring those who are seriously underweight–but both can lead to substantial health problems.
Maybe we should have a few more plus-size prom dresses but also a program to help high-school aged students deal with their weight problem. And maybe we should have few size 0 dresses and appropriate programs to help us get over our obsession with the belief that being underweight is desirable.

Erica

April 3rd, 2014
8:27 am

First DB and SHS, I am sooooo in agreement with your comments. If all one got out of this post was either an excuse to criticize the blogger or a way to bash teenage girls who do not fit the “small size fits all” body type, then you missed the point of the story that is posted. Prom night is a milestone moment for most high school students, and for girls, it is their night to feel special and good about themselves, whatever their size. I agree with DB, who stated that the dress styles have become far more clingy (these dresses are body hugging). My daughter has some years to go before prom, and based on her current body type (and assuming heredity is a factor), she’s tall and lanky. I would hope that dress designers and stores would be sensitive to the fact that teenage girls these days come in varying shapes and sizes (just like adult women) and that they provide flattering options. The larger issue is instilling in our girls the tenet of loving the body that they have, no matter what size and taking good care of themselves by eating healthy and getting plenty of rest, water and exercise. Let’s face it, every girl is not a size 0-4, with perfectly proportions and we need to stop selling this vision of perfection to our girls. Instead, the hope for prom should be that a young lady feels like an absolute princess, no matter what size she is on her special night….and that she looks like one as well.

WitchyWoman

April 3rd, 2014
9:08 am

My sister is 6′ 2″ and plus size. Let me tell you it was hard as heck for her to find a dress, but she did. One for her Junior Prom and one for her Senior Prom. They were beautiful, but really expensive. She got them at a local bridal shop. I on the other hand am 6′0″, but not plus size and it was still hard for me to find a dress that fit well. It’s actually hard for a woman over 5′9 to find nice clothes in general. They are usually really expensive or have a limited range of options. Things have gotten better over the years, but it is still hard.

RJ

April 3rd, 2014
9:22 am

My daughter isn’t plus-sized being a size 4, however she rented her dress online. They sent two sizes and you just had to send the one back that didn’t fit. Maybe there’s a store online that rents plus-sized dresses. It’s definitely worth a try. As for the really mean comments, girls in general already have issues with their bodes even when they’re small. My daughter constantly says she’s fat, even though her body is not big. It’s crazy. Stop bashing these girls. They still deserve to go to the prom and look beautiful.

janice

April 3rd, 2014
9:35 am

i’d check on ebay or a rental place for a plus size dress. if you have the time and can’t find one, make one yourself. of course if you aren’t a sewer, making a dress on the slinky fabric the first time can be tricky.

i know i’m old, but when i see prom pictures, i wonder about these dresses that i’m sure parents know about. strapless and cut low and slit high.

i also don’t think the kids today understand the important of wearing the proper foundations with a dress. does anyone under the age of 50 wear a slip any longer? i remember going to a senior prom in 1976 and i had a full length slip that i wore under my long dress. and even now being in late 50’s when i wear a dress i wear a slip. heck, in the 70’s when the goucho pants were popular they had a slip pants that you wore. and people like mariah carey and kim kardashian wearing clothes at least 2 sizes too small is not a good example. when you stand up your clothes aren’t suppose to stretch across you middle or upper legs. even a knit dress will have some body to it. all this body hugging clothing that’s out there now, i just don’t get. tight is not comfortable.

Crystal

April 3rd, 2014
10:28 am

I am sick and tired of people bashing plus size women. These girls are active and healthy but they are bigger than the so called norm. Besides, what is defined as normal? Size 0, I think not. The average woman in the US weights 167 pounds and is a size 14. Plus size women have a lot of money to spend and we will spend our money with shops that provide us with fashionable quality garments in our size range.

Denise

April 3rd, 2014
10:34 am

Theresa, my comment was eaten.

