What age can see ‘The Hunger Games’ movie?

I know lots of tweens and younger kids have read “The Hunger Games,” which I am still baffled by since it’s about teens fighting other teens to the death, but some groups are warning parents that seeing that type of violence is a lot different than just reading about it.

The website Common Sense Media is advising that kids only 13 years old or older see the movie. Here is some of what the site advises:

“What parents need to know

Parents need to know that although the bestselling Hunger Games books are enormously popular with tweens, there’s a clear distinction between reading about violence and seeing it portrayed on screen. Developmentally, the 10- to 12-year-olds who’ve read the book may find the movie’s visceral, sometimes bloody teen-on-teen violence upsetting — especially the brutal scene that opens the Games, in which several teens are slaughtered by their fellow contestants. Even young teens need to be mature enough to deal with the 20+ deaths in The Hunger Games; characters are viciously dispatched with various weapons — including spears, arrows, and swords — as well as by having their necks broken, their skulls cracked, and their bodies ravaged by carnivorous and poisonous creatures. Despite the violence (which is, overall, less graphic than the novel’s descriptions but is still very intense), the movie explores thought-provoking themes about reality television, totalitarian government, and screen violence as entertainment. And Katniss, the main character, is a strong heroine who’s resourceful, selfless, and a true survivor. Her mentor, Haymitch, is initially depicted as a cynical drunk, but he ultimately proves to be a valuable ally.”

The School Library Journal offered these thoughts on the movie:

“The filmmakers provide only a glimpse of children lying dead or in the act of killing other kids. Blood trickles, but doesn’t gush, as arrows, spears, knives, and even deadly wasps are employed to kill off one child after another. Still, viewers will be disturbed by some scenes, like when one of Katniss’s allies is felled by an arrow that’s hurled straight into the heart. In the end, the film, like Collins’s novel, offers as unflinching a look at the darkest side of human nature.”

“The filmmakers balance the action with some moments of calm-before-the-storm silence. The script leaves enough time to catch one’s breath (especially after an unnerving scene involving genetically engineered wasps). There’s also time allotted to watch the unfolding of the budding friendship between Katniss and Peeta, who gently flirt with one another amidst the orgy of human destruction erupting all around them.”

So what do you think? What age child/tween/teen are you willing to take to the movie? On a side note, can someone please explain to me how 8 and 10-year-old are reading this? (Kids in Walsh’s third-grade class have been reading it. He asked to and I told him “No Way!”)

109 comments Add your comment

FCM

March 23rd, 2012
11:14 am

I know a young lady 11 or 12 (not my child) that read the book. She was looking forward to the movie.

Why can’t Walsh read it (I mean his your kid you make the rules so I am just asking not judging)? I know there was an outcry about death in Harry Potter so I am always curious

Molly

March 23rd, 2012
11:18 am

Enter your comments here

K's Mom

March 23rd, 2012
11:19 am

This series just holds no interest for me. It seems dark for kids, but that is based solely on word of mouth. I guess the only hunger games I want to read about are the funny side kicks in my favorite novels being witchy because they are on a diet. Life is hard enough at times, I made it through HS and college lit, so now I mainly only read fun and light hearted stuff.

Molly

March 23rd, 2012
11:20 am

how terribly generalized! Not all kids Can’t handle the gory scences. And do you really think they haven’t been exposed to that before? And if you keep pushing kids away from that stuff they are going to want to watch it more.

A

March 23rd, 2012
11:43 am

My child (9) is old enough to read/watch Harry Potter, and has gone through the first 4 books and movies. He could probably read Hunger Games, technically speaking, since he’s a strong reader, but given the dark themes I will hold off recommending the books until middle school. Even later Potter books get very dark, but probably not as bad as Hunger Games.

JOD

March 23rd, 2012
11:46 am

I’m interested to see what others with older children say. I know 2 girls (aged 10 and 12) who are crazy about Hunger Games – they devoured the books. They are well-spoken, intelligent girls, and their mom is a teacher. In an age of risque network TV (to say nothing of cable), is a well-written book with some violence an issue? Not judging, just asking. I’m actually planning to read the books as soon as they are available at the library (I’m way behind the trends; I just read The Help).

