Can a family go Vegan? How do you pull it off?

I have a friend whose husband wants the family to start eating vegan. My friend isn’t quite sure how to pull it off.

Vegan is different than vegetarian. Some might say it is an extension.

From Vegan.org:

“why VEGAN? Veganism, the natural extension of vegetarianism, is an integral component of a cruelty-free lifestyle. Living vegan provides numerous benefits to animals’ lives, to the environment, and to our own health–through a healthy diet and lifestyle.”

“what is a VEGAN? A vegan (pronounced VEE-gun) is someone who, for various reasons, chooses to avoid using or consuming animal products. While vegetarians choose not to use flesh foods, vegans also avoid dairy and eggs, as well as fur, leather, wool, down, and cosmetics or chemical products tested on animals.”


On making the transition to Vegan:

“EATING VEGAN In starting the transition to a vegan diet, there are a few different strategies. Some people shift into a vegan diet slowly, starting with vegan ‘analogues’— plant-based foods whose taste resembles animal products. Others simply take out the animal products from their diet and replace them with plant foods with which they’re already familiar. Still others concentrate on experimenting with entirely new vegan foods, often from international cuisines. Thankfully, there is no shortage of vegan foods to help make the transition. In fact, most of the food we eat is vegan, without us knowing it!”

These are my mom friend’s concerns:

  1. She has three young children and she wants them to eat their meals. If she goes too far into left field the kids won’t eat and won’t be getting the nutrition they need.
  2. She is regularly a very health-conscious cook. She is very into natural ingredients with little additives. She is concerned by products that don’t occur in nature.  So the so called “analogues” mentioned above scare her! She doesn’t want to use plant-based foods that resemble animal products.

So she is looking for advice and recipes about how to make this healthy transition for her family without it being too complicated, without it creating holes in her children’s nutrition, and without it being gross – ie products that are fake and man-made as substitutes for animal products.

I think this process is more doable than before thanks to the internet. I think a mother wanting to do this would have to spend a lot of time reading articles, looking at websites and sorting through recipes to find ones that her family would be willing to accept.

I did some more poking around on the Vegan.org site and it has a lot of good information and links out to other sites – such as restaurants that serve vegan.

I found advice for replacing eggs in recipes as well as basic foods a family can start with. Some of the stuff was pretty obvious — a peanut butter and jelly sandwich.

I think it gets harder when you try real recipes and not just individual foods.I stopped by yesterday and my friend was making a birthday soup for her husband with peas and zucchini. It’s tough to make a creamy soup without any cream! She was also making his birthday cake vegan — again icing is really tough if you’re not using dairy products. She was still working on it when I left. It wasn’t quite right.

Has your family made the transition to vegan? How did you do it? Do the kids mind? Did it hurt their nutrition – ie were they getting enough protein from other sources? How did you measure? What is your advice for families trying veganism out?
Would you consider veganism for your family?

124 comments Add your comment

DB

September 15th, 2011
12:44 am

No vegans or vegetarians in my house. We’re far too fond of dairy products, steak and seafood. It’s good to be at the top of the food chain. :-)

PS: Happy birthday, MJG!

[...] Can a family go Vegan? How do you pull it off?Atlanta Journal Constitution (blog)Veganism, the natural extension of vegetarianism, is an integral component of a cruelty-free lifestyle. Living vegan provides numerous benefits to animals' lives, to the environment, and to our own health–through a healthy diet and lifestyle. …and more » [...]

Theresa Walsh Giarrusso

September 15th, 2011
1:02 am

Happy Birthday MJG!!!

A reporter Nedra Rhone is looking for parents to talk about when kids act up in public (the news peg is the woman who was arrested after her son laughed in a Dekalb County Library – her trial starts this week).

I’m searching for parents willing to talk about the unpredictable nature of kids, how they deal, etc.

Anyone interested can email or call me at 404-526-5465. or email Nedra.Rhone@ajc.com

Megan Watson (@veganwtsn)

September 15th, 2011
1:13 am

Of course a whole house can go vegan! Who does the grocery shopping? Who does the cooking? That’s right! Mom! While I tend to disagree with her choice on not using the grain-meats as a transition food, I do understand that she doesn’t want to eat “fake” meats. Vegans don’t eat anything FAKE, if anything our food is MORE real and natural than other chemical laced animal products. She does need to get her hands on some Earth Balance buttery spread for that cake though! Earth Balance was my gateway to veganism. seriously. Once I had a replacement for butter, I was ok. It is really not that different tasting than any of those other tubs of margarine, but without the dairy!

