Study: Giving birth at home is on the rise

Dad Days of Summer: While Momania’s Theresa Walsh Giarrusso takes a vacation, local dad and sportswriter Andy Johnston will be filling in. You can e-mail him at ajcmomania@gmail.com.

Home delivery never crossed our minds.

Andy and his son Ty.

Andy and his son Ty.

It wasn’t an option we talked about or discussed with anybody else. I’m sure it was mentioned in our birthing class, but we had always thought that Lori would give birth in a hospital.

But apparently not everybody thinks that way.

Home births were up 20 percent in the U.S. from 2004-08, according to the folks over at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. That accounted for 28,357 of 4.2 births in this country during that time.

An article on MSNBC.com reported that the study found, “White women led the drive, with 1 in 98 having babies at home in 2008, compared to 1 in 357 black women and 1 in 500 Hispanic women.”

Here’s more:

Robbie Davis-Floyd, a medical anthropologist at the University of Texas at Austin and researcher on global trends in childbirth, obstetrics and midwifery, said “at first, in the 1970s, it was largely a hippie, countercultural thing to give birth outside of the hospital. Over the years, as the formerly ‘lay’ midwives have become far more sophisticated, so has their clientele.”

The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, which certifies OB-GYNs, warns that home births can be unsafe, especially if the mother has high-risk conditions, if a birth attendant is inadequately trained and if there’s no nearby hospital in case of emergency. Some doctors also question whether a “feminist machoism” is at play in wanting to give birth at home.

But home birthers say they want to be free of drugs, fetal monitors, IVs and pressure to hurry their labor at the behest of doctors and hospitals. They prefer to labor in tubs of water or on hands and knees, walk around their living rooms or take comfort in their own beds, surrounded by loved ones as they listen to music or hypnosis recordings with the support of midwives and doulas. Some even go without midwives and rely on husbands or other non-professionals for support.

Here are some tips from babycenter.com if you’re thinking about delivering your baby at home.

If it’s right for their baby, the mom – and dad to a lesser degree — and their families, I’m all for home delivery. If people want to do it out of comfort or religious beliefs or affordability, that’s great.

I’m glad we didn’t go that route because Lori ended up needing an emergency C-section and the extended hospital stay that goes along with it.

What are your experiences with home delivery?

Do you think this is a fad, trend or do people just want to do something different?

Do you think home deliveries are too risky to try?

- By Andy Johnston, for the Momania blog

121 comments Add your comment

Julia

July 7th, 2011
1:30 am

no thanks. give me drugs

Julia

July 7th, 2011
1:31 am

Enter your comments here

mom of 3

July 7th, 2011
7:07 am

Much too risky to try. Be safe and responsible in case your baby or the mom needs emergency care.

Mrs. G

July 7th, 2011
7:52 am

I don’t know if I would want to do it because I would want to be in a hospital in case anything went wrong. I was reading about home births the other night and it is recommended that, if you are going to have one, that you live no more than 10-15 minutes from a hospital in case there is a problem. So, it would be impossible for me, anyway, as the closest hospital is 30 minutes from my house. However, I do have a friend who was dissatisfied with her first two births in hospitals (the doctors/nurses weren’t very respectful of her wishes with respect to drugs and just her birth plan in general), so she recently had her third at home and had an absolutely incredible experience. I think that it’s something that isn’t for everyone, obviously, but, for the right people, it’s the best way to have a baby.

MomOf2Girls

July 7th, 2011
7:57 am

This is actually something I am adamantly against because of what happened with my first child. She was born with major medical issues that we did not know about prenatally, and she had to be intubated within minutes of birth so she could breathe. Had we not been in the hospital, she would have died. Before she was born, I would have been considered an ideal candidate for home birth – I was young, had a low risk pregnancy, and was very healthy. The “experience” is not worth the risk of losing a baby.

Kathy

July 7th, 2011
8:01 am

I love my house, but giving birth in it is just something that I would never do.

shaggy

July 7th, 2011
8:15 am

I have no dog in this hunt.
However, you ladies might not know how the first nations peoples, and others of our aboriginal heritage (read all of our ancestors as being tribal at some time) did this.
The woman would begin labor and go off by herself, away from the tribe. She would squat, and give birth. Upon her return, the celebration of life would begin, with mother and child being honored.
Of course, many mothers, with child, never returned, but this guaranteed that only the strongest survived.
The men viewed all of this as a mystery, and way earlier in our history, the goddess was worshipped (think 30,000 years ago)above all.

motherjanegoose

July 7th, 2011
8:32 am

I would not be posting today if I had opted to give birth at home, with my second child. She would not be here either.

