Do you approve of new school lunch guidelines?

The government has proposed the first major overhaul of school lunches since 1996. It is looking to increase whole grains, fruits and vegetables and control calorie intake.

From The Associated Press (I bolded for a quick read):

“The guidelines, which were obtained by The Associated Press and confirmed by USDA, would require schools to cut sodium in those meals by more than half, use more whole grains and serve low fat milk. They also would limit kids to only one cup of starchy vegetables a week, so schools couldn’t offer french fries every day.

Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack said the new standards could affect more than 32 million children and are crucial because kids can consume as much as half of their daily calories in school.

“If we don’t contain obesity in this country it’s going to eat us alive in terms of health care costs,” Vilsack said Wednesday, prior to the release of the guidelines.

While many schools are improving meals already, others are still serving children meals high in fat, salt and calories. The new guidelines are based on 2009 recommendations by the Institute of Medicine, the health arm of the National Academy of Sciences.

The announcement comes just a few weeks after President Barack Obama signed into law a child nutrition bill that will help schools pay for the healthier foods, which often are more expensive.

The subsidized meals that would fall under the guidelines proposed this week are served as free and low-cost meals to low-income children and long have been subject to government nutrition standards. The new law for the first time will extend nutrition standards to other foods sold in schools that aren’t subsidized by the federal government, including “a la carte” foods on the lunch line and snacks in vending machines. Those standards, while expected to be similar, will be written separately.

The announcement is a proposal, and it could be several years before and schools are required to make changes.

The new USDA guidelines would:

— Establish the first calorie limits for school meals.

— Gradually reduce the amount of sodium in the meals over 10 years, with the eventual goal of reducing sodium by more than half.

— Ban most trans fats.

— Require more servings of fruits and vegetables.

— Require all milk served to be low fat or nonfat, and require all flavored milks to be nonfat.

— Incrementally increase the amount of whole grains required, eventually requiring most grains to be whole grains.

— Improve school breakfasts by requiring schools to serve a grain and a protein, instead of one or the other.

Some school groups have criticized efforts to make meals healthier, saying it will be hard for already-stretched schools to pay for the new requirements. Some conservatives, including former Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin, have charged that telling children what to eat is a case of government overreach.

Vilsack says he understands the new standards may pose some challenges for school districts, but he believes they are necessary. He compares obesity and related diseases like diabetes to a truck barreling toward a child, and the new guidelines are like a parent teaching that child to look both ways before he or she crosses the street.

“You want your kid to be able to walk across the street without getting hit,” he says.

According to the USDA, about a third of children 6 to 19 years old are overweight or obese, and the number of obese children has tripled in the past few decades.

The Agriculture Department also is planning to release new dietary guidelines for the general public, possibly as soon as this month. Those guidelines, revised every five years, are similarly expected to encourage less sodium consumption and more grains, fruits and vegetables.”

Will these new guidelines help our kids eat better at school? Are you happy with what they are proposing? Are your kids just better off with what you are sending? How do you think your particular school is doing?

87 comments Add your comment

[...] The government has proposed the first major overhaul of school lunches since 1996. It is looking to increase … would require schools to cut sodium in those meals by more than half, use more whole grains and serve low fat milk. They also would limit kids … read full article… [...]

Mr. Freeze

January 14th, 2011
7:05 am

Personal accountability?

Eating 10,000 french fries and not exercising makes one obese. Is it the job of the government school to police what children eat? Give them options, but ultimately it’s up to the individual of what and how much they consume.

Too Much Government

January 14th, 2011
7:12 am

Agree with you 100% Mr. Freeze.

smh728

January 14th, 2011
7:29 am

absolutely. It’s up to the parents. I am not a fan of what is offered at our school therefore, my kids choose one meal a week at school. The other four days they take a lunch from home.

smh728

January 14th, 2011
7:31 am

My absolutely was directed at Mr. Freeze – personal responsibility.

motherjanegoose

January 14th, 2011
7:34 am

Both posters above, to me, are correct. The problem is, to me again, is that many parents are not stepping up to the plate and doing their job. Educators, such as myself see this time and time again. Not just food issues…bed time, apparel, manners, civility etc.

