How do you tell the kids you’re being foreclosed on?

One of our readers has sent me a bunch of topics to use (which I always welcome) and one she would like for us to discuss is:

How do you tell the kids your house is going into foreclosure and your family is going to have to move?

Do you have to tell them? Could you pretend like you’re just moving if you get out before the sign goes up? How soon do you tell them? Do you only tell them when there’s a foreclosure sign hanging in the yard? How do you help them cope at school? Do you try to move out quickly so there’s no stigma or stay in the house mortgage-free as long as you can?

109 comments Add your comment

petercampana

December 13th, 2011
1:19 am

When You plan to move from your home in the next few years dont refinance your mortgage, use tools from 123 Refinance they make it easy to check your current loan and provide you the solution

Me

December 13th, 2011
5:55 am

We’ve never faced this so I can honestly say that dealing with telling the kids has never crossed my mind. I guess, however, that it would depend on the age(s) of the kid(s) at the time of such or at least on their ability to understand.

bobfromacworth

December 13th, 2011
6:33 am

Just tell them the truth and if they don’t understand you must explain it so that they do. If you don’t teach them about the problems that happen in life they will grow up misguided and not understand that things can go badly. Of course this would only work if the children are at least 5-6 years old.

djm_NC

December 13th, 2011
6:47 am

i have wondered the same thing. i see houses being foreclosed on and i always feel so bad for the people involved and how they handle telling their kids. what a sad thing for that to happen.

shaggy

December 13th, 2011
6:49 am

Hey Kids!
Remember you all said you wanted to go camping?
Well, were going camping for a VERY long time…until you are all 18 and can go find your very own campsite….

Ken

December 13th, 2011
6:51 am

The kids know what’s going on these days, probably by third grade. They can tell by where their friends get off the bus. Mine are handling the loss of our former house well. It’s a reality of the current economy.

Ken

December 13th, 2011
6:59 am

A second thought – many folks think you can hide things from the kids. Unfortunately, they have eyes and ears and are usually highly intelligent beings. It can’t be done.

nelson

December 13th, 2011
6:59 am

that is a great question. i really like it. To all of the above, be flat out honest. There is nothing in the universe worse than a parent the children do not believe. I knew i would get it right sooner or later.

Candy Man

December 13th, 2011
7:00 am

Just be truthful, the kids will adjust. Blame it on everyone else, tell them the economy did it and that there was nothing we can do. Promise them that they’ll have another TV, XBox, CDs, clothes, vacations etc etc just as soon as you move. Be certain to explain that above all – NEVER take responsibility for anything that goes wrong – ALWAYS assign blame elsewhere.

The little sweeties will be just fine in life with that approach.

Gtmom

December 13th, 2011
7:02 am

Hmm.. Totally curious on what is said here.
Last May, my neighbor told me they were behind on their payments and they may have to foreclose. I felt sorry for her. But come April, I went to her house for her daughter’s birthday. The 8 year old girl received a Ipod touch, a laptop, and other various expensive items. I was then alarmed.. You can afford these things but can not pay your mortgage? I know the recession had hit them as it did my family but I would not go out buying expensive items for my child even if we were loaded. Maybe because my child is not good at taking care of nice stuff, I feel this way?

Well then come October, I was talking with my neighbor again. They had not made a payment since the summer so they were abandoning their house that week to move to an apartment. They were afraid they would get a foreclosure notice and would have to move out without much thought of the new place. Plus, they wanted to secure an apartment before their credit was too poor. I can see their point there.

Now, I wonder what they told their daughter? What lessons did they teach her? The summer was spent on expensive trips to exotic places. I realize they had gotten used to a certain lifestyle and reining it was difficult. They had bought the house (which is adjoining our property) for over $400 K.

I feel for them to a certain extent. But a part of me wants them to be responsible. They both had jobs but had a serious loss in income. But they still made really good money. My biggest concern is now I have an abandoned property right beside me. The bank doesn’t know they have abandoned it. It has been sitting through fall with rain and leaves on the roof. It is already starting to show signs of disrepair. I have cleaned the leaves on their sidewalk (I would have to eventually). I live down hill from them and it would eventually make it on to my property. I am also scared vandals will move in. We live in town.

