Are fart jokes the only way to get boys reading?

Boys have lagged behind girls in reading achievement for more than 20 years, but the gender gap now exists in nearly every state and has widened as much as 10 percentage points in some, according to an Associated Press story.

Obviously parents and educators are very concerned by this gender gap. So how can we convince little guys to read?

From the Associated Press:

“The angst among parents, teachers and librarians has been met by a steady stream of sports and historical nonfiction, potty humor, bloodthirsty vampires and action-packed graphic novels, fantasy and sleuthing.”

“Butts, farts. Whatever, said Amelia Yunker, a children’s librarian in Farmington Hills, Mich. She hosted a grossology party with slime and an armpit noise demonstration. ‘Just get ‘em reading. Worry about what they’re reading later.’ ”

“Adding online tie-ins or packaged prizes like the steady-selling “39 Clues” series has publishers meeting young readers halfway.”

“Patrick Carman has gone a step further with his wicked creepy “Skeleton Creek” series from Scholastic. The upper-grade books use password-protected websites to alternate book text and quick fixes of shaky, hand-held video. To follow the story, reading and watching online are both required.”

So what books are hot right now for little guys? How about:

“SweetFarts” from author Raymond Bean. (Not his real name) The book follows a 9-year-old boy’s multimillion-dollar science fair invention of tablets that can change foul-smelling gas into the culprit’s scent of choice: summer rose, cotton candy, grape — even pickles, as requested by his little sister. Its sequel “Sweet Farts: Rippin’ it Old-School,” to be released next month.

“Spaceheadz” series (Simon & Schuster) about TV-saturated aliens in September, complete with websites that offer more.

And Dav Pilkey, creator of the perennial favorite “Captain Underpants” is releasing a  new book on Aug. 10 in “The Adventures of Ook and Gluk,” about two kung-fu lovin’ caveboys sucked into the future.

So far my 7-year-old son loves to read and is open to just about anything I pick up at the library for him. With that said, I am sure he would LOOOVE any of the three mentioned above, especially the kung-fu lovin’ caveboys sucked into the future. Pilkey knows his target audience.

I would be reluctant to pick up “SweetFarts,” as mentioned last week we are having a problem with fart references and jokes right now. But if my son didn’t read I would definitely give it a try.

What do you think: Should writers be able to do better than fart jokes to pull little boys into books? Should we try more with Westerns or adventure books? More mysteries? More kung-fu?

Why do you think boys are so far behind on reading? (We have so many great educators on our site. I am excited to hear their thoughts!)

(I have a second topic posting today around 2 p.m. on a recent A.D.H.D. survey.)

42 comments Add your comment

penguinmom

July 21st, 2010
1:47 am

My older son is an avid reader so this was never really an issue with him but my younger one is a little more active and so he just doesn’t like to sit still to read. Fortunately, he’s young so I still have time to figure out what sparks him the best.

I think humor is important with boys. I never appreciated the bathroom humor so I sought out books that had more kooky humor.

We like the Geronimo Stilton series which is very visual and funny. Some of the words in the text are done in different fonts and different shapes to show their meaning. (i.e. the word downstairs would be slanted down and shaped a little like stairs.)
There is a series called ‘The Extraordinary Adventures of Ordinary Boy’ by Boniface which my oldest really enjoyed. It was funny and had really short chapters plus it was about superheroes. It contains mild bathroom humor but not much.
The ‘Andrew Lost..’ series by Greenburg combines science with some level of grossness but not so much the fart type jokes. Andrew gets lost on the dog, in the drain and other places that are yucky and dirty.

I think boys tend towards more visual books also. I think that contributes to the popularity of Diary of a Wimpy Kid. Comic books are great for boys. Our local comic book store (Odin’s Comics) just opened a specific kids room that only has fairly safe comics in it. Reading comic books/graphic novels is still reading. We even have the Picture Bible which is a comic book style Bible. My oldest loved it and knew details about Bible stories that I didn’t even remember. My boys also drag out our old Calvin and Hobbes books and pour over those whenever they get the chance.