Years ago, people would hunt for food daily…some still do. I prefer the grocery store or a restaurant. They also pulled rotten teeth with a pliers and, some places, still do. I prefer the dentist. I respect progress most days.

mom2alex&max

July 7th, 2011
8:33 am

Hell no. People who do this always say, women have been doing this for thousands of years! Well yeah..and children and mothers have been dying of childbirth too.

While my natural selection tendencies incline me to agree with shaggy’s assessment of the First Nation’s people, for myself, I will go to the hospital, surrounded by all kinds of medical professionals and equipment.

motherjanegoose

July 7th, 2011
8:35 am

Actually, neither of my children would be here, nor would I…sorry I have not had my coffee yet.
So, I guess we are just a weak bunch?

Jeff

July 7th, 2011
8:39 am

“feminist machoism”! Bahahahaha. I am SO stealing that one.

Techmom

July 7th, 2011
8:42 am

I get the desire to not be in a hospital. It seems that out west birthing centers are on the rise. They are home-like places, mid-wives usually deliver the babies but they are also very near a regular hospital with a doctor on call. I think hospitals, doctors and nurses can be intimidating to people and instead of standing up for their birth plan or feeling like they can refuse certain things, many feel like they are pushed in a certain direction, more for the convenience of the doctor than the safety of mom or baby. I don’t think home births are ideal for first-time mothers. Maybe after having a couple of normal pregnancies and deliveries, it would be ok but I don’t think it’s something first time moms really know how they or their body is going to react.

Lori

July 7th, 2011
8:49 am

I agree with Momof2Girls…the experience for the Mother is not worth the risk to your child. I hated being in the hospital with my son. I hated the IV, I hated that they wouldn’t let me have any water, I hated the nurses bothering me every 10 minutes. But I would have hated losing my son more!! Thankfully, he was born (albeit a little early) but with no complications for him, but you just never know.

YUKI

July 7th, 2011
8:54 am

I had my son in a hospital and am going to have my next child (due in Dec) in one too. Like everyone said, I want emergency care available right away in case we have complications. I have no desire to sit in a tub, or in my own bed and have my baby (yuck). I actually enjoyed being taken care of and having my baby taken care of at times by the nurses so I could rest. And an epidural? yes, please!

homeschooler

July 7th, 2011
9:15 am

I’ve known three people who had their children at home. One was a hippie/love child whose children were born in the 70’s. One, had her children in the late 80’s. She was raised in an unusual religious community that refused most anything modern. The third was a highly educated, athletic, yuppie who just didn’t like the idea of a beautiful experience being tainted by doctors, nurses, medical equipment etc.. Each of them had two children at home with no complications and they all loved the experience. Two of them had an ambulance on stand-by in case of emergency.
I don’t get it, it’s not for me (because, in my opinion, the development of the epidural is every bit the miracle that child birth is) but, I get wanting to have more control because hospials can be very controling.
Like any time that we deal with the medical profession, the convenience of the doctors, hospital regulations etc..seem to take away from the patient’s needs and desires. (for example, I was not “allowed” to have my children in bed with me if I dozed off and I was not “allowed” to walk around the room with them.) So. I get it. But, I needed the drugs. And.. I would have been concerned about complications.
I think birthing centers are the way to go. Most hospitals have done well to make the experience less clinical.

JJ

July 7th, 2011
9:41 am

I just read that Casey Anthony got 4 years in jail.

lulu

July 7th, 2011
9:47 am

I planned to give birth in the hospital, but otherwise as naturally as possible. No OB (they were there, of course, but I saw a midwife group), no induction, no painkillers, no IV, etc. There was no reason to suspect that the delivery would be anything other than routine. Of course, it was anything but routine, and countless medical interventions were necessary to ensure survival. If we’d been at home, neither of us would be here today.

I’m much more in favor of having natural birthing centers within hospitals, which can provide the best of both worlds: a much more traditional, soothing, natural delivery process, with medical personnel and equipment immediately available when necessary.

Tonya C.