So here’s the challenge for Mom: making delicious tasting meals that her family would love. Use whole based ingredients, fresh vegetables (especially the ones they already eat and hide the rest), and beans! If they are not eating grain-based meats, beans will be a great source of protein. My husband doesn’t like all vegetables, but I encourage him to try them each time I prepare them differently, but the onions and tomatoes get pureed before he seems them and he’s ok with that. Oh, and Colleen Patrick-Goudreau’s books will provide many recipes that are whole foods based (no “fake” meats) but she does use tofu and tempeh. Tofu can be cooked in sooooo many different ways. I swear, every time I cut up the Wildwood Baked Tofu and want to eat it cold, I say, this could be the tofu to convince someone to like tofu. It is firm and flavorful! I think it can be done! Go Mom for standing up for her values and wanting to feed her family right!

[...] Can a family go Vegan? How do you pull it off?Atlanta Journal Constitution (blog)So she is looking for advice and recipes about how to make this healthy transition for her family without it being too complicated, without it creating holes in her children's nutrition, and without it being gross – ie products that are fake and …and more » [...]

[...] without it being gross – ie products that are fake and … … Read the rest here: Can a family go Vegan? How do you pull it off? | Momania: A Blog … ← Vegan Food Recipes: Effortless Vegan Recipes For Fresh [...]

Jeff

September 15th, 2011
6:23 am

Wow Megan. I’m having a mommy dearest flashback. Control freak implemented with aggression. I bet your a real joy to be around. Ever yelled the phrase “no more wire hangers”?

robert

September 15th, 2011
6:31 am

42 year old father of two girls (8 and 6 yrs old) my wife and i went vegan when our first was 2 years old, so the 4 of us have been vegan for 6 years. with our oldest child only 2 it was easy to go cold-turkey. we were full-on meat eaters, and went vegan over-night. at first we thought we’d just stop eating meat, but a couple quick hours reading about the issues surrounding dairy, and we realized it made absolutely zero sense since it was nearly the same thing ethically, enviromentally, and health-wise.

anyhow, when you’re talking about a family whose kids have all kinds of horrible preferences for non-vegan items, the idea of a slower transition makes a lot of sense. nutrition whould be of barely any concern imo. so long as you stick to the core goal of eating the widest variety of whole foods with a strong emphasis on dark green vegetables you cannot go wrong.

meat eaters love to harp about b-12, but guess what? my entire family has been tested for b-12 this past year and all our levels are hunky dory. b-12 is not a vegan issue since 45% of americans are deficient in it yet only 1% of americans are vegan.

anyhow…replacing one favorite thing with a vegan alternative might be the softest way to transition. if you’re good cooks, you can make it happen in just a few months.

good luck

Aaron

September 15th, 2011
6:49 am

Humans weren’t meant to be Vegans. It was the availability of meat that allowed our brains to become as large as they are along the evolutionary chain. Going vegan is a horrible, horrible decision for a family (especially the kids).

Do yourself a favor and read The Omnivore’s Dilemma or log onto Mark’s Daily Apple.

Humans were absolutely positively designed to eat meat along with tons of vegetables, some fruit and nuts and seeds. We were not designed to eat grains as evolution hasn’t had time to adapt to modern agriculture (about 10K years).

If you’re concerned with the treatment of animals, go completely grassfed (both meat, eggs and dairy). In terms of killing animals for food, we’re at the top of the food chain. Is a lion bad for eating a gazelle? Is a coyote evil because he eats rabbits?

I hope I make an excellent meal for worms and whatever else is interested when I’m dead. Are they bad for eating me? Would you be ethically okay with eating meat if you waited until it died a natural death?

robert

September 15th, 2011
6:53 am

shunning all the mock meat and cheese stuff and other vegan convenience foods is a great goal, but imo it will make the transition a lot harde for all. vegan sausage has saved our breakfasts. before you swear off all that stuff compare the ingredients list to your average ‘whole wheat’ loaf of bread and many other things people think are healthy to eat. the ingredient list is a mile-long and includes about 30 ingredients that sond more like items you’d find in a mad scientist’s labratory rather than a baker’s pantry.

pretty much anything you buy that is not a whole food has been processed to smithereens, but the efforts to recreate everything from scratch can become overwhelming for a family with kids.

when we became vegan i was making nearly every bread product our family ate, but over the 6 years it’s been reduced to about 10% of our breads. same with lots of other things- originally i was making veggie burgers, vegan cheese, sausage, and even our breakfast cereal all from, scratch, but i feel as our kids get older, we have less and less time for all that – gymnastics, horse back riding, swimming, piano, wife’s pta, business trips, and our own fitness regimes leave me little mental energy left over to make everything from scratch.

