‘Grups’: Are you a parent who won’t grow up?

New York magazine is examining “Grups” or adults who won’t grow up. The author describes a “Grup” as a 40-year-old (or could be in their 30s) man or woman who look, talk, act and dress like they are in their 20s.  The author, Adam Sternbergh, says it has eliminated the generation gap and describes how this state of being affects their clothes, their music, their jobs and their parenting.

From New York:

“…This cohort is not interested in putting away childish things. They are a generation or two of affluent, urban adults who are now happily sailing through their thirties and forties, and even fifties, clad in beat-up sneakers and cashmere hoodies, content that they can enjoy all the good parts of being a grown-up (a real paycheck, a family, the warm touch of cashmere) with none of the bad parts (Dockers, management seminars, indentured servitude at the local Gymboree). It’s about a brave new world whose citizens are radically rethinking what it means to be a grown-up and whether being a grown-up still requires, you know, actually growing up….”

“A number of trends have nudged us in this direction, from the increasingly casual dress codes at work to the persistent marketing of counterculture “rebellion” as an easily attainable, catchall symbol for cool. During the dot-com boom, businesses not only allowed people to come to work in clothes they might usually wear to clean out the attic but encouraged this as a celebration of youthful vivacity and an upheaval of the fusty corporate order. Suits were thought to be the provenance of, well, suits. The dot-com bubble burst, but the aesthetic remained, as part of the ongoing rock star–ification of America. Three-day stubble and shredded jeans are the now-familiar symbols of the most desirable kind of affluence and freedom. So why would anyone dress up anymore? A suit says, My mother made me wear this to go to a bar mitzvah. The Grup outfit says, I’m so cool, and so damned good at what I do, I can wear whatever the hell I want. At least when I go out to brunch.

Here’s how it affects their parenting:

“See, Grups aren’t afraid of parenting. Grups don’t avoid having kids. Grups love kids. In part, though, this is because Grups find kids to be perfect little Mr. Potato Head versions of themselves. Of course, there’s more to Grup parenting than simply molding your kid’s tastes. You must be vigilant that you don’t grow up and become uncool yourself. “I recognize that changes and sacrifices are necessary. I do occasionally wake up before nine these days,” says (Neal Pollack, the author of the forthcoming memoir Alternadad: The True Story of One Family’s Struggle to Raise a Cool Kid in America,) of parenthood. “But I didn’t want to lose touch with the world’s cultural progress. I didn’t want to freeze myself in time.” So instead of playdates, Pollack invites other cool dads and their kids over for playing (kids), beers (dads), and sampling new CDs (everyone). Or he packs up his toddler for the Austin City Limits Music Festival. Though that plan didn’t work so well. “It was really hot and crowded,” he says. “And the music sucked.” His son apparently concurred.”

“I don’t mean to be so hard on Pollack, who does seem genuinely interested in exploring a new kind of parenting—a kind that doesn’t involve totally losing any sense of who you were ten minutes before your baby was born. In fact, I got a much saner version of more or less the same philosophy from Adam Levite and Francine Hermelin, a couple in their thirties (he’s 38, she’s 36) with three (yes, three) kids: Asa, 6; Dora, 3; and Ester, 0.5. Levite directs music videos for artists like Beck and Interpol, and Hermelin spends most of her time with the kids while also organizing events like Downtown for Democracy’s mock election, in which 8-year-olds ran for president. Levite wears cool little geometric glasses and Hermelin wears slightly thinner cool little geometric glasses. The family lives in a large white envy-inducing loft apartment in Tribeca that looks like a design-magazine photo shoot. As you enter, you’ll find Levite’s guitar collection propped against the wall, right next to which you’ll find similar, miniature versions of the same guitars for his son, Asa. “From a very young age, we’ve always decided to try not to, you know, vanilla the kids in the things that we present to them,” says Levite. A-ha! Here we go—thunder music. “We’ve been listening to the Beatles since the moment they were born. They’re classic pop songs, but not full of anger and angst. And we still listen to some kids’ music. Music for Aardvarks is really great.”

This article is really long so click the link and read it all for the full explanation of this “movement.”

Anytime I read a trend story in New York publication, I always wonder is this just a New York thing? Is this just happening in Brooklyn and Manhattan so then the writer feels like this is the new state of being across the board? So are you seeing this in Atlanta? Are you seeing this in yourself? Are you seeing this in your friends?