Magazines are another option for reading. Ranger Rick is very visual, usually has good humor in it and also good information. If a boy has a specific interest, getting a magazine about that interest (like bikes, sports, etc) there are magazines out there about those interests.

At some point though you have to allow some level of ‘gross’ in boys reading. They enjoy it and it doesn’t really hurt anything.

penguinmom

July 21st, 2010
1:48 am

MJG: I’m trying to rival your posts in length… How did I do? :-)

theresa

July 21st, 2010
2:06 am

that is an awesome list I will use for walshie!

[...] This post was mentioned on Twitter by AJCMOMania and Twitting Out Loud, Elizabeth McAdams. Elizabeth McAdams said: Are fart jokes the only way to get boys reading?: I would be reluctant to pick up “SweetFarts,” as mentioned last … http://bit.ly/9VbeoQ [...]

Jeff

July 21st, 2010
6:40 am

They can do better but do whatever works. If fart jokes are what appeals to boys, then so be it. Don’t suppress a boys’ desire to read because you don’t like the subject. At least someone recognized it and acknowledges that boys have been all but ignored in the education system in recent years. See the figures in boys vs girls going to college and graduating with a degree.

"Walshie", at 2:06am...

July 21st, 2010
7:16 am

…c’mon T, give the kid a break…just like Lilina is not a baby anymore, Walsh is not a “Walshie”, at least in public…

motherjanegoose

July 21st, 2010
7:37 am

@ penguinmom…I am looking at the Boston skyline and need to hop in the shower before we head down to breakfast. You did just fine and y’all ( guess I will use it on the blog for today and not in the city here) will have to take it up for me today as this is a day for my daughter and myself to share.

My son was/is ( now in the Pharmacy) an AVID reader and my daughter loves to read too. If children see you reading ( not People magazine…which to me could be the adult version of what was mentioned above) they are more inclined to read. That being said, just get your kids to read anything.

We still have thousands of comics and baseball cards stashed in our house and they may never leave…lol.

I am looking forward to an historical day and remember that I once mentioned ( on this blog) my daughter did not want to go to Boston. Once she did, she loved it. Kinda like getting them interested in reading! Once they get bit…they like it!

There are so many things competing for reading and parents are not realizing that reading is a life long skill…GOOD READERS ARE WINNERS AND BOOKS ARE OUR FRIENDS…even if you are all alone, if you have a book, you have a friend!

Have fun!

irisheyes

July 21st, 2010
8:25 am

Magazines, newspaper articles, online articles, non-fiction. What he’s interested in? As a teacher, I want kids reading things they like. I expose them to great books through my read alouds, but early readers need to ENJOY reading. If it’s Goosebumps, so be it. The classics can wait. We spend so much time trying to squeeze boys into these perfect little boxes, and boys just don’t fit! Let them explore and discover while filling their environment with print.

Old fashioned values

July 21st, 2010
8:31 am

I don’t think the problem is with the subject matter, but with the attention span of today’s kids. They are so used to fast-paced video games or the TV/movie storyline that gets resolved in 1 or 2 hours. Reading a book is active, not passive, and it may take days to finally get to the end of the story.

Generations of boys went on wild adventures with pirates, nature, knights, and their dogs. The books taught boys about friendship, honesty, integrity, doing the right thing, love of nature… They told a great story, but also taught them values that would make them “good men.” My 4 boys (ages 3-9) also love non-fiction — bugs, planes, warcraft, natural wonders, ancient civilizations, inventions, space, optical illusions … and yes, the occasional book about bodily functions. I try not to direct their choices, and I’ve found that good subjects and good authors will always stand out on their own.

Finally, please don’t underestimate what our children can do, or they will live down to our standards and fulfill our expectations.

A

July 21st, 2010
8:44 am

The answer to the question at the top of the blog posting, is “no” that’s not the only way to get boys reading. And I don’t think it’s all boys who have issues with reading, if mine is any indication. But if your son (or daughter for that matter) is not excited about reading, then sure I guess something like a Captain Underpants or similar series wouldn’t be the end of the world. The main thing is to get them into a lifelong love of reading, and as long as the books are at their reading ability and age-appropriate, I don’t think it matters what they read.

