Too sad after watching 9-11 anniversary coverage

I watched probably more than six hours of CNN’s coverage of the 9-11 anniversary yesterday throughout the day. I cried until my eyes were sore and red. My head hurt, and I just felt completely spent. (I can’t imagine how the families who lost someone felt!)

We had good talks with the children. They basically knew what happened but it was interesting for them to see the memorial and the families affected. They found it hard to believe that the kids we saw on the TV were babies when they lost their mother or father in the tragedy.

Walsh couldn’t understand how the terrorists got weapons on the plane. He’s flown many times with us and said with all those metal detectors and body searches how could anybody sneak anything on the plane? We tried to explain that those measures were because of 9-11, and they didn’t use to do that.

Rose was only a few months old when the attacks happened. I was sick with a cold and was at the doctor’s office when the first plane hit. Michael was at home with the baby. I rushed home and he left as quickly as he could to get to work to help. Of course I was worried the CNN Center, where his office was, would be hit too. (When he covered the Olympics in Salt Lake City later that winter I also was very worried!)

We worried about our friends and colleagues that we had worked with in New York City years before. I hoped the editors I had worked closely with were safe and wondered how my former boss got home to her kids in New Jersey.

We loved living in New York City and visited the Towers with friends when they came to town. There were glass ledges you could lean forward on and feel like you were standing on air. (I can’t remember which tower or which floor but I remember doing it.) It’s awful to think about people coming out the windows to escape the smoke and fire.

On a slightly brighter side, I loved the new fountain memorials. At certain angles, it looked like the water coming from the top made lines that looked like the outside of the Trade Centers. And I liked how the inner box looked like the towers collapsing only for the water to return to the top and start anew.

Around 9 p.m. the DVR switched channels to record two more 9-11 shows, and Walsh and I just couldn’t take it anymore. We were too sad and we asked Michael to please turn the channel. (Walsh did like a show yesterday about how they were rebuilding the towers. He thought it was fascinating how they got the concrete up 60 stories and how the construction workers walked the beams in such high wind.)

I had planned to go tonight to hear former CNN anchor Aaron Brown speak at Arizona State University about his recollections from anchoring the attack. I’m not sure if I will go now. I’m not sure I can take anymore sadness.

Did you watch the coverage yesterday? Did you watch with your kids? Did you feel sad or happy to see the memorial built and the tower rising from the ground? What were your kids’ comments or thoughts about what they were seeing? What questions did they ask? How did you answer?

55 comments Add your comment

penguinmom

September 12th, 2011
2:02 am

Watching the coverage brought back a range of emotions – sorrow for the victims families; amazement at the strength those same families displayed then and today; pride remembering how Americans responded to the tragedy; and a small sense of the unity we had on that day. Even the football games with their remembrances and the chants of USA! USA! that rang out after the national anthem were poignant reminders of what we as a nation lived through, where we were then and where we are today.

Only my eldest has any memory of the event; but he was only 5 1/2 at the time. I recorded a documentary tonight to show all the kids. They all saw small bits of the memorials today but we will sit down later this week and watch the documentary so I can more fully explain it to the younger two.

I do like the memorial in NYC, I think it was really well done.

V.P. Joe Biden

September 12th, 2011
6:27 am

The stimulus is working! We’re doing a great job………

catlady

September 12th, 2011
6:39 am

I watched none of the coverage. (I watched none of the “anniversary” coverage over the years of JFK being shot, for that matter.) Seems to me that making a spectacle out of it trivializes it, somehow. I remembered, sadly.

shaggy

September 12th, 2011
7:09 am

I too started crying after about 2:00 PM, when I had taken all I could take.

Yes, I watched the Falcons season opener…a disaster, but I couldn’t keep from watching it, like the car wreck that you just have to look at.
After the Dawgs loss on Saturday, yet again to the evil genius, Steve Spurrier, and a bunch of S. Carolina chickens, (my dog likes to chase chickens) I had a serious, emotional, overload of football panic, by Sunday afternoon. Thankfully, I had enough beer to get me through.

The singing of the National Anthem before the Falcons, was one of the best I have ever heard, at any event. They should have punctuated the pre-game show with a F-18 flyover. Whoever the singer was had a serious set of pipes on him.

Oh, I refuse to let terror rule me. These colors (Red, White, & Blue) don’t run. Never have. Never will.

