Attachment Parenting 20 years later: Are we better or worse parents for it? Is it extreme parenting?

Time magazine has devoted its coverage this week to an issue that is near and dear to my heart – attachment parenting.

The issue, which hits newsstands on Friday, is the buzz of the internet and morning talk shows with a provocative cover of a mother nursing her almost 4-year-old child. (Click here to see the cover shot.) There are so many people posting about it on Facebook and so many negative comments – one man on a public Facebook site compared the woman to a cow!! Is it pandering to sell issues or a reasonable cover to discuss the issue of attachment parenting?

It’s not a model – although she looks like one – pretending to nurse a child on the cover. It’s a real mother who is still nursing her son, who turns 4 next month. The mother herself was nursed until she was 6. Check out her interview here.

(For a behind-the-scene look at the cover shots of moms nursing older children check out this photo slide show.)

Enough about the cover photo and back to the issue at hand – attachment parenting. Are we better or worse for the theories promoted by Dr. William Sears in his 1992 book “The Baby Book”?

Time has many stories covering the issues involved. Click here to see all the different angles. You can watch an interview above with the Time magazine cover story writer and get a gist of the major points above.

She says in the video that the U.S. has the highest levels of breastfeeding since formula was introduced in the 1950s and up to 20 percent of families are sleeping with their kids. She says the theories at attachment parenting have filtered down to all socio-economic backgrounds.

I have talked many times on this blog about being an attachment parent. I have a very dog-eared copy of Dr. Sears’ “The Baby Book.”

Attachment parenting was definitely being promoted at Piedmont Hospital when I went to breastfeeding classes there and gave birth there. Julie Duncan, the then head of perinatal education, definitely espoused the benefits or breastfeeding, baby wearing and co-sleeping. I don’t feel like she judged you if you didn’t do it but she educated mothers about the theories and techniques.

To me attachment parenting felt natural and made sense. I nursed all three around 18 months. (Lilina was a little bit shorter.) They all three have co-slept and will still jump into bed with us if they are needing something. And I loved using my sling and Baby Bjorn with all three. I did use stroller but I loved baby wearing. My first was very fussy and the baby wearing really did soothe here. With Walsh it was easy to let him nurse in the sling while I took care of Rose and by the time Lilina came it was necessary to take care of the two other kids.

The author of the Time piece asks in the video if attachment parenting is asking too much of parents? Or if attachment parenting is really only meant for stay-at-home moms and too hard for a working mother to be us nursing all night on demand? (Here is a fascinating essay about whether breastfeeding is keeping women down economically and in the workplace.)

Dr. Sears answers her criticism by saying that attachment parenting actually helps working mothers reattach when they come in from work. What do you think?

So lots and lots to discuss here. Take a look at the content that is available online and see what you think:

What do you think of the cover? Is it just to sell magazines? Is it not sensational because it is a real mother who is nursing that child and not just a model?

What do you think of attachment parenting in general? Is it too extreme? Are the theories the reason parents are so involved?  Is that’s what’s shifted parents it being helicopter parents later because they are so attached early on?

Is attachment parenting for working mothers? Does it help or just make your life harder or make you feel guilty?

Are breasts and breastfeeding keeping ladies down at work? Would they be economically better off if they didn’t nurse?

99 comments Add your comment

mom2alex&max

May 10th, 2012
1:54 pm

What really grated me was the title: “are you mom enough?”. So if I choose not to BF until my kid goes to college, then I am not “mom enough”? If I freakin like only sharing a bed with my husband and put my 6 month old in a crib in a different room I am not “mom enough”? If I HATED having my kid attached to me every waking second of every day and I put him in his stroller or baby seat so I could have a moment to myself, I am not “mom enough”?

Eff you and your attachment parenting Dr Sears, and Eff TIME magazine for going after shock value and making moms feel inadequate. When did parenting become a competitive sport? I’ll “mom” my own dang way and Dr Sears can put THAT in a juice box and SUCK IT.