But really, how did they explain this to their daughter???? I am very curious there. We can afford nice new things but we don’t want to pay our mortgage? Now for others who have lost their jobs and have done everything they can to keep their home or to be responsible. I feel very bad for them. This recession seems to keep going on and on. It has been hard on a lot of people.

catlady

December 13th, 2011
7:06 am

What I see is people giving their kids every bit of information and pain that they can when they suffer ANY kind of a loss. They blame others (that greedy bank, your father, my old boss, that woman) and make sure the kids are scared and suffering, too. It’s like, “Be sorry for me. Let’s all dwell on this awful thing.” and the kids come to school even more distracted, exhausted, angry.

It’s hard to put a good spin on it, but parents have to get their acts together and provide a sense of stability for their kids, instead of letting it all hang out. (”I don’t know what we are going to do! We will be living in the street.”) Instead of that, STEP UP, be the adult, and get a plan together! When you lose your house, or can’t pay the rent, IT IS NOT A BIG SURPRISE. You have KNOWN you were on shaky ground for quite a while. Don’t just hope it will get better!

I get real tired of seeing my kids at school, many of whom get little parental support as it is, have to go through the drama that many of them do, and THEY provide support to their PARENT. It isn’t right!

Ken

December 13th, 2011
7:14 am

Very judgemental here. I did eveyrthing “by the book” financially, but after almost 4 yrs of erratic employment and underemployment by both me and a spouse, coupled with a loss of all paper assets, will sometimes leave us to have to explain the situation to our children.

Sunny

December 13th, 2011
7:15 am

@Gtmom, once people are so far behind on their mortgage, they give up on even trying to save the home so they sock away their money for a move and/or to enjoy other things in life. It may seem a tad crazy to an outsider but having been faced with a similar situation, I don’t blame them. In many cases, the banks are simply unwilling to work with you and would rather have an empty property not generating any income versus taking what you can afford to pay.

Now the gifts for the child were quite extreme but those things could have been purchased by another family member or bought at a pawn shop to ensure things appeared “normal” for the child.

Gtmom

December 13th, 2011
7:31 am

The gifts were provided by the parents facing foreclosure. At least that is what the mother told me. They came in packages so if they were pawn shop purchases, I would assume they were stolen goods. I do feel for them losing income and for others. My husband made $92K back in 2007. He has made less than $30K since then. It is tough. I would feel better about the situation if they would tell their bank they have abandoned the property before the property becomes a homeless/drug haven. There are other people affected. The neighbors who live around them. So far, our neighborhood had kept up their property values… now, I don’t know what this can do to it.

Marley

December 13th, 2011
7:32 am

@ Ken While your situation is very common, the problem is that you and your spouse should have saved for the inevitable. My spouse was out of work for almost 3 years (some being under employed) with me as a stay at home mom and we did fine, because we had savings and did the right things.

To be quite honest the community at large knew that my husband had no job. They gossiped and probably betted how long before we were kicked to the curb. They most definitely shared our family’s situation with their kids as well. We were always honest with our kids and about our financial situation and handled the situation head on every day. Our entire family found out who our true frinds were. The rest of the scumbags don’t matter as long as you are doing the right thing.

To be quite blunt, if you are in foreclosure it most certainly is the neighborhood’s business. You are effecting them and the value of their home. It is all a matter of public record.

Ken

December 13th, 2011
7:32 am

@catlady – we paid our bills, but lost our wealth and house anyway. The kids get it. We don’t blame anyone. We are still in charge, with a roof over our head and the ability to move forward. We don’t get all kinds of gadgets at any occasion. What is with the judgmental anger, and stereotyping of families in this position?

Marley

December 13th, 2011
7:36 am

“In many cases, the banks are simply unwilling to work with you and would rather have an empty property not generating any income versus taking what you can afford to pay.”

It’s not the bank’s fault that someone was dishonest with how much they were able to afford. I could have gotten one of those crazy loans, but I did not. The banks aren’t unwilling, but the rules have changed and there is NOTHING they can do in many cases. The responsibility lies with everyone – but most importantly the no one ever held a gun to an individual’s head and told them they had to get a loan or own a home – BOTTOM LINE!

Ken

December 13th, 2011
7:42 am

@marley We had major saved reserves that eventually ran out. It is of course going to be y(our) neighbor’s business, as they have been going down with us. Anyway, we are still a happy family that will continue to thrive. I just can’t figure out why folks are so busy trying to find enemies in those who don’t have the same circumstances as them. Sounds like what they call “class warfare”. I’m signing off of this discussion.