Mom of 3

April 3rd, 2014
11:10 am

@ Crystal……Bashing? These girls are active and healthy? How do you know? Some might be but some might not. The truth hurts and the truth is that the “average” woman is overweight. Especially if her height is also average. My 5′3″ daughter with the size 0 prom dress has a tiny waist but a healthy booty and thighs. She wore the 0 because of her waist. She did not wear a tight and clingy dress. When she gained 10 pounds she did not look good or feel good. She knew she needed to lose the weight so she did.
Overweight girls need to know they are not worth less because they are fat. But they also need to know they need to lose the necessary weight to be healthy for their body type. They can love who they are without loving and excusing away their fat.

NO Crystal

April 3rd, 2014
11:15 am

Sixteen percent of women’s clothing sold in the U.S. is size 14 and up, according to the market research group NPD. But the plus-size women’s business has “pretty much been ignored by the big stores,” said Marshal Cohen, NPD’s chief retail analyst.
…………………

84 percent of US women wear a size 12 or below.

So NO Crystal … Your figure(s) are fictional and no where near the facts.

LizBeth

April 3rd, 2014
11:18 am

Know a few girls who had health conditions that caused their plus-size. Knew a few classmates who would never consider going to prom because of people make of fun of their weight and their supposed inability to get a date. If I had known way back in the ’80s that you could go to the prom with your friends instead of a date, I would have taken all my girlfriends, regardless of their size. The point is to be at your best and have fun.

We did find plus-size dresses that were lovely at formal shops and bridal salons. They are used to dealing with different sizes and can order if it’s early.

The second-hand shops were awful, full of smaller dresses, many damaged and selling at high prices anyway.

HB

April 3rd, 2014
11:18 am

“When she gained 10 pounds she did not look good or feel good.”

While bad habits that led to her weight gain may have made her feel lousy, the idea that a 10 lb weight gain on a previously size 0 girl meant she didn’t look good (her opinion, yours, or both?) is very concerning. What would she have been — 5′3″ and maybe a size 4? Surely she was still within a normal, healthy weight range, and maintaining her new size with healthier habits would have been fine. Needing to be a size 0 to look good doesn’t sound like a healthy body image, and I hope you didn’t encourage her to lose the weight. Encouraging healthy habits is good; encouraging a goal of being very small is not.

LizBeth

April 3rd, 2014
11:21 am

@janice. Taught my daughter to wear a short half-slip. She loves the look.

NO Crystal

April 3rd, 2014
11:22 am

Sixteen percent of women’s clothing sold in the U.S. is size 14 and up, according to the market research group NPD. But the plus-size women’s business has “pretty much been ignored by the big stores,” said Marshal Cohen, NPD’s chief retail analyst.
………………..

If ONLY 16 percent of clothing sold in the US is Size 14 and up the market is being served appropriately. If plus sized clothing is being ignored by the big stores, there is a reason for that.

Lay off the Krispy Kremes and Krystals and get off the Kouch!

HB

April 3rd, 2014
11:24 am

NO Crystal, your analysis is incorrect. 16% of clothing sold being size 14 and up does not necessarily mean 84% of women wear a size 12 or smaller. You’re assuming women of all sizes buy the same amount of clothing — could be that smaller women, on average, are purchasing more, and that could be due to a lack of good options (under targeted market).

NO Crystal

April 3rd, 2014
11:25 am

The 16 percent of plus size girls and women get there clothes from somewhere or else they would be walking around nude.

NO Crystal

April 3rd, 2014
11:35 am

There is always going to be a perceived “under targeted” market in any industry. I want an Aston Martin line of cars on a middle income budget! Think that will happen? Every major retailer from Walmart to Neimans has a Plus size or Womens department. These gals are not ” under served” literally or physically

HB

April 3rd, 2014
11:37 am

Again, 16% of sales that you cited does not equal 16% of women (sales are not people). The stat you provided is NOT 16% of women. You could have 40% of women being plus-sized and only buying 16% of clothes partly because they’re not finding as much out there that they like.