Theresa Walsh Giarrusso

May 10th, 2012
1:57 pm

Momto alex — people are really reacting to the photo on Facebook — but it is real mom who nurses and not a model but I agree with you — I find the headline more aggressive than the photo — I will get the magazine tomorrow to see the tone of the cover story — The other stories aren’t that aggressive either — I think the headline was definitely for shock value — the reporter’s interview isn’t that aggressive — but that headline is aggressive.

mom2alex&max

May 10th, 2012
2:03 pm

Oh yeah it’s all over FB. And most moms are outraged at the title. It was a brilliant move on the part of of TIME’s marketing department. Everyone is talking about it and the magazine isn’t even on the stands yet. But I think it will come back and bite them.

A

May 10th, 2012
2:32 pm

Agree with you mom2alex, etc. Because we weaned at 7 months doesn’t mean I’m a bad mom or a failure. But I hate the message this kind of story (and no the photo is not appropriate) sends. Moms who never BF at all already get demonized; now they are trying to those of us who did it until our babies started solids? What a horrible message. And for those of you who watch Game of Thrones, you’ll remember the scene where a 6-year-old character is shown nursing. Sure it was a fake breast, but the creepy factor trumped all the bloodshed and sex in the same episode!

Stookie

May 10th, 2012
2:37 pm

My wife and I are into organic, natural living, and do things that other people don’t understand, but to BF a 4 year old is just creepy.

katielenn

May 10th, 2012
2:47 pm

There is still a Time magazine? Who knew?

C'mon, mom2alex&max...

May 10th, 2012
2:48 pm

…tell us how you really feel, and don’t hold back…

mom2alex&max

May 10th, 2012
2:50 pm

Yeah I get that phrase all the time. Whatever, I don’t post here every day, when I do is because I feel strongly about the topic.

Jennifer

May 10th, 2012
2:57 pm

Here, here mom2! I saw the pic and was kind of like “eh, whatever”. But the headline really ticked me off!!!!

Scooby

May 10th, 2012
2:59 pm

Amen mom2 – totally agree! Attachment parenting wasn’t around when my kids were born, and I’m glad it wasn’t!

justme

May 10th, 2012
3:04 pm

I’m not outraged at the title of the story. It’s posed as a question…are you mom enough?? Obviously the picture shows the more extreme side of parenting and most people on the extreme end of parenting would probably assume that most of us don’t measure up to them. So I take it more as Time magazine opening the doors to the same old story of us vs. them. I’m not offended by the question because my answer is soooo obviously yes.

Also, if you don’t want to be criticized for weaning at 6 months, 7 months or whatever, then we also don’t have any right to criticize those that go up to four years. I personally was breastfeed by my mom for well over a year. I stopped with my daughter at 3 months because I was miserable and this time around I’m hoping to make it up to 9 months. We’ll see. No matter what happens, of course I’m mom enough.

mystery poster

May 10th, 2012
3:05 pm

I think the headline is kind of funny.
My two nursed until about 18 mos. Although I never heard the term “attachment parenting,” we did hold our children a lot. My mother always said that she thought my daughter would never learn to walk. She did, and has become a self-confident, successful adult.
As far as the TIME cover, meh….
I’m a subscriber so I will read it when it comes.

Scotty

May 10th, 2012
3:05 pm

Even as a father, I can agree that I find that headline offensive. As far as attachment parenting as a parenting style, I say to each their own. I don’t like when people tell me how to raise my children, so I avoid telling others how they should raise theirs. We’re all doing our best and what we think is best for our kids. As long as the children are healthy, safe and happy that is what really matters.

cadi'smom

May 10th, 2012
3:08 pm

i’m very much into natural and organic living. i’m involved in urban gardening, eat largely local and vegetarian, and had an all-natural water birth with a midwife, BUT i value my marriage as much as i value my child and so my daughter is not allowed to habitually sleep with my husband and i. not to mention, co-sleeping is highly controversial in terms of safety. i’ve heard the arguments on both sides, but i would rather not risk rolling over my baby in my sleep.