VaLady

December 13th, 2011
7:47 am

It’s best to tell the kids what they can understand based on their ages. Do not lie. If possible, try to generate some positive attitudes about moving to the new residence. In the 1950’s, our home was lost to foreclosure. My dad had taken a second on it to start a fledgling business. The business failed and he couldn’t make the payments on the second. I distinctly remember the day when the sheriff served the papers on Mother; I was seven years old. By that time, Daddy had deserted the family and was living elsewhere. My grandmother tried to make the move as interesting as possible (Mother was a basket case) by citing the advantages of living in town rather than in the country. Needless to say, there was a lot of emotional baggage related to this event due to the subsequent divorce (a rarity in the 1950’s) and the lawsuits that followed my mother for almost 20 years (she was a silent partner in Daddy’s business and had signed too many commitments without consulting a lawyer first).

The bottom line is that the kids need to know what they are able to understand NOW. When they’re older, they need to know the complete story. By not doing so, the kids may harbor fears and misunderstandings that can last a lifetime.

Candy Man

December 13th, 2011
7:50 am

Ken – don’t spend dollars when you make dimes, simple math. And yes, in a sense you are my enemy as your actions – and others like you – put us in this mess. Obama has done nothing to imrove things – he should just let the housing market finish the collapse and let it rebuild – it will. Instead we slowly choke…thanks Ken and all of your partners!

Responsible

December 13th, 2011
7:51 am

I know a set of parents who relocated from Fl..bought a million dollar property while still having 3 million dollars in loans from other properties…the husband went BK but not before buying ANOTHER home across the road in his wife’s name!!!(how the bank gave a loan to someone who doesn’t work I have no idea!)..18 months later thy had to sell that home and now moved and rent…

Of course they rented an expensive home…the reality ….these parents can’t even be responsible as adults with their own finances so what kind of story do you tell the kids when you have moved 4 times in 4 years?

It all comes down to leading by example…life is a set of ups and downs… If you have a problem and lose your home the kids who are old enough to understand should be told and SHOWN how you deal with it. when they become adults it will be a good lesson for them to draw on.

Gtmom

December 13th, 2011
7:52 am

I also agree with telling the kids what is going on. Kids will surprise you. I know that my kid has been willing to make sacrifices. He constantly ask me if something is too expensive. Just this week he said, “I want to get a basketball goal when we get enough money saved up. We could not eat dinner out for a while (we usually eat one family meal out a week).” Kids are tough and more resilient than adults.

Kathy

December 13th, 2011
8:02 am

Here is a scary statistic……1 out of every 45 children today is homeless. This is up 33% from 2007 (ABC news).

Gtmom

December 13th, 2011
8:07 am

Kathy, I saw a bunch of these kids yesterday standing in line at the women/children’s shelter yesterday when I went to pick up my kid at daycare. Those kids could care less about Ipods, laptops, etc. They would just want their own bed to sleep in. I had never seen the line that long. Very sad. I usually volunteer at the men’s shelter. To be honest all the shelter lines look longer than usual.

Kathy

December 13th, 2011
8:12 am

Gtmom…..The saddest thing I have ever seen is homeless women and children sitting on the wall surrounding our capitol building. As an educator, it scares me to think about the future of these children. You are so right…..all they want is to know where they are going to sleep at night.

Marley

December 13th, 2011
8:19 am

@ Ken My home never was in foreclosure. I don’t really see how you could have ‘major saved reserves’ and still loose your home. Did you make a decision to stop making payments? The mindset of the market falling so why pay for a depreciating asset is beyond stupid (IMO). Rent in many cases can be just as high as a mortgage payment. Life has a fixed set of expenses that you should be prepared for, shelter is one of them!

I live in Gwinnett where the public has access to almost everything speck of information. And if there is no hard core inforamtion, then there is unfortunately gossip. I am sure the community was following the legals section of the paper looking for us to show up. Even the court system has a site where you can investigate any lawsuit – from a DUI, divorce and financial lawsuits – it’s all out there for public consumption.

Be one of those oddballs that does the right thing and no one can dig up any dirt on you to prove otherwise.

Signing out on this note: Tell the kids or another kid will!

Gtmom

December 13th, 2011
8:26 am

Kathy, you are seeing the same thing I am seeing.. That is where my kids go to daycare.. The wall was so full yesterday with kids and moms and sleeping bags.

