Kids who live with smokers miss more school

Children whose parents smoke miss more school than classmates with non-smoking parents possibly because of a rate of higher respiratory infections.

A study, recently reported in the journal Pediatrics, found that among nearly 3,100 families in a national survey, children who lived with smokers missed an extra day out of the school year, on average.

They also tended to have more ear infections and chest colds than their peers.

While scientists say the study doesn’t prove that parents’ smoking itself leads to more absenteeism, doctors hope it will encourage parents to quit the habit.

From Reuters:

“The researchers estimate that the extra school absences linked to smoking cost parents $176 million in lost wages in 2005 — assuming a working parent stayed home each time a child was sick.”

” ‘Since almost half of the smoking households in our study had low incomes,’ Levy noted, ‘that impact may be strongest on households least able to afford it.’ ”

” ‘Overall,’ the researchers write, ‘these results illustrate the extent of tobacco’s impact on child and family well-being, highlighting academic disadvantage and financial burden in families in which parents smoke.’ “

Do you buy the findings of this study that seem to link second-hand smoke with kids missing school? Would that study help you give up smoking? Would realizing the economic impact of the kids missing school help parents give up smoking?

57 comments Add your comment

Me

September 7th, 2011
6:52 am

Well, I can’t win here, but I’m gonna say this anyway. I have two sisters..one who smokes, one who doesn’t. The sister who smokes also feeds her kids healthy all natural foods ( I know it makes no sense)…meanwhile, the other sister..the one who won’t let smoke near her house…feeds her children whatever processed junk they can find. Guess which kids are sick ALL the time. Meanwhile, my smoken sister’s kids get maybe one cold per year. How is that? Luck?

Me

September 7th, 2011
6:54 am

Don’t smoke so can’t really say although I think the findings to be plausible. Also not sure if this only applies to those who actually smoke within their house and/or vehicles. Seems it wouldn’t be as much of an issue provided the kids aren’t exposed to the second-hand smoke.

Me

September 7th, 2011
6:56 am

The are now two of us using “Me” now?

Jeff

September 7th, 2011
6:59 am

Sometimes there are two me’s as well. But I try to keep one of them confined to my head.

Karma

September 7th, 2011
7:13 am

Smokers are “renters” who wear white after labor day.

Karma

September 7th, 2011
7:30 am

I am not a renter. I have been foreclosed on…in 2004. It wasn’t because I couldn’t afford my payment. It was because I spent too much on crack and lost my Burger King, Jr.Assistant to the French Fryer Manager, position.

motherjanegoose

September 7th, 2011
7:32 am

My husband grew up in a smokestack house. He had a bad respiratory illness a while back and could hardly breath. They took x-rays. The Doctor asked him, ” Do you smoke?” He replied, ” No.”
Apparently his lungs looked so bad that they indicated he did. He will now carry this with him forever.

45 and some change

September 7th, 2011
7:42 am

My mom smoked until she found out she was pregnant, with me and my 2 siblings. As soon as she delivered, she lit right back up. She still smokes until this day, just less and confines it so the grandkids can’t see (they know!). My concern is that she has been smoking for so long that, if she quits, she will get sick. Can’t tell you the number of lifelong smokers I know that have cancer or lung issues as soon as they stopped, it is like the tobacco was a preservative that kept their body going.

Me nor my siblings smoke. Experimented as teenagers but never picked it up. We were never sick as children, except for your normal childhood diseases (chicken pox, mumps) and never remember any chronic illness that kept us from school, etc.

My kids don’t get that sick. Try to eat healthy and eat right. We all seem to be fairly healthy. The biggest offender are the sick people in public and in schools. I try to stay clear of the Dr’s office except for well checks and major illness (again, rarity). It’s the insanitary practices and stubborness to go out in public coughing and hacking that makes me mad.

My mom swears that more sickness is environmental these days. Kids not getting outside enough and our homes being so energy efficient locking in the germs. This is coming from a smoker, but I think she could be right.

JJ

September 7th, 2011
8:02 am

I grew up with my Dad smoking, at home and in the car. I very rarely got/get sick. Neither did my brother.

