Does your school name the next teacher now or later?

Last week all our buddies from our old school in Gwinnett were announcing on Facebook their teachers for next year. Other friends who are also at Gwinnett schools just minutes away came on to complain that they won’t find out their teachers until like two days before school.

I think it’s very interesting that some schools decide to announce ahead of time and other schools wait until the last minute.

Often schools say they won’t announce because they don’t know all their enrollment numbers and may have to make last-minute moves to even class sizes out but I don’t think that’s the main reason. I think they don’t want to hear parents complain and have to deal with requests to move kids. I think it takes a confident principal to release the names at the end of the school year.

However, I think it’s actually very good for students to know ahead of time who they are getting for the next year. (Our school won’t release until the Thursday before school starts.)

One teacher friend, who likes that her school doesn’t announce ahead of time, told me “I don’t want the parents talking about me all summer long.”

So what do you think: Why do you think some schools reveal teachers and other do not? Is it about enrollment or is it about heading off complaints?

Is it better for kids to know the whole summer before or does that increase stress if they don’t like the teacher?

If you’re a teacher tell us where you stand: do you mind if parents know ahead of time? Or do you not want them talking about you?

45 comments Add your comment

FCM

May 21st, 2012
12:19 pm

Cobb is in restructure mode. They are determing which teachers are left with jobs next year and what they will teach (either grades or subjects). Thus it will be August before we know who the teacher will be.

FCM

May 21st, 2012
12:22 pm

oh and to your teacher friend….what we parents end up doing (at the pool no less!) is discussing ALL the potential teachers the child can have instead of a specific one.

The only thing I do know is that my older child’s English teacher left an impression on all of us. My youngest announced last night “Look, I have heard all year about that teacher and she sounds like a Wakadoo!!!! If I get her I hope Mom yells enough to get me moved.” At which point I thought — the enemy I know is better then the one I don’t — so I replied “Ah, but each student is different and you could be fine with Mrs Wakadoo.”

Warrior Woman

May 21st, 2012
12:32 pm

It wouldn’t be an issue if all the teachers were competent and skilled at classroom management. I know that if the youngest is assigned to certain teachers, I will demand reassignment based on our experiences with the older girls.

And FCM is right – if we don’t know the actual teachers, we will discuss all the possibilities. If your friend doesn’t want parents (and kids, for that matter) discussing her, she should find another career. It comes with the territory in teaching.

What I find really odd is that practices vary within a school system.

Scooby

May 21st, 2012
12:45 pm

When did parents get to start choosing what teachers their kids got? Unless there’s a really, really, extreme reason, the kids should stay with the teacher(s) they’re assigned.

motherjanegoose

May 21st, 2012
12:57 pm

I only taught in schools where the teacher was announced the week before the school year began.
I often had parents pull me aside and say, ” I am requesting you for Bonnie Beautiful next year, just so you know!” Sometimes it worked and sometimes it did not. It was out of my control.

I requested a teacher ONE TIME. My son had a marvelous third grade teacher. She was still there when my daughter was moving into third grade. I wrote a note to the principal and told her how much we liked said teacher and IF WE COULD, we would love for our daughter to have her. If not, I understood that all requests cannot be granted. We did get the teacher and it was a great year. I never had to pull my child out of a class ( except my son in AP History where the teacher left unexpectedly after I pulled him out and has not been seen since).

We have several teachers in our neighborhood. Some, have told me that they would never teach at the school our neighborhood kids go to, as they do not want to deal with any pool talk.

@ Warrior…I visited 11 schools, in Florida, last week and have been in education for almost 30 years. Classroom management is on the wane…I am not sure if the cause is lack of teaching the correct skills to potential teachers ( I discuss this in my workshops and some teachers look they have no idea) or the fact that kids tend to be less respectful as times goes on and handling unruly children is HARD WORK. I am curious what catlady thinks about this.

