How to handle when schools add/subtract whole classes?

Now that the kids have settled into their classes for two weeks comes the inevitable note from schools:

“We have over/under estimated the number of kids in your child’s grade and we will need to add/subtract an entire class from the grade. We are looking for volunteers to switch teachers. If we don’t get enough volunteers we will take care of it for you.”

I know schools do their very best trying to estimate how many sections they need in a grade, and yes kids are resilient, but it still really stinks to have your child’s teacher ripped from them after just establishing a trust and rapport.

When Rose was in kindergarten the school thought they were going to have more kids than they ended up with so they had to collapse a class down – of course it was the last teacher hired. (There’s a lesson moms, always ask when your teacher was hired. Be aware last one hired often the first one collapsed.) I showed up to beg them not to move my kid. My 5-year-old had put so much trust into me telling her “Don’t worry. You’re going to be with this wonderful teacher.” She had learned the teacher’s classroom procedures and had gotten comfortable with the teacher and her classmates.

It had to be done. The die was cast and my child’s entire class was dispersed into the rest of the kindergarten. (The school did make an effort to send each child with one or two friends, which was appreciated.) However, Rose did not adjust well to the change and had a pretty tough year. I do think had she stayed with the other teacher the bad stuff would have been minimized.

Schools can handle the addition/subtraction in a couple of ways:

  1. They can be fairly open about the process and encourage you to write to the principal to express if you have a particular reason not to have your child moved. (Ie we’ve just moved to this state or my child really does not deal well with change.)
  2. Or they can say we’re making this change, not encourage parents to write in and be fairly closed-door about the process.

So have you gotten the letter home this year, or in the past? How did your school handle it? Did they want to hear from you pro or con? Did they just want to do the deed that had to be done? How did the change go? How can the pain of these changes be limited?

58 comments Add your comment

motherjanegoose

August 20th, 2010
7:47 am

I cannot fathom being a teacher who has decorated her room, gotten to know her class, poured over student information, met the parents, set the tone for the class and THEN being told ‘We are shutting you down…”

We moved to this house 1 month after my daughter started Kindergarten and she had to switch teachers and schools. Her brother, switched too. He was in 5th grade. Our builder was dragging his feet and told us we could move into an unfinished house but we were told it was best to sign the contract when the work was finished. Yes, he stepped it up when he realized this and got a lot done rather quickly. I was just beginning to travel, so in addition to my out of town meetings and one who just started Kinder, we yanked them both out of schools and MOVED.

Whew, I would not want to repeat that again!

Not fun for my kids to get settled in to school and then move not only classrooms but schools, one month later. We hastily had to teach a 5 year old her new phone number and address. Not a pretty picture but guess what…they both made it!

Do schools actually entertain your ##1 option in today’s economy? Someone here would know…I do not!

I am interested if there are any teachers out there who have been in this position and how they felt. Where do they put you and do YOU have a choice in pleading to keep you class? Do they listen to the parents over your vote?

DigALittleDeeper

August 20th, 2010
8:23 am

I can relate, but on a different level. This is the second school year where my daughter has started a science class without a book.

Why not just keep the teacher and class in place, it’s obviously she was apart of the budget? Did they eliminate the class just to save money?

LIFO Method Dumb

August 20th, 2010
8:29 am

The “Last In, First Out” method of reducing workforce is not smart when the goal is cost reduction. Most of the school systems in the metro area have reduced staff over the last two years in an effort to reduce costs. However, they employed this LIFO method to staff reduction. Think about that. The last hired teacher is also one of the lowest paid employees. Typically, in every school there are teachers who have worked long past retirement age. They are elligible for a full pension whenever they choose. These are the highest paid employees on the payroll. Many times, these are also the same teachers most resistant to any change the system wants to adopt. They are sometimes the most vocal in opposition to new instructional developments. It would be much wiser to reduce your staff of these teachers first. The newly hired teacher is hungry. She/He needs the work. They are eager to be there. They have not become jaded. Most importantly, they are cheap.

In private enterprise, when layoffs come, middle management is the first to go. They cost more than low level employees.

JJ

August 20th, 2010
8:30 am

YAWN….we could have covered this yesterday……so much for a fun friday topic.

Ya’ll have a nice weekend. I’m out.

MiltonMan

August 20th, 2010
8:36 am

How about being a little flexible here? I attended DoD schools growing up and I never knew who I would get & plenty of times through out the year I had to switch classes. My current employer convinces us to think out of the box. The company received 4 patents last year.