I hate smoking. I think it’s gross and disgusting. I find nothing attractive about anyone who lights up. I will not allow smoking in my home or my car, or around me. If you want to smoke, go ahead, but don’t do it around me. I’m VERY adamant about that. I hate smelling like smoke…..

catlady

September 7th, 2011
8:20 am

For almost 40 years, I have seen this to be true. You would be surprised how many parents of asthmatics smoke! I choke on the smoke, both tobacco and dope, that adheres to the clothes and backpacks of so many kids when they arrive at school. You know, if someone can smell your car before they arrive, and smell it after it leaves, YOU NEED TO GIVE IT UP!

NikNak

September 7th, 2011
8:40 am

When I was in grade school, the kids who reeked of stale cigarette smoke were treated like lepers. Nobody could stand to be around the stench, so they usually ended up playing alone. My friend who is a 1st grade teacher admitted to me that one boy in her class smells of smoke SO much that she had to move him to the back of the class near a window bc she couldn’t take it anymore. I’m not saying that it’s right, but it really is disgusting and you could be setting your children back socially and academically if you let them smell like an ashtray.

Techmom

September 7th, 2011
8:44 am

My dad finally stopped smoking in the house/car when I was a kid when the allergist told him he could not smoke around me. I was surprised and thankful that doctor read him the riot act. I doubt an article would have made him stop but the doctor calling him out at least made him stop smoking in confined spaces and around non-smokers.

yuki

September 7th, 2011
8:57 am

My mom smoked until I was about 10. She smoked in the house, car, you name it. . She also smoked while pregnant with my sister and I both (they didn’t “know better”). Then, she went in for gallbladder surgery and quit cold turkey. I was never sick. My sister has asthma (so does my dad). So, in our case it’s hard to say. I “socially” smoked in college and after until the day I found out I was pregant and have not smoked since, and never will again. It disgusts me now…it makes me wonder how I ever smoked in the first place. I would never ever smoke around my kids or anyone elses and in this day and age I can’t fathom how anyone else would either!

jarvis

September 7th, 2011
8:57 am

My dad was a smoker, and I had HORRIBLE alergies as a kid. They were at their absolute worst in our home. The “scratch” test I had done at the alergist in my teens revealed I was allergic to over 100 different things including smoke (and roaches for that matter?).

I now have almost none. Don’t know if I grew out of them post-puberty or if my lungs and auto-immune system were finally just given a break.

Denise

September 7th, 2011
9:12 am

I don’t know if it was being a preemie, living in Baton Rouge, LA around chemical plants, or living with smokers but my immune system and respiratory/sinus system sucks. I was sick for a week from sitting in a casino for a few hours with my mother. I will say that I believe that being around smoke for any amount of time does affect me and always has so I can believe the hypothesis of the study. What I think is bogus is the whole statement that smokers are low income. Unless they are saying that because cigs cost a lot, there is even less disposable income, I don’t see the correlation. What about the old rich men and their expensive cigars? I’m sure one of the expensive cigars cost more than a $7 pack of cigarettes. But I think it’s ALL disgusting. ALL. OF. IT.

jarvis

September 7th, 2011
9:14 am

You know it wouldn’t be me if I didn’t point out how the study is flawed. The comparison on days missed is against the U.S. population as a whole, but then it admits that a very high percentage of the homes in the study were “low income”.

I think you’d have to see how the days missed compare to smoking homes vs. non-smoking homes inside of income brackets to get a clean comparison. Obviously children in the lowest income homes are dealing with many factors outside of smoking that other income groups may not be dealing with.

