Secret baptisms and other grandparent No-Nos!

So my friend who is a grandmother was telling me about another set of grandmothers who secretly BAPTIZED their grandchild without the parents’ approval!

The grandmothers were both Catholic and very active in their respective churches. The child is a toddler.

My friend wasn’t bothered by the secret baptism but I think it’s just crazy! You can’t go around baptizing kids without the parents knowing. Now they did tell the mother after the fact but I’m not clear on how much later.

So my questions are:

Do we all agree that you cannot secretly baptize your grandchild?

Can you secretly take them to your church if the parents aren’t practicing?

What are other no-nos for grandparents that they may think are perfectly OK because they did them with their own kids but they are NOT OK?

75 comments Add your comment

DB

July 31st, 2013
1:09 am

Well, I think it would depend on the parents. If the parents were non-religious, and pretty much felt that all religion was superstitious nonsense, they might just shrug and say, “Whatever . . . it makes no difference to our life if you say a few words and throw some water around.” If the parents are active in their own church, then they might just ignore it and say, “Well, that was a complete waste of your time, we’re going to handle our religious beliefs as our own church sees fit.” However, I can see most parents getting pretty darn angry at their parents if they had specifically said, “NO WE ARE NOT PLANNING TO ENGAGE IN THIS PARTICULAR RITUAL” and the grandparents did an end-run around them in spite of it.

I think that the lack of respect would be the thing that would most disturb me the most. Any set of grandparents who feel the need to be this sneaky and deceptive are probably looking at being shut out of their grandchild’s life for a long, long time. I know that if my parents or my in-laws had gone against my express wishes in such an underhanded manner, I would be furious, and the lack of trust that it would engender would echo into almost every facet of our relationship for then on.

The family dynamics that would cause grandparents to disrespect their children to such a degree are really interesting . . . obviously, these are parents who have not acknowledged their children as adults, or trust them to act responsibly with regards to their children, so this would not be the only time that this would have cropped up.

Our children were baptized in our church at around 3-4 months (Episcopal), but we recognize that, as adults, they may change and be more comfortable in a different spiritual environment — just as my husband and I did, and just as our parents did before us.

Bisnono

July 31st, 2013
2:14 am

No, it’s not ok. The wishes of the parents raising the child must be respected. And I would go one step further and say that this applies to other things that the grandparents may want to “share” with their grandchildren against the wishes of their parents, including things like allowing the child to secretly handle the grandparents firearms, giving the child a pet that the parents have to care for without first consulting the parents, taking the child to a movie or allowing them to watch TV programs that are generally off-limits to the child because the parent considers them inappropriate given their level of maturity, giving the child toys that are not in line with the values of the parents (computer games with adult ratings, realistic looking toy guns, giving them dolls that look like look like strippers, letting them listen to music with very explicit lyrics), etc. it is up to the PARENT to decide what they want their child exposed to and when. And for grandparents to have a child baptized, potentially against the wishes of the parents, in secret, to fulfill their own desires and religious beliefs, is not only disrespectful but also very selfish of them.

FCM

July 31st, 2013
4:14 am

Both of the above posts have it right.

Our faith, we dont baptized until the person can conmit for themselves. For whatevr reason 3rd grade is earliest we do this. It depends on the individual, the parents sponsor, and of course the minister.
My parents nor his mom would have done this, but they all 3 played a part in helping my choose baptism. His dad is Catholic, and I was told he baptized his daughter without his wife knowledge. Daughter was raised Baptist by his wife. I would not b surpised if he did the same with mine but he shouldnt. It is wrong.

Ear piercing, hair cuts, birds and bees talks. Those should b a no too.

Mother of 2

July 31st, 2013
6:17 am

I can’t think of any instance where baptizing a grandchild secretly would be okay. These grandparents seem very controlling. I imagine that they are going to run into a conflict with their children and/or grandchildren before too long.

BlondeHoney

July 31st, 2013
6:21 am

I have been a proud grandmother now for almost 10 months and would NEVER disrespect my son & daughter-in-law in that way. Of course, that particular scenario would never come up because none of us are particularly religious; however, I would never do anything with the baby that mom & dad disapprove of. As crazy as i am about that baby, he is their baby, not mine.

iRun

July 31st, 2013
6:45 am

This makes me laugh because my Catholic mother baptized our son (now 12) behind our backs. We’re atheist and we’re raising our child to decide for himself what he wants to be (right now he says he doesn’t believe in a supernatural god but that may be because his greatest exposure to religion and the supernatural are his atheist parents).