A

September 12th, 2011
7:24 am

Just wondering why you watched 6 hours of coverage, especially with how emotional it all was. I listened to just a few minutes on NPR and had to turn it off. I vividly remember that day and will never forget, but I didn’t think there was any benefit to listening/watching all-day coverage of this.

motherjanegoose

September 12th, 2011
7:26 am

I traveled most of yesterday but did catch some clips at the hotel and in the airport. I was, once again, impressed by the young man with the red bandana. I read the story last week and heard it on the radio yesterday. He saved other’s lives but lost his own. He had apparently always wanted to be a fireman and in the end he was. He laid his life down for others. My mother also died 16 tears ago on September 11.

Jeff

September 12th, 2011
7:30 am

I saw a few minutes in passing through the room. I didn’t want to get the feeling the commentators were were being fake emotional, which they often seem to do. A low and behold, as I pass through the room, there is Nancy Grace’s replay of her comments on the actual day of ht event. But, not to worry, it just reinforced that my opinion of her is still correct.

Besides, I can’t sit and put myself through hours and hours of something that I know is going to make me unhappy. Why do people do that to themselves? It’s almost like some people are actually trying to go out and find something that will make them cry.

Sara

September 12th, 2011
7:50 am

I avoided the coverage as well. Watching it in real-time ten years ago was plenty. Instead, I took my kids to the park, ate dinner with them, and reflected with my husband on what had happened in the past ten years–for us and for the country.
I knew that if we watched coverage–my emotions would blind me and I wouldn’t be able to reflect clearly. Next year, our kids will be old enough to participate with us in a service project. So that is our plan–much more useful than watching the media put their own spin on tragedy.

redhousecat

September 12th, 2011
7:51 am

I agree with Jeff. The media coverage was overkill. I doubt very seriously any true American will “forget” that day. All the sadness yesterday made us look like a blubbering weak country that can’t get over a single day of attacks. I would have preferred the media portray our country as the strong nation that we are, and that that day only made us stronger. But hey, this “poor me” society we now live in prefers the wallow in the sadness.

lulu

September 12th, 2011
7:52 am

I watched bits and pieces. I truly thought I was far enough removed at this point, a decade later, to get through the day without tears. I was so wrong – and I watched less than 30 minutes. And at this anniversary, as they replayed all of the clips of important people saying how we were going to get vengeance, I couldn’t help but think of the hundreds of thousands who have died since. Looking back now, that retaliation just makes me even more sad.

I could not force myself to watch any actual news coverage yesterday – I read the articles, I looked at the pictures, I rewatched a little bit of CNNs coverage from ten years ago (a little bit was all I could handle). Watching all of the political posturing, commercialization, and faux unity just made me ill.

acts of war

September 12th, 2011
7:54 am

I can’t dwell on the Towers too long or I get boiling mad, and want to attack some innocent arab country with smart bombs and B52s and send in thousands of marines and just kill everything in sight. I still don’t feel avenged. And when a stinking third world country like Syria or Lebanon or Iran looks sideways at the US, I. WANT. WAR!!!!

Revenge is a dish best served bold!

Nuke Iran.

Jeff

September 12th, 2011
8:07 am

Thank you lulu. You said exactly what I was attempting to say.

Jonathan

September 12th, 2011
8:12 am

Sounds like you got sucked in by the media and wasted 6 hours of your life because you thought you were “supposed” to watch it to remember and “never forget”. Congratulations, you may now join the flock.

motherjanegoose

September 12th, 2011
8:20 am

The part that I do not understand is how often people live their lives without any evidence of spirituality. When tragedy hits…they feel the need to pray and ask God for help. Kind of like your own kids completely ignoring you but then crying out when they urgently need something. Of course, I would help mine but I would prefer to have had a bit of a relationship all along. Just my opinion.

HB

September 12th, 2011
8:21 am

I can’t take any more and did have to my TV off after about an hour of the Ground Zero service yesterday morning, but I thought the media coverage I saw was good for the most part, but that could be because I limited my viewing/reading. The Washington Post did an incredible series last week following up with families, survivors, and heroes of that day (mostly connected to the Pentagon attack). The only truly trivial story I saw was on the Today show about children from across the country who happened to be born on 9/11 who seemed to have been told that made them extra special little beacons of light.

PHR

September 12th, 2011
8:31 am

I watched 2 specials on HBO yesterday. I loved one of them that told some stories of heroism. It touched me in a good way. The other was a memorial with clips of 9/11/2001 from lots of different cameramen. It was touching and I did cry. But then I turned it off and went about spending the day with my family. I wanted to remember and commemorate.