Peachy

March 23rd, 2012
11:50 am

TWG – I am with FCM, why can’t he read it? I am not saying you are right or wrong, just wondering why…wouldn’t you rather read it (and maybe you read it too) so that you can talk about it? I feel like if you just tell him no he will either go ahead and read it behind your back, or wait a few years and then read it but at that point he won’t want to talk to you about it. On another note, didn’t we just talk about the importance of reading the other day…isn’t reading this better than not reading at all?

I’m not sure about a blanket age that is appopriate. I think that the more important questions here are: does the child understand this is a work of fiction and there fore made up and not true, was the child scared by the books (if so probably a bad idea to see the movie), and did the child enjoy the book (if so probably a good idea to see the movie).

Unfortunately in our world evil is real. The books draw some important parallels between the fictional evil in District 12 (book’s setting) and the true evils in this world. I think that parents should at least look into the book and read a little before deciding by hearsay that it is too dark or gorey for their child.

Augusta

March 23rd, 2012
11:57 am

But they can play gorry violent video games and that’s ok?

HB

March 23rd, 2012
12:07 pm

I agree with A that Hunger Games is darker than Harry Potter, and I don’t think it’s appropriate for kids younger than middle school age. It’s not just the amount of killing and violence that makes it a tougher read. Harry Potter has pretty clearly defined good and evil sides, and the good guys for the most part try hard to avoid killing while the bad guys are quicker to use that spell (and I think the first couple of books are appropriate for even young elementary school kids). The Hunger Games starts out with a clearly evil side forcing innocents either kill each other or be killed. As the trilogy goes on, who the good guys and bad guys are sometimes gets fuzzy and determining what violence committed by the main characters is justified and what isn’t is more complicated and disturbing than in the Harry Potter books — I think that’s all a bit much for 9 and 10 year olds.

Suzanne

March 23rd, 2012
12:11 pm

I understand why TGW wants to wait for Walsh to read it. My 12 year old has read all of the Harry Potter books and many war history books and never had any negative reaction. I finally let him read the Hunger Games and he was totally disturbed by the book, having negative emotional reactions (sudden crying, not wanting to go to sleep). That was the first time he’s ever had such a strong reaction to a book. There is no way he is going to see the movie any time soon. There is just something very disturbing about a storyline where teens kill teens to entertain some adults.

Me

March 23rd, 2012
12:16 pm

At what age “can” they see it or at what age “should” they see it? I know… the malcontent “me” is back… In all seriousness, I don’t see that this is any different from some of the other book/movies/video games available and being played by those that I, personally, would consider too young/immature but what do I know??

Denise

March 23rd, 2012
12:26 pm

I just started reading the first book and I’ll say that I was really disturbed when I realized what the book was about since my 12 year old niece was the one who enthusiastically encouraged me to read the books. I don’t think she is too young to read the books, per se, because she is clearly exposed to many more things than I was at 12 but I think my just-turned-11 year old nephew might be too immature. (Or maybe I just want to see him as sweet an innocent. But the books that I bought him for Christmas were definitely CHILDREN’S books.) In other words….I’m torn. I wouldn’t let an 8 year old see the movie but I would probably let a mature 12 year old. As far as reading the books, as the adult, I would read the book first – because I do have some concerns – and then decide. I wouldn’t just say no without being informed and I wouldn’t just say a blanket no without knowing the specific kid. Like I said, my niece is mature enough but my nephew is not.