We definitely fit into the first description DB mentioned. In other words, since we don’t believe in that stuff the whole thing was a matter of a few words and throwing water around. No harm, no foul.

Basically it means my mother is committing to teaching our son about Catholicism, etc, and that’s fine because it’s part of his culture (we come from a very Catholic part of the country). He should know about it. It can enhance the religious education we provide, though we provide an academic education on the topic. We don’t want him ignorant of something that influences so many people.

motherjanegoose

July 31st, 2013
7:17 am

I am not a Grandmother yet, so I cannot speak from that aspect.

Our family does have a strong faith. It will be sad, to me, if my children marry someone who does not participate in a Christian faith. I do not request them to be the same denomination but believing in the Bible is something I am praying will be a part of my grandchild’s life.

My college room mate married an atheist. He is a difficult person and has lost his job ( a few years ago) due to the fact that he argues with everyone. ( we know his employer). He insisted that she did not participate in her faith for 25 years. Never could bring her daughter to church. Made silly comments during the time she was with her family and they prayed before dinner. This summer, he left her and ran off to a HS sweet heart in another state. Still did not have job. SO sad for her and I hope she can rekindle the faith she missed. She is a very sweet person and I saw her earlier this summer, as she lives out of state.

Baptizing a child will not be an issue, as we baptize when the person who is being baptized wants to do it themselves. To us, baptism is the person sharing that he or she has accepted the faith and wants others to know that he/she wants to be part of the body of Christ. Thus, a grandparent does not get the child baptized “just for good measure”. I my grandchildren did not attend church, I would want to take them but would not sneak them behind their parents back.

@ DB…your 3rd paragraph could be my parents. It is ridiculous and laughable in light of the fact of the THOUSANDS of teachers and children who look to me for guidance. I once told my Dad, “Yes, it is true that people pay for my advice about teaching and children.” :)

motherjanegoose

July 31st, 2013
7:17 am

COMMENT GONE :(

K's Mom

July 31st, 2013
7:35 am

This would really upset me. That is a huge crossed line. Even if I were like iRun, I would be furious over the crossed line not because of the religious aspect of it. I am a big believer in respecting boundaries and that is just wrong to me. Fortunately, my parents would not do it and my husband’s mother is not involved with our kids.

My mom and dad spoil our kids the way most grandparents do, mostly with affection, but also with candy and toys. It really does not cause conflict because it is not very often and if we say no, Mimi and Papa do not argue with us. I guess I just feel very fortunate that the grandparents who are involved in my kids’ lives respect boundaries.

HB

July 31st, 2013
7:45 am

Of course grandparents shouldn’t secretly baptize children or secretly take them to church. A good rule of thumb is anything that has to be done behind parents’ backs is a big no-no.

FCM

July 31st, 2013
7:45 am

Paul wrote in 2 Corinithans about being unequally yoked with a non believer. One line sticks out “So trust and mistrust hold hands?” The grandmothers sowed seeds of mistrust with their children. Also they did it in “secret” which means they knew it was not welcome.

Deuteronomy 6:7 is very clear where the child’s learning will come from: “Write these commandments that I’ve given you today on your hearts. Get them inside of you and then get them inside your children.”

@IRun, you will know from the above I disagree with you about God. However, you prove the point well. I am not going to discuss right or wrong of it with you, because I know neither of us will sway the other.

I do want to point out that iRun very clearly illustrates the “impact” of the baptism of the child without the follow up at home (as stated in Deuteronomy), “right now he says he doesn’t believe in a supernatural god but that may be because his greatest exposure to religion and the supernatural are his atheist parents”

If the parents are not re-iterating the teaching at home, then whatever the grandmothers teach will fall on poor soil and likely have weak roots at best.

Notice in my earlier post I credited my parents (Disciples Church) and my ex-Mother-in-Law (Baptist) with my children’s decision to be baptised. The children themselves credit these people. Now, their father, step-mother, and grandfather, are all Catholic…and my children say they have little influence over their (the children) theology. The children will tell you it is because those people do not discuss with them anything more than “Yes Jesus came and died for us. Yes God is the Father.” Those 3 have not written it on the hearts of the child.

TWG, the baptisms of your children are backed up by you and Michael at home. To me that is the important part. What is being backed up in the home of the child this topic is about?