July 7th, 2011
9:47 am

I wanted a homebirth with my last, but didn’t get it due to insurance being a pain. I got a birth center birth with my second, and it was FANTASTIC! MUCH better experience than my first or third. It was pleasant, not rushed, and when minor issues arose I was talked through it and calmed. I hate hospitals and would prefer to AT LEAST have the option of a actual birthing center. But if I have a 4th, it will be a homebirth because getting childcare and the like for the other kids is more stressful than I care for.

I only have med-free births though, so pain meds are not an issues for me.

Tonya C.

July 7th, 2011
9:48 am

And there is no such thing as a ‘natural’ birthing experience in a hospital. I tried for that with the last child after a true birth center birth, and was sorely disappointed. Hospitals will always be hospitals.

JoeV

July 7th, 2011
10:06 am

You are an absolute and utter moron if you don’t birth your baby in a hospital with proper medical professionals and equipment standing by. What nonsense. How irresponsible.

My wife was born prematurely with a congenital heart defect, Tetrology of Fallot. If she had been born at home she most likely would have died. Its just not worth the risks to act like you are some special, old fashioned martyr for birthing your baby at home.

And for that matter, what the heck is wrong with people that refuse the drugs? Do you think that makes you special?

Denise

July 7th, 2011
10:06 am

Two of my friends had home births. The first had 2; the second, 3. Both had “company” during the births. I enjoy the story about the first friend’s second daughter’s birth because of how she prepared her first daughter for her labor. She told her that she would be roaring like a lion (i.e. moaning/screaming during contractions) and that when she did, the little girl should roar like a lion too. So they roared like lions while little one was being birthed and the little girl was not traumatized.

The second friend wanted to have a birthing party (yuck) for the first but she came early and quickly and in the middle of the night – no time to call friends over to enjoy the process with them (yuck). The daughter (age 2) and some friends were there for baby 2; no roaring like a lion but she was occupied and not traumatized. For baby 3, the daughter (age 6) and son (age 4) were taking pictures (yuck), giving their mother water, soothing her, etc. There were people there enjoying the experience with them (yuck). Needless to say, they knew better than to invite me over until the baby was OUT and the birthing pool was cleaned up and out of the living room. LOL!

Both of the friends said they had wonderful experiences and would not have traded them…however, neither had complications. I, for one, want to have a doctor near by in case of emergency, even though I would enjoy the comforts of “home”. I would NOT want a bunch of people around, though. And I definitely don’t want pictures. I was horrified at the pictures of the baby coming out. I wanted to claw my eyes out!

charlene

July 7th, 2011
10:07 am

Gave birth to all 4 in a hospital but there were 2 different hospitals. My 1st 3 children I had at the same hospital and it was a wonderful experience – Stephens County Hospital. The maternity area was updated to look more like hotel rooms on the inside, every room was private. And I remember they had started to offer water-birthing there too. I didn’t do that since my labors went so quickly though. The bed and equipment was the main thing that looked hospital-like. When #4 came, we had moved and so a different hospital. It was truly a hospital in every sense and I don’t even remember who was around other than my husband. She was my longest & most painful delivery too. No epidurals with any of them – too many horror stories that I’ve heard and didn’t want to chance complications. That’s the same reason I chose to have my children at hospitals also. It’s just not worth it to me. I did choose to go with midwives for all 4 though. I don’t regret that at all.

Tonya C.

July 7th, 2011
10:10 am

JoeV:

Thank you for the name-calling. Since you lack a vagina, your opinion is pretty mute. I am okay with the risks involved, and I feel that should be MY choice to make. I can accept what may happen due to my choice and have MY OWN beliefs behind it.

P.S. My grandfather died a long, slow death from a bad reaction to a blood pressure drug. So drugs ain’t always the saviors you want them to be…

JoeV

July 7th, 2011
10:22 am

@Tonya C.

Moot.

The word is moot.

It IS your choice to make. I didn’t say you couldn’t make the choice. I simply stated you are an idiot for making that choice. I am just as entitled to my opinion. People that refuse to accept science will eventually be weeded out naturally anyway.

JJ

July 7th, 2011
10:23 am

JoeV – exactly HOW many children have you birthed? You have no clue as to the pain involved in child-birth, unless you want to push a watermelon out of your penis. Then get back to us about pain meds.

chkrdr

July 7th, 2011
10:24 am

a slow morphine drip,please

JoeV

July 7th, 2011
10:25 am

JJ,

I’m curious if you read my post? I support pain medicine use. I fact, I think if you don’t use pain meds you deserve every excruciating second of unbearable pain for your arrogance.

