How are your kids’ class sizes this year?

Last May the flood gates were thrown open when the Georgia State Board of Education voted that in this current economic crisis school districts could adjust their class sizes however they saw fit.

From Maureen Downey’s May 23 Get Schooled Blog:

“Described as an emergency response to a worsening financial climate, The 9-2 vote means that Georgia school districts can raise class size by 5five, 10, 15 students — or as many students as they choose — without seeking a waiver from the board or the Department of Education.”

“The vote essentially guts the prevailing state rules that mandated 23 students or fewer in k-3 and 28 in grades 4-8.”

Maureen went on to interview the districts about their plans after the vote. Here’s what they told her they were planning to do as of May:

“*   City of Atlanta: “The district’s budget for FY11 has already been developed and approved by the School Board. It includes slight increases in average class sizes for all grade levels, but the resultant class sizes remain within state limits. The district does not anticipate having to use the state’s recent lessening of class size restrictions option at this point,” said spokesman Keith Bromery.

*   Clayton County: “As of today, the only class-size change Clayton County Public Schools is planning to implement for 2010-11 is increasing our kindergarten class size from 23 to 25 students. Each kindergarten classroom will be staffed by a teacher and a paraprofessional,” said Clayton schools spokesman Charles White.

*   Cobb County: “In Cobb, we anticipated the need to increase class sizes for the coming school year and planned accordingly by seeking waivers last fall and earlier this spring,” said Cobb schools spokesman Jay Dillon. “We do not anticipate a need to increase class sizes further than what we’ve already requested. In fact, after a preliminary review of our current status and the allotment of teachers for next school year, we are confident that the worst fears about overflowing classrooms will not happen in Cobb. Many classes will see a marginal increase of two or three, and in some cases four of five students, but we don’t foresee any overflowing classrooms or unmanageable situations.”

*   DeKalb County: “Our budget is already set, and we are raising class sizes by two students,” said DeKalb schools spokesman Dale Davis. “We will take this new state policy under advisement.”

*   Fayette County: “We will not take advantage of the new rule for increasing class sizes. We have already set our class sizes to the rule that was implemented last year,” said Fayette schools spokeswoman Melinda Berry-Dreisbach.

*   Fulton County: “We have no plans to go to the board and say that we have been given carte blanche now and let’s raise class size even higher,” said Fulton schools spokeswoman Allison Toller. Fulton parents can expect class sizes of 23 or less in the early grades and 30 students starting in fourth, she said. However, if the system was faced with one or two students arriving last minute and pushing class sizes beyond those limits, Toller said Fulton then might take advantage of the new flexibility.

*   Gwinnett County: Under a flexibility contract, Gwinnett is not affected by the state board policy as it sets its own class sizes. (The system has announced plans to raise class size next year by one student.)”

So I want know how have the schools done when left to their own devices to set class sizes? Are your child’s class sizes larger than last year? Are they out-of-control large? Are they equivalent to whatever you district is quoted as saying above? If large are they in the process of hiring more teachers to take the overflow?

We have lots of teachers in our community so I am very interested to hear from them what is the optimum class size for the different grades? (I’m sure what works for K is very different than what works for fourth or seventh or eleventh.) At what numbers should parents worry that their kids’ classes are just way too big?

(This is another blog from Maureen on how studies on class size often differ. For your consideration as well.)

85 comments Add your comment

motherjanegoose

August 19th, 2010
7:49 am

When I first started teaching , in Texas, I had 17 students all by myself. I was in Kindergarten over 25 years ago. I came here and was given a para pro with 18 WOW….that was a huge difference.

I would easily take 25 Kindergarteners with a para pro over 18 by myself. That is just me and others may differ. I have been out of the classroom for 12 years but I now work with 100 children at a time…for a 30 minute session. Many are amazed I can control that many children but it is different than being in there all day with the same children.

BUT….30 children in one classroom in the 4th or 5th grade is tough!