MrLiberty

September 12th, 2011
8:34 am

Acts of war’s comments seem to be the perfect symbol of everything that went wrong with america that day. No appreciation for the violence we had been committing all over the middle east since at least 1948. No appreciation for the estimated 1.5 million innocent Iraqis that died as a result of the sanctions imposed on their country in the mid 90s. No appreciation for all the Iranians who suffered and were killed by the Shah after our CIA deposed their democratically election leader in 1953. No appreciation for the impact stationing troops on the holy land of Saudi Arabia had on muslims worldwide. No appreciation for the hundreds of thousands of innocent Afghanis, Iraqis, Pakistanis, Yemeni, Somali, Libyans, etc. that have been killed by our troops, our drones, and our bombers. Innocent citizens that not only had nothing to do with 9-11, but never supported the beliefs of OBL or frankly had any ideas one way or the other about america.

It is certainly much easier to lash out at innocent brown people thousands of miles away rather than face the reality that your own government’s actions over the past 60 years have provoked such unbelievable anger that others would be so motivated to commit that kind of destruction.

But then american exceptionalism has always been the rule.

People used to say “9-11, we will never forget.” A more appropriate saying would be “9-11, we will never learn.” The attrocities we have committed over the past 10 years in the middle east and the vast numbers of terrorists these actions have inspired will likely motivate generation after generation of muslims to want to do us harm. But then, for the military-industrial-police state complex, maybe that has been the point all along.

Yes, yesterday was an especially sad day. It is truly sad to see what your great country has become.

Tunedout

September 12th, 2011
8:50 am

I didn’t watch any of the 9 11 coverage. Frankly I had enough of it. I found the commercials alone advertising the coverage to be enough. It was in our family just another Sunday to enjoy. Life goes on. I feel for the families..but even for them life must continue.

Tunedout

September 12th, 2011
8:54 am

At those making comments about “we will not forget”..why isn’t 9 11 a national holiday for ALL Americans killed by terrorist acts Worldwide(ex bombing,beheadings,etc…)?

  

September 12th, 2011
8:55 am

It is certainly much easier to lash out at innocent brown people thousands of miles away rather than face the reality that your own government’s actions over the past 60 years have provoked such unbelievable anger that others would be so motivated to commit that kind of destruction.

No one is “lashing out” at “innocent” people.

Perhaps you have no concept of right, wrong, and what it means to be an American citizen.

I find it disgusting when people, who live under the guise of being an American “citizen”, justify terrorism.

Lady Strange

September 12th, 2011
8:59 am

I didn’t watch any of the TV coverage. I spent the day with my family, enjoying what little time we have together in this world. I can remember that day without watching it on TV, especially for 6 hours.

JJ

September 12th, 2011
9:01 am

I’ve been recording some fascinating documentaries on National Geographic, and I’m watching them one by one…….I watched football yesterday, and the man who sang at the Atlanta/Chicago game was off the charts!!!!!! He does have a set of pipes on him. Everytime I hear the National Anthem, I stand with my hand over my heart and sing along. It drives me C R A Z Y to hear anyone talking during this beautiful song.

Jesse's Girl

September 12th, 2011
9:19 am

I was in New Jersey when it happened….just across the river. It was so vast and so all encompassing…all of the burrows got hit with debris “rain fall” of some sort. Even across the river…you could smell the disaster. It was the most horrific thing I have ever been a part of. No one will ever forget.

JOD

September 12th, 2011
9:37 am

I watched just the opening of the memorial with the bagpipes and the Brooklyn youth choir – it was beautiful, then the 102 minutes documentary. It stirred a lot of new emotions since I am a parent now, but wasn’t in 2001. After that, it was outside and Dad’s birthday – great weather and a nice day with family. It’s important to remember, but also to grab what we have while we have it. Carpe diem :o)

DB

September 12th, 2011
9:42 am

I watched it — I turned it on just before 8:46, and watched it until about noon, remembering each time the bell chimed how I felt 10 years ago, watching the second plane hit, watching the towers collapse in horror, knowing how many people worked in each tower. (It has always amazed me that it was “only” 2,800 people killed in that attack — it could have been sooo much worse.) And yes, I cried as the names were read out and relatives would pause for a moment in the readings to add their own personal “we miss you and love you” after reading their names, and wedging flowers and taking etchings of each name on the bronze memorial plates. I learned some new things — I hadn’t really heard the details on the boat evacuations, so that little vignette was interesting, and I found myself drawn to a story about the SAR dogs. And I watched with amazement the honor guard at the Pentagon — those men and women stood there for almost an hour at a hard parade attention, with their arms held out holding a bouquet for each memorial marker for each person killed at the Pentagon. Try to stand still with your arms held straight in front of you holding something, no matter how light, for that long. Then each person, by ones and twos, gently laid the bouquet on the memorial they were attending, made a crisp turn and walked away. It was beautiful.