College students discuss teachers and rate them too. We did not have this when I was a student. I met a teacher who told me her sister in law was a very attractive college professor and known as a HOT TAMALE. I know those words would never be used to describe me…maybe a HOTHEAD some days…haha!

Me

May 21st, 2012
1:01 pm

@FCM – Exactly — all the potential teachers in Cobb are discussed at the pool — and, at times, almost a third of those at the pool are teachers so we also get to hear the opposite side of the equation where teachers discuss what kids and parents they hope NOT to get!

Scotty

May 21st, 2012
1:13 pm

We won’t find out who our kids teachers are until the first day of school. We know all the possible options though, and yes if I could pick I know which teacher I’d choose for my kids, but I’m not going to request they be moved if they don’t get my choice (unless there is a real problem in one of their classrooms.) I’ve only requested a specific teacher once, when my son went into first grade. He has some mild learning disabilities and I knew that one of the first grade teachers had done a lot of extra studies in learning disabilities and I felt could help him more. It wasn’t that the other teacher’s were incompetent, just that at that point he really needed someone who understood his specific problems and I’m glad I did it. He hasn’t been as hampered by his learning disabilities since he took that teacher.

I see no reason to move kids to different classes unless there is a real problem with the teacher’s competency or the child has such a problem with the teacher that it begins to impede learning. When I was in school you got the teacher you got and you learned to get along with them. Some were better than others, sure, but that didn’t get you moved to a different class. We’ve dealt with a few teachers that wouldn’t have been our first choice for our kids, but it was a good lesson in learning to get along and in adapting to a situation for the kids.

HB

May 21st, 2012
1:13 pm

“However, I think it’s actually very good for students to know ahead of time who they are getting for the next year.”

Theresa, could you please give some specifics on why you think it’s very good to know far in advance? I’m just curious. I can see a number of downsides for the school to announcing the year before (flexibility if enrollments change, time for parents to complain before their children have even spent a day in a teacher’s class, etc), but I’m not seeing any obvious benefits to kids and families knowing at the end of the previous year.

Tonya C.

May 21st, 2012
1:43 pm

I would love to know, but we are moving so it’s a no go anyway. I requested my daughter’s teacher this year, and have ZERO problems doing so in the future if need be. I went against my gut once and allowed our oldest to stay in a classroom with a teacher who had moved grade levels every year she taught. It was the WORST year ever and after that I could care less about other’s feelings or concerns.

I would like to know the week before school as I think that’s plenty of time. If I have an issue that’s still enough time to request another teacher and get an answer.

jarvis

May 21st, 2012
1:59 pm

In 2010 the census found that there were 3.2 million public school teachers in the US. Fact of the matter is that at some point your kid is going to have a lousy one.

mom2alex&max

May 21st, 2012
2:02 pm

Teachers: we still talk about you ALL SUMMER LONG. And some of us have had bad experiences with some of you and will demand a transfer regardless on when we find out. So you have accomplished nothing but make the 1st few days of school more chaotic than they need to be.

If more of you were competent, this wouldn’t happen. And I say this as a parent that has children in a VERY well regarded school in East Cobb. About 95% of the teachers in that school are beyond awesome but there are a few that should have looked at a different profession.

Theresa Walsh Giarrusso

May 21st, 2012
2:08 pm

I think if you’ve been at the school and know the teachers it can be calming to them to know who they have coming. Also you can get them excited about having X next year. Like with Lilina’s preschool teacher I knew she was having Mrs. X so I would say during the summer Mrs. X will be doing this with you next year or just talking to her about the teacher. In our former school’s case the students are very excited to know who they are going to be with and find out if their friends are going to be with them.

Augusta

May 21st, 2012
2:09 pm

We find out on registration day.

jarvis

May 21st, 2012
2:26 pm

I will never forget the first year we were married, the phone rang one Sunday afternoon.

When I answered the person on the other end asked if they had reached the number for the Mrs. jarvis that worked at her son’s school. I thought it must be a hell of an emergency for them to be thumbing thru the phone book calling every Mrs. jarvis in greater Atlanta area, so I hurriedly got my wife on the phone.