Kathy

December 13th, 2011
8:28 am

There is a mother that sits on the corner with a baby that looks to be about 2. I just think about all that little baby is missing developmentally. They were there the day of the 1/2 marathon on TGiving day and I just cried all the way up the hill wondering how they were going to make it through the day.

I agree with Ken

December 13th, 2011
8:28 am

@Candy Man, everyone is so quick to blame President Obama, what would you do to change the housing market if you were ever to make it to the Oval Office? Being forclosed on is easy when you never experienced it, but, if you walk in the shoes of a forclosured family, you will be humbled yourself. No matter what you save or have saved, jobs are starting people off at less money or cutting their hourly pay to keep their jobs. I know someone hourly pay was just cut at the beginning of November from $15 to $10 per hour. Bills don’t decrease, but, income does. So savings will dwindle and every one has their opinion until it happen to them.

Reindeer

December 13th, 2011
8:30 am

You have no one to blame but yourself. During the housing boom, people often bought more than they could afford. Then they ran out and bought Top of the Line vehicles. Living high on a the hog, with the debt that goes with it. Oh, and let’s not forget the maxxed out credit cards. Living large, trying to impress others.

Then BOOM, the economy tanks…..suddenly your $350K home is now worth $250K, but you are still paying the $350K mortgage. You still pay for the high priced vehicle, with gas prices hovering around $4.00/gallon…..hubby lost his job. Now you have to go find a job, since you haven’t worked since your first kid was born. You had to fire the housekeeper, the lawn people, forfeited your swim/tennis membership. Oh God how do you face your friends.

I knew this was going to happen. It couldn’t be that way forever. Now, for those of us, who lived within our means, we are just fine, and don’t need to tell our kids why we suddenly have to move to a tiny apartment.

But if you are in this position, you need to be totally honest with your kids. They need to know why the rug has been pulled out from under them. Why do they have to leave their friends and the cushy lifestyle they have become accustomed? Because YOU took on too much!!!

Also, this could be a great teaching tool. LIVE WITHIN YOUR MEANS!!!!!

Steve

December 13th, 2011
8:33 am

People who are facing foreclosure need to educate themselves on the process. Someone doesn’t just show up at your door and kick you out. The auction date must be in your local paper for 4 weeks before the auction and then they still have to evict you if you are still in the house.

No one sticks a “Foreclosure” sign in your front yard before the foreclosure so I don’t know where the author of the article came up with that one,

The best thing is to stay in the house until you lose it. I recently helped a friend move after his foreclosure and Fannie Mae paid him $3,000 to leave the home broom clean.

BessieBear

December 13th, 2011
8:35 am

I agree – kids should be told. They’re going to figure it out anyways. Might as well have it come from the parents so that they learn the truth, and hopefully get a lesson in finances about it.

As for the blaming going on here, I can remember clearly the speech President Clinton gave where he stated that EVERY American should be able to to own their own home, which then lowered the mortgage requirements. I remember thinking – uhm, NO, not every person should own a house.

I sometimes have house-envy as I see people getting into those custom-designed 3000+ sq.ft. new houses. Sure, I’d love to be wealthy enough to live in something like that, but it’s not in our budget. If I was going to buy a dream home, I’d like to know that I can pay for a big portion of it upfront, and have a modest mortgage payment that we can pay, not only now, but down the road if our income is a bit less than we have now.

Instead, we live within our means, a 2000 sq.ft. 1978 3bed/2.5bath brick ranch house. We’ve done a lot to make it our home, and we’re happy here. I remind myself that I’m glad I don’t have to clean 4 bathrooms, or have the utility bills that people in much larger houses have.

While I the Clinton administration got this problem started, individuals need to take more personal responsibility for their finances, and live within their means – including paying off their credit cards every month.

DC

December 13th, 2011
8:35 am

amazing how some (2) can act to others on here who are struggling…no wonder when I travel to poor countries and people ask if everyone is like the women on desperate housewives…I laugh and say no….

Momof1

December 13th, 2011
8:35 am

Try and glide through this economy as a single parent…….it aint easy, but I have managed to keep a job, and keep a roof over our heads, and food on the table. It’s been a major struggle, but I get up EVERY day and thank the lord I have a job. And that I am able to provide for my child. I have a small home, and drive a used car, and once every 3 months I have a little left over to splurge on a pedicure…….My $130K home is now worth $75K…..but I’m good. I’m only $15,000 upside down, but I’m not leaving my home. I will endure and do what I need to do. I am no where near bankruptcy or foreclosure…..so I will wait at least 5 years before I make any kind of move……

Figment

December 13th, 2011
8:36 am

I think you should be honest with your children. Lead by example. My son was too young to explain why we had to move and he was fine with it after a while. We have a new place to live now and he loves it there. Sometimes you have to do what you need to do to survive.