What extent throws you into this category: Is it trying to share good music with your kids? Is it trying to dress younger? Is it not imposing boundaries on your kids?

I definitely don’t think we dress like we are in our 20s. I do think we try to impart some taste to them in music and TV shows. That doesn’t mean we’re pushing stuff from the ’80s. Michael will bring home CDs for Rose to check out – usually modern stuff—and they do share similar taste in music. I don’t hesitate to tell them if a show is just awful – such as “Pokemon” cartoons. This generally leads to a discussion in aesthetics, animation and voice acting. They make me support my opinion. And sometimes they convince me that a show is OK. For example, the new “My Little Pony series Friendship is Magic” is much better than the old series.

I like the question toward the end of the article of what happens to these kids? Do they turn out like Alex P. Keaton — an exact opposite of their parents?

So do you think there a generation gap between you and your kids? Are you trying to live like you are 20 but with kids? When are you sharing knowledge and opinions or pushing a Grup agenda?

59 comments Add your comment

Jessica

May 30th, 2013
3:05 pm

There are probably a few parents out there who can get away with presenting themselves as much younger than they are, but most of the ones who try it end up looking foolish. No matter how ‘cool’ parents think they are, their kids probably won’t see them that way. The same styles, music, and attitudes that parents see as youthful will look weird and dorky to the next generation (the way The Brady Bunch looked to my generation).
Also, the parents who are obsessed with maintaining their own youth will only be ‘the cool parents’ until their kids are somewhere around the 9th grade. After that, parents who try to act too young will seem pathetic and a little creepy. Teens and their friends only pretend to like those parents because they are really laid back about the rules (i.e. irresponsible) and let the kids get away with stuff that no reasonable adult would permit.

catlady

May 30th, 2013
3:22 pm

Unfortunately I know,a,few of these in their 50s, and quite a few apprentices in their 20s who are working hard at staying teenagers. No job, no education, living off parents, with nothing except talk to “prove” how they are adults.

K's Mom

May 30th, 2013
3:44 pm

I do not fall into that category and do not hang out with people who do. Anyone who is still trying to act like a teenager after graduating from HS is pathetic in my book. When I started college every decision I made was based on my future and I even gave thought about how my actions at that age would effect the family I wanted to have one day.

We live in a college town and the thing i hear about most that I do think is worse now that ever is sleeping around (maybe I am just naive). I am not an abstinence only advocate, but I always knew I wanted my body to carry a child so I treated like something special. I wish girls would think about themselves in terms other than a good hook up or booty call.

FCM

May 30th, 2013
3:50 pm

In music sure…I listen to “current” songs and even surprise the kids by liking some they like. Some I don’t like and they do.

My daughter and I had this conversation recently. She said as long as I don’t pretend (or worse think!) I a her older sister she doesn’t care. She assured me thus far she has no concern.

TA

May 30th, 2013
4:01 pm

50 year olds trying to look/act like 20 yrs olds are just that, old folks pretending to be something they are not, usually the kids turn out the same way. (this doesn’t end well for either of them)

Nothing sadder than a 50 yr old wannabe woman trying wear clothes like the 20s, only she seems to be confused about her dress size.

elgrunir

May 30th, 2013
5:43 pm

You don’t have to focus yourself on looking or acting 20 in order to get along with younger generations, though I suspect that’s not the only “raison d’etre” for Grups (a term taken from the original Star Trek episode “Miri,” no?).

I’m a bit north of 50, but in and out of the classroom I get along with the kids. Sometimes I’ll join a pickup game of volleyball or basketball, sometimes I’ll be invited to sit with them at lunch, and sometimes we’ll do something cool (such as singing the National Anthem together or having an eating contest). But our lives are still separate. I’m not trying to be anyone other than “me” and they still see me as a teacher, mentor, and occasional friend.

I’d say just be in the moment and be glad for who and where you are (age-wise). Being older doesn’t mean you have to be frumpy and distant–you can still feed your inner kid in plenty of ways: join a team or activity group, go to the ballgame once in a while, have a picnic, ride horses, go to an amusement park. Too many people, I think, spend too much time wishing they weren’t who they are then and there.

motherjanegoose

May 30th, 2013
7:32 pm

I do not try to be or look 20. I am 53 and fine with it. That being said, I am WAY more interested and in touch with my two than my parents were. My sisters and I agree that our parents acted old BEFORE they hit 50. We really had nothing in common with them.