Nope….the lady’s little turd had forgotten his homework assignment at school.

Many of the lunatics know no f’ing boundaries. The reason schools withhold information is because the schools have no idea what numbskulls are going to do with it. Rather than having to listen to your crap for 3 months about why your angel needs to be coddled in so-n-so’s class, they’d rather have it for two days just prior to the year beginning.

@mom2alex&max Coming from the spouse of teacher (that unlike my wife cares nothing about her kids), I wish she would get out of it. Thanks to furlough days my household pay goes down every year, and more and more we can’t eat in public without someone coming over to our table dribbling on and on about how their kid is doing in whatever they are doing like we care.

My wife is a saint and smiles and nods, but believe me, I make fun of everyone of those d-bags the second they walk away.

FCM

May 21st, 2012
2:36 pm

@ Scooby….I made it clear that I was not necessarily going to yank her from Mrs. Wakadoo’s class. I have only found 1 teacher in mine or my children’s school career who should have her teaching certifaction revoked…..that woman was just plain a plain evil (expletive delete). She actually liked my child so that was not the issue.

@ Me….yep I have heard the teachers at the pool and they discuss the kids/parents as much as parents discuss them.

Like Jarvis there are a number of teachers (and preachers)in my family tree. I can assure the blog that he was right you got your nut jobs and the really great ones. In fact I have found 3 teachers I would clone and put in every school in GA if I could.

mom2alex&max

May 21st, 2012
2:39 pm

Jarvis: I am under NO illusions. I know perfectly well that teachers gossip about our little monsters amongst themselves all the time. What I was pointing out is that not telling us who is going to be our child’s teacher until 2 days before school starts does nothing to prevent parents from making a stink if the teacher assigned is not ideal.

I know this: I was a “good little mommy” and never complained right up until the year my son got the worst 2nd grade teacher in the school. EVERYONE knew about her and EVERYONE put on a sad face when I told them who he had that year. Needless to say we have a horrible year. After that, I decided that if schools want parent participation, they just have to expect that parents will be involved in a lot of aspects of our children education. If the school expects me to donate hundreds of hours of my time and who knows how much of my money in supplies, extras, what have you, then you better believe I will make a stink if I my child gets a crappy teacher. I’m sorry if that makes me a PITA parent in the eyes of the teachers, but this is MY child we are talking about. I only get ONE chance to make sure his education goes right.

motherjanegoose

May 21st, 2012
2:42 pm

@momtoalexandmax…the teachers talk about the whacky parents too! I still share some of the kukoo stories and it has been 15 years since I was in the classroom. Here is one:

We used the paper half gallon milk jugs for a spring project when I started teaching almost 30 years ago. I sent a note home about 2 weeks prior and asked the parents to please send in a half gallon milk jug with their student’s name on it that had been rinsed out…as we will need them in 2 weeks. Getting closer to the date, I would remind the parents who still had not sent one in. One mother replied, “Well we do not drink milk in a half gallon. If you knew you needed these containers, you should have started buying them yourself as you and your husband would perhaps drink milk this way since you have no children at home!” Oh YES we could certainly drink 24 half gallons of milk in NO time at all! Thanks for clearing things up so that I could understand things!

Yes, I have stories and get a chuckle sharing them YEARS later.

The one about the 2nd grade field trip to the San Antonio Zoo is a good one too! We used Moms to drive, as it was 90 minutes one way. We left school early and had a long day and got back to the classroom right before release time. I had everyone there except one group and I was getting worried. No cell phones then. The 5 kids in that car arrived with huge ice cream cones, they were licking, and smiles to match. The rest of the class did not look as happy. We had to juggle book bags and ice cream cones to get lined up and out of the room. WHAT WAS THAT MOM THINKING? I asked her…”Um, they wanted to stop for ice cream and so I thought I would treat them!” REALLY?

motherjanegoose

May 21st, 2012
2:46 pm

@mom2alex….typically, if you volunteer a lot at school you have a bit of an edge, at least in my book. You are not the only one who thinks…this is MY child we are talking about…there in lies the problem.
We were always active…both parents…in school. That way, if something happened, we were known as parents who cared about making the school better for all children and not just those who showed up to complain.