Jeff

December 13th, 2011
8:37 am

I think it’s a dicey situation. I think you protect your kids as much as possible because you don’t want them going in to the mental mode of “if i sell my toys onebay or craigslist, then we’ll be able to eat”.

But you also have to tell them something so their mean friends aren’t who they hear something from first.

VoiceOfReason

December 13th, 2011
8:38 am

Sorry kids, mommy and daddy made bad choices and tried to live beyond our means and now karma has come to bite us in the ass.

/What I would say to my kids were I ever in that situation, but I don’t make bad choices nor do I live beyond my means so I really don’t have to worry about that.

LeeH1

December 13th, 2011
8:41 am

Losing a home is like losing someone you love. There is shock, grief, anger, and many other emotions, all wrapped up together. But telling a child they are losing the home is like tewlling them a family member has died.

You not only have to tell the ugly side, which actually is pretty easy to do, but also the upside, which is harder to do. The family is still intact. What is lost is a possession, not a person. While everyone is losing something, you are all in this together, and no one loses any thing more than another. With mutual support, the family can come out stronger.

The children take their cues from you. If you are bitter and outraged, they will also be bitter and outraged, but they just won’t know why. If you remain calm and optimistic, they will too. Remind them that any insults from friends, relatives or neighbors is not a person attack on them, but an insult to the entire family. You are all in this together, and you should try to keep everyone together in dealing with the problems that come up.

And put it in perspective, too. Almost all pioneers in wagon trains that went west, went west because of financial problems. Our country was built by people who lost all, and re-built in new communities. America is a land of second chances. You can always move to a new place and start over with a clean slate. If you lose the respect and love of people you only thought were your friends because of bankruptcy, and gain the love and respect of those closest to you, then you gain more than you will ever lose in lost money,

The first step in recovering from loss is re-establishing your love to those closest to you. That always makes a family stronger, even in uncertain times.

DC

December 13th, 2011
8:41 am

I am in a good financial position and I live within my means but some of you people are outright cold. Like someone posted earlier..its easy to point that finger until its pointed back at you…

Tea Party Conservative

December 13th, 2011
8:50 am

Tell them President Obama stole their house and gave it to radical Muslims.

I Hate Stupid People

December 13th, 2011
8:57 am

If you plan well and make good financial choices you should never have to worry about having this conversation with your children.

If you have a mortgage with a variable rate then you are an idiot. Variable means YOU CANNOT CONTROL IT!

Having a fixed rate mortgage means the rate stays the same so you can plan better financially because you should never be surprised by a high mortgage bill.

Why are these simple things SO hard for people to comprehend?

What was it Jerry Glanville said about pointing fingers...

December 13th, 2011
8:58 am

…when you point there is one finger pointing outward, while three other fingers and the thumb are pointing back at you…

Kynthia

December 13th, 2011
9:00 am

We’re not dealing with a foreclosure, but we are trying to sell our house as a short sale.

Our daughter (1st grade) knows that we don’t have a lot of money (I recently started back to work after being unemployed and actively job hunting for 18 months), but the way that we’ve played it up for her is that we’re going to be moving to another place to live and that she gets to help pick her new bedroom/our new home.

She likes being actively involved in that part of things and at some of the apartments she’s seen with us she’s even made a list for us of things she does/doesn’t like, lol.

Techmom

December 13th, 2011
9:07 am

Not all people were dishonest when getting loans (there were some) and then were some idiots who knew they were getting an interest only for a few years and would have to start paying bigger payments later but they thought they would manage and still there were more who were told they qualified for more than they could afford and didn’t really understand the rules of the game. Maybe it’s their own fault b/c these are mostly the same people who never would have been able to buy a house 20-30 years ago. But the market we were in was deceptive. Between giving loans to those who shouldn’t really have gotten them, tumbling home prices and sky rocketing unemployment, it’s a trifecta for foreclosures.

