What can American schools learn from Japan’s healthy school lunches from scratch?

In Japan, school lunches are made from scratch, the food is locally grown and there is no mystery meat. The children help serve it and the parents even ask for the recipes.

From The Washington Post:

“Schools in Japan, by contrast, give children the sort of food they’d get at home, not at a stadium. The meals are often made from scratch. They’re balanced but hearty, heavy on rice and vegetables, fish and soups. The meals haven’t changed much in four decades.

“Mealtime is a scene of communal duty: In both elementary and middle schools, students don white coats and caps and serve their classmates. Children eat in their classrooms. They get identical meals, and if they leave food untouched, they are out of luck: Their schools have no vending machines. Barring dietary restrictions, children in most districts can’t bring food to school, either, until they reach high school.

“Japan’s system has an envious payoff — its kids are relatively healthy. According to government data, Japan’s child obesity rate, always among the world’s lowest, has declined for each of the past six years, a period during which the country has expanded its dietary education program.”

Here is a sample of their menus versus an American school lunch menu.

Also click on the photos of the kitchen staff cooking and the kids helping to serve.

Our former elementary school in Gwinnett served good lunches. I know not all of it was made from scratch but I am pretty sure they made their lasagna from scratch. It was a big deal when they served it, and I would always buy it when I was there. The whole school smelled good when it was lasagna day. They also always had an excellent salad bar every day.

I was so unhappy with the school lunches in Arizona that my kids take their lunches. I would rather send PB&J on wheat bread or yogurt than what they were being served. I think what I am sending is also more economical.

I would love to see a school lunch program like the Japanese program. My 9-year-old would love to have the Japanese food every day. But most kids probably would not. But why couldn’t they cook balanced meals that American kids would like?

What do you think of the Japanese lunches? Would your kids eat them? Should there be a priority to make healthy, fresh lunches at our schools? Should the kids help serve? What would it take to accomplish this? How much do you think school lunches contribute to the obesity problem in America?

50 comments Add your comment

Momcat

January 28th, 2013
6:44 am

Make YOUR child’s lunch. It is NOT the government’s responsibility to feed my kid lunch.

MamaS

January 28th, 2013
7:14 am

Three points:
1. The government has CHOSEN to take my tax dollars to give free and reduced lunches to many and to make “at-cost” lunches available to all. It is MY money, so I should have a say in what MY children are offered at school.
2. Feeding children healthy meals results in a reduction in free medical and dental expenses for those children on PeachCare (my money again).
3. Considering all the non-academic subjects schools are expected to teach, participating in a healthy lunch program could be a Health Unit.

A Realist

January 28th, 2013
7:15 am

American schools can start to immulate Japan by eliminating the…….the “free lunch and reduced-cost” lunches…..or shall I dare call it the “let’s feed illegal alien Mexican kids on the taxpayer’s dime program”…..ahhh, but this would not be PC now would it

motherjanegoose

January 28th, 2013
7:22 am

@ Momcat…what are your thoughts about breakfast? Have you been to public school lately?

I loved this:

“Children eat in their classrooms. They get identical meals, and if they leave food untouched, they are out of luck: Their schools have no vending machines.”

If more parents took this approach and did not treat meal time like a diner, things might be easier. Oh I forgot, too many American kids get to order their dinner at the drive through window.

We ate dinner as a family, at the table, and my kids could take it or leave it….there were no options. You did not have to eat everything but I offered enough options and that was all you could eat.

We took a cruise a week before Christmas with very few children on board. One Asian family had their two boys along, WHO WERE VERY WELL BEHAVED. I see this more often than not, with their culture. KUDOS and perhaps we could learn something from them.

motherjanegoose

January 28th, 2013
7:28 am

A Realist…do you realize how many children are getting FREE and REDUCED lunch from sorts of ethnicities?

A Realist

January 28th, 2013
7:51 am

@MJGoose……..do you realize that “sorts” of ethnicities have well-behaved children? Not just Asians.

