My Christian kids love Hanukkah: Do your kids like others’ religious holidays?

My Christian children are fascinated with the Jewish holiday Hanukkah, which begins this year at sundown on Wednesday.

My 9-year-old has loved Hanukkah since she was itty bitty. I think it stemmed from the “Elmo’s World Happy Holidays” DVD that explained the traditions of Christmas, Hanuakkah and Kwanza.

She would sing the dreidel song ad nauseam. She was obsessed with the menorahs. She would cobble together her own with candle sticks around the house. She could even tell you the special name for the shamash (attendant) candle.

Two years in Vacation Bible School they studied Jewish traditions made dreidels, menorahs and ate Passover foods. (I know different holiday but still Jewish.)

Last year my mom gave Rose the American Girl Rebecca Rubin Hanukkah set with a menorah with tiny little fake candles. Rose loves it. (This year she’s getting Rebecca from Mimi.)

My 3-year-old came in last night wishing us a very hearty Happy Hanuakkah. It took me a while to figure out that Rose showed her the Elmo DVD upstairs.

I have no problems with my kids learning about any other religion’s holidays. I guess I wouldn’t want them celebrating a religious holiday that was contrary to our religious beliefs. I don’t feel that Hanukkah is contrary to what our religion teaches.

Growing up I had a Jayne friend whose family seemed to have a Christmas tree each year. She always picked out excellent presents. We also have a Jewish friend who hosts his company’s annual Christmas party at his house.

Do your kids like another religion’s holiday in particular? Do they talk about or try to celebrate it at home? Do you let your kids celebrate Christmas since so many people are celebrating even if it’s not your religion’s holiday?

- By Theresa Walsh Giarrusso, Momania

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penguinmom

November 30th, 2010
12:59 am

Hanukkah happened before Jesus was born so the story was part of his tradition also. Our church often celebrates Passover with a Seder (my husband makes an excellent banana cake for the Seder.)

I wouldn’t have a problem with celebrating Hanukkah with our kids. They’ve always been a little interested and we have talked about the story behind it. The dreidel song is really catchy – gets stuck in your head a little too easily. :-)

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[...] My Christian kids love Hanukkah: Do your kids like others' religious holidays?Atlanta Journal Constitution (blog)My Christian children are fascinated with the Jewish holiday Hanukkah, which begins this year at sundown on Wednesday. My 9-year-old has loved Hanukkah …and more » [...]

Victor Svolto, Jr.

November 30th, 2010
5:01 am

The Oil represents the Holy Spirit, who leads and comforts us as long as we need Him, until Jesus comes back.

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Steve Meckleburg

November 30th, 2010
6:48 am

I do not let my Jewish children observe and celebrate non-Jewish rituals. I prefer clarity about who and what we are. They are allowed to study other religions, but only as mythology.

deidre_NC

November 30th, 2010
7:09 am

there is nothing wrong with a christian celebrating jewish traditions-after all jesus did.

mom2alex&max

November 30th, 2010
7:20 am

No, my children have no interest in it. It’s not our religion. They know about it, but that’s all.

And PS, I love Steve’s comment about “mythology”. Nice going.

Larry

November 30th, 2010
7:33 am

Steve must have forgotten that half of the Chrisitan “mythology” is his Bible. However, in principle, I agree with him. The media and the government have long sought to marginalize Christianity. Beginning young and “harmlessly” is the best way to complete indoctrination. I seriously doubt that Theresa Walsh Giarrusso’s kids will be Christians when they are adults. I fault her mothering skills unless religion is as meaningless to her as it seems to be.

1sus

November 30th, 2010
7:37 am

My son’s kindergarten class learns about all sorts of holidays as they have a very varied school makeup. I was in the class yesterday when a mother came to explain Diwali. She had a craft for the kids, read a story, showed pictures of he holiday being celebrated i India, brought samples of food for the children, clothing that her son in class would wear for the holiday. They loved it! In fact, when my son loved the Dal she served and she mentioned it was a good protein source as it is made from lentils, I remarked that I need to find a place to buy it! He’s not a big meat eater and I’m always looking for protein sources. I like my children to be exposed to other cultures and holidays. We can certainly talk about what holidays WE celebrate and WHY, but it’s a big world out there with a lot of people who don’t necesarily live like we do. I’m happy to have my kids learn about them all.

deidre_NC

November 30th, 2010
7:40 am

in my opinion, learning about other religions is a way of making sure you believe what you feel is the right one for you.

mom of 3

November 30th, 2010
8:07 am

There is a difference in learning about other religions and traditions and then having your own religious traditions that you hope to teach your children and have them follow. We are a Christian family and respect all others traditions especially during their religious times. Respect for each other is what all religions teach and that is something I think we forget. Muslim terrorists are no more muslims than fanatics in any other religion. I am a Southern Baptist but submitting to my husband just isn’t gonna happen nor do I believe that a woman can be a minister. I don’t think anyone agrees with every aspect of the religion they have. All religions have them. Let’s celebrate and respect the religions of the world and hold our own beliefs close. There is room for us all.