I actually spoke to someone, in my block, last night who confirmed 30 children in the 5th grade in her school…it is in Gwinnett County. Another lady was speaking with us and she had taught school grade for years but left for another job that is not in the school system. The size of older children alone makes for a crowded classroom. She told us she had 25 last year and cannot imagine adding 5 more children….chaos. T….is there money to hire teachers? I thought teachers were being cut.

Yes, I know some teachers used to teach 40 kids in one room…years ago. They also had 8 grades together in a one room school house. Parenting and discipline styles were quite different and teachers have seen many things lately they never saw years ago.

My children , for the most part, had a wonderful education in the Gwinnett County Public Schools.
We had just a few challenges. We are now out of the system. I know several wonderful educators personally and respect the jobs they do. They are not miracle workers. I admire the fortitude of those who have hard work to do and accept the challenge.

Parents should be concerned and I am relieved that I do not have to walk on that sidewalk again. Our government is in a mess and I am not sure that what is being proposed is working at all. It affects all of us and I pity the children who will be overlooked as the classrooms are full and the teachers have only so much time to get things accomplished. If these are your children, I suggest you stop complaining and do something to solve the problem. Voting is one step.

I am curious, what are the private schools doing. I am hearing that enrollment is on the decline and wonder how this affects their bottom line.

Also, I think it would be great if teachers would tell us how many they feel comfortable with in their grade level…it is different for everyone! Little children are smaller physically but they are busy and interactive. Older children take up more room but can sit at a desk during class.

Busy Mom

August 19th, 2010
7:52 am

My 1st grader in Gwinnett has 21 in her class. Her kindergarten class had 21 last year, but that was with a para pro. This year the same Kindergarten class has 26. That seems like a lot!

irisheyes

August 19th, 2010
8:20 am

I have 21+ in my second grade (I say + because it could grow.), and there are 30+ in the upper grades. Not much extra help. I had to laugh (on the inside) at registration when I had parent after parent express shock that I had that many kids and no help. This is what “doing more with less” (that favorite term of so many legislators)looks like.

SnellvilleMom

August 19th, 2010
8:24 am

My daughter’s 4th grade class in Gwinnett has 24. For comparison, last year in third grade she had 21. From talking to my friends within the county, I think it varies quite a bit by cluster.

motherjanegoose

August 19th, 2010
8:42 am

@irish eyes…I do love 2nd grade and taught it too but Kinder is my favorite. Loved your last line…is that kind like “not in my backyard”? HHHMMM everyone else needs to handle it but not at my kid’s school.

FYI…the front page of the Gwinnett Daily Post states that our county ACT scores are improving. “an average composite score of 22.3 out of a possible 36, compared to 20.7 for the state and 21 for the nation…” Not sure what kind of a scholarship this would get you here, probably not much. Maybe something at a very small school. But for those who criticize the schools in GA and say that the education is better in most other states, take a look at this 2009 survey….Gwinnett County appears to be holding it’s own:

http://www.act.org/news/data/09/states.html

here is another link for other metro Atlanta schools:

http://www.ajc.com/news/georgia-act-scores-inch-594974.html

I apologize to those who live out of our state and join us. We hear ( from others) that the schools here are horrible and that everyone else is light years ahead of us. Some of us know something different.

deidre_NC

August 19th, 2010
8:43 am

a lot of schools are very happy to accept volunteers to help with things inthe classroom..not just parties….parents who have the time should see what they can do to help out if the classes are too crowded.

motherjanegoose

August 19th, 2010
8:44 am

Am I in moderation since I mentioned the Gwinnett Post… :)

Shannon

August 19th, 2010
8:58 am

14 kids; 2 teachers (Private)

Lynn

August 19th, 2010
9:05 am

Teachers in Cobb have anywhere from 31-37 students per class. It’s called crowd control. The government has sent money for the state and its not to late rehire or hire teachers. Teachers who are certified can get a class together within 72 hours.

motherjanegoose

August 19th, 2010
9:07 am

@ deidre_ NC…OR NOT…some parents add to the mayhem

I remember when my son was in 1st grade. I volunteered to share a few Halloween stories and songs. The teacher pulled me aside and said, ” I have to go to the office to get something. I am grabbing the para pro to come in here to be with you as legally you cannot be in here alone with the children.”