Tonya C.

May 21st, 2012
2:48 pm

mom2alex&max:

That’s pretty much my view. My husband’s a teacher, and I STILL have that view. One truly crappy teacher will change your mind on the whole issue, because I was NOT like this prior to what we now call The Very Bad Year.

jarvis

May 21st, 2012
3:03 pm

Believe me, I understand your feelings. I’d want my kid moved too. I was just telling you why they don’t give you the info earlier than they do…..the latter part was more of a rant on my own behalf.

I so wish my wife would go on to something more lucrative, but I know better. She loves the kids and the extra time with our family that her career affords.

Tonya C.

May 21st, 2012
3:10 pm

jarvis:

I’ve given up that fight. This is my husband’s calling, no matter how much I say or do to change his mind. I have decided to use it to my advantage at this point whenever I can and keep moving.

More than a few weeks notice would create chaos. Because while I am the e-mail and wait type, too many are the call repeatedly and curse type.

catlady

May 21st, 2012
3:26 pm

MJG–It isn’t just that the students are more unruly and undisciplined. (They certainly are in this little community I have been in for the last 4 decades!!) It is also that teacher’s hands are largely tied in dealing with these students and their parents. Forty years ago that was NOT the case! The saddest part is that is undermines the entire class to have kids acting like fools (and their parents too, truth be told. The apple doesn’t fall from the tree)

I think it is better that TEACHERS don’t know–when you know ahead of time that certain students will be in your room next year, it can put a pox on the summer!

Like you, I requested a teacher ONE TIME for my children. She was going into 8th grade, and the premier science teacher whose interests paralleled her was one of two science teachers. It meant a switch in pods. Oh, I had ruined her life! The year was going to be just awful (after switching her.) Oh, the trauma! The pathos! She will never have another happy day!

She came home the second day of school and said, “Ok, I get it now. I know why I had to be in Mr. H’s room.”

DB

May 21st, 2012
3:47 pm

My kids’ school, for years, didn’t tell you until you showed up at school and went from classroom to classroom looking for your name on a door! I believe they now tell them about a week ahead of time — the teacher writes each student a note a week or two ahead, telling them how much s/he is looking forward to the upcoming school year and having them in class, and then calls the parents two or three days before school to introduce themselves and give the parents a chance to chatter. That way, on the first day of school, they can concentrate on the kids and not on the parents who are desperately trying to introduce themselves and their children, and slip in a few “handling comments” at the same time!

Me

May 21st, 2012
3:49 pm

I do wish to emphasize this – sincerely and from the bottom of my heart — An absolute HUGE Thank You to all of those who do make the sacrifice necessary to be a teacher. I can honestly say that every teacher performs a job that I simply could not. I can only hope that, as a parent, I assisted in perhaps making a teacher’s job just a bit easier.

Judge Smails

May 21st, 2012
4:59 pm

We sit around the pool WITH the teachers drinking margaritas and dishing on the STUDENTS! Some of the things that come out of their mouths…

Stacey

May 21st, 2012
5:03 pm

My son is going to middle school in the fall so i’m not sure about them but his elementary school didn’t tell you until two days before school starts at open house. This past year he was very excited that two of his three teachers were the ones he really wanted (the 3rd was new to the school) only to have the main one he wanted transfer to another school after two weeks due to lower than expected enrollment. My coworker has a son in the same grade as my son who went to a different elementary school but same middle school and she has already requested certain teachers for her son based on the recommendations of her friends and neighbors. She says she was told (by middle school principal) that they do not assign classes based on parent nor teacher requests and if she gets the teachers she requested it will (more or less) be luck of the draw.