While many, on this blog joyfully shared the outside experiences that their children had in the snow…how many other parents just let their kids veg out with electronics….because it was easier.
No…not everyone had a sled handy but a walk outside would be possible or build a snowman. Or, some could play family games. I mentioned this to catlady yesterday as my daughter learned how to play chess from our neighbor’s son whom she babysits. Subsequently, we dug out our marble chess board and she played with my husband for several days before she left for college. We played a lot of games over the break.

@ Mr. Freeze..Give them options, but ultimately it’s up to the individual

YES on all levels…but we see how this is working out with many adults who depend on our government and cannot ever think for themselves.

Lots of kids would not know a fresh fruit or vegetable if it stared them in the face. They would rather have pudding or jello.

Packaged and fast foods are sadly the norm in many households. I am wondering how they would be able to offer fresh fruits and vegetables, as far as cost effective…since a jumbo can of fruit cocktail LOL would be a lot cheaper.

motherjanegoose

January 14th, 2011
7:35 am

TWG…my comment is already….

motherjanegoose

January 14th, 2011
8:05 am

lulu

January 14th, 2011
8:06 am

SMH at all of you who think kids should be expected to make healthy choices – you obviously know nothing about children. If you’ve been able to afford healthy food and have taught your children to enjoy it, they *might* make the healthy choice. But it’s not about the choices the kids make so much as the choices the adults make – mainly, the choice to serve unhealthy food because it is cheaper. Even the “healthy” choices are not particularly healthy (yes, grape juice counts as a fruit).

madmommy

January 14th, 2011
8:07 am

If kids aren’t learning the right way to eat at home and what an active lifestyle is, all the rules in the world won’t make a difference. I am trying to teach my child that you can eat certain things, just not all the time and until you pop. I pay a bit more for my food bill than most, but I keep fruits and veggies in the house at all times and it is offered at every meal and snack. Of course she isn’t going to eat it at every meal or snack, but I think it’s all about creating a habit. Also, she see’s me working out everyday and that all of my friends workout or run daily and I’m hoping that becomes second nature to her as well, like brushing her teeth.

Most of the time if the child is overweight, the parents are overweight as well. Why not have classes teaching parents as well as students in school how to eat, cook and be active. It is much easier to just sit back and say “oh well, guess I’ll just be fat” and I fear that is where most people are today. Did anyone see Jamie Oliver’s show where he took over a school’s kitchen? Look at how hard that was and how much push back he got, we are already set up to fail because of people’s attitude. Just sad regardless of how you look at it.

caf123

January 14th, 2011
8:09 am

I am the same was as smh728. I send lunch to school with my kids except 3 -4 times a month. I teach in a high school, and have “lunch duty” twice a week. We who send a healthy lunch are in the minority. What the cafeteria serves is awful in terms of healthy choices. Unfortunately it is cheaper to serve “crap”. I absolutely believe that it is the parents responsibility, but if the public schools are going to serve food, there should be healthier choices. Right now it is pizza, fries, mashed potatoes, chicken fingers, and some overcooked frozen green slop that passes as a vegetable. If the government is going to impose higher standards to save kids from obesity and ultimately the public health system, then they need to provide schools with some $$$. I refuse to have more furlough days to pay for someone’s lunch.

Bill Johnson

January 14th, 2011
8:11 am

I’m sorry, but these apes have no place telling me what to eat. Nor my children. Hasn’t the government been subsidizing school meals for 40 years now? Haven’t the schools been following government guidlines for nutrition?

So they fscked up, and want more control to try harder? How about rule me once, shame on you, rule me twice, shame on me.