Scotty

March 23rd, 2012
12:42 pm

My 8 year old has read The Hunger Games. Books that are meant for kids his age bore him to tears, so his mom & I usually pick books from the tween/teen section of the bookstore for him. We read them first ourselves though, to make sure that there is nothing too “adult” about the books. My wife and I both read The Hunger Games and felt like he could handle the violence. He has really enjoyed The Hunger Games and we’ve had several discussions with him about the violence which I think is key. Talk to your child about what he/she is reading and it will help them process what they are seeing or reading. Plus if you’ve read it first, you know exactly what your child is reading and can make an informed decision yourself about the content, not just a decision based on generalizations or others opinions, which aren’t always best for your child. Anyways, we haven’t noticed any strong reactions to the violence in the book (he got it for Christmas and read over half of it that night, so it has been a while since he read it.) Are we going to let him see the movie? That depends. Like with books, when considering taking our child to a movie rated over PG, my wife & I like to go screen it first for ourselves and then make the decision. Frankly, I’m not sure we are going to take him to see the movie. It’s not particularly a violence thing that I’m worried about – I believe he is mature enough to handle it – it’s more a money / fairness thing. Actually going to the movies is sacred in our house (because it costs so much, we rarely go) and a family affair. We’ve never take just one child and not the others and I know my 3 & 5 year olds would not be able to handle The Hunger Games and I would never dream of making them. We will probably just wait until the movie comes out on DVD later in the fall.

malleesmom

March 23rd, 2012
1:56 pm

I agree with TWG on this one. Luckily my almost 10y/o has absolutely no interest in either the books or the movie. My 13y/o read the books and saw the movie last night. She agrees the subject matter is not appropriate for younger audiences. My feeling is the ratings system is in place for a a reason; PG13 means just that. I also have no problem telling my children “no” if I feel something goes against my parenting style/judgement. I am always curious by parents who feel the need to buckle under peer pressure. If there’s such a dilemma, do your research. Read the books and see the movie before your child does. My mom did that with me growing up. While I may not have liked it at the time, as a parent it makes perfect sense.

K

March 23rd, 2012
1:59 pm

I’m 12, and honestly, just about all my friends have read it. I don’t think you should make generalizations, each person is unique. My parents are letting me see it because I’m mature enough, but I know tons of kids who are at least 13, yet only willing to read Diary of a Wimpy Kid.

catlady

March 23rd, 2012
2:15 pm

I sincerely doubt that I am old enough for this! I would not have let my middleschoolsers go see it or read it–too negative for us. Of course mind didn’t have gory video games, either.

Gtmom

March 23rd, 2012
2:23 pm

I believe the author’s intent was for the reader to find the book disturbing. It does not glorify the violence at all. It is a very sad book about people who have no control over their lives at all. This still happens in our world. Read the CNN stories about the Slaves in North Africa.

I have heard that they have kept out a lot of the violence in the movie. NPR did a great piece on this yesterday. By keeping out the violence, you might just make the violent parts look cool. In the book, it was nothing like that… the book was about humanity.

My 7 year old son is not mature enough to read the book but he is mature enough to talk about it. Our family had a discussion about it last night. TV Violence gives him nightmares. He hasn’t seen the Star Wars movies yet. He is just too sensitive.

I would love for him to read this (when he is able) so we can have a conversation on this. I do believe Lord of the Flies was about children killing each other.. (the beast). Again, another book about humanity. I read Lord of the Flies for school when I was in 5th grade.. age 10.

JATL

March 23rd, 2012
2:28 pm

GIANT eye roll here! I was reading adult novels when I was in 3rd grade. I’m not saying that to brag, but my parents basically felt like -if I could read it and understand it, then I could also watch it. I feel the same way. I cannot WAIT for my boys to be able to read, and now see, these books and films! My oldest, who is 6, is definitely going to love them. With the way he’s reading, I think he’ll probably be ready to read them at 8. I have friends with 10 year olds who are going to see it and they read and LOVED the books. If your kid can’t handle them -fine -but I think kids who can’t for the most part have been REALLY over-sheltered. Do you let Walsh read or see anything about the Holocaust or slavery? FAR more brutal stuff right there -yet definitely a connection with this story.