Dennis

September 15th, 2011
6:53 am

Why would you, outside of the animal rights argument?

Much healthier option in my opinion is Paleo like Aaron mentions. I’ve heavily adopted it for myself and try to find ways to get my kids more in that direction.

I’ve found in the several weeks I’ve adopted it more strictly my energy levels are great and I get all of the micro and macronutrition I need. No blood sugar crashes a couple hours after meals because I don’t get the huge bump at meals. My meals are lean protein, fat and a lot of vegetables.

Here’s a site about how to make your family paleo:
http://everydaypaleo.com/

robert

September 15th, 2011
7:00 am

aaron – yes we ate meat for thousands of years – but we can cange our practices to save the planet – read the united nations report on the global depletion and pollution of resources cause by meat and dairy agriculture. 2500 gallons minimum of water to produce 1 pound of beef? billions of tons of sewage and methane production? etc etc etc. it takes about 20 minutes of reading to locate about 50 other very solid environmental reasons to swear off meat/dairy.

catlady

September 15th, 2011
7:01 am

I eat little meat, but I do use eggs (produced by my own organic, well-cared-for chickens.) I have discovered a dairy that is more in line with my thinking, and get the gallon of milk I use each month from them. I intend to get my butter there, too.

I don’t go in for that “textured vegetable protein” (ie Wham from the whump of a whog) because why mimic what I don’t support?

I think it is very important to stay away from processed foods, which form a large percentage of most people’s diet.

I grow many of my own vegetables organically and rejoice that I can do so (although in the heat of this past summer I was questioning whether it would kill me or not.)

I like the stuff in Animal, Vegetable, or Miracle, in the Flexitarian Diet, and in Diet for a Small Planet and its followups.

shaggy

September 15th, 2011
7:09 am

I didn’t evolve to the top of the food chain, just so I can eat tofurky and sprouts.

Actually, I propose that the Paleo (caveman) diet is really better for you, since humans never were vegan in the first place. It is argued that our big hominid brains got their protein fueled evolutionary break, when we increased our hunting/scavenging of meat.
So, vegans over time, will devolve into something like a cow.

Plus, who is to say the vegans aren’t being “cruel” to those spinach plants, when they whack them for their barbaric feast. If I was a plant, I would be stocking up on poisins to keep those evil, cruel vegans from cutting my vascular throat.

Chesley

September 15th, 2011
7:19 am

Check out vegangal.com. We are nearly vegan and the kids are definitely a challenge We are somewhat lenient with them especially when it comes to school lunches etc. The only animal products we eat at home are the eggs from our 6 chickens (no cruelty involved).. calcium fortified oj, vega whole health optimizer, raw meal substitute are great supplementals.

Victor

September 15th, 2011
7:28 am

I would like to point out that our hunter-gatherer cavemen ancestors didn’t live very long lives. Also, there is no connection between increased protein intake and IQ. Einstein was vegetarian, as well as many, many Nobel lauretes.

The Paleo diet is something from our past. A vegan diet is our future.

shaggy

September 15th, 2011
7:32 am

I would like to point out that hunter-gatherer cavemen ancestors lived long enough and procreated so their decendants could come up with stupid stuff like rap music and cruelty to carrots.

If we forget our past Paleo diet, we are condemned to become antlered deer that like rap music.

shaggy

September 15th, 2011
7:34 am

Oh, Einstein is not smarter than Stephen Hawking, who tosses down a steak that has been run through a blender.

Jeff

September 15th, 2011
7:51 am

When I sit back and watch, I find it pretty funny that vegans, environmentalists, mother-earth types, etc use the same tactics and arguments of persuasion as many religious extremists. The possibliity that I could live my life different from yours always leads to the conversation that I need to be “enlightened” of what you call your facts.

Christine

September 15th, 2011
7:53 am

Our family went vegan when our first son was born – we wanted to raise him in a way that reflected the current state of this planet, which we mostly fail to acknowledge in our everyday lives. It’s been almost 3 years and it wasn’t nearly as hard as I had anticipated.

We do eat mock meats occasionally for convenience, but I like your idea of trying to get away from those.