I ain’t lettin these peabrains tell me anything. Reduce government 10 percent per year. Her’s a fine place to start.

Have you seen what ends up in the trash?

January 14th, 2011
8:15 am

I think the real shame is the amount of food that is thrown away each and every day. It is particularly upsetting to think that some of these tossed lunches are free or reduced….what a waste of money! The best thing would be if more parents would send lunch with their children. That way, if it’s wasted, at least its your money and not the taxpayers.

motherjanegoose

January 14th, 2011
8:24 am

@madmommy:I’m hoping that becomes second nature to her as well, like brushing her teeth

EXCELLENT POINT! Now, ask your child’s teacher how many kids come to school with breath that will blow you over because no one at home has taught them the responsibility of brushing teeth or followed up to make sure they brush their teeth!
My January unit is on Community Helpers and the dentist is one of the helpers we discuss. I talk all about brushing teeth and how YOU are responsible for your own teeth…not your parents nor your teacher…we sing songs too!

My first post is gone and hopefully will show up, so I will not repeat myself. Yes, it is expensive to provide healthy food choices. Rearing children properly does cost time and money. Some folks do not get this. Some have children they cannot afford…this is not a new announcement.

I just read, on Facebook, about a middle class mother who is getting antsy being stuck at home with her children this week in Atlanta…she has 5…I believe they are under 8. Whose choice was that?

Lori

January 14th, 2011
8:31 am

I’m cool with the lunches being healthier. When I was in school, the lunch ladies actually COOKED our lunches. Today’s school lunches are nothing but frozen, pre-processed boxed foods. Full of fat, salt and preservatives. To those who would say, you can’t tell my child what to eat, uh hello, they already are. You child is already limited by whatever the school is offering them. All this is saying is that we need to offer better choices. If you still want your kid to eat fat, grease and preservatives, feel free to pack him a lunch!!

Mom3Boys

January 14th, 2011
8:59 am

I’m so tired of the processed and prepackaged crap we pass off as lunch. We joke and call it “beige day.” This consists of a breaded something, fries, mashed potatoes, rolls, and anything else tan/beige they can serve. The same teachers who claim they want to lose weight load up their trays with this stuff. The only healthy option is a pre-fab salad w/ the meat from the day before chopped up on it. bleh!!

Lori

January 14th, 2011
9:07 am

I like the program at my son’s school. It’s a private school, but there could be a lesson from their program for public schools as well. They have a service that prepares several options for the kids. They have a hot lunch option that changes every day. Then there is always a salad and sandwich bar option. There are fresh fruits that they can choose as well, and of course there are desserts. The foods are color coded red, yellow and green. The red items are the worst nutritionally, the yellow are foods that are ok in moderation and the green ones are the healthiest options. The kids are allowed to choose to eat whatever they want, however the health of their choice is right in their face. At least they are being made aware that they are making healthy or unhealthy choices. I like that concept.

motherjanegoose

January 14th, 2011
9:20 am

Mom3Boys…beige day HAHA! I call my husband a beige eater. While I fix all sorts of things, he tends to choose the neutral colors: corn, potatoes, mac and cheese etc. He prefers iceberg to romaine/spinach but we have gotten him to eat steamed or grilled asparagus, so that is a big accomplishment.

People mostly tend to eat what they grew up eating. My aunt, who is in her late 60’s is a wonderful lady but she only fixes corn, green beans and peas. She cannot fathom all the different things we eat: squash, okra, broccoli, cauliflower, brussels sprouts etc.

While I have never been a trim person ( except right after I had my 10 pound 8 ounce son and nursed him virtually all day long) I LOVE a good green leafy salad and would eat one every day if possible. A bowl of fresh fruit is awesome too!

I do see the value of offering new foods to children, since they may have never eaten them at home.
How many children have eaten a fresh blueberry or even kiwi?