A

March 23rd, 2012
2:30 pm

I think @HB said it very well. As an adult, I love books, TV shows and movies where it’s not always clear who the “good guys” and “bad guys” are. But I don’t know that my 9-year-old, smart as he is, could enjoy something without clear lines. Sure in Harry Potter you have Prof. Snape who is more nebulous, but for the most part kids understand that Harry is on the side of good and Voldemort the side of evil. There are shades of gray, and characters do die/are killed, but Hunger Games is on a whole different level.

homeschooler

March 23rd, 2012
3:28 pm

My niece (12) is currently reading these books. When she told me the plot I thought, wow, that sounds deep and dark. After reading the above comments I think I would have to read it myself to determine if I want my kids to read it or see the movie. I’m not usually too picky about what my kids see but I agree that the complex grey area of good and evil is hard for a child in a concrete stage of development (under 11 or 12 yrs old). My 11 yr old can handle anything violent but he still gets confused about the deeper meaning of things. He loves to read about wars, has read about the holocaust etc.. I know other kids who can’t stand to read anything about those subjects (always amazes me when little boys get freaked out about blood and guts but some do).
I do know this. These kids are REALLY into these books. Reminds me of the Twilight series. Any time kids are that into a series I wonder what the allure is. Like I said, I really want to read them myself. Luckily, like I said yesterday, my 11 yr old is not interested at all in literature. He won’t be asking to read them any time soon and my daughter is still into the Boxcar children so I’ve got a while to worry about it.
My son has seen movies like “Troy” and “Gladiator” etc.. so I can’t imagine it would be much worse but something about teens killing teens and kids really getting into that is quite bothersome.

Jules

March 23rd, 2012
4:06 pm

I have read all the books, and just saw the movie at our theaters 10am viewing while my kids were in school. I would say its appropriate for my 12 year old son who has also read the books – and we reserved tickets for him and his friend to tomorrows showing – but its definitely not for my 7 year old daughter with whom I am currently reading the first book aloud to… All kids are different, and their sensitivities are different. As a parent we need to use our discretion and our judgement individually so can’t say whether or not its ok for all 12 year olds and not ok for all 7 year olds. Hope that helps.

DB

March 23rd, 2012
4:14 pm

If they are old enough to read it and understand it, then I think they are probably mature enough to see the movie. Look at the last Harry Potter movie — people dying left and right in the huge climax scene, people who whom readers had developed a connection.

I’ve read ‘em, and while the vision of a post-apocalyptic dog-eat-dog world is a grim one, I don’t think it’s any worse than “The Giver”. As an earlier poster observed — as violent as video games can be, I suspect Walsh is probably old enough to differentiate between reality and the fantasy of a movie.

Christy

March 23rd, 2012
4:33 pm

I just finished the trilogy and the fact that the books are so pervasively violent, and not just physically, but pyschologically, is the main reason I will encourage my children to hold off reading them until junior high or high school. I think the main question should not be “can they handle it without being too disturbed” but rather “can they make sense of the reason so much violence is in the book in the first place.” I don’t think elementary age students can really grasp the thematic point of all the bloodshed. If it is just a gripping action novel, it is not worth reading, because it will just contribute to the complete desensitizing of our violence-steeped culture. But if, as I believe the author intends, the violent content pushes young people to think about the ideas that war has no winners, the weak are ever enslaved by the powerful, the media manipulates truth to the extent that no one knows what truth is anymore, even our best moments as humans we wonder whether we are truly noble or just driven by fear of suffering and selfishness, even when we manage truly noble acts of self-sacrifice, they can be manipulated by the powers that be and used to perpetuate violence, the sins of the fathers are visited on the children, no triumphant heros emerge from the burning wreckage, just damaged broken people who have to constantly remind themselves that goodness and beauty exist as a shred of hope to keep the constant nightmare of existence at bay… then they are “mature enough” to actually get something out of the book. This trilogy is very dark. I think it gives a pretty accurate, though utterly depressing, picture of the depravity of mankind, and as a parent you better be prepared to point your child to the spiritual resources that will give some hope to face the mirror it holds up.

[...] does a pretty good job with showing teens killing teens and still having a PG 13 rating. It is more violent then most movies with this rating. Some of the action seemed to be shaky and zoomed in so at times it was hard to make out what was [...]

FCM

March 23rd, 2012
5:00 pm

@ catlady, I did reply to your post on the other reading blog here at Momania (1000 hours). I appreciate your talking with me on it.