My daughter (age 21) and I still hang out ( we did today) and I take her friends with us on trips or out to dinner. Sometimes my husband comes and sometimes not. I like classical and jazz music….mostly instrumentals. I could not tell you the names of the artists my daughter ( or son) like. I have purchased things for them but typically do not listen to it. We sometimes read the same authors and see movies together. We talk about mostly anything around here and I learn as much from them as they learn from me. Fascinating, for sure! I simply want to be able to enjoy their company, now that they are adults. It is their time to be in there 20’s not mine!

T.S.

May 31st, 2013
3:38 am

Things change for sure. “Back in the day” most everyone got dressed up for church. Today many adults choose to wear an old pair of jeans, etc. to church. It is certainly not that they don’t have anything else to put on. It’s really funny to see the old pictures of people dressed up to watch a baseball game decades ago.

Mother of 2

May 31st, 2013
5:33 am

My 17 and 21 year olds can see through the “cool” parents’ facades. One even mentioned all of the plastic surgery one mother had in her desperate quest to stay young. I have noticed that the older parents who are trying so hard to stay young have a tendency to be extremely lenient with their kids. Unsupervised teenagers with too much money and time leads to all sorts of trouble.

Aging is not a terrible thing. I am able to do so much more as an older adult, albeit it with more wrinkles and less tone. I’ve had plenty of role models who have aged gracefully – my goal is to do the same.

Bisnono

May 31st, 2013
6:41 am

I’m 40, my husband is 39, and we have one very active toddler. I REFUSE to join the stereotype of women who wear only yoga pants and mom jeans and lose all sense of being a beautiful and vivacious woman for a sexless, pony-tail and no makeup lazy look. We are both creative, both have jobs and work hard. We aren’t lazy, we just don’t think we should have to conform and settle for what so many people do, which is losing themselves entirely once they have a baby. We still go on movie dates, it just takes more planning. We still go out to dinner, it just means we go to dinner at 5 instead of 7 or 8. And we still hang with friends who don’t have kids. We liked the life we had before our son joined our family, now life is a little more complicated, but we haven’t left who we were as a couple on the floor of the hospital delivery room. And we are good parents, and a strong couple, which means our son will grow up with parents who not only love him, but are also still madly in love with each other and comfortable in retaining the parts of them that matter most. Just because I wear fashionable clothes that fit and are flattering does not mean I’m trying to look younger. I wear fashionable clothing because I want to, and always make sure it’s age and occasion appropriate. I own two pairs of yoga pants-which I wear only when exercising or at night before bed. Those babies don’t leave the house. I am still me, but now a mom, and I think I do my son a huge disservice by giving up all of who I was and all I loved to do just because the society of frumpy disheveled mothers thinks I should. The question to ask is, why does any of this bother other people? Jealousy? Unhappy marriage? Not my problem. Do what works for you and your family, but don’t expect me to do what you do.

FCM

May 31st, 2013
7:01 am

Bisnono you are not a Grup. You said you dress age appropriate and stay active in your interests/friends. That is what a good parent does.

A Grup is someone who is 40+ and dressing like he/she did at 22. I don’t think it is about books, music, and interests (Harry Potter proved a book could reach a WIDE audience across ages). Those may or may not be similar…after all the child is YOURS.

Here is what bothers me: “Grups aren’t afraid of parenting” WHAT? It sounds to me like Grups are to busy being the older cooler sibling and/or their child’s friend to be a parent.

motherjanegoose

May 31st, 2013
7:13 am

@ Bisono, I do wear yoga pants nor a pony tail. I rarely wear a t shirt. I am a professional and I dress with makeup and jewelry when I go out. Even to run an errand. I also never wear jeans to church.

motherjanegoose

May 31st, 2013
7:14 am

OOOPS…do NOT wear yoga pants….

real life

May 31st, 2013
7:53 am

@Bisnono–you seem to be adapting to parenthood in a wonderful and healthy manner. Stylish dressing, date nights, and time with friends does not make you a grup. It shows that you are not putting aside all the aspects of your life that make you who you are. And that is great.
I know several people who qualify as grups. Their attire is very similar to high school and college attire–even at work on some days. They especially want to be their teenagers . They talk like them, text like them, listen to the same music and so on. There is a big difference between you and them. And you sound like the better person.

FCM

May 31st, 2013
8:19 am

My elder daughter announced last night she was really into 80s music. Since I “came of age” in the 80s does that mean if I still like the music I am now a grup? (Rhetorical).