Lori

September 7th, 2011
9:20 am

Never smoked, never plan too. I don’t get it at all. Of course, I’m deathly allergic to many different scents and smells, so a puff off a cig would put me in the ER. But I’ve been around little babies who reek of smoke. It breaks my heart. I actually saw a woman at the movies one day with a newborn in one hand and a cigarette in the other. If you want to make yourself sick, go ahead, but please don’t smoke around your children. This study may not be great, but there is plenty of evidence that smoking is bad and second hand smoke is bad, so why would you subject your children to it? My father in law lived with a chain smoker. He’s never smoked a day in his life, but now he can’t get health insurance because of COPD!!

oneofeach4me

September 7th, 2011
9:23 am

@Jarvis ~ “Obviously children in the lowest income homes are dealing with many factors outside of smoking that other income groups may not be dealing with” That is exactly what I was thinking.I also think that kids entering daycare before school years should be taken into account also due to be exposed to illness and the building of their immune systems.

As for me, I smoke and I am not proud of it. I began at age 23, quit with both pregnancies and during breastfeeding, and then began again once no longer doing so. So out of the past 12 years I have smoked about half the time. However, I DO NOT smoke in my house, nor around my kids, nor in my car. I DO NOT smoke around other people’s children, nor in their house. My friend smoke’s in her house saying “as long as the window is open it’s okay”. NO it’s not, I will go outside. It is my choice to smoke, but it shouldn’t impact nor effect my children.

My kids probably miss one day of school a year due to sickness.

jarvis

September 7th, 2011
9:26 am

@Lori, I’ll top you there. I was at the Cracker Barrel one day and saw a greasy woman eating with fork and lit cigarette in the same hand.

I tried to replicate the action at home with a pencil and a fork for dramatic effect while telling my wife the story, and I couldn’t even work out holding both objects with my fingers. Apparently she was very dedicated.

motherjanegoose

September 7th, 2011
9:31 am

It is very sad, to me, when the children reek of smoke. I have worked with several ( at one time) who smell like shampoo, conditioner, fabric softener and then WHAM cigarettes. Most often, they are unaware of the odor as this is what their house smells like. I hate in, while on a plane, when a smoker sits next to me. They reek of cigarettes. Not much I can do but it makes for an uncomfortable flight in close quarters.

DB

September 7th, 2011
9:45 am

So, the study shows that kids of smokers tend to miss one more day of school than kids of non-smoking parents, and the study tries to extrapolate and say, “since parents have to stay home with sick kids, this has more impact on low-wage earners.” EVERYTHING has “more impact” on low-wage earners. These are also the parents who are more likely to send their kid to school sick, anyway, because there’s no alternative child care and they can’t miss work. And frankly, if you’re that far on the end of the low-wage scale — WHY ARE YOU WASTING MONEY ON CIGARETTES?!?

Both of my parents smoked while I was growing up, but they subsequently quit — my mother quit soon after my mild-mannered husband refused to allow her to smoke anywhere near him or our house, to the point where she was smoking outside during a snowstorm in Connecticut. :-) She, too, had a few respiratory issues during surgery a couple of years ago, when the doc felt like her breathing was compromised, even though she quit 20 years ago. I didn’t really have too many colds, etc. growing up, and I don’t really mind the smell of smoke, but my husband HATES it, as does my kids. Just standing on a street corner waiting to cross a street outside a Falcon’s game one year,
as everyone was getting one last smoke in, she had a rare asthma attack from all the second-hand smoke — and that was outside. (she had childhood asthma, but had pretty much outgrown it — but now she is very careful to stay away from smokey places.)

JJ

September 7th, 2011
9:54 am

I only have one co-worker who smokes. After he smokes, he comes into my office just reeking. I told him he was no longer allowed in my office right after a cigarette…..he was more than welcome to stand outside my office, but not to come in. I cannot stand that smell…..and it lingers.

NikNak

September 7th, 2011
10:08 am

I also find it funny when I’m walking through the airport and I see the smokers behind those glass doors, all crowded together like cattle. Very demeaning, I would be embarrassed to be seen in there! Same thing at sporting events. It could be 30 degrees during a Thrashers game (er, Jets game) and there are people standing outside in a fenced-in area because they couldn’t go 3 hours. Yeesh.

Denise

September 7th, 2011
10:09 am

It makes me laugh how new quitters complain about the smell of smoke. Really? What do you think YOU used to smell like? (Clothes, skin, hair, BREATH!!!!…criminal!) My mother doesn’t smoke anymore since her husband has quit (after throat cancer!) and is now very sensitive to the smell. I just shake my head. I used to wear dirty clothes to my mother’s house (the same clothes I wore over there the day before) when she smoked indoors so I wouldn’t contaminate ALL of my clothes.