also, i was set on exclusively breast feeding my baby, but around one month old my milk supply just started to drop off. i did all the stuff they tell you to do, snuggling, drinking more water, stress management, pumping before feedings, pumping after feedings etc. etc. etc. but my supply continued to wane, so we had to start supplementing with formula. it was hard enough to come to grips with that personally and not feel like a failure as a mother without AP mom’s asking with brows raised “well, have you TRIED breastfeeding?” yes, i tried, i tried my butt off, i tried everything i could, got advice, had consultations and it just didn’t work for me. get off my case.

and i personally like sleep and, in my experience, sleep tends to be healthy and beneficial for human beings of all ages, at least last time i checked. so we have scheduled feedings and have helped our daughter learn to sleep through the night and take regular naps, she’s happy, healthy, and lights up like the fourth of July when her father and i are around. we don’t feel detached. i’m well rested, she’s well rested, and she has a wonderful and empowering sense of independence.

i think parenting style should be up to the individual. if i don’t vilify you for co-sleeping, demand feeding and wearing your baby, please respect my decisions as a parent as well.

I'm just saying...

May 10th, 2012
3:14 pm

I just love how new terms are applied to old werid-ness… That has to stunt the childs social developement. I would not even click on the link to the pic…. the idea just freaks me out. ANd I am the father of a 10 month old who has Looooong since been weined off of BF.

Shannon W

May 10th, 2012
3:16 pm

Is attachment parenting for working mothers? Does it help or just make your life harder or make you feel guilty?

I always viewed attachment parenting as something to get ideas and permission from (ie it’s ok to sleep with your baby) but never let what I wasn’t doing make me feel guilty. I wasn’t into co-sleeping per say but I was into sleeping and sometimes co-sleeping was the best way to make that happen. Similarly, I wasn’t necessarily into “babywearing” but I was into “baby-not-crying” while I needed to do things and get around and sometimes that was accomplished by slings (mostly with baby #2) and the baby bjorn (mostly with baby#1).

I don’t think attachment parenting necessarily leads to helicopter parenting.

Are breasts and breastfeeding keeping ladies down at work? Would they be economically better off if they didn’t nurse?

Had to argue an economic benefit when formula is so expensive. I don’t think breast feeding keeps adies down at work but I was in a fairly supportive environment when was workinf and breastfeeding.

Kramer

May 10th, 2012
3:16 pm

Come on, what sicko would not want to see a 3 yearl old sucking on his beautiful mom’s teet on the cover of a magazine? Yep, Time has become the class of news magazines. Gee, I wonder why their business is down and they seem to be in financial problems? Oh well, they can always turn to child porn I guess.

Atlanta Native

May 10th, 2012
3:17 pm

STUPID. How you raise your child is a personal decision. (As long as no one gets hurt.) That label “attachment parenting” is just a way for one group of people to sterotype another group and make that group wrong.

Breastfeeding IS PROVEN TO BE BEST FOR BABIES. That is scientific fact. But how long you do it, and how you travel and sleep with your baby is no one’s business but the mother’s and father’s.

Danielle

May 10th, 2012
3:18 pm

I am 27, a full time working mom to a 14mo old, and I still breastfeed and don’t think I am going to stop anytime soon (much to many people’s dismay–even my husband gets embarrassed when we are in public–even though I cover up, because my son looks like a 2-3 year old). But I don’t care, I do it, because I see the benefits in my son: physically, mentally, and emotionally. I haven’t researched studies, but he is developing faster than the kids in his playgroup that are formula fed, he has also only been ill one time in 14months.
He still co-sleeps and hogs much of the bed now that he is almost half my size. I don’t do these things because I follow any theory; I have not even studied different forms of parenting or read books. I just do what comes naturally, and what works for me and my son. Yes, my husband would love the bed to just the two of us, but we both decided that our son is only little once and why not do what makes him comfortable and happy. Makes us wonder why we spent so much on a crib!
It has been a challenge. Breastfeeding for this long, I didn’t think I would last. I thought once he cut his first tooth, I’d be done, but I’m not. I enjoy being able to provide nourishment to my son in such a loving and comforting way. When he gets hurt, he nurses, and is instantly comforted. When he is tired, he nurses. It has become more than food, it is a comfort thing and I am happy to provide that to my son. And, it is actually easier for me. I recently stopped pumping while at work so throughout the day, he eats food and drinks water, but when I get home, he nurses. I was so happy to stop pumping, I think that was the only hassle.
After having my son, I have noticed society’s outlook on breastfeeding and cosleeping and it makes me upset that others want to judge how people parent. Every family, every mother, every baby has their own way. We all end up surviving and thriving whether we sleep in a crib, cosleep, breastfeed or drink formula.
My point is, why waste time arguing about who is right, who is wrong, who is disturbing…blah blah. We all have our own ways and as long as our kids are healthy and happy- who cares!