Jeff

January 28th, 2013
7:56 am

You would have to get our government and the special interests out of the way first.

James2

January 28th, 2013
8:03 am

Japan also serves whale meat, not that this offends me.

motherjanegoose

January 28th, 2013
8:05 am

@ A Realist…I see lots of children and know more educators ( from coast to coast) than probably anyone else on this blog. There are things I do not know and I do realize that I omitted ALL from sorts. I apologize. In my experience, Asian children (as a whole) are better behaved than other groups. They tend to be more respectful and their parents often have higher expectations for academics. I do not see many of them on free and reduced lunches but I could be wrong. Anyone?

Voice of Reason

January 28th, 2013
8:15 am

Asian cultures, specifically the Japanese, typically cherish their honor over everything else. It is not honorable to misbehave, perform badly in school, or take a free handout from anybody.

Japan has a high suicide rate, or at least it did, I haven’t seen statistics on this in a while. But the reason their suicide rate is so high is because when they fail, they lose honor, and they would rather kill themselves than lose their honor.

If there is anything Americans need to learn from the Japanese, it is the importance of honor.

Math Teacher

January 28th, 2013
8:18 am

A Realist: I am white and middle class. When I was in elementary school, I ate free lunches for several years because my father was laid off and neither he nor my home-maker mother was able to get a job that completely supported our family. I recall my mother crying because she didn’t know how to buy groceries. How dare you assume ANYTHING about ANY student who needs help getting healthy food? I sincerely hope no one you care about ever has to experience the stress that my parents felt at that time. If they do, I guess you’ll just dismiss them as an “illegal Mexican”.

Roni

January 28th, 2013
8:28 am

Even if the kids getting free lunches are illegals, or if their parents could work but don’t, I would love for someone to explain to me how letting a 6 year old starve is the right course of action. And any of you who make the suggestion of taking what might be the only meal a child gets that day out of their mouth, please don’t bother trying tell anyone you’re a Christian….or moral….or that you have any values.

I love the idea of mirroring this type of school lunch scenario, but the first think that would have to happen is for the US government to stop subsidizing the food mega-corps and if anything, helping out the local/small farmers instead. The reason public school lunches are in the shape they are in is because the US government has deals to purchase the unhealthiest mass produced ingredients available.

motherjanegoose

January 28th, 2013
8:46 am

I am all about feeding children who are hungry and would do so in a New York minute. YES many children need their lunch or they will not eat at all. Why do some families continue to have children they cannot feed?

My husband grew up on free lunch. He had 3 siblings. His Dad had $$ for booze and cigarettes each week, his enite life. It came from somewhere. My husband and I have worked very hard to assure that our children did not have to experience the shame of free lunch. We have been blessed with jobs , for our entire marriage. We are also prudent with our finances and only have two children, our choice. I worked at Wal Mart, in HS, and my parents made me pay for my own lunch at school. Make me upset to think of it now but I did learn how to budget at a young age.

motherjanegoose

January 28th, 2013
8:48 am

oops…entire life….

Mayhem

January 28th, 2013
8:50 am

My kids ALWAYS took their lunches. I packed a healthier lunch than any school could provide.

Plus, at the high school level, the lines were too long. 30 minutes to stand in line, wolf down your food and get prepared for the next class, it not enough time. Especially, when you spend 20 minutes standing in line. It was much easier for them to grab their lunch, sit down and relax for a few mintues, while eating a nutritious lunch, then head off to the next class.

We always packed the lunches the night before. Anyone who says they don’t have time to pack a healthy lunch for their child, doesn’t have their priorities set correctly. IMHO…

catlady

January 28th, 2013
9:16 am

I see lots of kids who get most of their food from others, including food sta,ps, WIC for younger siblings, free breakfast and lunch at school, food bank, snack backpack for weekends and holidays, church feeding programs, summer nutrition programs, etc. so many sources of help! You rarely see their parents raising a garden, although food stamps will pay for seeds and fertilizer, I think. However their parents have cell phones! And the kids frequently have a dollar each day to burn at the snack store! This drives teachers nuts.