I said, “that is perfect.”

A few weeks later, the teacher came to me to tell me:’ Remember the para pro who was in here when you were telling the Halloween stories?” ” Well, she told me ***that Mom really knew what to do and how to handle the kids….a lot different from others we have had!*** I told her you WERE A TEACHER!” We both laughed.

I do not know how to wait tables, prepare spreadsheets, clean teeth nor even program our own TV’s remote control but I DO know kids!

it doesn't matter much

August 19th, 2010
9:13 am

I could teach 30 well behaved students easier than I could teach 3 unruly children.

If you teach at a good school where parental involvement is high and behavioral issues are minimum, you won’t care if they throw a couple more kids in there. However, if you work at a school where discipline is the major issue day in and day out, another kid in there causing trouble is the last thing you need.

Its not the quantity of students nearly as much as the quality of students.

This is a mess

August 19th, 2010
9:17 am

20 2nd graders, 2 teachers, private, school is at capacity!

theresa

August 19th, 2010
9:20 am

mjg anlt rescie right now but as soon as I can get to my big computer I will.

TechMom

August 19th, 2010
9:32 am

My son is in private school. I think enrollment is down for most private schools though not horribly and about the same this year as it was last year. My son’s school specifically cut many teachers/parapros/staff the year before last. Quite honestly, they were overstaffed in some areas anyway (many of the classes had only 12 students the year before last) and because they weren’t expecting a huge increase in enrollment and needed to get out of the red and into the black, they decided to raise class size to the state max where possible. Most of the K-3 classes still have 18 or less students and a parapro is shared between 2 classes instead of each class having their own.

On the high school level, most of my son’s classes have 18-24 students. Some of the classes have as few as 10-12 (AP Chemistry for example). The only class my son has that has more than 24 students is Spanish III (there are 25) but that’s b/c there is only 1 teacher qualified to teach Spanish III. His band class is percussionists only and has 5 students. So it really just depends. We have had a 5% tuition increase every year (I’ve just come to expect it), and the year before last when they made all the staffing cuts, they also cut teacher & staff salary 5%.

Going into this year we still had the 5% increase in tuition and the school has been very realistic about finding ways to cut costs that don’t impact education. One of the areas of cost savings which seemed counter-intuitive in these days of going ‘green’ is that they switched to paper/disposable products in the lunch room. Even some of the kids were upset. But the cost savings (b/c they didn’t need dishwashers anymore) was $80,000. As much as I want to be green, it’s hard to cut that much from a school budget without it really affecting education somewhere else. So in the meantime, paper products it is. :(

RJ

August 19th, 2010
9:32 am

We haven’t seen an increase in the school system in which I teach, however Fulton County schools haven’t begun yet, so I have no idea what my children’s classrooms will look like.

Smaller classes don’t necessarily equate to a better education. The quality of the teacher and curriculum play a large role in the success of a student. It also depends on the level of the students. When my oldest attended private school, her 5th grade class had 28 students. I remember walking into the school for a field trip and approaching the classroom hearing absolutely nothing. I figured my run to Starbucks caused me to miss them. I was shocked to enter the classroom and find everyone sitting there waiting patiently for the teacher to prepare them to leave. Nobody was talking. I asked my daughter later if that was normal or was everybody just on their best behavior for the field trip. She explained that you just didn’t talk in that teacher’s class without permission. They were allowed to talk at certain times, however if you talked when everyone was to be quiet you would receive a demerit, have silent lunch for 30 minutes (nobody could talk the first 15 minutes of lunch) or lose time from recess. I regret putting her in public school to this day. She has adjusted to the testing madness, but the quality of education is not the same. Regardless of how small classes are, the testing mania has put an end to higher order thinking skills. It’s all about regurgitation of facts. It’s quite frustrating.