TechMom

August 20th, 2010
8:43 am

I don’t understand why the school system didn’t know by open house how many students they were going to have (or not have). I understand the not knowing if you are going to be 10 this way or that way for a grade but an entire class short? Isn’t there some kind of indication based on withdrawals? I guess in public school people can move and switch whenever they feel like it but it seems like there could be some kind of proactive approach to avoid this issue.

BTW, I moved and switched schools lots growing up (military) and I really don’t think the impact of changing teachers lasts the entire year. Sure there is disruption for the week or two but if the kids are in the same school with the same students and the same schedule, I don’t think it’s as big of a issue as T is making it out to be. If that’s the case then no teachers should be allowed to have babies and go out on leave for 6 weeks because there’s no way her students can adjust to her being out. I get there are some differences b/c the class would remain together but still kids get into a routine and can adjust to the new teacher.

I would feel bad for the teacher. What do they do if the teacher had a contract? I suppose if he/she were needed in another grade that they were qualified to teach they would be given a new position but to be laid off essentially after a contract has been signed is unfair.

motherjanegoose

August 20th, 2010
8:44 am

@LIFO, I see your point. Yesterday, I mentioned the balance between enthusiasm ( young teachers)
and experience ( old teachers). I am one of those older folks who might cost more to a school, if I were still teaching. I share my experience with young and old teachers alike via staff development.

“Most importantly, they are cheap. ” not sure if I would want my kid in a school full or even half full of cheap teachers…anyone else? As with anything, a little experience can help things move quickly in the right direction and yes we DO need to make room for new teachers as we all started one day. Having balance is important…to me.

@ JJ…you do know how to bluntly let us know when the topic is not your cup of tea :)

TechMom

August 20th, 2010
8:50 am

MiltonMan – I’m with you on being flexible not just as adults but also in teaching kids to be flexible. And yet I see so many times when parents are afraid of being flexible with their kids. We get up at X time, Johnny has breakfast, then plays for 1.25 hours, then has a nap from X-Y am and then we do this, and Tuesday nights are hamburger helper night and no we cannot possibly go to dinner on Thursday with friends b/c Cindy needs to be in the bath at 7:18pm and reading a night-night story at 7:45 so she can be in bed at 7:56. Ahhh! The world does NOT operate that way and I feel like some parents are so bent on keeping a schedule that their whole world revolves around it and they teach their kids to be the same way. Kids are resilient and flexible and yet we are teaching them to be afraid of change instead of embracing it!

iRun

August 20th, 2010
8:55 am

This has never happened at my son’s school. I can ask around to see if it ever has…maybe back in the 70s and 80s when people were fleeing the city for the suburbs. But in the past decade+ our schools as grown so rapidly they had to build another school. Even with that the 4th and 5th graders are in trailers.

But, if it did happen I’d tell my son that these things happens and he needs to just get used to a new set of classroom rules and get his work done. It helps that he’s in 4th grade and this is the year they start with having a homeroom teacher and an afternoon teacher. He’s never been one to get all that emotionally attached to his teacher. His friends, yes. Teacher, no.

iRun

August 20th, 2010
8:57 am

Wow, typo city. Sorry.

Lori

August 20th, 2010
8:59 am

Change is a part of life. Schools sometimes just don’t know how many kids they are going to have. Populations change and people withdraw, so they at least know that, but a lot of people don’t preregister their kids and they just show up on the first day of school or even after the first week or so and sign up. How can a school possible foresee that? It’s unfortunate for kids to have to change classes, but they, like anyone else in life need to learn to deal with change. I agree with TechMom, the inpact of changing shouldn’t last all year. If it does, then your child has issues regarding adaptation to change that need to be worked out.

LIFO Method Dumb

August 20th, 2010
9:07 am

Motherjanegoose,

Perhaps my post does discount the value of experience too much. What I mean is that employing a blanket policy of firing whoever was the last hired is not good policy. If the school system decided to reduce workforce by one teacher in every school, then I am sure that an objective case by case, teacher by teacher, evaluation based on cost, experience, and attitude would be most appropriate.

I suppose that I let my own personal experience jade my post. In that personal experience, I have found that the loudest complainers are those teaching past or close to retirement.

You know a lot of teachers, How many do you know that are in their 60’s and love to chew your ear all day about how the school system has messed this up, or been too unreasonable. They are poison to the newly hired eager teachers.

motherjanegoose

August 20th, 2010
9:13 am

@TechMom…balance….