I think many times instead of hunger it is misplaced priorities.

Voice of Reason

January 28th, 2013
9:19 am

Enter your comments here

catlady

January 28th, 2013
9:24 am

PS I taught in a school for 18 years that made scratch lunches. They were delicious! Now it is pre packaged everything, plastic food, heavy breading, too much salt, too little variety!

jarvis

January 28th, 2013
9:34 am

The Japanese middle school day lasts from 8:30 to 5:00 (once mandatory clubs are included) with 20 minutes for recess which is often spent cleaning the classroom.

There’s also a reason they have one of the highest suicide rates in the world. Their entire lives are over structured.

BessBear

January 28th, 2013
9:38 am

Does it shock anybody, other than me, that Gwinnett has 56% of it’s students receiving free or reduced (mostly it’s free) meals? This county is NOT that poor. Many (not all) of these people can certainly afford to make their child a sandwich for lunch. It’s not that hard! My kids make their own lunches EVERY day. We cannot afford to buy them lunch everyday, but making lunch costs much less.

Chaos

January 28th, 2013
9:43 am

@Jarvis

I think everyone here can agree that having structure in a child’s life is vitally important. It’s what keeps the boys off the pipe and the girls off the pole.

Patti Ghezzi

January 28th, 2013
9:56 am

I taught in Japan 20+ years ago, at a girls high school. In my observation, their eating habits were similar to those of American teenagers. Tons of junk food and the accompanying weight problems as well as obsessive dieting. I lived with a family with two teenagers, and the mom made traditional Japanese-style, healthy food for herself, her husband and her parents and then made less healthy American-style food for the kids. The town where I lived had McDonalds, KFC and other fast food restaurants on every corner. So I’m a bit skeptical that their child obesity rates are still “among the world’s lowest,” though I’m sure they are low compared to the U.S.

LeeH1

January 28th, 2013
10:12 am

Stupid Japanese. They don’t use vending machines to raise money because they raise their taxes high enough to run the schools. They don’t listen to agri-business lobbyests who insist that the school lunch money be spent buying their excess produce. They don’t have multiple ethnic groups who insist that their special needs be met- not to mention those on medical diets, allergies and gluten free.

Sensible diets and exercise at recess went out with school cut backs and budget cuts. Think of all the money that has been saved!

A

January 28th, 2013
10:18 am

I read this article with great interest over the weekend. As someone who loves Japanese food and culture, I’d love to bring their exact menus to Fulton schools, but of course that would not fly. My child brings lunch from home 4 days a week and buys lunch on Fridays. Even that 1 day of school lunch makes me uneasy because I do not know how the meals are prepared and what’s in them.

Theresa Walsh Giarrusso

January 28th, 2013
10:24 am

The lady that ran the lunchroom in my Gwinnett elementary school in the 1980s was a classmate’s mother. I always bought my lunch and I remember it being good. I don’t know if it was all scratch but the community knew the mom that was responsible for what we were being fed. When I started at the middle school I couldn’t believe how gross the lunches were and I started bringing lunch. It’s amazing that it could have been that different.

jarvis

January 28th, 2013
10:52 am

TWG, our Middle and High Schools had legendarily bad food.
A Pachito?

What the hell was that others may ask? That’s a microwavable burrito with a hotdog in the middle.

Mayhem

January 28th, 2013
10:58 am

Institutional food. ‘Nuff said……it’s not healthy. You cannot feed the masses healthy with Institutional food. Too many preservatives and the sodium content alone will give you a heart attack.

Same with most chain restaurants.

El Mongol

January 28th, 2013
11:06 am

So, are you seriously asking if most American kids would prefer spaghetti over squid?