I simply think parents do not step up to the plate to offer things children could learn to like. It is easier to throw a frozen pizza in the oven than to grill chicken and toss a salad. Or, it is expensive to buy things if you do not think your kids will eat it and then throw it away. Not many kids now belong to the clean plate club…” there are kids in Africa who are starving…now clean your plate!” Oldsters, like me, may remember that tactic…not sure how it helped the “starving” kids.

MomOf2Girls

January 14th, 2011
9:39 am

MJG – do you think that the “clean plate club” contributed to the weight problems we have now? Making a child eat everything on their plate teaches them to ignore the signals that say they are full. I subscribe to the “eat one bite of everything” philosophy (try it, if you don’t like it, you don’t have to eat it), and my children eat quite a variety now. They also stop when they are full and are very slender because they don’t overeat.

Regarding school lunches, I have to agree with establishing healthier guidelines. As someone else pointed out, the children are already a captive audience. Why force them to eat food that’s bad for them when you can provide food that’s good for them? If it was a question of first starting a school lunch program so the government could dictate what they eat, that would be another story. Of course, I don’t have a dog in this race, because my kids’ school doesn’t provide lunch.

Theresa Walsh Giarrusso

January 14th, 2011
9:51 am

MJG — I will look for it

I have a second topic popping up at 12

justmy2cents

January 14th, 2011
9:52 am

I don’t think the gov’t need to step in and do this; I think the schools need to take care of it. I rarely eat the school lunches, because they are rather gross. I will say they always have veggie options available, but again, with having all those free/reduced lunches, it is difficult to provide a decent meal without $$$. I think they should do away with all the flavored milks. Drink water or 1%. If you get rid of the unhealthy options altogether, makes it easy for kids to make good choices.

I would be perfectly ok with the schools not providing lunch. My kids’ schools do not provide breakfast since there are not enough free/reduced lunches at their school, but others do provide the carb overload w/ the slab of mystery meat. I need to go back to packing their lunches. Last year I had to take them back into the dr. after their checkup because their blood sugar was so high FIVE hours after lunch and they needed a fasting sample. Ridiculous.

HB

January 14th, 2011
9:54 am

So the new law will keep my tax dollars from paying for meals consisting of pizza and french fries (as my high school served together daily) and prohibit schools from selling ice cream and soda to raise extra funds. Sounds good to me!

fred

January 14th, 2011
9:55 am

check this out for a story on school lunches in France..http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ovO18E-hgew
wow. I would love to have my kids eat here. the whole attitude is different. fresh locally sourced food and a big variety.

motherjanegoose

January 14th, 2011
9:57 am

Momof2girls…in my case YES. On the flip side…my parents were not wasteful and we never were allowed to whine about not liking what we were having for dinner…can you say tuna noodle casserole or jello salad LOL. I did not adhere to the clean plate club with my own but they were required to taste everything on their plate and I did not offer “short order cook” options.

mom of 3

January 14th, 2011
9:57 am

I am all for healthier choices. I steam or grill my asparagus – went to my husbands family Christmas dinner – guess what – fried asparagus, never heard of it but she was happy they were eating a new vegetable. You know you can only do so much and the parent have the rights in the long run.
School lunches dictated by the government. How are they going to pay for them and if the price of the food increases how are families going to afford for the children to buy the lunch that will be provided by the schools. Do you really think the apple that gets eaten at lunch isn’t going to be followed by a twinkie when they get home? It’s the parents that teach and if the parent doesn’t teach the child doesn’t learn. Anyone can have a child but not everyone can be a parent.
Anyway, you aren’t talking about high school lunches. How many kids either get permission from a teacher or sneaks off campus and brings back lunch for them, the teacher and their friends? If you think 0, you have no child in high school.
Less national government and more local control.

motherjanegoose

January 14th, 2011
10:07 am

mom of 3…I had two in HS and I am CERTAIN that neither of them snuck off for lunch.
I also see lots of kids who are allowed to leave campus for lunch and do so, so I am sure some kids do sneak out too!