catlady

May 10th, 2012
3:23 pm

It is “dependency parenting”. Nursing a child to age 4, in this country, is crazy. It speaks more to the parent than to the child. If the kid is old enough to say, “Mom, I am feeling anxious and out of sorts. Can I suck on your t** for awhile?” he/she is too da**** old to be sucking! Mom needs to see a shrink, and prepare to get one for the kid.

I had a friend who did this (also had the “family bed”) and although her kids are bright and accomplished, they were basket cases until they hit about 15.

Sorry folks, but even the cave moms didn’t do this!

And before you think I am anti-breastfeeding, I did it with all 3, for varying lengths of time, for varying reasons. Unless my child was allergic to everything in the world except breast milk, I would not be “feeding” them by the breast with all 28 of their teeth in!

AtlCanuck

May 10th, 2012
3:23 pm

“The man who re-made motherhood” is the equivalent of Christopher Columbus “discovering” America. What a pile of crap. Dr. Sears brilliantly took mothering techniques commonplace everywhere except the rich Western world, and made millions off the backs of people who will never have the luxury of ever having a bed to themselves, or buying a stroller for that matter. Shame on Time magazine for trying to make most Moms feel inadequate with that stupid headline. The photo does not offend me whatsoever.

As to the idiots who are grossed out by breastfeeding an older child – guess what – that’s what breasts are made for. The sexualization of breasts is simply regressive thinking. I’m fine if a Mom does not or cannot breastfeed, but I’m not fine with parents who prop a bottle into a child’s mouth without ever holding the baby. I’ve seen this done with newborns even – that to me is disgusting – not breastfeeding!!!

BehindEnemyLines

May 10th, 2012
3:27 pm

Anyone who doesn’t believe the photo was specifically meant to create controversy (and to therefore sell magazines) seems incredibly naive. Of course that’s also Time’s job – their very reason for being – so it also seems naive to criticize them for trying to do so, however distasteful some (including me, tbh) find it.

As to the next question you posed, It’s no less effective in that regard simply because it’s an actual mother rather than a paid model standing in for one.

Kramer

May 10th, 2012
3:30 pm

I don’t think anyone is “grossed out” about breast feeding here people so lets stop that non-sense. What most people are “grossed out” about is one, the cover of Time. Two the age of the child. Three, any mom who continues breast feeding their child past one years old or when the solid food can kick in. If you want to supply your kid with your breast milk go right ahead. They have pumps use them and put in a bottle or a sippy cup. No one can prove that breast feeding your child until they are 5-6 years old makes them better then those that don’t. I wonder if some moms just have a hard time “letting go” and I wonder if there is a study that shows moms who do breast feed past the age of three tend to be smothering moms into the later years.

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Jewels

May 10th, 2012
3:59 pm

I think the cover of Time is gross and looks like child porn. There is nothing wrong with BF but my goodness come one and stop pretending this is for the benefit of the child. This is just for the parent. Who by the way can pump their milk and put it in a cup.