Mom

July 21st, 2010
8:46 am

My non- reading son became a reader by reading to me about fish and fishing!!! Then he read a few Hardy Boys books, then music, especially about trumpet players. Little by little, he became a fabulous reader and a terrific trumpet player! He liked mostly non-fiction books. Find what the child is interested in, REALLY interested in!.

Mom of Two

July 21st, 2010
8:51 am

You have to wonder if this is a situation of nurture not nature. Parents assume boys won’t want to read or push the boys to do “boy” things instead of reading, etc. Then, you throw in the mix of playstations, the TV and other mindless pacifiers and you’ve got kids who have barely been exposed to reading.

My boys (6 and 12) are both extremely avid readers and will read absolutely anything they can get their hands on.

The oldest is reading James Patterson books right now. He’s already read all the Michael Crichton books in addition to various other similar authors. If given the chance, he would read a novel per day. But, with playing outside, chores, helping in the garden and around the house, playing with friends and other physical activities, it takes him a couple of days per novel.

The younger one is reading on at least a 3rd grade level and can’t seem to find enough books to read. While he reads fiction daily, he really enjoys non-fiction books especially if they are about bugs, animals, frogs, lizards or any other creature out there. He loves his Audobon reference books (the adult version) and has a full set of them. As soon as he sees a new plant/bug/animal/bird he’s grabbing the correct Audobon book, looking it up and reading – to us – all about it.

Good readers start from birth. We started reading to our kids each and every day on day one. At a very young age, they started reading to us. An enjoyable family time is when National Geographic and National Geographic Kids magazines come in the mail and we all read them out loud together. As parents, we’ve also set a good example by reading ourselves. Besides the many books we own, we each (kids included) have our own library cards and use them – frequently.

We recently moved to a new school that, unfortunately, doesn’t encourage reading. For those of you familiar with AR, we had to beg them to let our younger son (in Kindergarten) check out books daily and take the tests (as he had done in his old school). In 7 weeks, he acculumated close to 80 points – at 1/2 point per test when he scored 100%. In that same 7 weeks, our older son accumulated close to 800 points and received an award at the end of the school year for having more points than any other kid in the school (collected over their entire school career).

Last week, we were supervising a 12 year old boy neighbor. When our son had to go out to cut the grass, my hubby asked the neighbor boy if he’d brought anything to do…such as bring a book to read. The blank stare said it all. I know when I’ve been over to their house, I have yet to see a single book anywhere. But, I have seen the multiple electronic games and have seen their TV running contantly. I don’t think anyone needs to look much further than that to know why reading scores have dropped…

Mom

July 21st, 2010
8:51 am

PS: We walked every week to the library in Decatur! The children could check out all the books they could carry, no backpacks in those days, so we took our red wagon! On the way back, got a DQ cone! Pure bribery!!! I have four terrific readers now, who hike all over creation! Still go to DQ from time to time!

Didn't Drown

July 21st, 2010
9:01 am

Growing up, we had the Hardy Boys series – I couldn’t wait till summer to read them. When we played in the woods or the creek or the marsh or even behind a building in town, my friends and I would pretend we were Hardy boys, making up our own plots and finding mysteries to solve. That’s the power of reading.

A

July 21st, 2010
9:01 am

@Mom of Two, I couldn’t agree with you more about nurture vs. nature. We started reading to our son at birth every single day, and showing him the pictures in the books. He has always seen his dad and I reading, whether it’s the newspaper, a novel, magazine, anything. He is 7 and is reading between a 3rd and 4th grade level, if the Accelerated Reader quizzes at school and CRCT scores mean anything. Not bragging, but I am not convinced his love of reading and ability is purely natural. I think having a home full of books and being encouraged to read makes a huge difference. And for families who simply can’t afford a lot of books, the library is a wonderful resource. By choice, we prefer to check out book rather than buy in most cases, and this way my son can try out a lot of series and authors that he might not normally if we had to pay for everything. Next time there is a library funding referendum on the ballot, vote yes!