I’ve lamented many times before about how non-core courses are treated as frivolous classes that allow core teachers to have a break. Our classes are often overflowing with students without concern of how learning is impacted. I’ve seen elementary art teachers expected to teach 2 classes at one time. Do you really think they’ll be able to do anything other than color? It really is nothing more than crowd control. Personally, I think the whole idea of teaching the whole child is out the window at this point. I haven’t heard those words used since the 90’s. Now it’s all about TEACHER accountability and CRCT scores.

To answer the question, yes you should be concerned with very large classes, however if it’s only one or two more students I wouldn’t be concerned. What we all should be concerned about is the state of education in Georgia.

RJ

August 19th, 2010
9:37 am

@it doesn’t matter much, you are absolutely right about discipline. I didn’t add that part.

motherjanegoose

August 19th, 2010
9:43 am

@itdoesn’t matter much/RJ re: discipline….ME TOO!

It breaks my heart to see brand new teachers being hired into the roughest schools out there, because that is where they can get a job and the turnover is tremendous.

I do not think I could handle it and I have been doing this for 27 years!

e

August 19th, 2010
9:50 am

My daughter’s 5th grade class has 27 with 2 teachers (it is an inclusion class). My son’s 3rd grade class has only 15. Not sure how that happened, but he does have the toughest teacher in 3rd grade. Cobb County.

KAW

August 19th, 2010
9:51 am

My girls attend a Cobb County elementary school. My third grader only has 16 in her class. However, she is in a trailer. I don’t think they could fit many more kids in there. Those trailers are small and cramped! My first grader has 17 kids. However, that number could grow in her class.

a mom

August 19th, 2010
10:06 am

@TechMom I also have a student in private school. Last year was when we had a decline in enrollment as well as letting several teachers go. This year, enrollment has stayed about the same, although there are a couple of new teachers. Our school does not raise tuition every year. You have a figure at the start of say middle school and for the three years it stays the same. High school went up about 6% but will stay the same for all four years.

Our high school class sizes stay between 10-15 students except for the electives. Those may go up to 20. Discipline is such that there is no extra talking, horsing around, inattention, etc. Infractions are given for any of that and demerits if you hit a certain number of infractions per week.

Whomever stated that as the kids get older, their size also contributes to the crowding of a classroom, is right. Think about 35-40 high school students in a classroom. Those rooms were not built to hold that many. I also want to weigh in about college classes getting larger. With the cutbacks, not only is it much more difficult to get a class but the prof is now teaching considerably more students in the same size classrooms or lecture halls.

Larger class sizes, no matter where it happens, adds up to probably more disciplinary problems, definitely more work for teachers as there are 2-5 more papers/tests/homework to look at and grade, and less time to check on students who may be having problems. For students, it is even easier to get lost in the shuffle, and not have a chance to even ask questions.

Cammi317

August 19th, 2010
10:08 am

10 children (private), with 1 homeroom teacher. She is in 7th so they change classes/teachers for every subject.

G'Vegas Dawg

August 19th, 2010
10:13 am

Teachers who complain about class sizes aren’t teachers, they are baby sitters. If you don’t have any classroom management with 22, you’re surely not going to have any management with 32 or more. It just gives the “teachers” who are stealing from the government more reason to complain. If you don’t like your class size then quit. There are certainly many well qualified teachers out there that will be more than happy to teach a class of 40.

motherjanegoose

August 19th, 2010
10:18 am

If we ignore those with ignorant comments….perhaps they will go away?

Guess some of you think it could be me….:)

G'Vegas Dawg

August 19th, 2010
10:19 am

And before you post your sm@rt@$$ comments, yes, I am a teacher. 8th sped.

Chumbucket

August 19th, 2010
10:21 am

A good teacher can easily handle 25+ students while a bad teacher can’t control even 10 kids in a classroom. My son’s kindergarten class had 15 students and a parapro, and his teacher still acted as if she was on the verge of a mental breakdown! It’s quality, not quantity that is the issue here.