FCM

July 31st, 2013
7:47 am

((((((((MJG))))))))))) yep another long post from me

MrLiberty

July 31st, 2013
7:50 am

Our society is overrun with people who think that they know better than someone else how to live, how to spend their money, how to raise their children, how to eat, how to educate children, etc. This would be of little concern to most of us except that the power of government has grown with the expanding numbers of these people and now they use the force and guns of government to get their way. In the old days this was called tyranny. In modern times they call this Progressivism and think its a wonderful thing.

Grandparents and others – worry about your own life. Don’t try to ameliorate your own failures through your control of others, their kids, or even your own grandkids. The rest of us will only put up with it for so long.

motherjanegoose

July 31st, 2013
7:52 am

FCM…good points and my post was not nearly as long as yours, yet it got kicked out! We will see if TWG can fish it out.

catlady

July 31st, 2013
7:56 am

In the tradition I grew up in, it is common to baptize babies, but not so in many churches., I do not think the grandmother should do this! What about the part of the,ceremony where the PARENTS promise to bring up the child “in the nurture and the admonishion of The Lord?”

Also, the grandparents should not feed the kids stuff their parents won’t let them have or play with “toys” their parents have banned.

motherjanegoose

July 31st, 2013
7:57 am

@ Mr. Liberty…as I am now telling my own two children ( a Doctor and a Senior at UGA):

There are about 50 things I know inside and out…you will not change my mind.
There are about 50,000 things I have little or no clue about. Please share your insights with me and I can learn! NO ONE knows everything.

Many people who have no idea how to live on a budget and now depend on the GOVERNMENT for everything…would do well to listen to some of us who have $$$ in the bank. Especially those, like us, who started out with $500.00 and living in a trailer park. WE are not wealthy but we know how to save and support ourselves. I also know how to make a dollar stretch!

catlady

July 31st, 2013
8:00 am

I understand the desperation of the grandparents. But their involvement should be limited to praying like crazy for the child and parents, and taking them to Sabbath School if the parents okay it.

catlady

July 31st, 2013
8:01 am

real life

July 31st, 2013
8:04 am

Highly unlikely that the child in question was baptized in a Catholic church because of the many rules in place regarding parental participation in church. It does not matter how active the grandparents are–it is a matter of how active the parents are. The parents are required to attend a baptism class and be members of the church they want for the baptism. Godparents must also be active practicing Catholics. And few, if any priests, would want to get involved in a legal mess sure to result if the parents are litigious.

Some friends of ours were not allowed to baptize their child in the Catholic church as they did not attend church regularly (Easter Catholics to be specific.) They tried a number of different churches in the Atlanta area as well as in the mom’s home town in Michigan. No budging on it at all.
The grandparents on both sides tried as well but were turned down as they were not the legal guardians of the child.

I think grandparents should not do anything with their grandchild in regards to religion that is not approved by the parents. There are many hands-off areas for grandparents and they have to take their cues from the parents to recognize these areas. Each family is different and has different ideas about what grandparents should and should not do. After all grandparents are not the parents and should follow what the parents want to do in regards to their children.

There is a difference...

July 31st, 2013
8:05 am

…between a Medical DOCTOR and a Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD) DOCTOR- just as there is a difference between a PharmD and a PHD…and yes, they can all be called DOCTOR, but really, how many of you refer to your pharmacist (if you even know their name), as Doctor So n So.?

A reader

July 31st, 2013
8:05 am

I got upset when my mother in law cut my daughter’s hair without asking me first. I got over it quickly because it is just hair. If I found out that either set of grandparents did something as significant as baptizing my daughter without consulting me then I would lose all trust in them. And they would basically be out of my life because I have no time for people I do not trust.

HSM

July 31st, 2013
8:30 am

@Reader, that’s shows your maturity to realize it was just hair, but I don’t know how you did it. To me it’s a nasty MIL setting the stage for other things she would do. You’re a bigger person than I am.

motherjanegoose

July 31st, 2013
8:33 am

@ There…you are CORRECT. Lots of types of Doctorates. Other folks, besides Medical Doctors.

http://blackphdeddmagazine.com/Explanation_and_Types_of_Doctorates.html

If I were in a legal situation, I may not seek a Dentist nor a Vet and yet both are VERY important when I need them and I respect their credentials.