There’s something about a 10 year anniversary that seems to be a major hurdle — I doubt there will be as many big remembrances from now on, since the memorial is now in place and there is a focus for memories and remembrance.

@JJ & Shaggy: I’d second that on John Christenson, the singer of the National Anthem at the Chicago/Atlanta game. That was absolutely the best Anthem performance I have ever heard, hands down. No “la-la-laaaaaaa’s!” or screeches thrown in because a singer doesn’t have the insane range that the song demands — that song rolled out of his throat with feeling, enunciation and power. I was crying half-way through it from the sheer beauty of it. It made Lady Antebellum singing at the Jets game look weak in comparison.

Teacher, Too

September 12th, 2011
9:46 am

I watched only a bit of the coverage. I was annoyed with CNN– they talked too much instead of letting usten to what was being said.

I teared up with the moments of silence. As the bells chimed, I thought about the heroes of the day, the United 93 heroes, the first responders, and all those who passed in those terrible moments and aftermath. I found it incredibly moving, and I think the memorials have been constructed with grace and beauty.

Finally, I appreciate that President Clinton and House Speaker Boehmer are working in a bi-partisan manner to raise money to complete the Pennsylvania memorial.

Kat

September 12th, 2011
9:47 am

I didn’t watch any of the coverage, and changed the radio stations when any news break happened. I don’t need to be reminded because I will never forget where I was and who I was with when I heard about the attacks.

What I did instead: Went to the store and bought a new flag. On 9/11/01, I left the house and went and bought a flag to hang up. It just seemed to be the right thing to do. Yesterday, I did the same thing. We then took our children to the Field of Flags at Kennesaw Mountain and among the (almost) 3,000 flags, our children put their hands over their hearts and said small prayers. We spoke a little bit about what had happened (in children’s terms), and why the flags were important.

If any of you can make it to the Field of Flags at Kennesaw Mountain, you should try to go and see the display. Very moving, indeed.

Kat

September 12th, 2011
9:52 am

Having said all of that, I cannot imagine watching any type of news coverage that upset me. Is it supposed to make you a “better” person or American by watching it and crying, especially with your children? If so, more power to you. But, that dwells on the sadness, and I’ve passed that stage (the Band-Aid is off now and that wound has healed for me). In my opinion, we need to know what is being done now to prevent a similar situation (or something far worse). And, what’s going to happen in the future.

Crying at this point is useless and pointless in my hard-edged way of thinking of things. If a relative had died, I would feel differently. I grieved for those families then, and I pray for strength for them now. But, we need to realize that what we’ve done so far (outside of killing OBL) is not working and our economy is in the toilet.

JJ

September 12th, 2011
10:10 am

@DB His name is Jim Cornelison. He is a Tenor, and sings the National Anthem & O Canada at the Chicago Blackhawks Hockey games.

Denise

September 12th, 2011
10:12 am

I got this on email today:

We respectfully mourn the dead and extend sympathies to their loved ones and families in our prayers and thoughts about 9/11. There were those who died by surprise and abruptly, and those who died heroically doing their jobs as expected of them, and those who died in the simple human compassion of attempting to help others even though it wasn’t their job. The finest tribute, perhaps, for all those people is for the rest of us to live life boldly and unafraid, to build and to explore, to protect our freedoms and to extend our help. After all, our “day” in the U.S. is neither September 11 nor December 7, but rather July 4.

As for me, I didn’t watch any coverage. Didn’t need any of it to remember and didn’t need to cry to feel the impact of the anniversary. The attack on our soil made me sad and our response and its effects still make me sad, regardless if we think it was necessary and appropriate. (That is not a conversation I engage in.)

penguinmom

September 12th, 2011
10:36 am

I agree that I personally don’t need to watch the coverage to remember but we have a generation coming of age that doesn’t remember. It is history to them like the Vietnam war, Civil rights movement, WW1, WW2, etc. They have no personal experience of it and need the reminder of what happened that day because it did change so much.