Teacher, Too

August 19th, 2010
10:21 am

I’ll post when I get home this evening…

TM

August 19th, 2010
10:21 am

Henry county schools my 4th grader has 22 and my 2nd grader has 21. Don’t mind the class size, but they are limiting subs. My second grader has to join another class when her teacher is out. Teachers are human and will be out from time to time – not fair to push kids in with another teacher. Then there are two classes affected by the absence.

motherjanegoose

August 19th, 2010
10:26 am

FYI…some of the best teachers who do not want to deal with the drama have quit…or moved to other jobs, where they can make a valuable contribution with out the same red tape.

Teachers leaving schools ( to take another job) is kinda like those who do not want to live in neighborhoods that are going to pot…they sell their house and move on to somewhere where curb appeal is appreciated. What is left in the neighborhood? Not much.

No, I am not good at ignoring ignorant comments…I need to take my own advice.

G'Vegas Dawg

August 19th, 2010
10:31 am

So what you are saying motherjane, is that shools that are “run down” or in poverty don’t matter and those kids don’t deserve the same education as the more fortunate kids. It’s not about the “red tape” or the government, or even about the teachers. It’s about the kids.

Becky

August 19th, 2010
10:32 am

My two are in Cobb County and I think he has maybe 18-19 and the girl has about the same..

@it doesn’t maatter..Not a teacher (probably couldn’t be) but I would think that is so true..As far as I know, my two are very well behaved at school, i know they are at home and with me..

@MJG..lol..I can wait tables, line cook, food prep and bartend, but like you I can’t do spreadsheets, clean teeth or a lot of other stuff..I do love kids though and have had lots of people ask me if I am a teacher when I am out with the kids..I usually am very calm and in control when I am with them..

@e..Best of luck to your son for having the toughest teacher in Cobb..I don’t know that my two have tough teachers, but they might need them later on..They have parents that don’t do well with helping out on homework or even making sure that they eve do homework..

TechMom

August 19th, 2010
10:42 am

G’V D – MJG did not say the teachers don’t care or that kids don’t deserve an education; she’s just giving a realistic view of what has happened in some schools and why some good teachers have found non-classroom jobs.

G'Vegas Dawg

August 19th, 2010
10:46 am

Maybe it’s realistic to those who can afford private education. However, those of us that serve ALL children know that no matter what the situation is, you don’t give up on children.

Katie

August 19th, 2010
10:49 am

2nd grade, gwinnett county – 21 students! 5th grade has almost 30! one teacher each.

motherjanegoose

August 19th, 2010
10:53 am

@ GVegas, so in your eyes, would this be true: If you can be be a good parent with 3 kids, having 6 would not make a difference?

I have 2 ( of my own) but do not think I could be as effective with 6.

I have many folks who would tell you that I am a good teacher. My classroom management skills were one of my strongest assets and the ability to think quickly on my feet. I would NOT want 30 Kindergarteners in my class, all by myself. Perhaps I am the only one on this blog who feels this way. I KNOW I am not the only teacher ( former) who feels this way!

ALL CHILDREN ABSOLUTELY DO DESERVE A QUALITY EDUCATION. Finding someone who is willing to tough it ( for the long haul) out in those tough schools is finding a SAINT. Some dogs behave better than some children or their parents. AND if we can train a dog, surely we can make and impact on human beings? I have seen wonderful teachers make miracles with children. I have also seen brand new teachers who look like a deer in head lights. NO ONE prepared them for what they have.

I have often observed, that the best schools are those who have parents who are open to doing WHATEVER it takes to educate their children for a successful future. The private schools typically have a higher caliber of parents as they are making a tremendous financial sacrifice to put their children in those schools by paying their tuition. Those of us who have opted for public school are left with what we can get, in the neighborhoods we choose and can afford to live in.

Actually, in my book, the TRUE SAINTS are the bus drivers…I could NEVER do that job!

Yes, it IS about the kids. I have said, “if I could take that kid home with me, I could probably make some progress.” Maybe NOT with all kids but with a lot of them! I have raised two that have turned out pretty well but all kids are certainly different.

Becky, you are a gift to those children!