RJ

May 31st, 2013
8:24 am

@Bisnono I am very much like you. I am not about to give up stylish clothes and make up because of my age. I still dress fashionably, I love make up, and I listen to some popular music. I dress age appropriate, but I keep it fashionable.

Mayhem

May 31st, 2013
8:54 am

Well, we have a ton of kids in and out of our home. I have to be the “adult” and not allow myself to act their age. Although I have a sick sense of humor, I still to not “hang” out with those kids. I prefer the company of people my own age, you know, with experience. However, the kids do come and talk to us, but when it comes time to “hanging out” they usually hit the basement or go outside. Occassionaly they will help out in the kitchen, or at the grill and we all talk and laugh. Once in a great while, one of them will come and sit and watch a show with us.

This article reminds me of the mom in Mean Girls. “You kids keep me so young”, as she is serving them margaritas, and dressing like them….LOL….

HB

May 31st, 2013
9:55 am

So urban hipsters are steadfastly remaining urban hipsters even after they have kids. So what? It doesn’t sound to me like they’re really trying to be like their kids or act like teenagers or even act as their kids best friends instead of as parents. They’re just not buying into the traditional image of a grown-up wearing business clothes, becoming out of touch with new trends, or introducing their kids to commercial kid stuff (Austin City Limits > Barney — why wouldn’t all parents take this approach?!). What’s wrong with that?

I think it’s odd that some people jump to the idea that these will be overly permissive parents. Why assume that not catering your tastes to kids or old ideas of what a grown-up should look like means the kids won’t be taught what’s right and wrong and be held accountable for their actions?

elgrunir

May 31st, 2013
10:01 am

@bisono:

Sounds like you love your child and don’t worship him. Good job!

@all:

If you’re trying too hard to be “cool” at any age, you’re not.

MountainDawg

May 31st, 2013
11:32 am

LOL…I’ve been told I was born 3-4 generations too late. I’m in early 40s, but very ‘old school’/traditional about most things (including dress & music). IMHO, these ‘grups’ are largely pathetic and vain…trying to emulate kids that’re 20 years younger. Folks need to grow up & act like adults.

HB

May 31st, 2013
11:37 am

Exactly why do they need to act like your vision of an adult? They’re happy and successful and making a point of continuing to enjoy the things they did as younger adults. What is pathetic about that?

Babs29

May 31st, 2013
11:54 am

AGREED:
……… “the older parents who are trying so hard to stay young have a tendency to be extremely lenient with their kids. Unsupervised teenagers with too much money and time leads to all sorts of trouble.” This is the underlying point that concerns me. Trying to be liked too much by your kids might be ok for a while, but it leads to “all sorts of trouble” as the kids become teens. As I told my kids when they were teens, “believe it or not, we used to be cool.” We all had a good laugh, and then I’d still say no if necessary. Was told later on by my now-38-year-old that I was smart to have kept her away from certain situations when she was a teen! It is smart to try to understand the kids, but smarter to keep your sense of judgment intact. A few times, when I knew my kids were seeing a movie that I would have preferred them not to, but let them win the little battles, I made sure to see it also (of course without them) so I’d know what they were seeing, what they were being exposed to. Some were shattering to my equilibrium, but that was my job as a parent. Grow up. You had the child, it is your job to be the parent. Boring at times, exciting, beyond your wildest dreams of love and connectedness (is that a word) many times! Be a grown up.

Babs29

May 31st, 2013
12:02 pm

And that is not about how one dresses…….. my cousin wears skirts shorter than most middle schoolers, and is beautiful as in Hollywood beautiful. But always acted like a grown up, set limits for her child, (who is now a mom herself) and just happens to love fashion. It’s about being a parent, not a kid, emotionally. Setting limits.

A Realist

May 31st, 2013
2:05 pm

Well-stated by Bisnono and Babs29! …….could it be there are way too many old hens out there on this blog who are just jealous they aren’t hot and hip at 40/50-something?

Becky

May 31st, 2013
2:16 pm

I’m 51 and I dress like I want to..Nothing to skimpy, I never have..Even when I was younger and much, much skinnier, I never dressed skimpy..Like FCM, I like the 80’s music and older country music..

@A Realist..Yeah, I am an old hen, but trust me I’m not jealous..I wouldn’t mind shedding a few pounds, but I don’t want to be hot and hip at my age..I survived my 20’s (thank goodness) and don’t want to live them again..