V for Vendetta

November 30th, 2010
8:07 am

I can’t say that I’m surprised by the close-mindedness already displayed by some of the posters. It is the inevitable result of faith. The entire idea of a winter holiday was started thousands of years before any of the current religions snatched it up and made it holy, but I’m sure posters such as the above are not concerned with history.

In any case, my children, who have been raised without religion and always will be, thoroughly enjoy the festivities of all faiths and the concept of a winter celebration. It is a fun and family-oriented time of year–no matter what you believe or don’t believe.

MomOf2Girls

November 30th, 2010
8:10 am

First of all, I want to correct something @Victor said. The oil is NOT any kind of “spirit”. The oil represents the sacred oil used to light the eternal flame in the holy Temple. When the Temple was destroyed, there was only enough oil to last 1 day, and it takes 8 days to produce enough to sustain the flame. The miracle of Chanukah was that the oil lasted 8 days, permitting the flame to continue burning. This is why Chanukah is 8 days. (The other miracle of Chanukah is that the small group of Jewish fighters were able to defeat the large, well organized Greek army.)

Now that that’s out of the way, the subject at hand. We do not even remotely observe any religious holidays but our own. I find odd that anyone would even want to. Learning about them I understand, but not actual observance.

Lou Hastings

November 30th, 2010
8:14 am

Victor,
The Oil has nothing to do with the Holy Spirit. The Chanukkah story celebrates the Macabee’s ability to stave off the Roman assault for 8 days. Part of the miracle of Chanukkah is the fact that 1 days worth of oil lasted for 8 days. Chaukkah is not a Biblical story or Holiday. It is based more in tradition than religion. My children are surrounded by Christmas. We enjoy the lights and this time of the year. As a Jewish family, what we try to do with our kids is to seperate the Holiday of Christmas from the religious aspects. I have no problem with my kids enjoying the season, I just perfer that they enjoy the trees, lights and the festive nature as opposed to celebrating Jesus’ birth.

First time poster

November 30th, 2010
8:18 am

I’m with V on this one. In my experience, religion for the most part is a divider, not something that brings different people together. However, I would never disparage someone’s beliefs, provided of course that their beliefs weren’t hurting others. To each their own and all that.

PW

November 30th, 2010
8:19 am

What I love about some christians is their amazing inability, despite their christianess, to follow the greatest command from the Lord, “…to love one another as I have so loved you”.

I love learning about other religions and have passed that on to my daughter and grandson. We incorporate other traditions into our own Christian traditions and openly acknowledge that we are honoring those who may believe differently than we do but are still deserving of respect.

WHEN YOU LEARN ABOUT AND UNDERSTAND OTHER RELIGIONS YOU ARE LESS LIKELY TO GROW UP AND BECOME AN UNYIELDING AND INTOLERANT HATER OF OTHERS AND THEN YOU TEACH THAT TO YOUR CHILDREN.

In the end, no matter what or in whom we believe, we all return to the earth as dust. Love and respect others even if it’s not what you believe.

mom of 3

November 30th, 2010
8:20 am

OOPS – meant I don’t see why a woman can’t be a minister.

motherjanegoose

November 30th, 2010
8:21 am

It’s early and we already have snarky?

When I was student teaching in 3rd grade, over 25 years ago in public school, the class was introduced to Hanukkah by a Jewish teacher. We made latkes and learned of the traditions. I have some wonderful Jewish clients and I have worked with them on several occasions. In their honor, I wrote a Hanukkah song for them. They were thrilled and it is on one of my Cd’s. My own children have sung Hanukkah songs with me.

I am wondering if the public school today would still introduce Hanukkah and also Christmas as religious holidays? I do know that holidays are allowed in schools or eliminated altogether based on the pressure from the parents in the district. Some areas are much more flexible while other areas have ditched all holiday celebrations, to avoid the hassle. Sometimes the minority is the most vocal and the choice that is made may not reflect the majority’s opinion. catlady…your thoughts?