TechMom

August 19th, 2010
10:53 am

G’V D- huh? I’m totally missing what your point has to do with those of us who choose to sacrifice and send our kids private school. Please do explain.

Robin

August 19th, 2010
11:02 am

In Gwinnett, Brookwood cluster, my 5th grader has 22 in his class. I think the 23 is the most per in that grade level. I hope one of the reasons for stable classroom sizes is due to the fact GCPS finally seems to be cracking down on verifying residency.

motherjanegoose

August 19th, 2010
11:07 am

@ Robin, I heard yesterday….30 in 5th grade Gwinnett County, reliable source in the Collins Hill cluster.
Not my neighborhood school.

G'Vegas Dawg

August 19th, 2010
11:10 am

95% of the students that attend private school are not being sent there by a sacrifice, as you say, by the parents. Most are pampered, spioled, rotten to the core, rich snobs. And before you say it, yes, I have experienced it myself. I attended a private school for 8 years before attending a public for the last 5. My early childhood was miserable and I didn’t learn squat. Most teachers at a private school don’t even have a college education. Rich parents pay the tuition, spoiled kids passes. It’s as simple as that. The only reason I went to a private school is because my father taught there and my tuition was free. I didn’t fit in becuase my parents weren’t doctors and lawyers and CEOs. Ask yourself a question TechMom – are you truely sacrificing to send your child to a private school? Or, are you one of the 5%? What do you sacrifice? A trip to the Islands? Do you have to drive a Honda instead of a BMW? Is it truely a sacrifice? Have you wittnessed kid go from Friday to Monday without a meal? Have you seen a kid come to school after spending the night in his car becuase that’s where he lives? That’s reality, not private school.

G'Vegas Dawg

August 19th, 2010
11:12 am

MJG – you lost me. Of course having 6 kids would be different than 3. It doesn’t mean I quit parenting though.

motherjanegoose

August 19th, 2010
11:17 am

@ Techmom….feel free to take on G’Vegas Dawg….I am not. Anyone?
I think I will go to the pool now, as this is my last week off to myself. Have fun!

G'Vegas Dawg

August 19th, 2010
11:21 am

Sounds about right…I’ve got kids coming back anyway.

Robin

August 19th, 2010
11:24 am

@ motherjanegoose I feel extremely lucky to be where I am at! That number for CH is very high!

TechMom

August 19th, 2010
11:40 am

G’V D – First, I wish you would explain to us all why you are so bitter. I’m with MJG in that you are not going to be reasonable about the discussion here and so this will be my last response to you.

Sacrifice is different to different people. I don’t know where your statistics come from other than from some burning desire to make yourself look like you know what you’re talking about. There is a small population of kids at my son’s school who come from very wealthy families and no doubt fit the stereotype but I believe your statistics would be flipped in that 95% of the families at his school are making a sacrifice and the other 5% simply have more money than they know what to do with. I live in the burbs by the way and we aren’t spending $20k a year in tuition. Perhaps your personal experience is from a different type of private school. I don’t claim that they’re all alike but I can certainly give a personal view on my son’s school and the general population.

Personally speaking, I am not a doctor, lawyer or CEO instead my husband and I both work, I drive a 7-year old vehicle that is paid off and we’re both still paying off student loans because we did not come from wealthy families (barely above poverty line families actually). We both graduated from public schools and went to public colleges, working full-time the whole way through and taking out loans to be able to live along the way. We tried public school with our son but I quickly realized that if we wanted any say or control in the matter of his education, then the public realm was not where we was going to get it. So maybe you say I’m paying tuition because I want control over my son’s education- that’s fine and partly true. I’d rather not sit back and allow him to simply become a part of a system that is floundering in inefficiencies and ineffectualness simply because I’d rather drive a brand new car or vacation more often.

And quite frankly, I don’t understand why public school educators or parents of public school children don’t in fact value that some of us do send our kids to private school- that’s more of my tax dollars to go toward educating kids who are in public school and one less kid in that over-crowded classroom.