aMbEr9877

May 10th, 2012
4:01 pm

AP should be nothing more than a helpful guideline that parents can choose to take from & apply whatever elements of it best fits their lifestyle. As long as children’s physical, intelectual & emotional needs are met consistantly by caregivers, a healthy attachment will naturally form. There are many ways to do this, AP is only a collection of some. Each parent, each child, have unique needs and the vast majority do not need prolonged breastfeeding. Just because prolonged breastfeeding is something that most people do not need, does not make it wrong for others. There are currently many cultures that practice prolonged breastfeeding all over the world–not to mention historically– and is found more commonly in impoverished societies where this is a child’s best bet for regular nourishment. If children grow into healthy & happy adults as a result of this, then what’s the problem? I personally have very happily nursed my 2 older children until two-years-old and am currently nursing my third child who is 6 months old. I cannot say at this time how long we will continue nursing–there is truly no set period of time. I may only nurse till she is 1, or I may nurse beyond 2–we will figure it out as we go along. If our needs are both met we will phase out and eventually end our breastfeeding relationship when the time is right for both of us. There is nothing wrong with this nor is there anything wrong with other parenting styles– formula fed/breastfed/extended breastfeeding, co-sleep/crib, sling/stroller, however it works best for the individual families, is what should be accpted as long as informed & loving choices are made with the end result being the development of a healthy & happy person.

Chris

May 10th, 2012
4:05 pm

Danielle, my experience mirrors yours alot. I went back to work full-time and nursing was a wonderful bond I had with my daughter. We fell into co-sleeping to get some rest. I never attached a title to it either; I was doing what worked best for our family. We stopped nursing around 2 years. My child is ten now and thriving. I agree with everything you said.

Elder Flower Child

May 10th, 2012
4:05 pm

I thnk breast feeding a four year old is outrageous, and is really not feeding at all. It is dependency. I breast fed both of mine until they were ready to quit. Once quit at 11 months, the other other at nine months. I didn’t do solids until they were close to six months, and they both learned to drink from a cup instead of a bottle, at around the same time. Biggest problem I had was getting them off of the darn pacifiers. But I also believe to each his own. If you want your child on the breast until he starts school, go for it. Even if I think it is not good for you or the child, you have the right to do it if that is what you want.

I am pro breast feeding, and I do urge all new mothers to give it their best shot. But there again, to each his own. Or her. It is an individual choice, period.

Samantha Nash

May 10th, 2012
4:06 pm

I haven’t had the privilege of having a child of my own yet, however both of my sisters tried to breast feed, and due to issues with their children’s health couldn’t. Honestly I hadn’t even heard of this attachment parenting before, as I was under the impression most doctors tell you to stop breastfeeding around the age of 9 months to a year, that infants are not suppose to be in bed with the parents due to increased risk of suffocation. As for the wearing your child, I agree that at times it is nice to have your newborn next to you, so you can use both hands to take care of other things, but when your newborn is a 30 pound 3 year old, I am guessing physically it would be impossible to carry your child like that.

I guess in my opinion no matter whether you BF or not, if you love your child and do everything in your ability to be the best parent possible who is anyone to judge whether or not you are mom enough???

Spuchy

May 10th, 2012
4:09 pm

Creepy, weird, nutty, narcisstic women.

What’s next? Allowing the whole family to observe the conception too? I mean c’mon, that’s a “natural act” too, right? Jeez…

Jill

May 10th, 2012
4:15 pm

Time just wants to sell magazines and this is creating a lot of buzz. I breastfed my 2 kids for varies times and it was hard work. My job was supportive and it was never an issue. What I have an issue with is “Are you Mom Enough.” You have GOT to be kidding me. It’s is just disgraceful and makes women feel even worse. As a mom, you are always wondering if you are doing things right. This just creates even more doubt. Shame on you Time Magazine.

Roekest

May 10th, 2012
4:19 pm

Eerie subject aside….that’s one mega-MILF. Is there a line behind the kid?

Tony C.

May 10th, 2012
4:22 pm

So, I can blame attachment parenting for all the egomaniacal teenagers with horrible social skills? Or are we still blaming the internet for that?

jarvis

May 10th, 2012
4:27 pm

Well congrats lady…starting in the 2nd grade that cover pic should only get that kid’s azz kicked twice daily until he graduates from high school.

missnadine

May 10th, 2012
4:50 pm

Danielle, you should have some concern about your husband’s feelings. I doubt your marriage will last. If your child looks 3, and you bf in public, it looks inappropriate. The fact that this child sleeps with both of you is an issue as well. I realy do think this is about the mother’s refusal to let go, as mentioned by other posters.