Becky

September 7th, 2011
10:32 am

Wow, where to begin..I grew up in a house that was full of smokers..Mom, Dad, brothers and sisters..Out of ten children in my family, there were only 3 that didn’t smoke..I was (am) one of them..

I hated it and would beg my family to quit..Never happened..My oldest brother quit after about 20 years of smoking..The only reason that my Mom finally quit is because she had cancer and couldn’t walk and could barely breath the last five years of her life..

I now have sinus problems so bad that I usually wind up with an infection every year..My family never comes to my house, because they can’t smoke in my house or in my car..If I go to any family functions at their house, they ALL have to go outside to smoke..Have two sisters that always sound like they are coughing up a lung most of the time.. Yet both of them are very quick to tell me that smoking doesn’t stink and that it’s not bad for you..DUH..

Like JJ, I have a coworker that goes out about 5-6 times per day to smoke and then walks right back in our office like nothing..I flat out told her that she can’t do that anymore, just the smell of her when she comes back in is enough to make me gag..

justmy2cents

September 7th, 2011
10:47 am

I grew up in a household of smokers, and I missed 2 days of school total- because I was out of town visiting family. Our household growing up was low income and we ate crappy, cheap food.

As an adult, I am an ex-smoker. I never smoked in the house or around my kids, and they too, are rarely ill. The current household is not low income.

Now when they go to my folks’ house, they come back reeking and usually coughing for a few days. I hate letting them spend the night, but it is their grandparents. They know the routine. We call them when we are on the way, and the hop in the shower, and their clothes are in sealed bags. As soon as we get home, all the clothes go into the washer, and they hop right back in the shower. 5 adults with 1-2 pack a day habits can really put out a lot of smell!!!

motherjanegoose

September 7th, 2011
11:18 am

The last time my son visited his smoking grandparents was 10 years ago. He had a lot of problems with his sinuses without adding smoke into the mix. We live over 1000 miles away and had frequently asked for smoking to be done outside while we were there. Yes, they promised it would be.
We never stay with them but in a hotel. When we got there, they smoked inside. He came home sick and after many prescriptions he ended up having sinus surgery when we got home. That was his last trip to see his grandparents. Too much of a hassle when you travel that far and come home ill. I will not make him go somewhere where he knows he will get sick.

JOD

September 7th, 2011
11:26 am

I think smoking is just foul – not only does the smell linger, but it is SO pervasive! 1 set of neighbors smokes outside – why would they stink up their house?! – and the smell hits our screened-in porch like a wave. God forbid the windows are open! I get so mad on beautiful fall days when they’re outside smoking or burning leaves (or BOTH) when I have my windows open…

@justmy2cents – I always dreaded going to my Aunt and Uncle’s house, since they smoked inside. My poor cousin always smelled like an ash tray; I wonder if she was picked on in school? I know I had to wash my hair twice after coming home. They probably still smoke inside, but being an adult is great :o) I just see them at other places.

catlady

September 7th, 2011
11:30 am

I am going to make a statement that many will find upsetting. A large proportion of our “underachieving” kids have parents who smoke. Disproportionately. Could be an income thing–as said before, smoking TENDS to happen more with lower-income folks.

I watched a mother in law and my mother die of lung cancer. The MIL did not quit until she was diagnosed. My mother had quit about 15 years earlier, but the seed had been planted and nurtured for about 40 years so the damage was done. Both of them immediately said, “I have lung cancer BUT NOT FROM SMOKING” although the type of cancer it was is highly associated with smoking. Watching someone die of lung cancer is terrible.

The years my mother was smoke-free were wonderful. I had told her how badly the packages she sent me smelled–I would have to open them outside and air out what she had sent for days–but it was not until after she quit and she would get packages from my aunt, that she would say,”I don’t know what kind of cigarretts your aunt smokes, but they sure do smell bad. I have to open packages from her outside before I can bring them in.”