Judge Smails

May 21st, 2012
5:04 pm

By the way…my sons lauguage arts teacher is a tramp. (in a good sort of way)

Denise

May 21st, 2012
5:16 pm

I’m not trying to be funny but do kids really need “calming” because of potential teachers? I never knew – until high school – what teacher I was going to have and that was only because I knew who taught what. It was go to school, find the classroom and surprise! There is your teacher. Like it or lump it. I’m not heartless. If my nieces or nephews came home with real tales of woe – not just whining because they weren’t getting their way – then yes, I’d be concerned, but “I don’t like Ms. Jackson because she made me do xyz” that was supposed to be done, negative on the sympathy. And this is coming from the aunt that cries when I leave them and gets weepy when I get off the phone with them.

apples2apples

May 21st, 2012
5:34 pm

Teachers are nothing without the board-certified tools. In the last two genererations, teachers have been stripped of time-tested devices that ensure learning; and it’s all been done in the interest of being politically correct. The result has been students who wont learn. Our test scores are horrible. We need to go back to the protocols that have worked and can still work.

First, every classroom should have a year’s supply of castor oil. Second, dunce caps, when used liberally, can be instramental in a student’s performance. Finally, three foot long yardsticks made out of English Ash are a perfect discipline enhancing device.

We must reverse the trends of the bleeding heart liberals who have ruined our classrooms.

ATL06

May 21st, 2012
5:57 pm

Wow. I guess I’m in the minority. My Son finds out who his teacher is 1 week before school starts and we roll with it. If there is a problem I address it when it happens. I refuse to spend the entire summer worried about who my son could possibly be getting for a teacher in August.

mom2alex&max

May 21st, 2012
6:04 pm

Jarvis: this might not help you, but teaching is a calling. There are those souls among us that just have been touched by that gift and despite all the crap, they can’t be happy doing anything else.

jarvis

May 21st, 2012
6:53 pm

@mom2alex&max, I made it sound worse that it really is. I apologize. You guys caught me in the middle of my tantrum having just seen that the County budget had thrown another 3 day hole into our income and postponed a pay increase until January.

Neither is significant in the large scale of things, but you never want to hear that money is being taken from your family.

mom2alex&max

May 21st, 2012
7:38 pm

Jarvis: I DO understand that.

motherjanegoose

May 21st, 2012
8:42 pm

@ jarvis…I am down about $5000 this year…I think that equates to at least 15 furlough days? Not sure how many most folks have to take. In the scope of all the awful things people are facing…I am blessed.

Denise

May 21st, 2012
9:29 pm

They worry about teachers teaching for test scores BUT reduce the days they teach. WTH kind of logic is that? We have trouble retaining GOOD teachers so they lower the pay for the ones we have. WTH kind of logic is that? I’m glad there are people who are called to this work because I couldn’t do it…too impatient to teach and couldn’t deal with the BS called budged reductions, furloughs, spending own money to enhance classroom experiences, overcrowded classrooms, bad children and worse parents, teaching for test scores…Again, thank goodness for teachers!

K's Mom

May 22nd, 2012
12:21 am

@Denise…there is no logic that is why education is in the state it is in. Personally I think parents and students should have to sign a contract to participate in the educational process that states clear objectives to be met by both before a teacher can be thrown under the bus. I think the administrations in some of these schools should be jacked up or fired, but the teachers are getting a raw deal in a lot of cases because as someone else mentioned their hands are tied when it comes to discipline and classroom management. If parents would support teachers or at least hear them out when getting constructive criticism on Susie or Johnny we would all be in a better place.