I had mine on a schedule when they were smaller for nap times and bed time. You probably already know that I am BIG on kids getting enough sleep. 10 minutes either way is NOT going to kill anyone.
But those who say, “oh they will fall asleep when they are tired…” are not in my orbit. IMHO children get over tired and then wired up and will not fall asleep. Or kids that take a nap from 5-7 will not want to go to bed when the rest of us do. This might just be my kids?

When I taught in Texas, if it was 2:16 and your lesson plans stated you would be in chapter 7 of Social Studies…that is where you had better be if anyone from the state came to observe you. They checked everything! Is that how it is here now? I do not know.

Yes, kids are still coming to school each day. It amazes me that parents have no idea when school starts…do they just think the buses are out roaming the streets? I DO understand that there are some who move to GA from other states and they may not realize that we start earlier.

My kids adored many of their teachers. We still run into them and they stop to chat for 30 minutes.
My son invited his 3rd grade teacher to our HS graduation dinner/party. Here eyes teared up when I introduced her. It was awesome!

motherjanegoose

August 20th, 2010
9:15 am

LIFO..thanks for your comment…I do know a lot of teachers but most of those I know are not in their 60’s and teach early childhood…their knees and backs simply cannot take it….:) So I do not have an answer to that question…imagine it?

SuwaneeMommy

August 20th, 2010
9:21 am

I never had this happen to me (as a student in one of California’s largest public school districts for all 13 years) and I never experienced it in college, either. I don’t think it happens all that often, and I really don’t think it’s that big of a deal for students. Plus, if it’s a constant issue at the schools that your children attend, I think it points to leadership who don’t understand how to project demand and operations very well.

Robin

August 20th, 2010
9:22 am

This was done twice that I know of in the last couple of years at my kids elementary school in Gwinnett. Once they had to create a new class because of too many new students coming in after the school year had started; and another time eliminate a class when the number projected for that grade level just never happened.

Both instances were definitely related to the rise and fall in the economy. My kids were never involved but I know families that were and the transitions were handled with very few problems. They always paired up a few kids to help with the transition. You always had some parents (the ones that must handpick teachers every year) get upset, but all in all everything was just fine! I believe the school system mandates this and the funds go elsewhere within that school.

I believe the parents are the ones that make a big deal of the situation, which the child can see and in turn upsets them. Kids have to learn that change happens and you can make any situation into a positive one. Parents need to be the positive role model in these kinds of situations.

theresa

August 20th, 2010
9:22 am

jj my other topic idea for today was on underwear. Maybe i’ll put it up later just for you!!!

motherjanegoose

August 20th, 2010
10:07 am

@ T…should the rest of us complain when we do not like your topic choice and then maybe you will put something up to please us too? :) We might be on to something here!

This kind of reminds me of parents who are short order cooks as the kids do not like the dinner entree presented ( I do not like this and will not eat it or participate) and then Mama scrambles around to find something “just for you”. Thinking out loud here…that can be dangerous.

Kate

August 20th, 2010
10:54 am

My son’s school sent home a letter before school even started letting us know there was a possibility they would have to add another class to several grades (including his) after school started due to increased enrollment. Given that information, I assumed my son’s class would be huge, but there is only about 22 or 23 kids in there, which really doesn’t seem like a lot to me. When I was in school, including elementary, we always had at least 25 kids in a class, and I don’t remember it really causing any problems. Previous generations, who generally seem better educated to me, had even more than that in a classroom. This subject relates to the topic yesterday. Where do school boards come up with these seemingly arbitrary class sizes?

TechMom

August 20th, 2010
10:57 am

MJG – I don’t have a problem with schedules, especially during the school year with bed time, but I see so many parents who go way overboard with it to the point where they or their children can’t seem to function outside of their normal schedule. And typically these are the same parents who are so versed in routine that it’s not just a time schedule they’re sticking to- it’s about controlling every single little thing in their lives that their routine ends up ruling them.

deidre_NC

August 20th, 2010
11:06 am

i think the kids will be fine if they are allowed to be. just dont act like its the end of the world. kids need to learn how the real world works from the time they are young…i think if everyone acts like its no big deal then it wont be. kids are too coddled. sorry if i offend anyone. people move and kids lose their friends, teacher quit or get fired and the kids have to get a new teacher. parents get divorced. the dog dies. it all sucks and it can for sure be sad. but its life. let them be sad but then let/help them get over it.