My point is that my children have BOTH learned lots of things in college, that I DO NOT KNOW.

justmy2cents

July 31st, 2013
8:43 am

That is exactly what my in-laws did. DB’s 2nd paragraph sums it up perfectly. Not only that- the fact they are teaching my child to keep secrets from me thoroughly ticked me off. Then the fact that they told my husband after the fact, and HE kept it from me, only added fuel to the fire. Especially since these are not their biological grandchildren AND they ended up making me violate the terms of my divorce decree. Needless to say, I don’t have anything to do with them, and their contact with the girls is very limited.

Techmom

July 31st, 2013
8:43 am

Baptism – no way. If the grandchild is staying with the grandparents however and they normally attend church, then that’s ok.

I agree with whoever said it’s a matter of respecting the parents’ decisions. At some point, the grandparents are going to harm the relationship to the point that the parents won’t allow them to see the grandparents at all.

motherjanegoose

July 31st, 2013
8:52 am

@Techmom…blowing smoke near my children, who are allergic to smoke, certainly harmed the relationship in our house. As did alcoholism and foul language. MIL died of throat cancer. SAD!
My two have not seen their paternal grandparents in at least a dozen years. We always made the trip ( to the midwest) to see them. Grandparents have NEVER been here ( in 24 years).

Grandpa just skipped his first grandchild’s wedding to go to Nevada to gamble. They live in the same town. He flew back in time to pop in for the reception. We flew out for the wedding and wondered where he was. Priorities for sure. I think our family could go on Jerry Springer…haha!

Um, MotherJaneGoose......

July 31st, 2013
9:12 am

Telling people your son is a “doctor” is wrong. He may have a doctorate in Pharmacologyt he is NOT a doctor. He does not see patients, nor prescribe medication.

I believe you should tell people you son has a doctorate in Pharmacology. By saying he is a doctor, you are seeking ohhhhs and awws from others. It’s not your claim to fame. It’s his, and he worked very hard for that degree, it’s his moment. Don’t take away from it. Plus, you are not being honest and you want others to be impressed. Envy is what you are seeking.

Tom

July 31st, 2013
9:18 am

Didn’t Archie Bunker pull this trick once?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K_YutZBOcYk

hockey goalie

July 31st, 2013
9:23 am

I have to laugh. I was ’secretly’ baptized in my grandmother’s kitchen sink as an infant. Clearly not a secret cause the whole extended family found out that grammy “saved” me. While this kind of thing is definitely not appropriate behavior, I don’t know if it’s that big of a deal. Baptism by grandparent doesn’t count in anyone’s eyes; not even the big guy upstairs if you believe in that sort of thing.

I’m much more up-in-arms about grandparents undermining the parents’ authority. That can actually do some damage…

motherjanegoose

July 31st, 2013
9:31 am

My son worked his #$%^ off to get his Doctorate. He is the poster child for clawing his way through. Other students got into school easier/before him and did not make it through. I believe he is a Doctor of Pharmacy just as much as anyone can be a Doctor of Veterinary. I am going to the Chiropractor today and Dr. Patty is what I call her.

My daugher has two friends who are heading in the VET direction at UGA and I am THRILLED FOR THEM. I brag on them too! They will be Doctors. If you have a sick animal, you perhaps will appreciate their expertise.

My son knows LOTS of things I do not know. My husband plays WORDS WITH FRIENDS with him and fusses that he adds words that others might now know. You think? He took 3 years of Latin and had 8 years of college. I HOPE he might know more words than his parents. HAHA!

Notice, that I also mentioned my daughter. She is in Terry at UGA. Knows LOTS of Business things I do not know. I learn all sorts of things from her too and am also proud of her.

I mention these things to other sbecause being a good parent takes work. I have made plenty of mistakes. Others have poo pooed my ideas as being too strict. Those of us, with successful adult children, know what it might take, such as DB and catlady . We have shared stories about our children in person and over the phone. They both know TONS of things about parenting. I am sure lakerat could chime in too but I do not know her personally. There are certainly others! Some younger parents would do well to listen to those of us who are farther along on the sidewalk. I listen to grandparents, as this is a field I do not know!

motherjanegoose

July 31st, 2013
9:33 am

@hocky…no one can save you but yourself…IMHO.

GardenDiva

July 31st, 2013
9:48 am

Grandparent No-no’s in my opinion include (unless previously approved by the parents):
first haircuts
ear piercing
pets that will go home with the child
debunking of childhood myths such as Santa Claus, the Tooth Fairy, …
religious sacraments
anything that one of the parents has specifically come out against – whether it be feeding formula instead of pumped breast milk, feeding solid foods before a certain age, toy guns, and etc.