I have a former student who has completely bought into all the conspiracy theories about ‘no plane hit the pentagon’ or ‘military/cargo planes instead of passenger planes’. I want my children to see some of the original coverage so they can see the truth for themselves.

I had a friend on FB complain that there were fireworks at an event in Cumming (the annual Forsyth Family Fest). They felt that fireworks were inappropriate on Sept 11. I felt that we can’t change what we do completely just because it is the anniversary of 9/11.
Any thoughts?

DB

September 12th, 2011
11:16 am

@JJ: Thanks — I knew it began with a C and ended with an “son” :-) When I typed “Christenson, it didn’t look quite right, but I was rushing off to work, and figured I had messed up an “e” with an “a’” or something . . .! By all means, let’s give Mr. Cornelison every bit of credit that he is due!

Re: Crying or lack thereof. I don’t think it necessarily means anything pro or con — I just empathized with the families reading the names of their loved ones, tried to imagine how I would have handled it if it had been me — and my eyes got a little damp. I also cry at sappy movies and ASCPA commercials. :-)

I LOVE...

September 12th, 2011
11:21 am

everything shaggy says (types or whatever). You are my dream husband. xoxoxoxoxo

MrLiberty

September 12th, 2011
11:26 am

“I find it disgusting when people, who live under the guise of being an American “citizen”, justify terrorism.”

Isn’t that what we have been doing for 10 years now? Justifying the terrorism we have been doling out all over the middle east under the guise of being Americans.

The original comment from “Acts of War” was : “I can’t dwell on the Towers too long or I get boiling mad, and want to attack some innocent arab country with smart bombs and B52s and send in thousands of marines and just kill everything in sight.” Sounds like “lashing out at innocent brown people” to me. And the reality is that whether you call it “collateral damage” or some other palatable phrase that makes you feel better, we have been dropping bombs into neighborhoods, shooting up families, and starving and allowing millions to die with our government-imposed sanctions. 99.9999% of these people have been completely innocent with regards to the acts committed on 9-11. That they are attempting to protect their country from foreign invasion and occupation but are called terrorists, only underscores the “american exceptionalism” that now pervades our mindsets.

jarvis

September 12th, 2011
11:37 am

@Mr. Liberty, an author lashing out….really? That’s the best you have?

malleesmom

September 12th, 2011
2:19 pm

@redhousecat – my thoughts exactly. I watched zero coverage.

I agree with Neal Boortz...

September 12th, 2011
2:23 pm

…today he said he read multipe newspapers yesterday about the “rememberances” (he also said that to use the term “anniversary” for the 1o0th year post 9/11 is a misnomer, since “anniversaries” designate happy occasions) and not one newspaper mentioned the word Muslim or Islam as being responsible for the destruction…he compared that to Dec. 7, 1941, and this year will be the 70th remembrance of that “day in imfamy”, which we have, and still call, the day the JAPANESE attacked a U.S. naval base in an act of war…

Becky

September 12th, 2011
2:32 pm

I watched about 20 mins or so of The 102 Minutes special..I thought the coverage was really good on that..I didn’t need to see reminders to help me remember it, but my two little ones wanted to see some of it..They are only nine, so they thought it was good to see the little that they did see..

As others have said, it was sad and I didn’t want to out myself through being sad again..I watched minute by minute coverage when it first happened..I didn’t go out and buy a flag, I have had a flag for years..

I visited ground zero in 2002 and that is a sight that I will never, ever forget..We took flowers and were there for about an hour..I think I cried the entire time..

Oh, Please!

September 12th, 2011
2:34 pm

I am sad that people have also forgotten about the tragedy in Fort Hood.

Most have forgotten … and we keep letting people invade our country due to our horrific immigration policies. Those of you that support illegal immigration have most certainly “forgotten” All this politically correct, compassion, and letting the World’s lowest common denominators invade us on a daily basis is destroying the US, bit by bit!

Most of you show more compassion towards our enemies than you do to your neighbor down the street. You should really be ashamed of yourselves. Hope you shed some tears yesterday, albeit the fake crocodile type!

Nick

September 12th, 2011
2:34 pm

I did not watch the 9-11 anniversary coverage. Can not handle it. Never will.

Scooby

September 12th, 2011
3:43 pm

I can’t imagine sitting in front of my television for 6+hours reliving such a tragedy. I remember it everyday. The 10th anniversary wasn’t any different.

JJ

September 12th, 2011
3:54 pm

@OhPlease – I bought a commerative surgical steel NFL Atlanta Falcons bracelet, which proceeds benefited the victims of Ft. Hood.