@ Wayne…I called my daughter and mentioned Dominick…she laughed and sang to me on the phone as her friends at college have been having fun with it. I am delighted that she can still enjoy singing and fun! We have a lot of that in our house.

Scrooge

November 30th, 2010
8:24 am

We celebrate Festivus!

Cynthia M

November 30th, 2010
8:24 am

To V for Vendetta – how sad. I hope and pray your children find Christ in spite of how you raised them. I really enjoy reading and knowing about many of the Jewish traditions. As someone stated earlier, it is, after all, part of the Lord’s heritage. We are christians, but have longed anjoyed having a Menorrah as part of our holiday decor. You cannot ignore the Bible. The Jews ARE God’s chosen people who will return one day to full acceptance of His whole word and Jesus as Messiah.

Photius

November 30th, 2010
8:25 am

No, we do not allow our son to celebrate non-Orthodox religious celebrations. Some people are religious, some are not – fine with me. Too many people who proclaim to have a certain faith really know very little about their own beliefs. We conducted a survey in the Catholic and Orthodox Churches and 20% of the congregation thought that receiving Communion was the symbolic partaking of the body and blood of Christ – incredible. Being Orthodox and living in the South surrounded mostly by Methodists and Baptists brought many challenges to our son from peers and other parents simply out of ignorance. We teach him about other religions however he has been instructed very well and thoroughly in the 2,000 year tradition of the Holy Orthodox Church and is well founded in his beliefs. If Theresa raises her children in the Catholic Church and she follows Church tradition those children will be very well founded as well. For me as a parent who is religious, my duty is to raise my son in the Orthodox Church and make sure he understands everything about it; education of other faiths is a bonus and great but we are an Orthodox family. As you will know a solid Jewish or Catholic home when you enter, when you arrive in my home it is very clear via the Icons, votive candles, Holy Palm behind the Cross on the wall and Icons of all the Saints our home is founded in the traditions of the original Church, the Holy Orthodox Church.

RJ

November 30th, 2010
8:26 am

As a Christian, I have no problem with my children learning about other religions, especially since we have family members of a different faith. However, they will not be celebrating any of their holidays. We respect all faiths in our house, but we are Christians and will only participate in what we deem are Christian practices. @V is right regarding the history of Christmas. All of the customs of Christmas pre-date the birth of Jesus. Christmas is a combination of many traditions. However, what is most important to me is that the “reason” we celebrate Christmas is to give praise to the birth of Jesus Christ, our Lord and Savior. Today, that message seems to be lost as I see more and more non-believers celebrating Christmas!

I have family members that are Muslim. There are several Muslim holidays throughout the year that they celebrate. We respect their holidays and they respect ours, but we don’t celebrate together.

motherjanegoose

November 30th, 2010
8:38 am

@ PW…this is what I call

BUFFET CHRISTIANITY

when you eat at a buffet, you take the food that you like ( perhaps a lot) and ignore the other selections ( or wrinkle up your nose at it when you walk by)

Sometimes Christians are emphatic about the scriptures they like ( being diligent and often obnoxious) and ignore the others or simply “forget”. It is sad but true. I, for one, cannot be 100% with all the things mentioned in the scripture but I simply try each day and often fail. That is what forgiveness is for, to me,

I Thessalonians 5:12 Be at peace among yourselves…

Sometimes this is very hard to do.

In addition to Christianity, our family has tried to practice tolerance towards other’s ideas. This is not always easy to do when you KNOW ( based on solid experience) that something another person is doing could be dangerous or even wrong. Example: our dog jumped out of my daughter’s lap ( while sitting in our yard) to chase a stray dog when a neighbor drove down the street and plowed right over her. Since we lost her, we find it hard to witness other dogs who are left to wander our neighborhood at will.

deidre_NC

November 30th, 2010
8:40 am

@MJG—did you really think we could have a discussion related in anyway to religion and people not get snarky? lol..as soon as i saw the topic i knew what was coming…happy holidays to you woman…and to everyone else.

V for Vendetta

November 30th, 2010
8:41 am

Cynthia M,

My kids are just fine without religion, or Christ for that matter. They are happy and wonderful, kind and caring, and respectful and tolerant. Too bad they’re going to hell, huh? Oh well. At least we’ll all stick together.