NO Crystal

April 3rd, 2014
11:44 am

HB my stat comes from Momania above, where are your stats (with valid links) to show what you state as fact. Don’t you think if there was BIG money to be made in the Plus market after all these decades there would be women looking to hit that untapped gold mine. No, the Sara Blakey’s of this world chose to offer them Spanx. ;)

NO Crystal

April 3rd, 2014
11:49 am

“sales are not people”
………………………………

Then who is buying clothes besides people for people?

NO Crystal

April 3rd, 2014
11:58 am

I don’t find much I like either, but when I buy my sales count. My age group of 40 to 50 year physically fit women don’t have much to choose from either – the barely covered wannabe teen or the bright colored grain sack matronly look. Decisions, decisions! I just want my budget line Aston Martin.

Denise

April 3rd, 2014
12:01 pm

NO Crystal – the stat is % of clothing, not % of peole. Think of it this way. If they said 16% the money spent on clothes was spent on plus size clothes, it doesn’t mean that 16% of women are plus sized. I just means that that is how much money was spent. Maybe some plus sized women don’t purchase a lot of clothes but some go wild. The amount of clothing/money is being counted here, not the number of women.

Anyway, I think the proper foundation is important and MISSING with a lot of these young girls. And some women too. Spanx are our friends. Or even seamless panties.

HB

April 3rd, 2014
12:04 pm

I’m not saying your stat is wrong. I’m saying you don’t understand what it represents. It does not mean 16% of women are size 14+.

Let’s say you sell $1000 worth of clothes. 4 plus-sized women buy clothes for themselves spending a total of $160. 6 other women buy clothes smaller than size 14 spending a total of $840.

Are 16% of the women plus-sized? No, 40% are (4 out of 10), but plus-sized sales only equal 16% of the total ($160 out of $1,000). Percentage of sales does NOT equal percentage of people.

So you are wrong to assume that 16% of sales being size 14+ means 14 cannot be the average size as Crystal said. Both stats could very well be true.

alecia

April 3rd, 2014
12:49 pm

Mom of 3 enjoys taking pleasure with her daughter’s anorexia and thinks a 10 lb weight gain is bad. God help her child. DFACS has removed larger children from homes for starvation. Call the medics on the 10 lb weight gain. Then again, when your name is mom of 3, do you really have a grip on yourself?
No Crystal is off her meds and swears that she knows why every single female is overweight. It’s not genetics,thyroid disorder,hormones, or medicine. She personally sits at their house at watches them eat twinkies.
To be too obsessed with others is more dangerous than being overweight. Of course, how are we to create the playground bullies to beat up on the size 8s? Gotta have a crazy mom somewher obsessed with her daughter’s size 0 or another one that is full of malice, because she has no life and posts on the internet all day.
Anyway, the average dress size in this country is a size 14. This does not take into consideration
the vanity sizing that has been going on for years. Here’s a link:http://webcenters.netscape.compuserve.com/homerealestate/package.jsp?name=fte/clothessize/clothessize

mother of 2

April 3rd, 2014
1:07 pm

Love the rental idea! These girls don’t like to wear the dresses ever again, so renting is a brilliant option.

NO Crystal

April 3rd, 2014
1:14 pm

No Crystal is off her meds and swears that she knows why every single female is overweight. It’s not genetics,thyroid disorder,hormones, or medicine. She personally sits at their house at watches them eat twinkies.
—————————

Ha, off my meds – so original!

So, I take it alecia is Plus sized and easily offended. Most overweight people are most certainly lazy and over eat. Only a miniscule amount have medical issues that prevent them from losing weight. That BS excuse meant to shut people up and make them feel sorry for you. Just like you threated a mom with DFACS becuase her size zero teenage daughter makes you feel FAT. Maybe size ) teenager eats whatever she wants and cant gain the weight. The excuses are found on both sides. Even POTUS is buying into your claims alecia!

alecia, please do tell us what is really eating you UP! ;)

@ alecia

April 3rd, 2014
1:19 pm

The reason you lost your husband and your 3 kids is your own fault. Bitter much?