JJ

July 7th, 2011
10:37 am

JoeV – my apologies. I just re-read your post.

I apologize. I’m in vacation mode, and they are piling the work on me today……and I just injured myself in the warehouse. I took it out on you. Again, my apologies…..

lulu

July 7th, 2011
10:40 am

JoeV – It is, of course, anybody’s right to chose whether they take pain medication or not. However, nobody should make that choice without first educating themselves on the potential risks. With IV painkillers, many people have adverse reactions that can make labor more difficult. A whole plethora of things can go wrong with epidurals.

For me, personally, the combination of the potential risks and the thought of a huge needle going into my spine led me to choose to hold out on the drugs. I also knew that, should I change my mind during labor, they would be available to me – but as it turned out, I did not change my mind. I don’t feel that the decision makes me special, but neither does it make me arrogant or a moron.

Cindy

July 7th, 2011
10:42 am

I just love the fact that people can’t state their opinions without being rude about it.
I have experienced two births. The first was a non-emergency c-section b/c I didn’t educate myself totally on the birth experience. I relied on my OB instead of my body. So…when I didn’t progress at their timetable, I gave up and had a c-section. My second was as natural as I could make it…but I had to fight tooth and nail to get my VBAC. I apparently cook my babes longer and it was a battle just to get to actually go into labor naturally and have my daughter without interventions….the only one I had to give in on was a fetal monitor. I do wish that Georgia had birth centers and that options existed for Mothers and babies. Insurance companies and OB’s seem to want to control the arena way too much. And I think the mother should do her research completely before making decisions. But really, the greatest point I want to make is that we allow families to give birth the way they want with all options laid out there. Birth isn’t supposed to be “convenient” and I hear of way too many birth choices today being made out of convenience for the doctors and mothers.

JoeV

July 7th, 2011
10:45 am

JJ

We cool. ;) Feel better!

JoeV

July 7th, 2011
10:47 am

lulu,

Won’t argue with that clear, intelligent response. But I still think you are nuts! ;-)

motherjanegoose

July 7th, 2011
10:51 am

JJ…is JoeV against meds? I did not sense that but maybe I am wrong.

I had complications with both of mine and when other women tell me they want a natural delivery or no medical intevention, I cannot comprehend. Not everyone thinks about the possibility of having a dead baby due to complications during delivery but once you have been there ( twice) you sit up and take notice of what COULD happen. I was also told that my body was a perfect incubator for birthing a child. Having the baby inside and then getting it out were two different situations.

I color my hair and get my nails done…I am not a natural person…LOL. Just curious…how natural are those who applaud a natural birth?

This is what always confuses me…those who poo poo the role a hospital plays in providing immediate medical intervention. Being 15 minutes away may not be appropriate, in some situations. Children are born every day with no trouble but why take the risk? Are you prepared to face the outcome if something goes wrong? Not something I wanted to do.

jarvis

July 7th, 2011
10:54 am

The truth is in the numbers. This is still a very low number of births.

A 20% increase up to 28,357 is less than 5,000 more births. That’s a difference between about .56% births being at home and .68% of births being at home.

Hardly an epidemic.

Jeff

July 7th, 2011
11:08 am

If we had home birthed, my daughter would not have survived. Full term, all checkups as recommended, no issues, mother healthy. Madelyn inhaled fluid during the birth process and had to go to NICU for 8 days to clear her lungs.

But. It’s your body and your choice. But recognize the risks involved. I would imagine that with all the nashing of teeth over that “poor innocent baby” over the last couple of days, you would be incredibly risk-averse.

kevin

July 7th, 2011
11:16 am

My wife is a practicing doula and studying to be a midwife. As a result, I have been exposed to copious amounts of birthing info. Ultimately, it is up to the mother to decide the kind of birth she wants; however, for those of you commenting that home births are somehow less safe, frankly, you’re misinformed.

The infant mortality rate for births taking place in US hospitals is greater than it is for home births, i.e. your child has greater chance of dying in via a hospital birth. Trained midwives have birthing plans for their clients which includes a potential hospital visit in the case of an emergency.