The Uneducated Public Makes Me Sick

May 22nd, 2012
5:57 am

Oh how I adore uninformed, needy parents who know all the inner workings of a school…(eyes rolling). You have no idea what teachers and administrators go through on a daily basis for your children. I am so disgusted by some of the comments. Walk in my shoes for a day as an under appreciated, under paid professional that has to adhere to a trillion guidelines, mandates, standards, be everything for your child and still teach. What you fail to realize is that you could never do what we do on a daily basis EVER! If it is so bad, pony up the money to send your little angels to private school where the teachers are not required to be certified to teach. No certification + no teacher preparation= a teacher teaching your child without an ounce of training. So the next time you decide to part your lips or lift a finger to strike a key, make sure you know your stuff about what TRULY goes on in schools. I would hate for you to look and sound foolish.

motherjanegoose

May 22nd, 2012
7:21 am

@ the Uneducated….would you like a copy of this book:

What America’s Teachers Wish Parents Knew by Tony Privett
I read it years ago and have ordered it in bulk to share with teachers. I have at least 500 copies and would be happy to send you one if you you check in with TWG and she can pass your info to me.

FYI some private schools have amazing teachers and some public schools have certified teachers who are not good. To me, it is not the certification that necessarily makes a good teacher but we do have to have a bar to measure things by. Just because you have a driver’s license does not make you a good driver either. It is true that there are private schools out there with teachers who do not need to be teaching, just as there are public schools with the same type of teachers. I am not a licensed Speech Pathologist and yet I have been invited to teach my ideas to SLPS in 27 states.

I know THOUSANDS of good teachers and it is truly a calling to teach…Lord knows they are not doing it for the money or the things they have to put up with!

@ Denise…things are the way they are because we are running out of money. When less folks are paying taxes and more folks are getting programs funded by taxes…the money is running out. As you know, I share staff development. Good teachers need to have staff development to learn current ideas that work. Many schools have no money left to do this. I RARELY am called to work with teachers in the state of GA…does that look good for our state? In any profession, you want your employees to stay up to date with the trends and ideas that are pertinent to their job. Not many school districts here will hire me. I mentioned this to an Asst. Principal and told her I would share a FREE summer session for Kinder teachers in our County. Her reply was, “Well you would have to send in a proposal to show how it aligns with our state standards.” I like the lady and laughed…
“Did you hear FREE? I am not putting together a proposal for FREE.” I will hop a plane instead and head off to another state that is paying me. Many states will!

DB

May 22nd, 2012
8:31 am

@the Uneducated: Ditto what MJG said: Certification doesn’t define a great teacher. It means you have a teacher who was able to take a test — which, in retrospect, is often what they are limited to teaching: How to take a test. You have some teachers who have gone for national certification, and in my mind, that’s a fairly long-term commitment. But you know, I’ve helped someone put their package together for the national assessment, and there’s still a great deal of “fuzziness” when it comes to the basic question: Is this person a good teacher?

There is horrible teaching done by teachers who couldn’t think of anything else to do in college, and go into teaching because you have the summers off. There are good teachers who know their material and can communicate it to most of the students and then there are great teachers — the ones who inspire and make students (adult and kids alike) sit up and beg for more. A “certification” sets a bare minimum. It doesn’t raise any bar.

Having said that, your ignorant comment about private school teachers being “uncertified” is pure crap. In my kids high private high school, there were an awful lot of “Dr. ____”, teachers who had their Ph.D’s — which indicate a certain degree of mastery in their subject, but admittedly may not indicate a passion for teaching. All of them had state certification, and several of them had or were working on their National Board. We had AP teachers who worked with the AP board on crafting exams in their field of expertise and actually flew out each spring/summer to grade AP exams. One teacher organized Sunday afternoon study groups at their home during the spring semester that attracted up to 20-25 kids — some sessions ended with a Jeopardy-type quiz that the kids competed for fiercely. All of the teachers gave out their cell phones every year during Parent-Teacher night and invited parents to call or email with any questions (but, as one teacher asked nicely, “Please call before 8 pm, I have children that need to go to bed, too!”) My kids were blessed with teachers who cared not only about making sure that their students learned the material to the best of their ability and were well-prepared for college, but were also passionate about opening our children’s eyes to being active and caring members of the world. Were they all fabulous teachers? No — we encountered a few duds here and there. But guess what? They seldom stayed more than a year, because if a teacher didn’t perform to expectations, the school could actually get rid of them!