FCM

March 23rd, 2012
5:03 pm

@ DB….there is one scene in Book 7 (HP) that no matter how often I read it I cry. A very beloved (in my house) character dies. My kids took it way better than I did, they were like Mom go back to book 6 where he is alive and smile again! Another characters death (Book 5) made me angry b/c I liked the character :)

I did try to read Hunger Games but it just didn’t grab my interest so I put it up. I mentioned that to the 12 yo who read it and she said if you can get through the first part it gets way better and less crazy.

Betty

March 23rd, 2012
5:09 pm

I’ve read all three books and look forward to seeing the movie myself, but also know that my 9 year old would not handle this well at all……the book or movie. Each kid is different and you will know if yours can handle this type of violence/message. We have tried, rather unsuccessfully I’m afraid, to expose her to books and discussions about history……..the Holocaust, slavery, 911 etc, and it seems to upset her so much that she has trouble sleeping. We’re not trying to raise such a sheltered soul but we seem to fall back on very happy, safe books and discussions around our house. I am confident that she will eventually enjoy this type of book, but it won’t be for quite a while.

Theresa Walsh Giarrusso

March 23rd, 2012
5:15 pm

I have not read the books but from my understanding the whole premise is about kids having to fight and kill each other. I don’t let him play violent video games or watch violent stuff. He didn’t see Captain America or Thor or X-Men last summer. They watch very few PG movies.

Over 7 books Harry potter had about 14 main characters die (if you include harry’s parents). There was a lot of material in between and the books definitely were not all about killing.

Denise

March 23rd, 2012
5:17 pm

@Christy – that is a deep description of the theme of the book. Now I’m wondering what my niece enjoyed in the book. It doesn’t seem “enjoyable” as much as it is interesting and thought-provoking. I’m much more interested in reading it now that I’ve read what you’ve written.

JATL

March 23rd, 2012
5:29 pm

@TWG -I’m sorry, I love your blog, but PLEASE do not blog and comment on something you haven’t even READ! This is the second blog/posting about “The Hunger Games” I’ve seen from a parent who is strictly going on what they’ve heard. Would you let Walsh watch “The Sound of Music”? What if you had never seen or known much about it, and I really didn’t either, but I wrote a blog about how I thought it would be far too terrifying for kids to see because I heard the Nazis are chasing a family and we know they’ll all go to the gas chambers if they get caught. Personally I hate “The Sound of Music” -but that’s not really a fair or accurate take on why I wouldn’t let a child watch it, now is it?

Read the books and decide what you think -yes, there’s a lot of violence and killing -that’s kind of the whole point. They’re disturbing because we’re SUPPOSED to be disturbed by a world spun this far out of control where we no longer have any freedom, and even if the government tells us we’re going to give up our children to fight to the death, well, we have to do it. Personally I think the sooner kids learn how precious and wonderful freedom is -and not to take it for granted -the better. There are kids far younger than Walsh killing in armies and being hacked to pieces in Sudan just like they were in Rwanda, but it’s not a book or movie and no one asked if they were old enough.

Please read them and see the movie before making any more decisions for your kids about them or being so shocked that 10 year olds would read them. I would have LOVED them at age 10, and no, they would not have freaked me out or any of my friends I can think of, and we would have understood them. I think most of the 10 year olds reading them and seeing this movie get it. They just don’t get enough credit from many adults.

Emma

March 23rd, 2012
5:58 pm

If this movie follows the book(s)…it is NOT about kids killing kids. It is really about the society that requires children from each area of the country to “play” the Hunger Games for entertainment of the masses…unfortunately, historically, there has only been one winner of the game…I think young kids probably won’t understand that part of it, most of the posts here dwell on the “kids killing kids” part of it…that is NOT what it’s about, that’s incidental. If you live in a society that requires playing of this televised “game”…what ELSE does this society require?? That’s the real question here.

Justin

March 23rd, 2012
5:58 pm

While the series is a good example of fast-paced, enrapturing, and enthralling story line, the brutality of some of the deaths and the mere thought of kids mercilessly slaughtering one another is horrid. I’d wait until Walsh is a little older before allowing him to read these books, but a very good, very much gentler alternative is the Percy Jackson series.