Get It RIght

May 31st, 2013
2:44 pm

I’ve seen some of these “Grups”. They’re paying attention to themselves and not so much attention to their kids. Because they observe so few boundries for themselves, they seem to set very few buondries for their children. “Let them do what they feel like doing”, is the mantra. I think the formative years are for learning HOW to be an adult. A few non-negotiable rules, such as ALWAYS dress properly for work, teach a valuable lesson. Once the child is an adult, then they can decide where to go from there. Be a grown-up and raise your children to be adults.

ZZ

May 31st, 2013
3:20 pm

Been said here but it’s worth repeating, folks that behave like this are obvious, no one from 10 to 50 y.o is fooled. We all see it and it’s pathetic.

We have a friend...

May 31st, 2013
3:39 pm

…who has a daughter in college and a daughter who starts college maybe this year or next – the friend is an absolute GRUP, staying “hip” with both daughters, dressing like THEM and THEIR friends, and really, really into being with them at most all the time. Otherwise, she is a great person, but just cannot let the kids grow up alone…

Are you listening M K?

motherjanegoose

May 31st, 2013
8:45 pm

@ Realist …never been jealous of others for their hipness. I have never considered myself hip/hot and that is fine with me. From being VP of my High School Senior Class ( a LONG time ago) to being hired to speak to thousands of educators, no one has every said to me, “You are so hip /hot!” At 53, I am WAY over being hip. I do have lots of friends, all over the country and I like all sorts of people. Even those who are obviously not hip nor hot. I tend to think that what is on the inside is more important.

SEE

June 1st, 2013
5:20 am

I, for one, LOVE being able to wear yoga pants and pony-tail with no make-up. That’s the way I looked in H.S. and college. Now that I am working, I find I must wear makeup and dress clothes to look “professional”. HATE IT! My sister, on the other hand, won’t stick her nose out of the door w/o full makeup, outfit and accessories. My husband, in fact, is kinda the same way. Obviously, that is just our personalities…I don’t believe people should take it as some sort of statement on life.

Kat

June 1st, 2013
1:55 pm

Pokemon is awful but My Little Pony isn’t? Huh?

Miss Priss!

June 2nd, 2013
10:31 am

Well, my fellow sweeties, people you know or meet might not say you’re hot or hip (for a good reason, Jane K. and Becky), but I’ve noticed my whole life the very first thing women say …squeal … to people they meet or have known … “Oh, don’t you look nice!” or “Isn’t that a precious outfit!” A number of squealie things to that effect. The first thing you say. Trust me. It’s hideous. Especially at church.

Anyhow, also notice what women always do the moment before your picture is taken. Exactly. You cutely tilt your head to the left or right. Just downright girlie at your age. So, nothing wrong with actually being hip or actually being hot. Stop the rationalizing and get to work. It’s called getting fit and looking healthy … and not ending up at 50 looking like your farm mother.

motherjanegoose

June 2nd, 2013
3:40 pm

If someone you have never met, nor most likely will every meet, tells you that you are not hip nor hot…should you be concerned? Not me.

Making new friends who are interesting is more important to me than what they look like.

Though we travel the world over to find the beautiful, we must carry it with us or we find it not. – Ralph Waldo Emerson

Miss Priss!

June 2nd, 2013
5:23 pm

I found there was only one way to look thin: hang out with fat people.

—Rodney Dangerfield

cobbmom

June 2nd, 2013
7:20 pm

My mother in law shopped in the junior section until she turned 60. She would tell strangers she was my son’s mother when he was too young to correct her. Her children are embarrassed to go in public with her. Mothers of my daughter’s basketball teammates wore tighter skimpier clothing than their daughters. I’ve always dressed modestly, probably slightly older than my age and I’m considered the “cool” mom by my daughter’s friends. She has a much earlier curfew than her friends, we monitor her social media and she has household chores. Most of her friends feel as if their parents have no interest in them because they don’t monitor their behavior. Women/men who try to be young, hip or whatever you want to call it appear foolish and mentally limited. I will never do business with a “professional” who adapts this lifestyle.

Family First

June 3rd, 2013
4:51 am

Well said Childfree to Childless!!!

-http://familyfirst-online.blogspot.com/

Techmom

June 3rd, 2013
9:25 am

I’m very close in age to my son since I had him very young so we do share some common interests but it’s not my goal in life to be like him and his friends. We’re still his parents and though we always welcome his friends into our home and often have conversations with them and such, we aren’t trying to be a part of their circle of friends.