With that said, “emergency baptism” by lay people is permitted under certain circumstances in the Roman Catholic church. And even if this was not an emergency situation or they were not Catholic, the grandparents may have had an overwhelming concern/belief about the presence of Original Sin in the soul of the child, which compelled them to have the child baptized without the permission or participation of the parents. Note, I am not saying that action was correct from a parental rights standpoint. I am simply offering possible motivations.

lakerat

July 31st, 2013
10:14 am

How did my name get involved in the “doctor” controversy? I am like Sgt. Schultz (from the Hogan’s Hero’s [no, not Hulk Hogan] TV show back in the 60’s – for those of you younger than catlady and me) “I know Noth-THING”!

HB

July 31st, 2013
10:25 am

MJG, while I’m sure your son worked very hard, it is incorrect to refer to him as a doctor. I don’t know whether or not PharmDs often use the title Dr. with their names (DDS holders do, JD holders don’t), as in “Dr. Smith is a pharmacist,” but it is not correct to simply say he is a doctor as you did. “Doctor”, other than as a title, is reserved for medical doctors. Others with doctorates are called pharmacists, veterinarians, dentists, attorneys, professors, academics, etc.

KR

July 31st, 2013
10:40 am

I believe that, just because you have raised the parent of your grandchildren, it does not give you the right to make decisions for the grandchildren without their parents knowledge/approval. It is the parents place to raise their children’s the manner they choose, and NOT the grandparents place to stray from their choosing. The parents should be able to trust and know that the grandparents respect their choices and decisions. If the grandparents don’t respect the parents choices, or KNOW THEIR PLACE, then the parents WILL or CAN loose their trust in the grandparents. That will result in a strain on their relationship.

KR

July 31st, 2013
10:42 am

P.s……I am a mother of 3 (Ages 26, 22, & 6yrs), AND a grandmother.

Hey, KR, my

July 31st, 2013
10:54 am

…aunt did that, had two different sets of children (a boy and a girl the first time, and a boy and a girl the second time) about 20 years apart – and with the same husband, too…

Mayhem

July 31st, 2013
11:09 am

My mother in law had 4 kids. Two have the same birthday, but are 15 years apart.

A neighbor had a 21 year old, 22 & 17 year old, then had a baby with her new husband. I thought she was insane. 2 out the door, one with a foot out the door, and she started it all over again. NO THANK YOU!!!! My kids are all in their 20’s and there is no way in HELL I would want to start raising another kid. It’s MY time now. AND we told the kids, no grandkids until we are in our 60’s. We spent 20 years raising them, we want 10 years to ourselves before the grands come along. LOL So far, so good.

really?

July 31st, 2013
11:47 am

MJG:

“…My college room mate married an atheist. He is a difficult person and has lost his job ( a few years ago) due to the fact that he argues with everyone. ( we know his employer). He insisted that she did not participate in her faith for 25 years. Nev…”

The fact that the man you were referring to was an Atheist has nothing to do with the fact that he was a jerk. There are plenty of churchgoers and very religious people who argue with everyone and/or leave their wife.

Mayhem

July 31st, 2013
11:57 am

MJG – sometimes your tone can be very condensending. Your arm must hurt from constantly patting yourself on the back. For years you have bragged on your kids, as you should, but in all those years, never once did you mention your son was a DOCTOR until recently. We all know he was in Pharmacy school and has graduated, and I am sure you are extremely proud. But to now claim he is a “Doctor” is just not right.

“Those of us, with successful adult children, know what it might take, such as DB and catlady”…..Your daughter is still in school….

I happen to believe my children are successful, although they are not “doctors”, nor to they attend UGA (big deal). I have raised my children successfully. Success as a parent, to me, is that my kids are respectful, kind, generous, they are not on drugs, they don’t drink, they are EACH paying their way through school, AND working full time jobs. I have done my job successfully, they are good members of society, and not a burden on anyone!!!

Just because there isn’t a doctorate in anything, does not mean I am not a successful parent, nor does it mean my children are not successful.

Seriously?

July 31st, 2013
12:06 pm

As an atheist, I’d never trust my mother (super religious) with my child alone for these exact types of reasons. She would absolutely expose my child to her beliefs as the absolute truth, which I categorically reject. My child can learn about all religions/creation myths now and decide for themselves if they wish to participate in a religion when they are adults. No child of mine will be going to church as a minor. (Cue the “poor child” “mean atheist” comments).