Scrooge

November 30th, 2010
8:47 am

Most of you need to be boiled in your own fig pudding and sent to workhouses, with that being said, pick a religion that your happy with, have faith, do good, and treat others as you wish to be treated. Yes all of our holidays are based off pagan holidays, so what. Our books of faith were written by men, to which we hope were guided by God. Can you critize any religion and pick out its weakness, sure. Is one religion right and all the others wrong? Please.

Well enough of this, I have to go make sure my workers are working and not bloging. Good day to you and yours

Photius

November 30th, 2010
8:50 am

@V for Vendetta – I totally agree with your point. I have seen many excellent families and children raised with no religion and they are great people. Free Will applies to all. We are a religious family however the main point we teach is that religion is for you and God. The best way to spread one’s faith is via their works, not their mouth.

ABC

November 30th, 2010
8:51 am

Jesus was a Jew after all, so there should be no problem here.

gpkbsin

November 30th, 2010
8:52 am

wow, the first few posters amaze me. my kids are being raised without religion by me. my mil has a different agenda.. raising them hindu. even if we want to shut out xmas, we can’t because of all the schools celebrating only that. we get a letter each year about sharing the holidays we celebrate every year.. the letter comes out in december. ummm… diwali is usually in late october and early november.

So, at our house, the festivities start in october and go on till end of december.

V.. I like your going to hell comment.. I say that about myself all the time cause I get comments like that when I say I don’t believe in religion ;)

Name (required)

November 30th, 2010
8:52 am

So what exactly happens to the cavemen, the ancient Egyptians, etc. when they died? Jesus hadn’t even been born yet, so they weren’t even around to worship him. Are they doomed to the Christian idea of “Hell” simply because they were born too early? Seems unfair, but nobody ever has a good explanation for it.

motherjanegoose

November 30th, 2010
8:56 am

Hey Scrooge…do keep an eye on your employees…no one has to keep an eye on me as any time spent on this blog is my own time…I work for myself. Good Day to you to!

ABC

November 30th, 2010
8:57 am

And to Cynthia M who is spewing hatred toward @V, not everyone raises their children to believe in Christ. That is a personal choice that should not be forced on anyone. You don’t have to believe in Christ as the son of God and lord and savior or whatever to be a good person and live a good life. I personally believe Jesus was a good man, but that is all. I don’t think he ever set out to found a new religion. When you see how so-called Christians (or Muslims or any other group) act toward other humans, you can see how far they have strayed from the original message of peace and love toward others that Jesus taught.

Photius

November 30th, 2010
9:06 am

Belive it or not, in the Orthodox and Catholic faiths, you can go to heaven even if you are not a believer in Christ! Certain Protestant faiths draw the line in the sand, some Protestant one’s like the Anglican Church also adhere that one can gain admission into heaven even if they do not believe in Christ. Surprise – surprise – surprise – learn something new every day.

GA Mom

November 30th, 2010
9:12 am

Reporting in from the Pagans…..no organized religion in my house. We celebrate nature, the changing of the seasons, and we are OPEN to learning of other “customs”. We are not close-minded in my home.

Once again, it amazes me that people are still sucked into this organized religion and are so closed-minded, they cannot accept other peoples faith. That’s not very christian.

I believe if you live a good clean life, are kind to others, and have respect for those different that yourself, you will be happy. I do not push my “beliefs” on to anyone. Live and let live!!!!!

Happy Holidays everyone, regardless of how you chose to celebrate!!!!!!!

Jennifer

November 30th, 2010
9:13 am

The key is respecting other people and being allowed to believe what each of us choose. Bringing up the subject of religion doesn’t always have to turn into a spitting contest. My family is thankful for what we believe in and being able to go to a church that we enjoy so much. My kids and I live a life doing what we believe is right and try to keep religion an upbeat and happy part of our lives. We’re currently raising money for the Salvation Army selling light-hearted and funky bumper stickers that let people know you believe while keeping it light, if you’d like to help it would go a long way. http://www.EightyEightPercent.com

V for Vendetta

November 30th, 2010
9:41 am

Jennifer,

I agree completely, and, if everyone believed and acted as you do, we wouldn’t have such bigoted and hateful rhetoric coming from either side. Kudos to you for being kind-hearted and putting your money where your mouth is.