Kate

August 20th, 2010
11:13 am

TechMom – I see your point. I know a lot of parents like that. There is no spontanaity in their lives at all. Every moment of their child’s day (even on the weekends) is planned out weeks, or even months, in advance and every spare moment is taken up with some class or sport. Yet, those very parents seem incapable of really interacting with their kids. They probably couldn’t tell you when they last had a real conversation with their children, if they ever have at all. It almost seems like they are afraid to be alone with them.

Reader

August 20th, 2010
11:52 am

I’m trying to understand why a parent would even believe she has a choice in this matter. The class is essentially shut down, the teacher (at best)reassigned, the classroom used for other purposes (or mothballed, I guess).
If you say your child shouldn’t be moved, exactly what should happen to her? Moved to the new grade with her teacher?
Sitting in the vacant classroom where they store the extra desks and unused equipment?
Am I missing something?

lakerat

August 20th, 2010
12:21 pm

I mentioned recently how my youngest son was moved and moved in kinder and first grade so I will not rehash it here. Moving about is just a part of life, and kids are adaptable – some of the more “hovering ” parents like Ms. T are seemingly the ones who are affected the most.

Personally, I was in 2 different kindergartens (in 2 different states 1000 miles apart) 3 different elementary schools in 6 years (in 3 different states), 3 different middle/jr. high schools (in 2 different states), 1 high school, 1 college (out of my home state), and 1 grad school – and I have had 8 different employers in 33 years, so, in my book, change is good, except when the current White House “change” is involved!!?!!??!?!?!?!?!

Valstake

August 20th, 2010
12:29 pm

I can’t have much sympathy in this matter, since my family always moved in the late fall from western NY to Florida and then in late spring moved back to western NY where we spent the summer. Changing schools was simply routine for us. One year I started 7th grade in western NY, went to Florida (as usual) and ended the school year in Connecticut. It didn’t seem to effect my grades too much – I eventually attained a MA.

Children readily adapt to situations if their parents don’t overreact to changes of routine.

motherjanegoose

August 20th, 2010
1:06 pm

@lakerat…loved your last line!

OFF TOPIC:
I am curious about the whole: Obama is a Christian, as he prays every day…line I read the other day. I also remember an old line, I learned as a child:
actions speak louder than words…thinking out loud again…sorry!

Yes, Christians are supposed to help one another. They are also expected to work themselves…when they are able.

Proverbs 12:11
He who works his land will have abundant food, but he who chases fantasies lacks judgment.

ON TOPIC:
@reader…I was thinking the same thing but I have never had a child in a shut down class nor been shut down myself. I HAVE BEEN SHOT DOWN on this blog….LOL.

Kate

August 20th, 2010
1:21 pm

MJG – You are Obama comment was way off topic, but since today’s topic isn’t that awesome anyway (sorry TWG), I can’t help but comment on the Obama/Muslim controversy myself.

I heard the same quote as you about Obama praying every day. My mother in law saw a quote from one of his spokesmen stating that Obama is a devout Christian, he just doesn’t “wear it on his sleeve.” According to my mother in law, a true Christian is supposed to wear their faith “on their sleeve.” Whether I agree with her or not (no way I’m arguing anything with my mother in law!), given the fact so many people are under the impression Obama is a Muslim, he may want to re-think how demonstrative he is of his faith.

Kate

August 20th, 2010
1:22 pm

sorry for the typo. Should be your, not you are!

Mom of Two

August 20th, 2010
1:31 pm

For a typical 5 year old, changing to a new teacher only 2 weeks into the school year would not affect the entire school year. I can potentially see taking a couple of days to readjust, but if Rose couldn’t adjust after an entire school year, the change in teachers was not the problem.

Rose either wasn’t ready for school and would have had a difficult school year regardless of the teacher; and/or, she was merely feeding off of your insecurity.

This did happen to my youngest last year. They actually added a class a couple of weeks into the school year and culled kids from the existing classes. Although my kid was moved, it had zero effect on him.

This year, there are two teachers with the same last name. My kid thought he was getting one teacher (one he already knew), when in actuality, he got the other. His attitude was pretty much “whatever.”

Kids feed off their parents. If the parent is in a tizzy and makes a big deal out of something and expresses negativity, the kid will too.

motherjanegoose

August 20th, 2010
1:38 pm

@ kate, yes it was off topic but I did preface it….lakerat’s last line made me think of it :) maybe she will take the blame…LOL!