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Danielle

May 10th, 2012
5:14 pm

Chris- thanks for the affirmation :) glad to hear we have similar stories, makes me happy!

missnadine- Thank you for your concern. I guess you read my comment with something else in mind. To be honest, I think you are cruel and ignorant to even suggest that my marriage won’t last. I’m sorry that you feel that way. Fortunately, for me and my husband, we don’t feel the way you do.

I emailed my husband a link to the article earlier today and he responded, “Interesting article , comments too !!!!! Especially that Danielle person ! All jokes aside whatever u want to do …. 3 years 4 years even 6 years whatever makes u happy ;)”

My husband and I are very happy and have a fulfilling marriage and we feel very blessed to share our love with our child. I hope all couples communicate with each other and agree on parenting methods that satisfy the needs of every member of the family.

I don’t worry that nourishing and caring for my child looks inappropriate to some people, because I know that nursing a baby is healthy and natural. And he is after all, he is a baby :)

To all wives and mothers out there…I wish you all health and happiness! Being a mother and a wife is a blessing.

Being a mother m ay be a blessing...

May 10th, 2012
5:33 pm

…but being a wife, eh, not so much…

Good Grief

May 10th, 2012
5:56 pm

This is purely to sell the h*ell out of TIME magazine and will do nothing to promote or encourage so-called attachment parenting. Stay at home and part time working mothers are quickly becoming a thing of the past.

Once this subject has it’s alotted 15 minutes of fame these TIME magazine covers will become objects of inspiration for sexual deviants and pedophiles. Our desire to become an enlightened and progressive society is creating a sub-culture of degenerates that is actually endangering children. Get people people. Stop making everything so darn polically correct and PUBLIC.

I don’t care what anyone does in the privacy of their own home, but when you make a public statement like this expect their to be consequences you don’t like. You can voice your opnion, I can sure as heck voice mine. Tolerance is a two way street.

America has become so disgustingly in your face. Have some modesty and respect, if not for yourself, do it for your children! Our sociey is so uncivilized!

Good Grief

May 10th, 2012
5:58 pm

Sorry for all the errors!

PS: Let the Nipple Nazi’s rejoice

The Mommy Psychologist

May 10th, 2012
6:02 pm

As a child psychologist and a mom, one of the things that is so misleading about attachment parenting is the name. It is only called attachment parenting because of the theory it was based upon. It is not called this because it is the only form of parenting which allows parents to develop a secure attachment relationship with their children. There are numerous ways to develop a secure attachment relationship with our kids. I explore more of this myth here for anyone who is interested:
http://www.themommypsychologist.com/2012/04/15/what-does-the-mommy-psychologist-have-to-say-about-attachment-parenting/

Young 20s

May 10th, 2012
6:02 pm

My friend was nursed until after she was 3 yrs old and she has been a complete wreck since. She is 21.

She is always afraid and full of anxieties. She regrets and sometimes feels ambivalent towards her mother for breastfeeding her until she was a toddler because she remembers it and has seemed to be conditioned, or has learned from that age, that the world isn’t as safe of a place without her mother present. She finds it difficult to live on her own and be independent because she is so used to having her mother do everything for her and help her get through the “difficult” (but not so difficult) times. She is FIXATED on sucking – kissing etc., she even sucks her vitamins that she takes everyday (instead of swallowing them with water). She’s a great person, but she has to relearn how to be independent and that she is okay when trying new things even without her mother there. She is always on her guard and she always says that she “doesn’t feel safe,” even when surrounded by friends she has had a long history with. She calls her mom everyday and always needs reassuring from others.

As much as I am pro-breastfeeding, I think that caution should be used in discerning when to stop. The possibility of preventing independent development by prolonging breastfeeding (beyond what is necessary) can be damaging to the child’s psyche and schema of the world etc. If mothers want a closer relationship with their child, I think that breastfeeding is not necessarily the key – instead, affirmation and intentional time with the child is. This is especially true in Sear’s case, in which it wasn’t the amount of breastfeeding he had received from his mother that made his childhood miserable, but the loneliness and rejection felt in knowing that his father left their family, and in the fact that he had to witness his mother through those difficult times.