Crystal

April 3rd, 2014
1:28 pm

For your information, I do not eat Krispy Kremes or Krystals. I have lost over 100 pounds. I have gone from a size 34 to a size 18. There are a lot of nice plus size clothing out there. Take a look at Torrid, Lane Bryant, Forever 21, Wet Seal + Kiyonna, City Chic,and Fashion to Figure. Any store that does not carry plus sizes is denying a growing market. For Mom of 3, I have a niece that wear size 0 and she rocks it. For her, she is naturally petite and that is her normal size.

Mom of 3

April 3rd, 2014
1:50 pm

@alecia…..jealous much, judge much? Sorry to disappoint you but my daughter is healthy and happy. She is exactly what she should be given her petite size, just like Crystal’s niece. And you should be every bit as concerned and judgmental of the parents of the fat girls as you are the parents of the thin girls. As I said earlier, girls should aim to be the right weight for their body type.
Get a grip on yourself.

Irony

April 3rd, 2014
1:58 pm

There is a pop up ad to the right for clothing line zulilly, with a 2x model touting All Shapes, All Sizes. But your big girl panties on and stop whining with your Cheetos stuffed in your mouth.

Torrid is a sad name for a clothing store. Crystal good for you for realizing you must make the changes because society will not change to fit you. Spend all that money on weight loss programs and then the stores will be happy to have you purchase normal size clothing.

A

April 3rd, 2014
2:08 pm

Stop the madness! This blog has totally gone off the rails. Where is the moderator?

OMG

April 3rd, 2014
2:09 pm

Any store that does not carry plus sizes is denying a growing market?

^^^ OMG ^^^

What kind twisted psychology is that? We are gonna be fat and screw our health? Y’all better save that clothing budget for healthcare expenses, because I won’t be paying for your pre existing condition of obesity and the plethora or medical conditions that come with that.

B

April 3rd, 2014
2:11 pm

The moderator is too busy relocating from AZ to NY. She has no time to protect the feeling off fat GA girls

Denise

April 3rd, 2014
2:13 pm

I know it sounds crazy to say that a size 0 gaining 10 pounds could not possibly look bad but it depends on where she carries her weight. What if all went to her stomach and now she looks like she is pregnant? Come on yall, get over it. People feel how they feel about their appearance. The problem is when folks who should mean nothing to them impose their views and it negatively affects them. This not only happens with kids; adults buy into it also. Just stop it. Make sure YOU and YOURS are healthy, whole, and happy – whatever that means to your family – and stop being mean.

I know I see my cousins and think they look like stuffed sausages in their clothes so I am judgmental as well. It’s normal to see something and comment on it. But we need to learn to keep some things to ourselves and definitely not say anything to the people we are judging, especially kids we have no influence over. I WANT so badly to tell them to go up a size or two so they look better in their clothes but it’s not my place and we don’t have the kind of relationship where that kind of comment would be received as a constructive criticism. It would be taken as destructive and I love them too much to be destructive. Also, I have to remember that we are in different generations and what they think is cute is definitely nothing I’d wear…and vice versa. We don’t “understand” each other.

Mensa Notamember

April 3rd, 2014
2:13 pm

They have some nice truck canvasses at Tractor Supply Co.

Sugarbakers

April 3rd, 2014
2:27 pm

Georgia Tent and Awning might be able to help. They have done excellent work in the past for one of us in the bigger boned, pleasantly plump category.

Mean Girls

April 3rd, 2014
2:36 pm

I have witnessed many of these plus sized girls as being the meanest and biggest bullies. I guess it’s safety in numbers. The gorgeous model like girls get the most hate and vitriol spewed at them these days. It’s always the insecure girls that do the most bullying. This entire blog kind of proves my point. Means girls are not Lean girls.

Crystal

April 3rd, 2014
3:13 pm

Torrid is a California chain of clothing stores. Here is their website http://www.torrid.com/torrid/Homepage.jsp. I have bought a number of clothes from them and they have trendy clothing geared to young women.