When I have had morning duty at school sometimes cars will pull up and as they disgorge the kids you can SEE the smoke pouring out of the interior of the car! It does not “brighten the bulb.”

Bwana

September 7th, 2011
11:34 am

My mother in law is 71 and has smoked since being a teenager. She smokes in her car and house and my wife and I have to go visit her for Christmas Holidays. We don’t unload our clothes from our car into her house because within 5 minutes, they reek. I hate going there for Christmas as it ruins my holiday. But, she isn’t going to stop and I guess we won’t stop going to her house for Christmas either. My parents smoked when I was a kid, as did everyone elses parents, and we turned out okay and didn’t miss school very often. It was the times then. Now, there are definitely fewer people (parents) who smoke for sure and that’s a good thing. It’s a huge dis service to the children because they reek of smoke and can’t help it. I feel sorry for the student who had to be moved to the back of the classroom because the teacher couldn’t deal with it. That sucks.

Wayne

September 7th, 2011
11:38 am

Wow, this brings back memories. I grew up in a smoker’s household. Mom and stepdad both smoked. Dad did too when he and my Mom were married. Ever get the chance to clean walls and ceilings in a smoker’s household? I did. Yay. I tried smoking (yes, even after all that cleaning) and thought WTH? People enjoy this? I had/have allergies and I think they were worse when I was living at home. Didn’t miss work or school and we weren’t exactly rolling in dough.

I recall, after getting divorced years ago taking my dog (at the time she was the ‘granddaughter’ to the folks house for dinner every Sunday. I had to leave early every time in order to give the dog a bath, and for me to take a shower. Yech.

Carter

September 7th, 2011
11:47 am

Grew up with chain-smoking parents. In the home, in the car, you name it. As a small child, I wasn’t conscious of the smoke. However, around the age of 9, I was very aware of the smoke because it made me choke. I literally could not breath around it. My sister and I constantly implored my parents to quit. The smoke affected our breathing, we got numerous ear infections and other sicknesses, and maybe worst of all our clothes and hair reeked of that awful smell where we would sometimes get teased in school.

This upbringing really affected us as adults. My sister and I are now in our late thirties. We NEVER touched cigarettes, cigars, or any other smoking substance. I do not allow smoke anywhere near me or my children. We lost our mother to LUNG CANCER in ‘97, and just lost our father to LUNG CANCER three months ago.

If any smoking parent is reading this, I BEG of you to please not smoke around your children. It’s hurting them. And as difficult as it may be, please get serious about quitting. Give yourself a chance to be around to see your children and even grandchildren. Thank you.

Speaking of lingering smoke smells...

September 7th, 2011
12:24 pm

…don’t you just hate it when you wait for an elevator for a long time and when it finally arrives no one is on it, yet it reeks of a recently let out fart; and then, because you know that, if you get on, it will stop on the next floor and 5 or your co-workers (or even strangers) will get on and think it is you? I just let the elevator doors close and wait a while for another one…and this goes for the elevator smelling like B.O, perfume, smoke, and any other toxic smell…

motherjanegoose

September 7th, 2011
12:25 pm

It is interesting to hear Neal Boortz talk about smokers…this is not new but his take:

http://www.instapunk.com/archives/InstaPunkArchiveV2.php3?a=371

Laura

September 7th, 2011
12:33 pm

I believe people that hang out in drug stores get sick more often than those who don’t (because they are exposed to all the other sickies). I believe people that hang out in grocery stores, weigh more than they should (because they can’t shut their piehole). Also believe that people that hang around stadiums and other sports venues really like to drink beer (so they can talk real loud and advertise their ignorance).

The American Cancer Society has raised lots of money for its directors and employees since its inception in 1913, but yet it has not eliminated ANY type of cancer. They have NO interest in curing cancer, only in keeping their gravy train rolling. The same can be said for the Heart Association, Breast Cancer, et al.

So before you wrap yourself in a tea-stained flag and lecture me about what I can do with a legal substance, on my time in the privacy of my child-free home, sod off. I hate the smell of your perfume that fails to disguise the smell of your soul rotting.