What bothers me is the people who can afford their houses and are still walking away from them. Our neighbors across the street left their [original] $450k house this summer after they bought another one in town. He’s an orthopedic surgeon and could afford the house but they wanted to move and decided it wasn’t worth selling b/c then they would have to show up at the table with a check. He looked at it like an investment; he wasn’t going to ever make his money back so might as well walk now. Great for him; sucks for the rest of us.

Gtmom

December 13th, 2011
9:07 am

Every situation is different… I hope most realize that.. there are some who lived beyond their means and their are some who saved responsibliy and there are some who just started out before the whole mess began and they had not time to save. I am sure we all have unique situations. I was devastated by the loss of income and benefits and I just knew we would have to give up our home. But we figured it out and we were lucky. I am sorry for those who really did try and keep their homes. If you do abandon your home, please let your bank know so the neighbors are not stuck with trying to keep the vandals out..

With kids, I think we all have different parenting techniques and I think that is ok. My son seems to be mature and understands a lot about economy, natural diasters, and homeless. His grandfather was homeless and had mental illness. He listens to NPR on his own radio every morning in his room (he is 6).

Most people don't agree with Ken

December 13th, 2011
9:14 am

“Being forclosed on is easy when you never experienced it, but, if you walk in the shoes of a forclosured family, you will be humbled yourself.”

Sounds like Ken was wearing shoes made by Bruno Magli and his wife Barbie was wearing Jimmy Choo. Ken tried to walk in shoes he couldn’t afford, he practically spelled it out in his posts but tries to place blame elsewhere. Most (yes the majority) of homeowners facing foreclosure have no one to blame but themselves. This is not the first financial mistake they have made, there is always something left out of the story that they are telling.

The reason people have no sympathy anymore is because a sob story like Ken’s has major parts left out of it. Many people are sick of the lies and no one or their story of “woe is me” is not believable anymore. I am sure Ken’s former neighbors know more about his tall tales.

max

December 13th, 2011
9:17 am

People are quick to assume that everyone who goes into foreclosure bought a house that they could not afford or lived well beyond their means. Some people did the right thing and bought homes that they could very well afford at the time, but for circumstances beyond their control (job loss, divorce, medical) still lost their home. Even if you do have a 6 or 12 month reserve fund, those funds will eventually run out if they are not replenished. With the current job market, it may take a while to find a job and if you do find a job it may not be close to the salary that you were making on your previous job. The bills don’t stop because you are out of work or make less.

Sunny

December 13th, 2011
9:20 am

Some of you people are sickening with your judgemental attitudes. It’s quite simple to live within your means when you HAVE means, however, once your severance is gone, the savings have dwindled, and you’re faced with any type of medical emergency or major expense, you will deal with a difficult choice of having to walk away from a home.Too many people place worth on material things, a house is temporary but you can make a HOME anywhere.

Be thankful that you’ve never had to endure what so many others have. You all are they type that would be plastered all over the news for killing yourself and your kids if you had to deal with a financial blow. SMH…show some compassion for you fellow man.

E

December 13th, 2011
9:23 am

I am so surprised at the very judgemental and “holier than thou” attitudes on this blog. Clearly, you feel that thanks to your efforts, you are immune to the forclosesure crisis. My husband and I have been blessed to be able to remain in our home, despite his once successful business taking a HUGE financial hit due to the economic downturn. Our family took a 50K plus per year hit, because he took a job making a fraction of what he used to make,because that was the job he could get. We are both professionals, and we saved well when times were good. We have been fortunate. But, there are many, who did all the right things, saved when times were good, lived within their means, paid bills on time….and life happened. Jobs were lost, incomes were cut or eliminated….and no matter how well you’ve saved, most folks cannot survive for an indefinite period, even withsavings. All I can hope is that none of you has to walk in those shoes.

To answer Theresa’s question, I think how you explain it (in terms of detail), depends on your childrens’ ages. I think you have to be honest with them, but balance it with a dose of reassurance, and not making them feel burdened.

Augusta

December 13th, 2011
9:26 am

When we were looking to buy, many years ago, our Real Estate Agent kept trying to get us to look at houses $100,000 OVER what we wanted, as we had qualified for $250,000, but we wanted to keep it under $175,000….We firmly said NO, these are our parameters, and we flat out refused to look at ANYTHING that was $10,000 over our budget. WE knew what we could afford, not the Agent…..we ended up firing him, and got another agent, and found our perfect little home. We’ve been in this home for about 10 years now…..and I couldn’t be happier.