@ Mom of Two…last paragraph absolutely correct. There have been a few things, as a parent, I
( wrongly) have made a big deal out of and then my kids followed suit (sp?) We often underestimate how much they are picking up from us. There have also been other things that they needed to know and I am proud that they have picked up on them as they move into adulthood.

irisheyes

August 20th, 2010
1:38 pm

Nowadays students are SO transient (especially in low income schools) that it’s almost impossible for principals and central offices to be right 100% of the time. The predict, they use models, they do the best they can, but in the end, it has to happen. Would you want your child in a class of 25 – 30 students when the principal had the ability to bring the numbers down? And when it comes to dissolving a class, it’s not up to the principal to determine whether that happens. They get told from the central office, and they have to make it happen. This year is the first year in a couple we haven’t had to dissolve a kindergarten class. (Kindergarten is the hardest grade to judge, because you just don’t know how many will show up.)

Off topic: If the President says he’s a Christian, who am I to call him a liar whether or not he “shows his faith on his sleeve”? I’m curious, though, if he really had been a Muslim, why is that a problem? Why is it that we feel that Muslims are now the pariahs of our society?

lwa

August 20th, 2010
1:53 pm

No a Christian does not have to wear it on their sleeve. It is reflective in their actions.

Let’s not ask any more of this President than we would of others. Bush Sr. and Jr. and Clinton were not hounded about their religions preference or practices.

Lets get back on topic.

Tiger Ochocinco Mellencamp

August 20th, 2010
1:55 pm

I went to 6 different schools K-6, two of which were mid year transfers, then two different ones 7-12. Your kids will be fine. YOU may not be fine, and that may be a catalyst to more problems for them. Left to their own devices, they’re not developing abandonment complexes because they, along with half the class, got sent into another class..in the same school they originally attended to begin with.

Jesse's Girl

August 20th, 2010
1:56 pm

I’m sorry…but I could give a rat’s ass what faith Obama practices. He’s a slippery little eel of a man with only his time as “President” giving him any true political experience at all. He was a sub-par Senator who spent more time schlepping for causes his constituents didn’t sanction and going to dinner parties than he did doing work of any kind that would have truly benefited said constituents. NOW….per the topic at hand….I think its a good lesson for kids. Yes…even the cute kinders. They need to learn that things don’t always go the way they want them to go. Its not so much learning to accept dissappointment as it is about learning your experience is as good as you make it. A lesson more kids need to learn in my opinion. You explain to your kid…”hey sweetie, you don’t have to like it. and you can even cry about it and talk it over with me when you get home. but while you’re at school, you will do your best and you will treat the situation and your teacher with respect.”

A Pastor

August 20th, 2010
1:58 pm

Off topic: As a Pastor, I find it refreshing that the President’s faith is in question. We are given clear instructions of when and where to pray in Matthew, and the Presidential Podium seems out of place. Using your faith for political gain is like using an olive branch to beat a person.

motherjanegoose

August 20th, 2010
2:12 pm

lwa…what did you contribute on the topic today…I missed it ;)

Perhaps some Americans just want to know the truth about things…I think it is getting harder and harder to find out the truth about anything related to government…maybe is is just me.

This is something interesting to know:

But what’s really shaky is the story’s accuser, Obama “faith adviser” Joshua DuBois, trying to tout how the president is deeply, “diligently” Christian, when the president is much more diligent at golfing than he is at church attendance. The number of Sunday church services Obama has attended since the Inauguration doesn’t get beyond counting on one hand, even bypassing the pews at Christmas.

Is that true?

Sorry for the hijack…it is Friday afternoon and we might need a diversion? Maybe not.
If he is more devoted to golfing, that is his choice not mine…just be truthful with us.

lakerat

August 20th, 2010
2:15 pm

And those olive branches can be painful, too!

Kate

August 20th, 2010
2:18 pm

Personally, since I seldom believe anything they say anyway, I believe politicians should keep their mouths shut on the subject of religion whenever possible. I just found the idea of Obama praying every day humorous. Maybe he’s praying to get re-elected?

HB

August 20th, 2010
2:32 pm

MJG, the First Family tried to find a church when they first moved here, but after attending services at a few, they decided their presence was just too disruptive to the churches and their members (crowds of nonmembers showing up, blocked off streets, long lines for congregants to get through metal detectors, people trying to take pictures during the service, etc). They’ve chosen instead to worship primarily in private services at the Camp David chapel as George and Laura Bush did. The fact that security-wise it’s easier to get the President onto a private golf course (or in President Bush’s case to a secured federal land for mountain biking on a regular basis) than into a church on a public street in a city neighborhood should not be seen as a sign of greater devotion to sport than to faith.

Theresa, the blog ate one of my posts. Could you please dig it out? Thanks.