DB

January 28th, 2013
11:09 am

I’ve described it on this blog before, but my middle school in Virginia growing up, had an AMAZING cafeteria director. She and five helpers ran that cafeteria like it was your grandmother’s dining room — and the food was wonderful. Real potatoes that got mashed, real meat that could be identified, real veggies. There wasn’t a lot of variety, but what there was was well-prepared – just like eating dinner at Grandmas (at least, MY grandmothers!) And she made all her desserts from scratch — they were so good that at Thanksgiving and Christmas, they sold pies to families to raise money for the cafeteria budget, and everyone knew to get their orders in EARLY, otherwise, you were out of luck! No vending machines, no ice cream chests — but you could buy an extra milk if you wanted one, for $.05. The cafeteria was always clean as a whistle, too, because she did NOT put up with hijinks, and frankly, she was so beloved that it would never occur to us to mess up Miz Jacob’s domain. And if someone forgot, they were firmly sent back to their seat to clean up their mess! It was a matter of respect — she respected us enough to do her very best, and that respect was returned.

Yucky

January 28th, 2013
11:22 am

I worked in a school cafeteria in a local school district for one week. It was the nastiest, most discusting job I have ever had. I thought that I could suck it up and do it, but I couldn’t. The schools use a lot of frozen food and then they refreeze it if i’s not all eaten. When french fries get cold, they put them in the microwave to reheat. When I interviewed, I asked about school gardens and that isn’t allowed. It’s all because of the government being involved and all of the red tape and hoops. I think if each school just did its own lunch and kept the government out of it, there would be better lunches. School could grown their own foods, kids could learn where food comes from, the food would be fresh and there might even be enough left over fresh produce to sell to local families.

missnadine

January 28th, 2013
11:35 am

You can’t compare a lot of the cultural aspects – like eating squid, but yes, there should be healthy options in schools. I grew up without vending machines and did just fine. I also think that the parents should take responsibility. Stop feeding your kid crap and they won’t want it all the time. Lastly, it really does seem that a lot of the Christian folks on this blog (I know they are Christian based on responses in the past), are some of the cruelest with regard to entitlements. Yes some of those parents are lazy, but as some of the educators have said, is the answer to NOT feed a kid what might be their only meal?

My dad’s wife is Japanese. They have been married for 35 years. They are both super thin and fit, and I think everything she makes at the home is steamed! I can say that when my dad visits, he loves to eat things like Mexican food, as he never gets that at home, and is too old-school to actually cook it himself.

Political Mongrel

January 28th, 2013
12:38 pm

The picture of Japanese lunches shown here is far from complete. There is a large culture of bentos, homemade lunches in compartmented boxes with a good sealing lid. Some schools have vending machines nearby even if they’re not on campus, and many schools have stands nearby that serve stuffed or flavored breads and snacks. Some schools require students to eat on campus, some turn out for an hour for lunch and students go where they want in the area or eat in the lunchroom.

Whichever way they go, the food is usually far more healthy than what our kids get, even if lunches are homemade.

My district had several elementary schools with superb lunchrooms. Then a couple of decades ago, a lunchroom supervisor was hired to force higher standards in the failing ones. Instead, the great lunchrooms were forced into line with the rest, and mediocrity is the best one could hope for. This person’s successors have been even worse.

Sk8ing Momma

January 28th, 2013
12:38 pm

@motherjanegoose – My guess if you go to a state/city with a high Asian population (San Francisco & vicinity, Washington state etc.) you will find many Asians receiving free lunch. I wouldn’t make such a statement based on one’s experience/observations in Georgia.

The Japanese lunches sound great. I’m happy that Japan has a nutritional system that appears to work well. Having visited Japan for six weeks and having eaten in a college cafeteria during my stay there, I’d give two thumbs up for the food.