Photius,

Same to you. It makes me happy to know there are religious folks in the world who are interested in being kind towards others and not discriminating against them because of their beliefs, culture, or sexual preferences. I hope your holiday is very merry. :-)

JATL

November 30th, 2010
9:59 am

Wow -reading these comments makes me happier than ever to be a Unitarian Universalist! I have no idea why it should be problematic for anyone to learn about different religions and their celebrations. Celebrate and teach whatever religion YOU are to YOUR kids. Let them know those are your beliefs, but that in this wide world there are many different beliefs than yours. So what if your child is fascinated with Jewish custom (or Buddhism, Hinduism, whatever). Religious study is quite interesting and it doesn’t mean you’re doing your personal beliefs any injustice. My children are quite young, but the oldest does know about Hannukah and the youngest will probably decorate his first dreidel this year at our neighborhood holiday fair. Last year during their Sunday school classes, our Jewish congregants split up and went into the classes to tell the story of Hanukkah. The man who came to my oldest son’s class brought little dreidels for all the kids, taught them the song, etc. Interesting and fun! My son asked about it this year, so I just explained that we aren’t Jewish, but it’s a holiday Jewish people celebrate and pointed out some of our Jewish friends who celebrate it. At our house we celebrate Christmas and mark the winter solstice.

Whether you’re Christian, Jewish, or Pagan, this season is about waiting, hoping and celebrating the light -the light of hope – that is expressed in the story of Jesus’ birth; the miracle of lights at Hanukkah or the winter solstice and the turning toward longer days and more light that will eventually bring about new growth and another spring. The other duality of the season is the promise of miracle and generosity -the generosity of God to send his son in a miraculous birth; the miracle of the lamp burning with very low oil for 8 days; and the natural miracle that when all is dead and cold, once again we know the Earth and Goddess will be generous in her bounty.Believe what you want, but there’s no harm in knowing, respecting or enjoying any of these philosophies and celebrations.

JATL

November 30th, 2010
10:14 am

@Jennifer -thanks for the refreshing post!

@V for Vendetta -it drives me crazy that so many “believers” cannot see the forest for the trees! Because of their close-mindedness and judgmental behavior (two VERY anti-Christian acts) -they turn so many off of any kind of religion. It never fails -they cannot comment or speak to anyone they know to be non-religious, atheist or agnostic without insinuating that you’re hell-bound or you’ve done some huge disservice to your children. Most of the people I observe acting in the most Christ-like manner these days actually aren’t Christians at all or any religion for that matter. They’re just kind-hearted and OPEN MINDED people! Happy Holidays -whatever you observe. Heck -even if it’s only a break to spend some time with your family -hope you enjoy it!

JATL

November 30th, 2010
10:15 am

TWG -my first post (and one I REALLY wanted posted) is gone! Guess I’m back in the spam queue. Interesting that it will now post as many other things as I enter…

mom2alex&max

November 30th, 2010
10:18 am

To Name (required): actually, the Bible doesn’t say anywhere that those that don’t accept Jesus will be doomed to eternal damnation. It says very clearly: all who believe in him will have eternal life.

It DOES NOT say that if you don’t believe you will go to hell. It is not up to us to judge. We DO NOT KNOW what God does to those who don’t believe in him. And I wish Christians would stop telling people they will go to hell if they don’t accept Jesus. Saving your own behind is not a good reason to accept Christ’s teachings.

JATL

November 30th, 2010
10:32 am

Here’s a holiday challenge to all of the super-religious Christians:

How about TRULY embodying what the miracle of Jesus’ birth is supposed to herald? Quit believing in HELL! You can see from many comments how you drive so many away with the constant blathering on about damnation. JESUS certainly didn’t talk about hell. Jesus is supposedly God’s promise to us that we can have ever-lasting life and that hope and love exist in the world -and that God is a god of hope and love. I’ve always viewed the birth of Jesus as God’s love letter to humanity -in fact as God’s APOLOGY for any wrathfulness toward humanity. Now that God doesn’t sound like one who would damn people to a hell of any sort. I’ve always found the concept of hell to be incredibly anti-Christian. Perhaps hell is only the shutting of your heart while you’re here on earth -ever thought about that? The more closed and shut your heart and mind are -the more personal hell you will probably experience. There is no greater hell than turning from love and being lonely. Yes, bad things happen to good people. Part of the natural world is negative energy and there would be no good without it, but to not only think it continues after death but to actually want certain people to be mired in the negative energy of hell for all eternity? Sounds like an evil thought to me.

Tiger Ochocinco Mellencamp

November 30th, 2010
10:43 am

My atheist/agnostic kid LOVES CHRISTMAS!!!!!

Tiger Ochocinco Mellencamp

November 30th, 2010
10:44 am

Oh…he’s six.