We have tofu almost every night – it’s amazing how versatile it is! One of my favorite things to do is pan fry it in small pieces, then toss with a little soy sauce. My son gobbles this up like it’s popcorn. He also LOVES fruit, as do most kids, so I always try to have the most nutritious fruits in the house. And nuts are a lifesaver – protein, good fats, lots of variety, and kids love them. Soy milk is whole food and can be modified with cornstarch to make soups creamy. And tofu can be whipped into a cheese-like spread.

Our favorite cookbooks: Veganomicon and Vegan Cupcakes take over the World (and everything else that team writes), Vegan Soul Food, asian cookbooks, and the Ultimate Uncheese Cookbook.

Lastly, I want to say a few words about ice cream. What would childhood be without it? :-) Coconut based ice cream (we like a brand called Vegan Decadence, which many people would see as a contradiction in terms) is amazing. My dad, who is an ice cream fanatic (the cow milk kind) even eats it willingly.

What's up...

September 15th, 2011
7:57 am

…with all the guys commenting today…

TallMom

September 15th, 2011
8:03 am

I have no issues with how people want to feed their families…definitely a personal choice.

I can, however, spot a vegan family from a mile away. They seem to think they’re very healthy for the way they choose to eat but almost every vegan I have ever seen looks sickly…various reasons why they look sickly, but they do.

I’m a firm believer in “moderation” when it comes to all foods. Eliminating one food group completely is not healthy. It just isn’t. There is ZERO (unbiased) medical evidence to suggest veganism is a healthier lifestyle.

Patricia

September 15th, 2011
8:13 am

It’s easy but does require organization and planning,e.g., remembering to soak beans overnight and keeping a full pantry. It may take a little time to read labels at first, but once you figure out which products are vegan, it’s easy! We also have a great cast iron wok. I cook a lot of dishes like chili, lentil stew, vegetable soup in large quantities (stock pot full) and then freeze them in containers large enough for a family meal. Then it’s a simple matter to pull containers out and thaw them for meals. Add salad, bread, and dessert. Pasta is another easy meal. A helpful hint is to strat boiling the pasta and then about 3 minutes before the pasta is cooked thrown several cups of vegetables (broccoli, carrots, peppers, cauliflower,etc) into the boiling water. It will all be done at once…drain, add sauce (there are several good vegan pasta sauces), and toss together. We’ve eaten a vegan diet for ten years. We also have the limiting factor that we don’t do chemicals, MSG, natural flavorings, etc. either. So we eat very little food that comes in a box (processed food). We also grow our vegetables in our own garden. If we can do all that — anyone can eat vegan at home.

DB

September 15th, 2011
8:14 am

@Victor: Cavemen died “young” because they had no doctors/medical science. The diseases that killed children — chix pox, measles, mumps, etc. — were rampant, a scratch or a puncture wound could get infected and mean death within a week, an appendix would rupture, cancer would run its course quickly . . . to assume that a caveman’s diet wasresponsible for his life span is ludicrous. They got a lot more exercise than a sedentary person these days, too — are you going to say THAT killed them, too?

Patricia

September 15th, 2011
8:15 am

I meant to add that we almost never have tofu — yuck. There are tons of other sources of protein. How in the world did vegans get the reputation of living on tofu!?

Glenn

September 15th, 2011
8:18 am

Any evolutionary “digestive tract” -”canine-teeth” argument must fail. In the ancestral environment we ate meat out of necessity, but this says nothing at all about what is good for us to eat today. Because food was in short supply and famines were common in the ancestral environment, humans evolved to crave more salt and sugar than is healthy for us in todays environment, where food and calories are plentiful. But it makes no sense to continue doing something that is unhealthy for us today just because it is part of our evolutionary history — like eating lots of salt and sugar or meat– just because when we lived in the cave, it was healthy for us to eat as much of these things as we could get our hands on. Evolution doesn’t make us eat meat. We choose to eat it or not.

Sylvania

September 15th, 2011
8:23 am

To each his own, I guess. Vegans run the risk of having vitamin B12 deficiency. I’m sure most vegans have done their homework, are aware of this, and compensate accordingly. B12 is found only in animal products, and a lack of B12 can lead to anemia and blindness. B12 deficiency in pregnant and lactating women can lead to neurological disorders in their children.