With regard to those of you have your nose out of joint because our federal government has a subsidized lunch program…REALLY? I don’t like paying taxes any more than the next person; HOWEVER, I do not have a problem with providing a safety net for those in need (as well as those that game the system). IMO, it is part of the price of living in a society that takes care of its own and provides help where needed. I may be on the end of needing help one day. Those who are able to help/pay do and those who can’t (or sometimes won’t) don’t.

I cannot in good conscience say that I’d rather my government not make help available to those in need. Really, a few extra dollars in my pocket are not worth it. With regard to those who take without being in need, shame on them. I’d rather take the high road and do my fair share b/c I believe it is the right thing to do — regardless of the actions of others. Besides, I’m just blessed and thankful that I’ve never been in need.

jmb

January 28th, 2013
12:45 pm

Monticello schools still prepare everything homemade. I have several friends that work there and say everyone loves the food and it’s cheaper than the processed crap to make.

drumminduck

January 28th, 2013
12:53 pm

@MamaS

I love this idea

3. Considering all the non-academic subjects schools are expected to teach, participating in a healthy lunch program could be a Health Unit.

Food Revolution

January 28th, 2013
1:14 pm

Remember Jamie Oliver’s “Food Revolution” reality show back in 2010? He taught the school cooks how to make healthy, nutritious lunches for the children. And two years later, they are still doing it, and within the USDA guidelines. They figured a way to make it work within their budgets. Limited funds doesn’t have to mean mystery meat. Ugh!
http://www.thekitchn.com/jamies-food-rev-157925

Scooby

January 28th, 2013
1:47 pm

If you want you child to have a super nutritious, healthy lunch full of super foods then pack a bento box every day. If not, I guess your child will eat whatever the school is offering. This has been discussed to death in one form or another.

Patrick

January 28th, 2013
2:03 pm

I remember reading about a college somewhere doing a “home cooked” week where students submitted recipes of their favorite homemade dishes, and the winners (especially those that could be easily converted to serve 4,000 vs. 4) would be prepared that week. I think this would be a great opportunity for parents to have a bigger hand in what their children eat, and there’s a better chance students will eat the food, knowing someone’s mom made it. If parents would actually take the time to volunteer in the kitchen, they would see what goes in their kids’ lunch, and would raise more of a stink about it. Even if they could just stop in one day a month and eat lunch with their kids, that would really open their eyes.

motherjanegoose

January 28th, 2013
5:41 pm

@ Patrick…I believe UGA does this. They feature the winning recipes in the dining halls with credit to the parents. I have never entered. I am a pretty good cook to follow recipes but not good with original ideas in the kitchen.

@ Sk8ingMama…It is true that I know little about anything in the San Francisco area.

I found this:
Overall, 48 percent of public school 4th-graders were eligible for free or reduced-price lunches in 2009. White 4th-graders had the lowest percentage of eligible students (29 percent). The percentages of Black (74 percent), Hispanic (77 percent), and American Indian/Alaska Native (68 percent) 4th-graders who were eligible were higher than the percentages of White 4th-graders and Asian/Pacific Islander (34 percent) 4th-graders who were eligible.

A higher percentage of public school 4th-graders in cities (62 percent) were eligible for free or reduced-price lunch than were 4th-graders in suburban areas (39 percent), towns (52 percent), and rural areas (42 percent). Eighty-two percent of Hispanics in cities and 84 percent of Hispanics in towns were eligible; these percentages were higher than those for their Hispanic counterparts in suburban (70 percent) and rural areas (72 percent). For Blacks, the percentage of eligible students was higher in cities and towns (80 and 83 percent, respectively) than in suburban and rural areas (65 and 72 percent, respectively). Higher percentages of Black and Hispanic students in cities were eligible compared with students of other races/ethnicities living in cities.

@ catlady… I also cannot figure out how children can come to school with ice cream money each day but eat a free lunch. Oh is that it? We buy their lunch and they buy their ice cream? My two did not get ice cream money each day as I paid for their lunch.
I never fault children for not having food. I do not understand parents who can drive fancy cars, obtain all sorts of electronics and yet not be able to feed their children.