George Burdell

July 21st, 2010
9:10 am

The reading lists for kids are not geared to boys. You’ve got to offer boys books that interest them. Every summer I struggled with a girl-centric reading list until one summer a book entered the list called “Run Silent, Run Deep” about a WW2 submarine. Wow! That book got me to read more about WW2 and subs and was the catalyst to start reading novels on my own.

Cammi317

July 21st, 2010
9:30 am

Diary of a Wimpy Kid is universal. I know kids going into 7th grade and still love those books, male & female. My brother is and was an avid reader who read anything he could get his hands on, including my and my sisters’ Judy Blume books growing up. He read every one. I seem to recall that he loved books on astronomy and dinosaurs when he first began reading independently around age 4. I don’t know if they still sell them, but in addition to Hardy Boys/Nancy Drew Mysteries growing up, I used to LOVE Encyclopedia Brown, Boy Detective.

DB

July 21st, 2010
10:23 am

Just for the record: There is no way on God’s green earth — or any other planet you can think of — that I would EVER purchase a book with the title “Sweet Farts” for my son It may “appeal” to boys — but hell, so does porn. Doesn’t mean that I’d buy it for my child! Somewhere in the mix, there needs to be some modicum of good taste. I agree with “Old Fashioned Values” — there are many, many, many other books written over the last couple of hundred years that, instead of catering to the very lowest common denominator, inspires creativity, imagination and presents a vision of what a person can be. Book stores are FILLED with books. Libraries are FILLED with books. Why, oh WHY would the unwashed masses buy a book that plays off of a bodily function that most people in polite society are taught to politely ignore?

Kids learn a love of reading primarily from their parents — if their parents are always reading, discussing and enjoying books, THAT’S how you encourage kids to read — not by buying books based on fart jokes and armpit music. Kids are smarter than you think, and you get what you expect. If you don’t expect anything more than fart jokes — then that’s all you get.

Old fashioned values

July 21st, 2010
10:31 am

I wanted to relive my old favorites, so I started the kids on Roald Dahl, Beverly Cleary, Andrew Clements … A good book is a good book, whether the main characters are boys, girls, mice, crickets, etc. My kids listen to books-on-tape almost every night for their bedtime stories. Once they listen to a good author, they want to find everything else written by that person.

I’m thinking of getting a library card in the neighboring county (using our business address) just to expand our choices!

theresa

July 21st, 2010
10:42 am

I am with you on beverly cleary. We are goint to talk about the new ramona movie later this week. I am worried selena gomez will ruin it by taking the focus off of ramona. She is the star of the book!!!!

Didn't Drown

July 21st, 2010
10:46 am

There are loads of children’s books for all ages about baseball, space travel, inventors, adventurers, soldiers, fantasy, mystery, mythology, dogs, horses, wild animals, growing up with 2 dads or moms, etc. Surely there is something that will interest your boys (yeah, yeah, I know, “don’t call me Shirley”).

newblogger

July 21st, 2010
11:05 am

Soapbox here: The “unwashed masses” buy books that play off bodily functions that most people in polite society are taught to politely ignore because that’s what little boys talk about. And if you don’t believe they do then you haven’t been around enough of them. I have been a teacher for 22 years and yes, even the most polite, well brought up little boys say things out of their mother’s hearing that would probably make you wonder if it’s really your child. Who cares what they read (barring porn), as long as they read. Hook them with something-anything. The great literature and non-fiction will come eventually. Of course you want to mix some really good books with the not so desirable ones, but imho, it gives boys an “out”. They are thinking about it (farting, burping, etc.) and talking about it and doing it out of earshot anyway, so it helps them feel normal when they read about it. Yes, a print rich home is important. But it’s not always all it takes. We live in a home full of books and magazines (yes,the good kind) but my children couldn’t be at more opposite ends of the spectrum. My oldest was reading Harry Potter in third grade and will read as a hobby. My youngest would rather solve mathematical equations all day. He can read and does read well, but finding books he’s interested in is a chore. He just finished “Fantastic Mr. Fox” and is will be starting “James and the Giant Peach” soon, but in between the two of them, I may run out and buy him the SweetFart book just because. After all, he and his best friend had a farting contest just the other day when they were in the playroom and thought I was in the kitchen where I couldn’t hear them. BOYS!