Cammi317

November 30th, 2010
11:08 am

I was raised Muslim, as I am raising my daughter. Her father and his family are Christians as are many of my relatives. Growing up, my parents encouraged myself and my siblings to learn about other religions. When we were visiting non-Muslim relatives we would often go to church with them. We also participated in school holiday festivities, back when public schools were allowed to have Christmas celebrations. I sometimes enjoy listening to holiday music and gospel music. It’s not so much the literal words, but the faith and spirit behind the words. I find it very uplifting. I raise my daughter the same way. From my perspective, it gave me a much better understanding of our similarities and our differences, particularly on the issue of Jesus Christ. Muslims believe he is a Prophet of G’d, born to the Virgin Mary, and Christians believe he is the Son of G’d. It seems that a lot of people fear that their children will flee from their beliefs if they are allowed to learn about others. Albeit, I have some issues with certain aspects of all organized religions, I believe being allowed to learn about and participate with others has only strengthened my own faith. I see the same thing happening with my daughter. Knowledge is Power…

JATL

November 30th, 2010
11:17 am

@MJG -TWG emailed and asked that you message her. She’s having trouble accessing her email to retrieve the info needed to pass on my email to you!

DB

November 30th, 2010
11:43 am

I think there’s a difference between learning, appreciating and respecting another faith’s traditions, and actually “celebrating” those traditions. As a Christian, I do not “celebrate” Hanukkah. As a Christian, I do not observe Ramadan. As a Christian, I do not observe Beltane. As a Christian, I do not observe Yom Kippur.

I think an empty observance of the forms of a holiday without a true appreciation and belief of the tradition and meaning behind the observance borders on disrespect. Hanukkah is actually a fairly minor observance among orthodox Jews, and I think it’s a little sad that it’s been overinflated by marketing in order to gain some warped sense of “equal time” with the Christmas gift-giving tradition. (Heck, even Christmas is pretty overdone, when you get right down to it :-) )

“Going through the motions” of celebrating another faith’s holidays is an empty gesture, devoid of meaning, and while it is well-meant, it seems to me to belittle that religion’s faith-based tradition. I am all for knowledge and learning about other’s traditions and meanings – in fact, I actively encourage it, because I am a firm believer in greater understanding. But as far as actively participating in them — no, sorry, I draw the line there. Life is too short to fake it.

Kate

November 30th, 2010
11:55 am

@Name (required) – As someone who was raised agnostic, I never thought I’d be the one to give an explanation to your question, but the answer, as I was taught after I started going to church as an adult, is that knowing Jesus and choosing to reject him is a sin, but simply having no knowledge of Jesus is not. Choosing to be an atheist does not necessarily mean you’re going to hell either. My particular religion teaches that no one (and I mean NO ONE) is beyond redemption.

@V for Vendetta – I have a degree in history, and before my current incarnation as a full-time mommy, I had a career in historical research. I can assure you that history is very important to me and plays a role in all my thought processes, including the one that lead me to becoming a Christian. You should try studying the Bible sometime, that sucker is filled with history!

As for Hanukkah, my kids think it’s really cool, too. They have a toy dreidel, and my son also made one in school last year. We may be Christian, but our church tries to incorporate many Jewish traditions into our holiday celebration and teaches everyone about all the Jewish holidays. Judaism is a beautiful religion filled with many wonderful traditions. Plus, they have awesome weddings!

motherjanegoose

November 30th, 2010
12:29 pm

DB…good point…we do not celebrate other religious holidays here but we have taken time to learn about them and appreciate the history involved. I have never put up a Menorah but have enjoyed seeing other homes that display them. I have played the Dreidel game with my kids and had fun!

This is just me speaking…in schools, we see more and more children whose families do not ever attend church and that is ***absolutely their choice***. While some parents can and will do a wonderful job of instilling morals without any religious upbringing…this is not always the case. I am calling a spade a spade here and if you believe in sin, as I do, you can explain evil and why it is wrong to do certain things.

Oh yes, there are many Christians who have sinned ( myself included) but hopefully our moral compass will direct us back to the path we need to be on.

On the flip side, there are church children who are toots too!

I have personally observed that kindness, charity, obedience, respect, courtesy and other things one might learn in Sunday School have continued to disappear from both children and adults.

While it may not be popular, OBEDIENCE is something we all have to do or face the consequences of a speeding ticket, late fine on a bill, or even jail. Would that all parents could explain this to their children earlier than later. No it is not fun to be obedient but it is sometimes necessary. Even adults can be punished!