My husband and I also work with the youth at church so we hang out with middle and high-schoolers on a regular basis. The whole point is to be someone they can relate to and to be a good role model, not to dress like them or listen to certain music so they’ll like us. We simply try to be real and for me, that means NOT wearing the clothes my mom wears nor is it most of what the teenagers wear either. I’m good with shorts/jeans, t-shirts and flip-flops or running shoes, which is who I am and what I wear most of the time. Except when I have to go into the office and then I’ll avoid shorts and flip-flops. The key is that I don’t dress or act a certain way simply b/c I’m trying to fit in with anyone; I dress and act the way I do b/c it’s who I am and what I’m comfortable with.

buckheadgirl

June 3rd, 2013
10:06 am

Did I miss the memo about the 4 day weekend?

Becky

June 3rd, 2013
10:37 am

Well, Miss Priss!, thank you very much, but I don’t recall that I said that others haven’t ever told me that I wasn’t hot/hip.There are still men out there that look at me sometimes..In fact I had man follow me thru the grocery store a while back and he told me that I was the prettiest woman he had ever seen.. I know that I am not beautiful and have never been mistaken for it..But men did and still do look..The only one though that interest me is my husband of 19 years, that to this say still thinks I’m hot..You don’t have to dress like a hooker to be sexy..

motherjanegoose

June 3rd, 2013
11:22 am

Thinking about this last night as I watched THE NEXT FOOD NETWORK STAR. One of the contestants is a model and consides herself hot and hip ( as I am sure many folks do). She almost got cut from the show. There were others who were carrying a few more pounds and certainly not eye candy, that were fascinating. Tricky to be perfect at everything!

Miss Priss!

June 3rd, 2013
12:27 pm

I am the one who got myself fat … who did all the eating. So I had to take full responsibility for it.

—Kirstie Alley

BuckheadBetty

June 3rd, 2013
2:38 pm

Haha! Love the grup moniker. My husband and I (he’s early 50s, I’m early 40s) and I dress up for church. We live in Buckhead, are proud Republicans, and happily try to look our best at church, as we believe it teaches our children something about reference before God–if church isn’t worth the effort, what is? We are probably the folks the grups are trying so hard not to be. They would say we dress and act like their parents, maybe? But their jeans are as expensive as my linen skirt, and they are trying to be *cool* just as hard as their parents were trying to be *respectable.* Whatever floats one’s boat, it doesn’t matter to me, but there does seem to be some hypocrisy there worth pointing out.

BuckheadBetty

June 3rd, 2013
2:39 pm

I meant “reverence”…LOL!

motherjanegoose

June 3rd, 2013
4:54 pm

@ Buckhead…I also dress up for church. I do not even wear jeans on an airplane. I am fine in shorts and a top at home but not when I am out and about. I feel better about myself when I wear jewelry, make up, have my nails done and appropriate clothes. That is just me. I have worn nail polish for 30 years. Also just me.

Mayhem

June 4th, 2013
7:26 am

There’s some vain people up in here. Makeup, jewelry, no jeans. Sad, very sad.

I work in a very casual office. Right now I have on capris and flip flops. Most of our techs are in shorts, tee shirts and tennis shoes. None of the women in my office wear makeup. We don’t need to impress each other, we have all worked together for over 20 years.

I’ve been known to dash to the grocery store in sweats. No problem.

Mayhem

June 4th, 2013
7:28 am

BUT I REFUSE to wear the “housewife baseball cap”. The only time I wear a baseball cap is when doing yard work, or if I’m at the beach/lake.

motherjanegoose

June 4th, 2013
8:09 am

@ Mayhem…if you knew me you would never say I am vain. I am pretty sure I have not met you. Your kids might know me, as I am in Costco nearly every week :). I sometimes go out to get the paper in my robe / bed hair and most vain people would not.

When I am hired to be in front of people, I try to look nice and professional. A vain person would not dress up in what I wear and look silly, as I do with children, most weeks. The outfit does not flatter me at ALL but that is what I use in schools. Most pictures I have online are in my costume.

Perhaps there are others here who are vain. I have met 6 personally, from this blog, and they are not vain either. I typically do not hang out with vain people.

To me, this is kind of like camping…I do not care for it but there are others who do! If some folks want to look natural in sweats, flip flops and a pony tail, that is fine with me. I do not call them sad…that is what they like!

Scooby

June 4th, 2013
9:22 am

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June 4th, 2013
12:15 pm

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