Kat

May 10th, 2012
6:20 pm

@Danielle: For someone who doesn’t feel that there should be any arguing, you sure put up one heck of an argument before you finally stated that.

Also, if this woman were unattractive, chubby, etc., there would be more outrage. Just saying.

Kat

May 10th, 2012
6:23 pm

I will add that this woman is old enough to know if she wants to go down in history as having been “that” woman in “that” picture. Similar to that mastectomy picture a number of years ago, which I thought was a good move on that woman’s part. Her son, though, is too young to accurately gauge whether this is something he wanted to do in front of the world. Exploitation of a child?

Really Smart Dad

May 10th, 2012
6:57 pm

It is sad people have such unfulfilled lives that over-breast-feeding and having nothing better to do than follow their kids around until a restraining order is issued (i.e., attachment parenting) is how they find self-worth. Go take an MMPI II, get diagnosed, fix it, breast feed your kid for a healthy amount of time, and quit using it as a replacement for all the under-achieving and other personal and professional failures in your life.

Fresh Spring

May 10th, 2012
7:31 pm

Awful ! Awful ! Awful ! Why is this photo being displayed ? Breastfeeding at 4 yrs old and 6 yrs old ? Completely wrong on all levels. Mother should be arrested for a sex crime. Stop the madness !!!!

AtlCanuck

May 10th, 2012
7:53 pm

WOW!! I shouldn’t be surprised, but I cannot believe the misinformed and uneducated posts regarding breastfeeding. For those who aren’t aware there is scientific proof that breastfeeding provides benefits that baby formula cannot. This is simply because breast milk cannot be duplicated, no matter what formula makers say. Breastmilk also changes or evolves as the child gets older. I understand that some women are not able to for physical or psychological reasons, however if you can, you should cherish the one thing that only you can give your child.

FORMULA FED BABIES are EIGHT TIMES MORE LIKELY TO DEVELOP CANCER than children who are breastfed for 6 months.

America has the lowest maternity leave and the lowest breastfeeding rate in all of the industrialized world. This is no coincidence. There are 178 countries with guaranteed paid maternity leave. (In Canada it is 1 year of paid maternity or paternity leave). Americans needs to fight for their right to have free medical care and paid maternity leave. This is a basic human right in developed nations no matter what your political beliefs are.

BTW, breastmilk does not only benefit babies, mothers who lactate for two years or more, reduce their chances of breast cancer by 24%. It also reduces the risk of ovarian and uterine cancer. Breastfed babies have fewer cavities, lowered diabetes risks and are significantly less likely to become obese as they get older.

STOP BEING JUDGEMENTAL AND EDUCATE YOURSELVES FOR YOUR CHILD’S SAKE.

OlgaB311

May 10th, 2012
8:24 pm

I support both Chris and Danielle’s comments. I too nursed my child until 2-3 years old, did family bed (still do occasionally), and am still married. I enjoy the bond my child and I have because of this growth time we had. Attachment parenting is just a style choice, similar to feeding on demand or every four hours only as my grandmother did. I live in America so that I may have the freedom to parent as I choose, whether it is what someone else may chose or not. I am sad to see the angry comments by many posters, they seem unable or unwilling to see things other than their own view.

Side note to the poster who thinks her friend is having emotional issues due to nursing, I suggest she seek some counseling and try to work past this issue. Your comment suggests that the issue she is dealing with has more to it than just nursing.

catlady

May 10th, 2012
8:54 pm

I haven’t seen the Time cover for some reason. Is it hidden with the girlie magazines? When mine arrives, if I am as disgusted as I am just hearing about it, I will cancel my subscription with a letter telling why. We women are exploited no matter what, it seems!

Ronda

May 10th, 2012
9:01 pm

Its not always the case but as teachers we can usually see the ones that still nurse a mile away. When the child gets upset at school there is difficulty self soothing and when the see mom they grab at her chest. Its not about nutrition at a certain age, its about comfort. If you want to nurse them until whenever….fine, but realize that if you send them to a school setting, they may want a pacifier or something to suck on when the going gets tough.