But most of all, the teachers were supported by an administration whose goals were not built around the score on the next CRCT. So don’t give me that baloney about how public school teachers are soo much better than private school teachers, because buddy, that dog don’t hunt. There are many public school teachers who are so overwhelmed with all the damn mandates, guidelines and standards that it’s hard to actually fit TEACHING in there, with everything else they have to do.

catlady

May 22nd, 2012
8:56 am

BTW, for much of my career, I was the only teacher of K in that school. There was one first grade, one second grade, etc. So the kids knew who their teacher would be years in advance. In some ways it was great to be “an institution,” but there was a lot of pressure, too. When my son was badly hurt in late July, I had a parent COME TO THE HOSPITAL (LUCKILY WE WERE OUT OF INTENSIVE CARE BY THEN) to reassure herself that I was going to be at school the first day. This also happened when I gave birth August7. Several parents even called the superintendent, and he came by my house to “check” on us. I mean, really?

FCM

May 22nd, 2012
9:26 am

@ Uneducated….Are you saying you have never met a teacher ever that probably should not be teaching? Mrs. Wakadoo has every right to be upset with my child when she doesn’t do her work…I never defend that kind thing. However, some of the reasons she is not going to give credit for what is turned in (on time) are stupid, especially when other parents tell me their child did get credit in the same situation. One particular assignment she said was not done correctly…I went back over the guidelines and said ok I guess I am stupid show me where it doesn’t meet the requirements and deserves an F. She has NEVER replied. I am not telling the teacher she is wrong, I said show me how the child did wrong so I can help her do better. Certainly that should be addressed.

Warrior Woman

May 22nd, 2012
9:51 am

@MJG – I’m sure some of the classroom management issues are caused, or at least exacerbated, by bad policies that punish teachers for imposing discipline. Others may be lack of teacher skill or lack of civilized students.

jarvis

May 22nd, 2012
10:05 am

@The Uneducated Public Makes Me Sick, please don’t pretend that teacher certification is the end-all be-all. I would be willing to wager that 25% of the people that have their certificates couldn’t pass most business certification exams.

Warrior Woman

May 22nd, 2012
10:27 am

@Uneducated (which you certainly appear to be) – Certification simply means you have at least the ability to pass a test. It does not speak to requisite knowledge, or lack thereof, of subject materials, adequacy of classroom managment skills, or general competence. You can have a MS or PhD in your subject without certification, and you can be certified and completely incompetent in a classroom.

momof2

May 22nd, 2012
6:06 pm

All the kids in our school district have always found out which teacher they have at the district’s annual open house, which is usually the Thursday before school starts. They actually advertise it as the first opportunity for parents to find out who their child’s teacher will be for the school year. As for requesting teachers, we had one principal at our grade school who actually sent a letter home with the students stating that you could request certain “character” traits or teaching styles for your child’s next teacher, but you had to do it in writing before the end of the school year. That same letter also stated that you could not ask for a teacher by name, that any requests for a teacher by name would be thrown out. If you wanted to request a specific teacher, you had to make an appointment with the principal, provide documented reasons for your request and politely ask that the request be taken into consideration when they were assigning students to a teacher.

The only exception to that was when my daughter’s kindergarten teacher moved into teaching 1st grade. They sent a letter home, asking the parents if they wanted their child to stay with this teacher for 1st grade, they had to send back the form indicating yes or no, and that their wishes would be taken into consideration. But even then, we didn’t know if that was actually going to happen until the open house!

I’ve also gotten the impression that most teachers at my son’s grade school do not have much choice in which students they get. One of the comments I heard last year was “I was hoping I would get your son this year, I was so glad when I found out he was in my class”. I’ve also heard some other comments from other teachers like “I was so glad to when I saw my class list and so-and-so was/was not in my class” “I was happy to see your child’s name on my student list” etc. I think the lead teacher for the grade and several of the admin (principle, school councilor, etc) get together and decide who goes into each class, but I’m not sure about that.