Toby

September 15th, 2011
8:23 am

I am vegan… my mother is vegetarian… my neighbors are vegetarian. It is not difficult to be vegan: it may be socially challenging for of those of a sort of weak disposition, no disrespect to them, but it is straight forward. If you don’t want to fund murder you can easily avoid it; you should, everyone should… it’s actually cheaper, healthier & greener to be vegan too.
All it takes is some vegan multivitamin (everyone should take multivitamins anyway, they’re online & that cuts off access for some, but they are not expensive compared to other multivitamins), protein like lentils or one of the many great meat-substitutes (I love lentils will Earth Balance & sea salt), veg, fruit, carbohyrdrates, a little oil & you’re living like you should!

paige

September 15th, 2011
8:24 am

If Einstein was a meat eater time travel would be more than just a theory. His brain was only working on 2 cylinders.

Glenn

September 15th, 2011
8:25 am

This cartoon is for Tall Mom. She thinks vegans look sickly! Compared to what? Ha !

http://goo.gl/TFXys

JB from East Point

September 15th, 2011
8:26 am

Robert – there is another way to avoid all the pollution and cruelty factory farms generate that Aaron is trying to point out. Sustainable agriculture for meat and veggies is needed. It’s not just meat production that generates a huge environmental impact, but the commodity crops of corn, grain and soy that are also very bad for our environment. Grass fed meat, dairy, and eggs are very sustainable and don’t generate the same environmental impact, nor do the animals endure the same hardships.

Adam & Eve

September 15th, 2011
8:28 am

`
Animals were not eaten in the Garden of Eden. — (Genesis)
.

Toby

September 15th, 2011
8:29 am

To reply to some common cocerns: murder is unethical, fullstop, coyotes & wolves included… non-human animals also rape… it’s wrong, fullstop, however natural rape, murder & slavery are, they’re bad.
Veganism is important because suffering is bad & well-being is good. We evolved with rape & murder & we should stop raping and/or murdering. Something being natural is not always good: vegans are healthier than omnivores, going vegan is the single greenest thing someone can do, and most importantly it’s the most ethical move because the murder victims deserve far better & avoiding murder is not technically difficult.

robert

September 15th, 2011
8:34 am

Sylvania b-12 deficiency has nothing to do with vegans – approximately 1-2% of the american population is vegan, yet over 40% of the population of the united states is estimated to suffer from b-12 deficiency. if anything, i’d guess that vegans suffer from it a lot less than omnivores do because it’s constantly brought up as proof of the deficiencies of the lifestyle, thus they are more consciously consuming it or taking a supplement that contains it.

jarvis

September 15th, 2011
8:34 am

If God hadn’t intended us to eat animals, he wouldn’t have made them out of meat.

Dennis

September 15th, 2011
8:35 am

To avoid the entire ideological discussion of vegan versus Paleo versus any other system of eating and address this in a more generic format, you can change your family’s diet in any way. It takes the parents to largely agree on what type of food will be in their home and what their family will eat at home.

If there’s food you don’t want your family to eat – whether it’s potato chips, ice cream, bread, meat, etc – don’t have it in your home and eat more meals at home. When kids are hungry, they will eat what’s available.

Obviously, kids have a lot of chances away from home to eat other food – which once they get to a certain age, you don’t have control over. If you have a teenager who wants to eat meat or whatever food is forbidden at home when out with friends – he or she will. But they may come to buy into their parents methodology and agree that it works for them and makes them feel well.

I’m not a fan of “Substitute” foods in any diet – whether you are in a Gluten free, low carb, Low fat, or Vegan diet. If there are foods that you shouldn’t be eating – you need to not eat them! If you switch from cookies to “low fat” cookies you are just switching from fat to probably higher sugar or sugar alcohol content to make the food taste like it should. Gluten free breads are made from a different grain which you could react to as well.

Overall, I’m also in favoring of eating a real food diet. That means eating food that your great grandparents would recognize as food and not spending your life eating out of boxes. When you eat from boxes – you are introducing a whole host of ingredients to your body that you would never cook with at home and probably are not good for you. You are also handing over control of you and your family’s diet to a company that doesn’t have your best interests in mind (their goal is to have you eat more of their products!)

Me

September 15th, 2011
8:36 am

Sorry, but no way we give up the foods we so dearly love!

NikNak

September 15th, 2011
8:38 am

One of my very favorite memories of childhood was cake and ice cream at birthday parties. You don’t want to be the weird kid who’s mom drops off their own “special” cake to a birthday party (aside from allergies).

Didn’t an infant die of malnourishment recently bc the mother refused to even breastfeed her? Fed her soy milk and apple juice or something….

Now excuse me while I finish my chik fil a chicken biscuit. I wouldn’t trade this treat for anything.

  

September 15th, 2011
8:38 am

Normally I’ve found any time a met a person who claimed/purported/etc to be a vegan they typically have personal issues, much like any person going to an extreme in any category.