Momcat

January 28th, 2013
6:03 pm

Motherjanegoose provides examples that match my children’s 3 public schools. 8 year old “mom, why does Jane Doe get free lunch and gets ice cream EVERY single day?” 13 year old, “mom, why does John Doe get a free lunch and have a cell phone data plan and I don’t?” 15 year old, “why does Mary Doe get a free lunch and can spend $300 on a cheer leading outfit?” All questions asked last week. And I couldn’t answer their questions. I don’t begrudge the needy. I begrudge their poor choices. Rich or poor… We all make choices.

Teaching in Japan

January 28th, 2013
6:19 pm

I currently teach in Japan and have eaten their school lunch for a few years. It’s ok, better than most school lunches I had as a kid, but not amazing or anything. I was surprised at how many calories they are; the average lunch is 700-800 calories, and the kids are expected to eat it all. That’s fine for the kids since many of them go to sports clubs after school, but a lot of teachers complained about gaining weight. The food itself can be pretty good, but a lot of days there’s mushy or slimy vegetables, fried things, or salads drenched in vinegar. School lunch is only offered in elementary and middle schools. Oh, and there’s free/reduced lunch here as well. High school kids are on their own. Many high school kids here eat some of the same junk kids back home do. Some kids bring their own bento boxes, but there’s just as many kids getting 500 calorie breads and ramen and such from the nearby convenience store on the way to school.

I think that having the home cooked lunches are a good thing though.

atlmom

January 28th, 2013
6:39 pm

But these days the federal government is now putting themselves in the lunch room!!! it is ABSURD. In portland, our elementary school has a SCRATCH kitchen. It almost had to be shut down because of the stupid new federal ‘guidelines’ that came down. there is ONE person who works in the kitchen – so the parents volunteer in helping out a LOT – because the food is *that* important to our neighborhood.

How crazy that they were going to have to shut down the kitchen because there wasn’t enough that the federal govt knew about the food (if it was all from the freezer, it would have all the federal regs on it for what was in the food – idiocy) – instead, since they are using real food, there was an idiotic regimen that the lunch lady had to go thru to get ‘ready’ for the school inspectors to come out.

We have problems in this country that are not going to be solved by federal involvement.

Georgia

January 28th, 2013
7:19 pm

The problem is that you can’t get Japanese children to eat shepherds pie. It’s bad enough that we count catsup as a vegetable in the school lunch program. What is worse is that if we did finally put something healthy, like seaweed on the school menu, our kids would only smoke it. Where’s the restaurant impossible guy when you need him?

Corey

January 28th, 2013
7:46 pm

@Voice of Reason

January 28th, 2013
8:15 am

Voice, do we want to see the suicide rate in the U.S. go through the roof?

motherjanegoose

January 28th, 2013
8:27 pm

@Momcat…teachers tell me these stories all the time. I am wondering how and if we could get a bit more accountability. My own two knew that we had a budget and made choices about what we could have. Not many kids know what this means IMHO. I did not buy lunchables and fruit roll ups for my kids. My daughter calls and jokes that this is what she eats now. Fine by me…she is paying for her own food with her part time job. Not much I can do…haha!

A Realist

January 28th, 2013
10:46 pm

Wake-up Motherjane Goose. It’s democrat libtards like you that have given this country four more years of no hope and no change! The blind leading blind. No wonder the school systems are in trouble.

motherjanegoose

January 29th, 2013
7:42 am

@ Realist…me a Democrat…a liberal….thanks for the laugh…hahaha! No I did not vote for Obama either time. You REALLY have no clue about me and should, before you make a comment about me. YES I am awake…thank you.

Tired of the Questions...