Techmom

January 14th, 2011
10:22 am

@Lori, I’m sure our kids’ schools are serviced by the same company. They’re not cheap but they do offer choices that some kids would never have at home and there are always alternate but healthy options (sandwiches, soup & salad are offered every day). I’m sure some public school lunchrooms spend just as much on stuff that goes in the trash but they’re not willing to think outside the box to figure out how to offer different and better choices.

We had this conversation a few months ago and I’m still of the notion that if you just don’t offer crappy choices at lunch they will eventually eat what is available. Or they will bring the crap from home but that’s their parents’ realm of control (or lack thereof).

DB

January 14th, 2011
10:26 am

Well, personally, I think that if you’re eating a free or subsidized lunch, you really aren’t in a position to be too darn choosy about what is served. And if the government has decided to serve healthier alternatives, how is that bad? How is the government making choices to serve healthier food at school any different from a responsible parent’s decision to serve healthier food at home? Do you think kids have “choices” at home as to what to eat? “No, mommy, I am only going to eat french fries and greasy pizza, I am not going to eat those delicious brussel sprouts.”

DB

January 14th, 2011
10:27 am

At my kids’ high school, leaving campus for lunch was considered a “senior privilege”, as long as you had permission from your parents. No sneaking necessary. :-)

Bluebell Jones

January 14th, 2011
10:46 am

Well, why not. It’s not exactly elitist to eat decent food. I have always thought that with a little wit a school could serve a completely different menu. I’d like to have a look at what a school budgets for lunch-I’m sure there are alternatives to all this heart attack food.

motherjanegoose

January 14th, 2011
10:49 am

OK DB, I told you that my daughter fixed brussels sprouts in a vanilla/blackberry reduction sauce for Thanksgiving…you wrinkled your nose….LOL…I think I did my part as a parent…we did not eat pizza nor french fries for our holiday meal…LOL. I hope to see you again soon!

motherjanegoose

January 14th, 2011
10:51 am

Come to think of it…aren’t soups relatively inexpensive and if you keep the sodium down…healthy too?
A bowl of soup, crackers and an apple/banana for lunch with a carton of milk…how much could that be? I do not know.

Tiger Ochocinco Mellencamp

January 14th, 2011
11:06 am

I don’t see how a federal government, which already provides funding to public schools, is over-reaching in a mandate to say “if you want our money, you’ll provide healthier meals than you have in the past”. That’s not forcing any parent to eat a government mandated meal. If, as parents, you don’t like the menu, make the lunch yourself. This is a far cry from a govt telling a family what their child must eat.

Mom3Boys

January 14th, 2011
11:15 am

@mom of 3: how are we going to pay for it?? Most people are filling out the free lunch form, it seems. Very few are verified (under 5%). Kids w/ designer clothes and iPhones turn those in stating their fam income is $500 a month…total BS.

Tiger Ochocinco Mellencamp

January 14th, 2011
11:19 am

@Bill Johnson…”these apes have no place telling me what to eat. Nor my children.” When exactly did they tell you what you have to eat? I went to 7 different schools K-12 growing up…and now I have a son in 1st grade…and I don’t recall once a school telling me or my family that bringing lunch to school was prohibited and we were required to eat the cafeteria lunch.

I

M1chelle

January 14th, 2011
11:20 am

If the government provides subsidies for school lunch, I think it’s their responsibility to ensure that the options they provide are healthy. Growing up, my school served fries EVERYDAY as a side. There was a small (more like tiny) section of the hot bar that had a vegetable. Every week we had pizza, fish sticks, hamburgers, tacos, and beefaroni. All were frozen, processed foods that are high in sodium. I don’t understand why anyone would oppose healthier options. No one’s taking your choice away…Did anyone see the Jamie Oliver special where he went to schools to try to get them to change their menus. He showed kids how most chicken nuggets were made with the leftover parts of the chicken, breaded, and fried. The process was not appetizing, yet the kids chose the processed chicken nuggets. He went to a classroom and many of the kids couldn’t name vegetables like broccoli. It was shocking and this was not an inner city school.