Don’t do it. It’s not healthy & not natural.

jarvis

September 15th, 2011
8:40 am

@robert, I’m on board. I will try to eliminate methane emissions one cow at a time.

The Carnivore

September 15th, 2011
8:40 am

We are all all meat household. The kids have whole milk, chicken, turkey, and roast beaf, while we rotate between the four food groups: Filet Mignon, London Broil, NY Strip, and Porterhouse. There are three full-sized grills on the back deck plus a barbeque pit in the backyard where we roast the pigs every so often.

The neighbors are vegan, and their kids sneak over at night to eat the scraps we leave behind, because their lives suck.

paige

September 15th, 2011
8:43 am

More proof that vegans brains don’t work properly. Have you ever met one that wasn’t a democrat? They also all believe in global warming. Just a bunch of fools trying to be different.

Gordon Kelley

September 15th, 2011
8:44 am

Being vegan is easy. I’ve done it for nearly 6 years, and am the main cook for my family. In the debate over veganism, most people (as in, many of the commenters here), miss a key point in the debate over vegan vs omnivore: the difference between the principle of eating meat and the reality of how the vast majority of meat is produced. I’m not vegan because I don’t like meat or because I think eating animals is immoral on principle — I’m vegan because nearly every animal raised for food today experiences intense suffering in large factory-farm agribusiness operations. Once I realized this, I knew I could no longer support it. And this is why many people are vegan. I don’t think the debate over whether eating meat is “natural” will ever be conclusively decided, but I do know that billions of animals are suffering greatly their entire lives right now, and that’s why conscious, compassionate people should avoid purchasing those meat and dairy products. To me, buying a piece of meat or a dairy product that is very likely to have been created via substantial suffering is immoral. It’s not the eating of it — it’s the support of cruel behavior involved in producing it — that’s immoral. It is possible to obtain meat and dairy from small farmers who truly treat their animals well, but it is expensive and not widely available, thus not widely consumed, and therefore insignificant in this debate.

I feel so sad, outraged, and helpless when I see people Just Not Care about really awful suffering by the animals that end up on the dinner plate. I’m not an animal rights activist (though I do sympathize with their goals, of course), I can’t stand PETA, and I don’t support violence in the goal of reducing animal suffering. I’m just a guy who will no longer choose to support the abysmal experience of animals on factory farms. And I want you to consider these questions for yourself.

I’ve said it many times and will repeat it here: compassionate people should avoid buying animal products from factory farms.

Visit http://www.veganoutreach.org for a level-headed approach to this issue. I also encourage you to read “Eating Animals” by Jonathan Safran Foer, and “Animals as People” by Gary Francione.

Lady Strange

September 15th, 2011
8:47 am

I have no desire to be vegan. I like meat and dairy and will continue to eat it and so will my family for as long as they choose to. If you want to be vegan or vegetarian or whatever, good for you, that’s your choice.

Bella

September 15th, 2011
8:48 am

Wow, there are alot of pro-vegan posts from men. I love it posters reproduce like rabbits!

PS: I love my all carnivore diet. Veggies are for pansies. ;)

JB from East Point

September 15th, 2011
8:48 am

paige, I’m neither a vegan nor a democrat. I am a republican and an enviornmentalist. I believe the earth is warming, but not from man made causes. Does this mean we should not treat our animals ethically? Should we not grow our food locally and put less chemicals into our air and water? Would we not be better off without the man made waste polluting our envionment. Whether the warming is man made or not is a moot point, as a population, we are stressing the planet and need to live more sustainably.

Bella

September 15th, 2011
8:50 am

Gordon, Robert, Dennis, Toby, Glenn, Aaron, Victor, Chesley ……

What male name will be used next?

Billy Kidman

September 15th, 2011
8:59 am

Everyone on this blog is the biggest idiot I have ever seen.

*beatitnerds*

stephanie*L

September 15th, 2011
8:59 am

While I am not vegan, I do enjoy some amazing recipes you can find at peasandthankyou.com as well as the blog writer’s new book- Peas and thank you. Sarah is a mother who transitioned her family to a vegan diet and all the recipes she has created are delicious and nutritious

shaggy

September 15th, 2011
9:00 am

Wouldn’t it suck to be an arrogant, “preaching” vegan, which conststutes most of them, and suddenly realize that the planet is not going to join hands in a circle and sing kumbayah…unless we are roasting meat on an open, wood fire.
That sizzling juice smell and flavor brings people together, plus world peace seems attainable after some pulled pork or a juicy hamburger.