January 29th, 2013
10:44 am

I am so tired of people that continue to ask how do people afford things when they are on free/reduced lunch as if there are no other means of support available to these families. Free and reduced lunch is based off the parents’ income, not that of the student (well as long as they don’t make over $3000 within the year). There are extended family members that try to assist and there are the students themselves that can work for extra money.

My sister and I started off on free lunch. By the time I was in middle school that changed to reduced lunch. My mother did not give us additional money, but we had ice-cream and juice just about every day because we worked for the money. In doing so my sister and I learned how to shop sales, how to save, and how to budget to get what we wanted. My parents are divorced (married when my sister and I was conceived and born). He was in our lives, but he wasn’t always in the picture. He did pay child support, but it wasn’t enough. We had auntie and uncles who were in a better financial position then my mother. They would give us cash for doing well in school.

As 10/12 yrs. olds, we would walk to the local store and people would let us keep their change. We learned how to braid hair and would charge $20 to braid hair. At 13, we got summer jobs and saved majority of the money we made over the summer to buy our clothes/shoes for school (which is how we could afford $75-$100 shoes). My mother would take us to the Reebok Outlet at Tanger and we would spend $120 on 3 pairs of shoes, 2 pairs of white shoes and a pair of black. I would wear a white pair and black pair one semester, and save the other white pair for the next semester. My 3 pairs of shoes would cost (and still cost) $210 retail. My sister and I paid for our own junior/senior fees, marching band fees, as well as our proms because we bought our dresses in the off season on sale for $10-$20 apiece. When we found our dresses during regular prom season, the dress I purchased which I paid $10 for was over $150.

@Momcat –scenarios when I was in school
High school: “15 year old, “why does Mary Doe get a free lunch and can spend $300 on a cheer leading outfit?”” …. the girl who got free lunch and can spend $300 on a cheer leading outfit prostituted for a short period of time to get the money for the outfit and the overall cost of being a cheerleader to attempt to get a scholarship for college. Did the coach know about the prostitution? No. Students? Yes.

Middle School: “13 year old, “mom, why does John Doe get a free lunch and have a cell phone data plan and I don’t?”” …John Doe mother has a Pimp as a boyfriend and he is able to pay for the plan because Mom sure don’t have money on her minimum wage job. Or Jane Doe had a sugar daddy that provides for her, not mommy and daddy. Or better yet, John Doe is a street pharmacist, depending upon the time of day you can see him on the corner selling his drugs.

Elementary: “8 year old “mom, why does Jane Doe get free lunch and gets ice cream EVERY single day?”” ….read where aunts and uncles give cash for doing well in school…That how I got my money

Tired of the Questions...

January 29th, 2013
11:19 am

I apologize for the rant above, but I feel as if people are sometimes jealous when they find that they can’t do something for their family, especially when they see someone getting something free that they feel shouldn’t. Yes people abuse the system, but guess what you can report those individuals and sometimes the punishment can mean the individual being barred from receiving those services again, at the minimum the individuals abusing the system will have to pay back what they took.

As for the story, I feel that American Schools can feed the students fresh from scratch foods on a daily basis, however there is too much red tape to do so. The best idea would be for the schools to have a garden, but then who would take care of the garden, as the cafeteria workers are literally cooking/cleaning from the time they arrive until the time they leave. What type of foods could be grown, as everything cannot grow everywhere?

I do like the concept of taking the vending machines out of the schools, but it may not stop anything because students can just bring stuff from home or stop by the store on the way to school.

Yumbox

January 30th, 2013
9:34 am

The amazing school lunches are not restricted to Japan. A lot of other countries, like France, have amazing school canteens with five course lunches. However, all those programs are subsidized by local governments. Lunch prices are also income sensitive and most kids end up eating at school, unless they have allergies or special dietary needs.
But I agree with you that if you’re questioning the quality of your school’s lunch then it’s better and more economical to pack your own. Our product Yumbox is a lunch container that makes healthy eating fun for kids.
http://www.yumboxlunch.com