SJ

March 23rd, 2012
7:05 pm

I read the series and loved it. I read the first book quite some time ago, and have re-read it twice since then. I really didn’t intend to suggest it to my girls, but they started asking about reading it. At first I said no due to the violence/death.

But then I thought about how I was. I read everything as a kid. I read adult books, teen books, anything at all. It didn’t scar me for life. Instead, it made me a voracious reader who majored in English Lit and used those skills to also succeed in law school.

So I told my daughters (11 and 9) that they could read the book, but they couldn’t see the movie unless they could read the book without nightmares. They have devoured the book. My oldest says it’s her favorite book of all time. Isn’t that the point – to get them to read? I want them to read what will keep them interested, within reason. While this is definitely a mature book, they are learning about similar issues with respect to the Holocaust and slavery.

I definitely think it’s a matter of parental choice and determining whether your child is mature enough, but I really don’t think you can make that call without at least reading the book yourself.

My mother has read the book, my niece (13) is in the process, and we are all going to see the movie together over Spring Break.

Briana Carter

March 23rd, 2012
7:54 pm

Enter your comments here

Theresa Walsh Giarrusso

March 23rd, 2012
8:19 pm

JATL — the blog wasn’t about my kids reading it or me being offended by it. The blog was about what other parent review groups are saying about the film and the question is what age is it appropriate for kids to see it — what did other parents think — —–people asked me why I would let walsh read it so I answered. You guys can do whatever the heck you want with your kids.

Sarah Hunt

March 23rd, 2012
9:06 pm

I think that this is a kid to kid and family to family basis and decision. Some people have commented that it is ok for the kids to play gory games but not see the movie. Odds are if they are not allowed to see the movies for this reason then they are probably not allowed to play those types of games either. From what I have heard without seeing the movie yet, but I have read all three books, is that it should be screened by the parents first. I realized when I began describing the book just how graphic it really was. But in reading it the violence and gore are covered by what she is feeling. But think about it….the movie can only portray the visual parts which would be the violence and gore. So my reccommendation is that as a parent you view the movie first and then decide if it is appropirate for your child.

Sk8ing Momma

March 23rd, 2012
9:11 pm

It took my 12yo daughter, soon to be 13, a couple of tries to get through the book. She’ll be 13yo next month. She first attempted to read the book late last spring. She made it approximately 1/4 through the book before it gave her nightmares. She elected to put it down. She picked it up again a couple of weeks ago. She was able to finish the book without having nightmares and actually enjoyed it. Apparently, she was too soft-hearted and/or immature to handle it at first.

My 10yo son decided to read it in the midst of the movie hype. He finished it earlier this week. It didn’t cause any problems for him. He loved it and is eagerly reading the second title in the trilogy.

As was demonstrated in my household, every child is different! Both of my children are looking forward to seeing the movie. If we don’t take them this weekend, we’ll take them next weekend.

Sk8ing Momma

March 23rd, 2012
9:17 pm

One more point…A parent *really* needs to know her child. My 10yo son is obsessed with all things military. He enjoys reading military-themed non-fiction, particularly about WW II and weaponry. (I’d challenge any adult to have a conversation with him about WW II.) He has for years. The military is his passion. Accordingly, we’ve allowed him to watch Saving Private Ryan, Blackhawk Down, Red Tails and other military-based movies. He most recently read (in 2 days!) and saw Act of Valor. He LOVES them all.

I know his interest in not typical for a 10yo; however, it is what it is. My point is that each parent has to know her child before she determines what is and what isn’t appropriate for him to view.

A person SMART enough to know......

March 23rd, 2012
9:20 pm

Is basically the short story “The Lottery” blown up.

“The Lottery” is a short story by Shirley Jackson, first published in the June 26, 1948, issue of The New Yorker. Written the same month it was published, it is ranked today as “one of the most famous short stories in the history of American literature”.
Response to the story was negative, surprising Jackson and The New Yorker. Readers canceled subscriptions and sent hate mail throughout the summer. The story was banned in the Union of South Africa. Since then, it has been accepted as a classic American short story, subject to critical interpretations and media adaptations, and it has been taught in middle schools and high schools for decades.

openminded

March 23rd, 2012
9:30 pm

Has anyone ever heard of the Lord of the Flies book or movie..I remember watching that as a young child in school and it is all about kids killing eachother. So can someone please tell me how this is any different? Some kids can handle certain things that other children can`t. I think it`s ok for 10-12 yr old kids to read and watch.