For some women, the process of giving birth is an important life experience. For others it seems to be a means to an end. If the latter, it seems a standard hospital birth might be appropriate. However, if the former, a home birth offers a potentially more serene, natural option.

Check out the documentary “The Business of Being Born” which offers some interesting birthing facts.

armywife299

July 7th, 2011
11:16 am

Again, we have a wide range of personality types here. We all may go to the Grand Canyon but not all will walk down to phantom ranch, or further rim to rim. But we do have people who are able to go to the ranch, and to run (not walk) rim to rim. We should have that choice, and that choice should not be taken from us. That is not the role of goverment or of doctors. And, when we make choices again, we have to accept the responsibility for those choices.

Angie

July 7th, 2011
11:22 am

I think women should be free to make the decision after educating themselves. That being said, I think a birthing center close to a hospital or having the child in the hospital is the safest route to take.

I have a background and extensive education in maternal and child health and I would recommend (and have to many friends) that you have someone other than your partner in the room with you at ALL times that is unemotionally attached to you (read: not a family member) to be your advocate. In the industry, they are called doulas. They usually are not credentialed health care providers and if they are reputable, they will tell you this up front. This person will have thoroughly discussed your birth plan with you and usually your OB knows they will be there and if it’s a decent OB, they will support you 100%. They are there to be your support and your support only but, you have someone there who can help you talk through what can be a scary and overwhelming process. If you use an experienced doula, they will have attended hundreds if not thousands of births in their career and will have seen and heard it all. I know GA has some quirky laws and may “restrict” the use of doulas but there are ways around most rules. ;-)

kevin

July 7th, 2011
11:23 am

So far, the largest and most complete study on the comparison of hospital birth outcomes to that of homebirth outcomes was done by Dr. Lewis Mehl and associates in 1976. In the study, 1046 homebirths were compared with 1046 hospital births of equivalent populations in the United States. For each home-birth patient, a hospital-birth patient was matched for age, length of gestation, parity (number of pregnancies), risk factor score, education and socio-economic status, race, presentation of the baby and individual major risk factors. The homebirth population also had trained attendants and prenatal care. The results of this study showed a three times greater likelihood of cesarean operation if a woman gave birth in a hospital instead of at home with the hospital standing by. The hospital population revealed twenty times more use of forceps, twice as much use of oxytocin to accelerate or induce labor, greater incidence of episiotomy (while at the same time having more severe tears in need of major repair). The hospital group showed six times more infant distress in labor, five times more cases of maternal high blood pressure, and three times greater incidence of postpartum hemorrhage. There was four times more infection among the newborn; three times more babies that needed help to begin breathing. While the hospital group had thirty cases of birth injuries, including skull fractures, facial nerve palsies, brachial nerve injuries and severe cephalohematomas, there were no such injuries at home. The infant death rate of the study was low in both cases and essentially the same. There were no maternal deaths for either home or hospital. The main differences were in the significant improvement of the mother’s and baby’s health if the couple planned a homebirth, and this was true despite the fact that the homebirth statistics of the study included those who began labor at home but ultimately needed to be transferred to the hospital. [Dr. Lewis Mehl, “Home Birth Versus Hospital Birth: Comparisons of Outcomes of Matched Populations.” Presented on October 20, 1976 before the 104th annual meeting of the American Public Health Association. For further information contact the Institute for Childbirth and Family Research, 2522 Dana St., Suite 201, Berkeley, CA 94704]

kevin

July 7th, 2011
11:24 am

JoeV

July 7th, 2011
11:28 am

Kevin

You aren’t telling the whole story. What about the percentage of home births that convert to hospital births because of complications, thus resulting in infant death?

What about the neonatal mortality rate? Neonatal death is TWICE as likely overall for home births and THREE times as likely for births without congenital defects.

Also, a greater proportion of deaths in home births are atributed to respitory distress and failed resuscitation than in hospital births.

This is all info from a study in the American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

Tiger Ochocinco Mellencamp

July 7th, 2011
11:31 am

@Kevin “The infant mortality rate for births taking place in US hospitals is greater than it is for home births, i.e. your child has greater chance of dying in via a hospital birth”

That may be statistically correct, but as Jarvis points out, the numbers can skew things. So out of 4,200,000 births last year, approximately 4,172,000 were performed in hospitals and 28,000 at home. I don’t know this for a fact, but I imagine that 99.99% of high risk births were performed at hospitals and that 99.99% of people who opted to have home deliveries did so under ideal pre-natal conditions (full term, no issues, regular checkups without incidence, etc.).