Grandma

September 7th, 2011
12:45 pm

I’m not saying it’s right, but I smoked through both of my pregnancies. “They say” that babies born to smokers have lower birth weight. Both of my kids were over 8 lbs. I also smoked around them at home. Both got awards for perfect attendance almost every year, and they never had any medical problems other than the occasional cold or stomach virus, like every other kid in school. I know I was wrong, but “way back when” it wasn’t considered a no-no to smoke during pg. or around others. Now when I smoke, I go outdoors, since I live with my non-smoking daughter.

Grandma

September 7th, 2011
12:47 pm

P.S. One bad thing that has come of my smoking is bladder cancer. (Yes, it is attributed to smoking.) Luckily it was caught early, and taken care of.

Why Income?

September 7th, 2011
12:52 pm

What I don’t understand is what does income have to do with smoking? I’ve been up and down the income ladder…I’ve been riding high, and I’ve been at poverty level…smoking all along the way. It’s an addiction, and no matter how much you make, you’ll find a way to get that addiction fed.

trystme

September 7th, 2011
12:55 pm

I see that this is a sensitive subject for a lot of us. My parents chain smoked in the house and car and I’m sure that I always smelled like smoke. Every adult that I knew smoked and kids started smoking as soon as they could. My parents provided the cigarettes to my brother, then to his two boys. I smoked for a little while too but never really took to it like others.

Many of my family members have died from either lung cancer or COPD. My father died in 2006 of COPD and one of his last acts was to be wheeled outside so that he could smoke.

I was sick a lot as a child with many ear, sinus and respiratory infections. I still have a chronic cough. I have no idea if it is because I grew up always being around smoke, but I’m sure that it didn’t help.

Momma Mia

September 7th, 2011
12:58 pm

Do what I did. If you MUST smoke, try one of the new electronic cigarettes. It’s like a nic patch in that all you get from the e-cig is nicotine…none of the carcinogens, etc. and the “smoke” you blow out is actually water vapor. I’ve been using one for the last 6 months, and haven’t smoked a regular cig since. I can even “smoke” it in hospitals, stores, and most every place that doesn’t allow smoking (except airplanes). I was laid up in the hospital after heart surgery, at which time I was given a nic patch…so I decided to use my e-cig while lying in bed (no chance of catching the bed on fire since the “fire” at the end is just a red light), and my doc was really excited about it. He “borrowed” it to show other patients that were having nic-fits.

Caroline

September 7th, 2011
1:14 pm

My son has a friend that sleeps over sometimes. The house that child comes from, I swear, they must smoke a carton a day and close up the house so tight that no smoke will escape (and they wonder why the 2 year-old in the house has asthma). I will wash the little boys clothes as soon as he comes over (his pj’s for the night and the clothes he’s to wear the next day) without him knowing (he’s too busy playing LEGO’s and Xbox with my son to notice). HE STINKS!!!! I never let my son sleep over their house simply because of the smoke.

I used to work at an office where 3/4 of them would smoke and take about 5 smoke breaks a day. They would all come back into the office reeking of cigarette smoke, so I’d keep Febreeze or a candle lit at my desk.

My mother smoked when I was a kid and now whenever I smell a kid that smells like a bar, I can imagine what I smelled like when I was their age. I saw a pregnant woman at Wal-Mart standing outside smoking…I could have smacked her.

Tommy Chong

September 7th, 2011
1:22 pm

Shut up and hit the bong already

DLink

September 7th, 2011
1:27 pm

I really don’t think people realize the environment they live in. My plumber brother called me one day in sheer amazement, during rush hour commute in Atlanta. He said, “I’m on a high rise and you wouldn’t believe the expressways! I-20 and I-85 have a thick layer of yellow smog over them like a pair of cross-hairs over the city, it’s unbelievable.” I don’t think I’d be quick to blame smokers for the amazing increase in people with asthma, while the number of people who smoke are getting fewer.