HB

July 31st, 2013
12:26 pm

Seriously?, no disrespect intended, just curious — when you say no child of yours will go as a minor, do you mean you’d outright forbid it? If say, as high schoolers they wanted to attend church with friends, you wouldn’t allow them to go? If so, does that go for all religions and denominations?

Jaynie

July 31st, 2013
12:54 pm

I am a grandmother and I cannot imagine pulling a stunt like this with my grandchildren. Those kids are not my children. Their parents must raise, provide for and teach them their values. I would never dream of baptizing my grandchildren even if the parents would not be upset. That is a parent’s responsibility and choice. I know from personal experience how grandparents can try to undermine parental guidance as my own mother tried this kind of stuff when my children were younger. Needless to say, my mother and I were never very close and because of this kind of stuff, we never will be.

FCM

July 31st, 2013
1:38 pm

You know in 7th grade they studied the Middle East. Judaism, Christianity, and Muslimism (is that right?) were all part of the ciriculum. They studied India and learned about Hindu. They studied Asia and learned about Budda and Confuscious. My point is the kid is likely to get exposed to something regardless of the parent advocating it. However, what they learned in school did not seem to “convert” any of the kids I know.

Denise

July 31st, 2013
2:35 pm

@Seriously – what if your kids WANTED to attend services (not forced)? Would you allow them to then? I understand you saying that you want them to make their own decisions as adults but sometimes it doesn’t take that long to decide if you believe. For some it takes a lifetime, for some the decision is made earlier. I would suspect, though, CHILDREN who become religious at a young age have religious parents and are taught about God (from the perspective of a believer) from a young age.

motherjanegoose

July 31st, 2013
2:37 pm

Clarification Time:

1. The atheist who is married to my college room mate pushed his Atheism on those at the office and this was a big part of why he got fired. His superior attitude was a problem and it bled over. He is not able to find another job, as that employer ( in a specialized field) is reluctant to recommend him.

2. lakerat…I did not intend to drag you into this…I was complimenting you because ( from what I know…probably not much) your children are grown and out on their own. I take it they are successful too. You must have done many things right! I am sorry if this was not taken in a positive manner. I will not mention your name again.

3. BlondeHoney…I missed you and know (from what you have told us) that your children are successful adults who live on their own. Again, I apologize.

4. Mayhem…I have no idea about your children. Certainly they must be fine people, if you happen to believe it! I did not gather that they were finished with college or living away from home. If I missed that, I APOLOGIZE. I have not asked to meet you for lunch ( even thought we must live close enough) because I feel that we are more different than alike and probably would not have much to visit about. This comment reinforces my opinion about whether we could be personal friends: “Your arm must hurt from constantly patting yourself on the back”. You may have others here who you have visited with personally as they are interested in meeting you. I hope you have a great time. I have had lots of fun meeting people on this blog.

5. There are folks, on this blog, who have a Doctorate or are related to someone with a Doctorate. I respect that level of expertise enormously. Even if they are not medical Doctors. The amount of schooling it takes to get to that level and the reading that needs to be done, amazes me. I love to converse with highly intelligent people. I am NOT one of those people but am lucky to claim some as friends.

My point was that I am an expert ( so to speak) at about 50 things, while there are 50,000 things I know nothing about and I am delighted to have resources so that I can still learn. SHEESH!

Thank you to those who do put up with me and perhaps think I might be able to share something of value on this blog.

motherjanegoose

July 31st, 2013
2:39 pm

@ Denise….just back from Houston and I got my Texas fix. It was fun. Sad I was not close enough to visit with you in Ft. Worth. Maybe another time!

Kat

July 31st, 2013
2:49 pm

We baptized our kids “just in case,” but we are atheists. Years ago, when the baptisms happened, we were only occasional church-goers. Take them, don’t take them, it’s fine. If my kids want to be Catholics or Baptists, have at it.

Denise

July 31st, 2013
2:59 pm

@MJG – shoot! It would have been nice to connect again. :-) Glad you had a great time.

NTLB

July 31st, 2013
4:54 pm

My mom actually did this to my son when he was 8 years old. Though I was upset about the whole issue of going behind my back, my son was actually proud of being baptized and and elated about gaining godparents. My son’s happy experience outweighed the secrecy of the act.