A person SMART enough to know......

March 23rd, 2012
9:39 pm

openminded tell me who and how killing of kids happens in the Lord of the Flies?

gernalist?

March 23rd, 2012
9:40 pm

The entire first paragraph is one of the worst run on sentences I have ever read, I’m dizzy, periods are cheap, use them but, oh crap, its contagious, oh no. Finally!

openminded

March 23rd, 2012
9:44 pm

If you are not familiar with the book or movie maybe you should look it up. It`s about a young group of boys stranded on an island, they end up going mad and start killing eachother. The movie dates back to 1990.

NtrlGAGirl

March 23rd, 2012
9:47 pm

My 10 yr. old son, a very advanced reader, read The Hunger Games a couple of weeks ago. I, initially, wouldn’t let him read the books because they were catalogued under “teen literature”, but he checked it out from his school library, brought it home, & I relented. He was already aware of the plot & several of his friends had read the book and/or series. He had no problems with it and because he wanted to see the movie, I read the book earlier this week.

HOWEVER, we saw the movie this afternoon. Afterwards, I asked him what he thought of it and his answer was, “It was very good, but it was brutal. I didn’t picture the scene (at the opening of the games) in my head the way it was on the screen.” I KNOW my son and that was unexpected. It wasn’t very gory at all, but it was still bit much for him–exactly as indicated by Common Sense Media. That was definitely a lesson learned for me.

A person SMART enough to know......

March 23rd, 2012
9:48 pm

Only 2 people die in the Lord of the Flies. More are killed in the start of this movie and book. lord of the Flies is not about the Killing where in The Hunger Games killing is an integral part of the story. You need to read the Lord of the Flies again.

A person SMART enough to know......

March 23rd, 2012
9:51 pm

openminded…………Simon attempts to alert Jack’s tribe that the “beast” is nothing more than a cadaver. While trying to tell Jack’s tribe of this fact, Simon is caught in a ring during a primal dance. He is mistaken for the “beast” in the darkness, and Jack’s tribe kills him, with Ralph, Piggy, Sam, and Eric in the ring also. Ralph, Piggy, Sam, and Eric later try to convince themselves that they did not take part in the murder.
Jack’s tribe then raids Ralph’s camp to steal Piggy’s glasses – the glass lenses being the only source of starting a fire. Ralph’s tribe journeys to Jack’s tribe at Castle Rock to try to retrieve the glasses. In the ensuing confrontation, Roger drops a boulder, aiming at Piggy. Piggy is struck by the boulder, and the conch is smashed into pieces. Piggy flies through the air and falls forty feet onto the rocks below by the sea, and is killed. Sam and Eric are captured and tortured into joining Jack’s tribe. Ralph is forced to flee.

A person SMART enough to know......

March 23rd, 2012
9:54 pm

I saw the original movie and read the book in 1981.

Lord of the Flies (1963), directed by Peter Brook
Lord of the Flies (1990), directed by Harry Hook

openminded

March 23rd, 2012
10:08 pm

I don`t think it matters how many kids get killed in the book or movie, it`s still about kids killing eachother.So it sounds to me like you are saying it`s ok because it was only 2 kids? Every child is different and like I said some can handle it and some can`t. Kids see more violance on tv and video games these days that I think most are smart enough to know that it is not real. I`m allowing my child to read The Hunger Games right now and she is fine. I used the Lord of the Flies as an example because it`s about kids killing other kids.

openminded

March 23rd, 2012
10:11 pm

Wow! everyone is allowed to express their own opinions. I used an example of a movie I saw as a young child where I watched kids killing eachother.

A person SMART enough to know......

March 23rd, 2012
10:21 pm

Open you need to read or watch the Lord of the Flies again if that is what you think it is about.

Like I said The Hunger Games is basically “The Lottery” with maybe the group dynamic of the Lord of the Flies added to it.