Oh, Please!

September 12th, 2011
4:06 pm

@JJ You are so full of it! You basically made fun of a decesaed friend that died at the hands of that Muslim terrorist. Hope you enjoy your cheap laugh at his expense. You are the epitomy of what I was refering too. :(

Becky

September 12th, 2011
4:10 pm

@Oh, Please..I remember the shootig at Ft. Hood..We remember a lot of things, yesterday just happened to be an anniversary for 9-11-11..More than the Twins Towers for 9-11, I remember that it was 21 years ago (on 9-11) that my Mother passed away..

I have family and friends that is in the Military, so I think of these things a lot..They fight for my freedon daily, so yes, I cried..Not crocodile type tears..Do you feel better now? Also, during the next election, when I see that Oh, Please is running for President, I’ll be sure to vote for you..

FCM

September 12th, 2011
4:41 pm

I set the DVR for 120 Minutes that Changed America which was on the History Channel. It seems to be the most comprehensive of what happened…The kids did find it depressing, even with me skipping some of it.

One child was 21 months and the other was a few weeks in the womb (though we did not know it yet) when the event happened. I was working for Delta at Hartsfield the time and remember it all vividly. Well, I thought I did….I had forgtten the people jumping, and that was the hardest to explain to the children.

At our church we did an interfaith remembrence service yesterday. Jews, Christians, and Muslims under one roof…with a luncheon of fellowship following. It was a moving experience to hear the Iman call us to worship in Arabic…and to have the Rabbi do prayers with the Shofar being sounded.

in fact, I was pleased with everything until my minister stood up to talk about Communion. We have an open table that allows all BELIEVERS to step forward…..he flat out said “It is just bread, it is just grape juice. We do not portend that it is transcended into something else”

UH YEAH WE DO EVERY OTHER SUNDAY SO WHY NOT TODAY, PHIL?

To me, his having to justify communion, to make it less than what it is set….was an apology for being a Christian, and let those terrorists on the plane win! Too me the trivilaizing of the sacrement by my minister was the most depressing part of the day.

catlady

September 12th, 2011
5:01 pm

FCM, what type church do you go to? I cannot imagine denigrating the communion. Yes, it is grape juice and bread, but when do we use the word “just”?

FCM

September 12th, 2011
5:05 pm

Catlady, thank you that was what got me….the “just” it is not just anything….and he said it more than once.

Actually I am Disciple of Christ…5th generation to be brought up in that denomination….and Communion as part of Sunday service is a big part of our spiritual life.

At my church yesterday, FCM...

September 12th, 2011
5:06 pm

…the message was mainly that America has gotten so politically correct that “we” would rather offend God by not continuing to remember that the U.S.’s motto is “In God We Trust” – created in 1953 or so by Congress, rather than offend the 8% of the U.S. citizenry who proclaim to not believe in God…

fk

September 12th, 2011
6:35 pm

I put my flag outside and went to 9 a.m. mass. I watched some programs off and on during the day. I did watch the 2 hour program that started off as a documentary of a fireman in training. Two of my classmates from high school lost brothers that day. One was a police officer and the other a fireman. Each of them left a wife and three kids. There are a few streets in my hometown that have been renamed in honor of residents who died in the line of duty that day. Since then, many more lives were lost because of what occurred on that day. It is a day of remembrance for those lives lost, but, to me, it is also one of gratitude for those who serve us. We live in a great country, and we still have so many people overseas as well as here, protecting us. Life goes on and the day should be a reminder for all of us to take nothing or anyone for granted. Appreciate those around you and let them know how much they mean in your life. So many people left their homes that day thinking it would be business as usual.

DB

September 12th, 2011
9:36 pm

@FCM and catlady: As a Protestant denomination, and from what I know of DOC, it sounds as though your minister was trying to make point, in a clumsy way, that their belief is that the grape juice and bread is a considered only a representation of the Body and Blood and that there is no belief in transubstantiation (i.e. that the consecration of the communion creates a change that conforms with Jesus’ words at the Last Supper (”this is my body, etc., etc.”) In the Roman Catholic faith, of course, transubstantiation is a precept that accounts for the substance and appearance of the bread and wine (the real stuff, not grape juice :-) as the Body and Blood.

Still, it’s a little mind-blowing to hear a minister dismiss communion so casually. I’m Episcopal, and communion is one of the hallmarks of our worship service each week, too. (with wine :-) I simply cannot fathom one of our priests casually dismissing it as “just wine and crackers.”