Witness the number of people in this very blog who come from a “smoke free” atmosphere, yet their children, themselves are asthmatic, and can’t tolerate smoke and other smells. Half my family smokes, one non-smoking family both kids were asthmatic, two kids living in Washington state aren’t. Both other families smoke, and one of the 5 kids are asthmatic. The two asthmatic kids moved to rural Midwest – asthma went away.

We may or may not smoke as families, but we all live in smog, whether you have a chance to see it as my brother did, or not. While you can try to protect your children from every possible adversity… it can’t be done. 4 people die in traffic every day in an average year in GA. Wearing a seat-belt can help, it won’t change the facts. Shootings, murder-suicides, it’s an environment in which one’s “immune system” has to learn to defend itself from in all aspects. And over-all it’s not something someone will always be there to protect you from.

Hedley Lamarr

September 7th, 2011
1:27 pm

Smokers are morons.

It's disgusting and pathetic!

September 7th, 2011
1:32 pm

I’m SO glad that the smoking population has died down considerably as more people have beoome EDUCATED.

Many smokers fail to realize that they STINK! There is nothing attractive about being SMELLY, having YELLOW teeth, niootine-stained lips and fingertips, wasted tastebuds, and talking RASPY.

I curse the day that this country made cigarette smoking legal. It’s LETHAL to YOU and to EVERYONE ELSE you come in contact with! You allow yourself to be a SLAVE to toxins. You are paying to DIE! Set your toxic-laden body FREE!

For the love of HEALTH, get yourself some HELP and quit TODAY!

mountain mom

September 7th, 2011
1:35 pm

My mom was a smoker, and it was awful (the smell, the ashtrays, driving in the car, etc.). I was stunned when my brother started smoking in high school after living with that. I have shared with my kids that if they can make it to age 20 without smoking, they very likely never will. Ask any smoker when they started, and 95% will tell you it was as a teenager. If tobacco companies say they don’t market to teens, they are full of it. They have a narrow window to hook their next generation of addicts, and when your product kills off a half million of its users each year, you have to keep the recruitment machine humming. What’s sadly pathetic is that if you ask any teenager with a cigarette hanging out of their mouth why they smoke, they will say something about being cool or defiant or hip or whatever. Gee, that’s why my mom started smoking in the 1950s and my brother in the 1980s….. how cool is that?

pws

September 7th, 2011
1:41 pm

No one in my house smokes. However, when my oldest was a baby, we would go visit her paternal grandparents on the weekend, and on Tuesday I would be in the pediatrician’s office with her and she would have an ear infection. My doctor asked me after the third infection if anyone smoked around her, and I said, no one except her grandfather, and he only sees her for about an hour on the weekend which isn’t much. My doctor then blasted me and said that was all it took, was just s short time for her to get the infection. He explained about how her ears weren’t developed enough to filter the smoke. We told my father in law what he had said, and he stopped smoking around her. Guess what, no more ear infections! A few years later, my mother in law who has never smoked, was diagnosed with the beginnings of emphosyema from his second hand smoke. 26 years later, he’s still smoking, but now goes outside to do so, and has since she was diagnosed. Oh, MDJ, is’ been awhile since I posted, but our youngest is in her first year of medical school. She feels so fortunate that she got in, she is one of the youngest kids in her class. The competition for medical school entrance is really intense, I’m so thankful that she didn’t have to wait another year and reapply.

city

September 7th, 2011
1:48 pm

If the study “doesn’t prove” that parents smoking leads to childrens absenteeism, then how do the “researchers” come to their “estimates” both financial and otherwise? This discussion and particularly these comments back and forth are incredibly inane.

Chanel No. 5

September 7th, 2011
1:56 pm

Laura @ 12:33 pm

Go ahead, and smoke away! However, when you are on disability or medicaid, WE refuse to pay for any of your cancer, lung, etc treatments. Which stinch do you think would bother you worse, your beloved cancer stick smoke or your rotting corpse?

Look Far East

September 7th, 2011
1:59 pm

Asia is the biggest market for cigarette producers right now. It probably ranks up high with their oil consumption. They don’t seem so smart now, do they?