TechMom

August 19th, 2010
11:44 am

excuse the typo – ‘was’ should be ‘were’
“…the public realm was not where we were going to get it.”

Chumbucket

August 19th, 2010
11:46 am

G’Vegas Dawg, I really think your gross generalization of private school students, and their parents, is completely inaccurate. Many schools throughout Atlanta and the metro area (and even the state) are so deplorable, parents simply have no choice but to send their kids to a private school. Public school is not an option. Sending kids to a private school represents a huge financial sacrifice for many parents, but even for wealthier families, it can cause a strain. I know many people who have limited their family size to only 1 or 2 kids solely because they cannot afford tuition for any more children than that. The days when private schools were a bastion for the overprivileged offspring of the wealthy are over!

a mom

August 19th, 2010
12:10 pm

@G’V: I also will respond once, but only once, to your tirade. My child has learning disabilities and goes to a private school because the public school was not providing the learning environment that he needed. We HAVE sacrificed as a family as we do not go on vacations, our oldest is paying her own way through a state university (HOPE and athletic scholarships) with only meal plan and book help from us, and we both drive 12 year old cars.

My husband was laid off earlier this year and the first thing we looked at was our child’s tuition. Could we go to public school? We met with the counselors at our public high school, did the tours, etc. When we looked at what his learning environment would be vs his current school, we decided that it was our responsibility as his parents to give him the best possible scenerio. An analogy is: would you not do anything to provide medicine if your child had a physical medical problem? Why would we not do the same for our child’s learning disabilities?

So….we found some more ways to cut expenses, our college student found a part-time job, so in additional to a full load and playing a DII sport, she is working. I am looking for a part-time job so in addition to my 50+ hours a week full-time job, I can work on the weekends. My spouse constantly is looking for employment, but we all know how bad it is out there. Our son gave up playing soccer on a high skill level team because we can’t afford the travel, training, etc. We eat a lot of rice, beans, and pasta. We don’t have meat every day. Luckily tuition includes lunch for our teenage son who is still growing like a weed! It is not easy, it is a family choice, but we feel it is worth the sacrifice.

And before you say we are the minority, I know there are other parents at his school who are having the same issues. We are just finding ways to provide the best for our children, especially when the public systems can’t. As @TechMom said: “I don’t understand why public school educators or parents of public school children don’t in fact value that some of us do send our kids to private school- that’s more of my tax dollars to go toward educating kids who are in public school and one less kid in that over-crowded classroom.” In my case, it is even more money saved as the public system spends more on kids with IEPs who need special services.

Mary

August 19th, 2010
12:18 pm

I would rather home school my child, than send them to private school. I hate private schools. The kids are snobs, and come from snobby parents who live way out of their means, to impress strangers, and who teach their kids to look down their noses at the “Public” children.

You can have your fancy school, your ugly uniforms, and your obnoxious SUV’s. That’s all I see coming in and out of Wesleyan in Norcross. And the fact that they have a “Wesleyan” sticker on their car, does that make you exempt from traffic rules. The speed limit in front of Norcross High School, directly across the street from Wesleyan, is 35 when the lights are blinking. I have seen NUMEROUS cars with Wesleyan stickers race through the school zone.

I also have witnessed the students behaviour in restaurants and stores around the school. In come the little snobs in their little skirts and khaki pants and they prance around like they own the place. I have NEVER in my life encountered a ruder group of kids and parents.

I’ll take public schools ANY DAY!!!!!

SALLY

August 19th, 2010
12:22 pm

@G’Vegas Dawg – you just sound jealous and bitter. I feel bad for you – not angry which I am sure was your goal.
Have a good day.

Anonymous

August 19th, 2010
12:36 pm

@Mary – You should be more concerned with why the police are not monitoring the school zone for the safety of the children.

Mary

August 19th, 2010
12:57 pm

Anonymous – there is only one police office there during the school hours, and he is only there to direct bus traffic. He is an OFF DUTY policeman, paid by the schools, $20/hour, to stand out there and direct the bus traffic.