So to say equate infant mortality rates with it actually being a safer environment simply because the mortality rate is greater at hospitals I think could be a little misleading.

JoeV

July 7th, 2011
11:31 am

And with all due respect to your wife, I don’t care how much “training” a midwife has…if that training wasn’t medical school I don’t want her near my birthing wife.

I wouldn’t have wanted the pulmonary valve salesman doing my wife’s open heart surgey…

Oh Please!

July 7th, 2011
11:37 am

When will the competition end? Home births vs. Hospital Births, Stay at Home Moms vs. Working Moms, Madonna vs. Whore . . . I am so over all this! I have given birth in the hospital and at home. It was my choice. There is some level of risk in either choice. We don’t control anything about this cycle of life and death, so let’s leave all the fear mongering out of the conversation. Make choices that you can live with regardless of the outcomes because there are no guarantees. Why do we try to put others down so we can be right all the time? Give it up!

Tiger Ochocinco Mellencamp

July 7th, 2011
11:39 am

citing a 1976 study? Seriously? Isn’t that just a little outdated?

the first test tube baby was conceived in 1978.

Tiger Ochocinco Mellencamp

July 7th, 2011
11:43 am

actually born in 1978….could have been “conceived” in ‘77….

in either event, if I was getting a medical procedure done, I think I’d get a second opinion if a Dr. cited 40 year old data based upon 40 year old technology as to why he/she felt a particular protocol was right for me.

kevin

July 7th, 2011
11:44 am

JoeV,

A doula is a birthing assistant; she provides comfort and assists in relaxation techniques during births–and follows the lead of the midwife and/ or doctor.

All midwives have medical training and many of them have been to medical school (which my wife will also be attending).

With all due respect, your faith in our hospitals which boast the 2nd worst birthing mortality rate in the modern world is baffling.

My Dad is a cardiologist and I have been indoctrinated to believe that western medicinal practices were superior to all others. However, on this particular issue, after speaking with women who have had both experiences, reading articles, reviewing statistics, etc., there is no evidence that a US hospital birth is safer than a home birth.

Watch “The Business of Being Born”–it’s a very informative and interesting documentary.

motherjanegoose

July 7th, 2011
11:45 am

@JoeV…sometimes my clients ask me to speak on educational topics that are outside of my expertise. I decline ( as I want to stay on topic with what I know) and give them this analogy:

“Would you want your pedicatrician taking out your appendix? It can be done, in a pinch, but they perhaps are not the most skilled at the procedure.”

I GET your point completely.

TallMom

July 7th, 2011
11:47 am

Also, a lot of hospital births are hospital births because there are known complications, which means there’s a greater risk for death at delivery.

The fact is, 1.7 per 1,000 of home births go wrong….1.7 per 1,000 of hospital births go wrong….both statistics are for LOW RISK pregnancies. They are identical. LOW RISK. Not all pregnancies are low risk….and often, a “normal, low risk” delivery can go bad FAST. Within a matter of minutes…before a midwife would even have time to dial 911. THAT’S why it’s inherently SAFER to give birth in a hospital. PERIOD.

I used midwives for 3 of my 4 children. I delivered in a hospital. I had everything EXACTLY as I wanted, because *I* am the patient and it’s within my rights to accept or refuse ANY medical procedure.

I also know that when I started hemorrhaging for no known reason after #3 that I was within seconds of everything I NEEDED for my baby and I to survive. Had I been at home, it would’ve ended tragically.

Kevin–I hope your wife isn’t studying to be a”direct entry midwife” (a “midwife” with no actual medical training)…those are JUST as dangerous as a home birth. Certified NURSE midwives (who have had extensive medical training) are the only midwives a person should trust. Unfortunately, I think people often don’t realize the difference…and it could be a life or death difference. In fact, I believe in GA (and almost half the United States) direct entry midwives are ILLEGAL. That should say something.

Tiger Ochocinco Mellencamp

July 7th, 2011
11:49 am

“A doula is a birthing assistant; she provides comfort and assists in relaxation techniques during births–and follows the lead of the midwife and/ or doctor.”

That’s EXACTLY what I did when my wife gave birth to our son! I had no idea I am a doula too! ;-)