LM

August 20th, 2010
3:08 pm

Kinds adapt to change if you don’t get all crazy yourself.

As a kid we moved a lot… by the time I bought my house in Lawrenceville, I was 26 at it was the 52nd place I had lived. I went to 9 elementary schools, 3 middle schools and 5 high schools. I didn’t know anything different and adapted.

My daughter has been in 1 pre-k, 1 elememtary, 1 middle and 1 high school. We moved between middle and high school and since we had been visiting my boyfriend for years before the moved, she already had a feel for the area.

As for the president, didn’t want him in the white house, but I respect the office he holds. As to his religion, if you have to make a point to inform others your beliefs then you are not a believer. Actions speak!

LM

August 20th, 2010
3:09 pm

sorry that was Kids adapt, clumsy fingers :)

lakerat

August 20th, 2010
3:31 pm

And here I thought I had moved a lot by moving 35 times in 57 years, when LM moved almost twice that many times in half the number of years…5 high schools? Holy crap – and I thought my sister had it bad when she was in 3 high schools in less than 8 months.

I bow down to you LM “I am not worthy, I am not worthy!!!!!!

motherjanegoose

August 20th, 2010
3:38 pm

@ lakerat, me too! We have lived in this house for almost 13 years, Prior to that I lived in 14 different houses, not including 2 apartments in college and the dorms. Not a DROP in the bucket compared to LM. Can we say, “pack your suitcase?”

DB

August 20th, 2010
3:43 pm

While I am not in LM’s or lakerat’s league, I went to five different schools by the time I was in 7th grade — my dad was tranferred a lot due to his job. I can’t tell you how many classes I walked into mid-year and had to figure it all out all over again. *shrug* I survived, and I got pretty good at it. My parents never really “prepared” me for it, other than one time I got a chance to check out a school before I was registered.

Ironically, I swore I would never do that to MY kids — which resulted in them being in the same house all their lives and not only that, they were in the same private school from K-12! I think I probably went overboard with the whole “stability” thing! Happily, neither one of them had a bit of trouble adjusting to large universities, which I was watching for since they had not had to deal with a lot of that kind of change.

Kids move all the time — their parents change houses, their parents get new jobs, they go from public to private or private to public . . . give kids some credit, they almost always adjust well as long as the parents adjust well! Kids pick up their parents’ concerns. If the parents are positive, then the kids will generally adapt well. Learning how to adapt to life’s ups and downs is an essential life skill.

smh

August 20th, 2010
4:41 pm

No one has mentioned the influx of students who’s parents, either being new to the area or in denial about the end of summer, bring their children to school on their own schedule i.e. after Labor Day. Our school is approximately one classroom less than expected. I almost bet that the numbers will shift right after the holiday. Never fails. When my oldest was in second grade a class was added and she moved. I was not happy with her teacher at that time and requested a classroom transfer after the second week of school. We knew she would move, welcomed the move and it was the best thing we did for her thus far in her education. It took until the first nine weeks was over to get the new classroom in place and we were thrilled for the remainder of that year.

Kate

August 20th, 2010
4:48 pm

It’s true kids do adapt and change can actually be a good thing. My son changed schools last year after we moved into a new school district, and he absolutely loves his new school. He has really thrived there. When I was in 5th grade a new class was formed about 2 months into the school year due increased enrollment. Each class had two or three students removed to make up the new class. I remember being so worried that I would be one of the ones moved and then being so relieved when I wasn’t. However, the new teacher hired for the class quickly became one of the most popular and respected teachers at the school and I ended up being jealous that I wasn’t moved!

penguinmom

August 20th, 2010
6:32 pm

@smh – I was thinking the same thing. There are always kids who come into the school system after Labor Day. I assume it is a conscious choice because you’d pretty much have to live under a rock to not know school has started already.

DavidS

August 21st, 2010
8:53 am

Homeschooling your children would solve all of these problems and make sure they were being given the kind of quality education you all seem to think is important for them. So what are you waiting for?

MR. NADS

August 21st, 2010
11:16 am

homeschool ,you fool!!

Robin

August 21st, 2010
2:20 pm

@smh Good point that I should have expanded upon. Most families try to move during the Summer months. Schools here in metro ATL start early August, while schools in the Midwest (OH, MI, IL) and Northeast (NY, NJ, CT) start very late August or after Labor Day. If I were moving here in August with kids, I would certainly give myself a bit more time to settle in and start in September.
I should point out that my 5th grader came home yesterday and announced a new classmate coming in on Monday from CA!