Bree

January 14th, 2011
11:22 am

I find it amusing that the faculty hardly ever eats school lunches served at their schools. School lunches are nasty. Personally, I think schools should outsource lunch services to allow for more choices, and let the parents choose – online. This would save the school vast amounts of overhead money in maintaining a kitchen and providing lunches. Exercise is a bigger issue – P.E. should consist of cross country running, real exercise, and teaching healthy habits will have more of an impact on the kids.

Sam

January 14th, 2011
11:23 am

You’re right, the children have the option to choose what the government is offering, or not choose it. No one says you have to buy the lunch. If you don’t want the healthier options the government is offering, then feel free to pack your child a lunch with as much trans fat as you please. I’m glad they are working on fixing the “nutrition” of these meals. French fries does not a vegetable make. School lunches and breakfasts are sometimes the only meals kids get to eat. They need nutrition, not fried chicken tenders with a side of fries every day.

motherjanegoose

January 14th, 2011
11:23 am

Momof3boys…please take it up with HB…we have had this discussion many times in the past:
free lunch abuse. I thought I was one of few here up on this soap box…glad to have you…LOL.
Becky, deirdre and catlady…please scoot over ;)
I am ALL about feeding kids who are truly hungry. Not so much about feeding children whose parents do not know what the word BUDGET or TRUTH means…

@ tiger…yes, to me it should be this:

here is what we are serving and you are welcome to eat it: cheerios/milk with a sliced banana on top…chili with a corn muffin and apple….cheese sandwich with tomato soup and an orange….
take it or leave it…or bring your own. I am not a nutritionist…is there something wrong with those choices?

motherjanegoose

January 14th, 2011
11:24 am

@ tiger…the schools in our county prohibit fast food from being brought in…a sign is posted at the front door. The parents do not like it!

motherjanegoose

January 14th, 2011
11:27 am

Sam…awe come ON…I thought ketchup was a vegetable…NOT.

I do know that some of my clients in Texas say they are not allowed to serve syrup on pancakes/waffles as they deem this to be unhealthy…they go with peanut butter or jelly ( fruit I guess?) …. anyone else know about this?

FCM

January 14th, 2011
11:29 am

Not all kids are obese. What about kids like mine that need more calories in the day? I have an 11 yo that is considered “average” she is 53″ (4 ft 5 in) and is 63 lbs. See the issue?

The school requires gym 3 times a week plus the kids are in sports…the gym stuff is to combat fat kids…and trust me the school has them, most of them have stay at home moms who let the kids veg in front of TV all afternoon.

FOOD is not the enemy here…Couch Potato Syndrome is the real problem.

FCM

January 14th, 2011
11:32 am

(BTW my kids hate french fries. Seriously they choose apples or oranges over fries every time. They also hate mac & cheese and other high fat/salt foods….so that could be a factor…helping kids to know what are good choices.)

Ann

January 14th, 2011
11:42 am

I’m all for personal responsibility in many situations, but this issue is not that simple. Leaving it to personal responsibility would be fine if my tax dollars were not going to be spent to pay for all of the increased rates of diabetes and heart disease by Medicaid/Medicare patients in the future. With the projected obesity rates, our taxes will be unlike anything we have seen in the past. When your personal choices affect other people, it involves societal responsibility as well. And, the Armed Forces now say that a large percentage of applicants don’t meet the physical/health/weight requirements and we will not have adequate numbers ready to serve as needed in the future.

As far as providing choices to kids, that is great, as long as we keep in mind these are kids without fully developed brains and decision making skills. Many are capable of making good choices, though, if they’ve been exposed to healthy foods from an early point.

I see this issue as simply the schools correcting their mistakes with having veered so far into processed and junk foods. If your kids are in public school, the “government” is already controlling their day and learning. Providing healthy foods is simply part of that. It is not “increased” government interference when they are already providing the meals currently. Providing healthy options is not always more expensive. Publix had, in the last couple of weeks, tangerines for 10 for one dollar. At 10 cents a piece, that is cheaper than a candy bar. Health eating does not necessarily cost more.

JJ

January 14th, 2011
11:56 am

My daughter took her lunch most of the time.

I don’t keep junk food, ie potato chips, crackers, candy, cookies, etc. in my home. Too tempting.

I adhere to the supermarket rules. I only shop the perimeter of the store, and I don’t go up and down the aisles. Canned veggies are not allowed in my home, only fresh or frozen. The only can I have in my kitchen right now, is a can of pork and beans. No canned soups, no canned veggies or fruits, and certainly NO canned meat.

The only aisles I do go to are Pet food, and cleaning products. But more often than not, I buy those items at Target.

During the three days I was unable to get to work, I planned my summer veggie garden. I am going to start in March with seeds. I was very successful with jalapenos and tomatos in containers on my deck last summer, so I am going to do that again. I also plan on planting (in the ground), carrots, radishes, cucumbers, maybe some beans along the fence, etc. And I’m going to do an herb garden also.

HB

January 14th, 2011
12:02 pm

Yes, MJG, we have had the discussion before, and I still agree with Momof3boys that income should be verified. It may be too time consuming to check every form (school systems tend to weigh money saved by catching abusers against money spent on salaries for those doing the checking), but it seems like spot checking percentage could be higher than 5% without losing money (I could be wrong). I suspect verifying could be made less time consuming than it used to be using current technologies, but districts probably just haven’t gotten around to reassessing standing policies.

What I’ve disagreed with MJG on before is that the vast majority of those signed up shouldn’t actually qualify (if you have numbers from a reputable source that back up your claims, please share — but remember counting the number of Lexuses in a high free-lunch rate school’s car line and discounting the fact that a high proportion of poor kids ride the bus does not good research make).

Tiger Ochocinco Mellencamp

January 14th, 2011
12:08 pm

Ever the lemonade making guy that I am….the funniest thing about this subject is quoting Sarah Palin. As a die hard capitalist, I idolize her for her ability to make money at the rate she’s making it…..as a realist, I SOOO appreciate the entertainment I get from her delusions of being relevant!

mom of 3

January 14th, 2011
12:10 pm

MotherJaneGoose didn’t mean that all kids sneak off school grounds but there are some. Also, you menu choices sound great to me. I don’t know how many times I saw moms bring lunch to their kids at the appropriate lunch time for them that came from a variety of fast food restaurants.
Free lunch abuse drives the majority of us crazy. If you really can’t afford to feed your child then please use whats available and if you can don’t take away from someone that really needs this program. Don’t get me on this soapbox. Help for the helpless not the lazy or the ones that just want to see what they can get for free.
Honestly, my girls took PB&J’s, tuna and any dinner leftovers from home before they would eat the lunch room food. They were allowed to warm it in the home ec room and then go to the lunchroom to eat.

JATL

January 14th, 2011
12:11 pm

I’m all for them making school lunches healthier -much healthier, but it’s not going to keep the obese children from being obese. That is where the parents have to step up, like many others have said. If your kitchen is full of junk and your typical family meal is McDonald’s, Pizza Hut or Taco Bell -it’s highly likely that obesity is going to be an issue. Further that with not wanting to expend the effort or energy to get the kids outside and active -and that’s not something schools can completely take on. YES, we need daily, mandated recess and physical education, but tubby kids are going to eat the junk when they’re not at school.

JATL

January 14th, 2011
12:13 pm

@MJG -I WISH I saw those choices on a school cafeteria menu! I would let my kid buy his breakfast and lunch then!