newblogger

July 21st, 2010
11:10 am

oh…and DB, you may not buy this book for your child but I can promise you that if he wants to read it, he will. I’ve had several children in my class over the years who were instructed by their parents not to read certain books (Harry Potter comes to mind) but checked it out anyway or borrowed it from a friend. Very interesting in parent conferences to share what their child is reading at school, or have the parent dig it out of their child’s desks, only to be surprised with a comment from the parents about how their child is not allowed to read those books. Hmmm…..

TechMom

July 21st, 2010
11:16 am

@Old Fashioned Values – if you live in a location that is part of the Ga Pines Library system, you can check books out from any of them. Unfortunately I think most of the metro libraries aren’t members but we live in a southern burb and ours is. You can go to: http://www.georgialibraries.org/directories/pineslibdir.php to find out which library systems participate. We use the library in our neighboring county because we live on the county line and their library is closer than ours.

As far as nature/nurture goes, I’m not sold on the idea. I used to think I was but as my son has gotten older, I often wonder. I am an avid reader and always have been. We have lots of books in our house and I almost always read before going to sleep at night. I read to my son every night for years, we read books out loud together and he is a great reader. But he doesn’t like it and will never pick up a book and read on his own free will. In fact with less than 2 weeks left before school goes back, I had to remind him once again that he has to have his assigned reading done in a week. Even when he’s allowed to choose his books and he will even say that he enjoyed them in the end, he has zero initiative to do it without prompting.

DB

July 21st, 2010
11:20 am

@newblogger: But that’s my point — why cater to the crassest possible behavior? “They are thinking about it (farting, burping, etc.) and talking about it and doing it out of earshot anyway, so it helps them feel normal when they read about it.” Sorry, but we’re just going to have to agree to disagree on this one – there’s a difference between accepting that the body excretes a variety of substances and gases, and buying a book celebrating them! They did it where they thought you couldn’t hear because they knew it wasn’t polite! That’s fine — kids do a lot of things they aren’t supposed to do in polite company when they think we aren’t around. But they know it’s “normal” — they don’t need a book to validate any uncertainties regarding their farts!

While I can’t imagine a life without reading, I think it’s fair to aknowledge that, for some people, it doesn’t stir the mind the same way that it does other people, because people’s brains are just wired differently. I’m never going to sit down and relax with a book of math puzzles. I think there’s room for both kinds of brains in this world. For those of us who treasure books, reading and the world that it invites us into, we can’t fathom a brain that doesn’t work that way, and reading fart books isn’t going to change the way his brain is wired!

DB

July 21st, 2010
11:30 am

@newblogger: My son was permitted to read whatever he wanted — the only time I had a qualm was when his 3rd grade teacher recommended “The Giver” to him. Not that it wasn’t an interesting and thought-provoking story, but because I wasn’t sure if, at the age of 8, he was ready to read about babies being euthanized. But when I brought it up to the teacher, she told me that the main reason that she had recommended it to him was because she knew that I’d be willing to talk to him about it. Other than that, he pretty much had free reign over the library and our home library — nothing was off-limits.

I don’t doubt that he read his fair share of not-so-enlightening literature — heck, at the age of 21, he refuses to give up his complete set of “Animorphs”, go figure. (I don’t push it, guiltily remembering the boxes of “Nancy Drew” books I have in the attic!) But that doesn’t mean I’m going to encourage it!

newblogger

July 21st, 2010
12:21 pm

@DB-I do agree with you on some points. Didn’t mean to come across as on your case. I guess my main point is that I want them to read, read, read, and if they have to resort to toilet humor to hook them-well there are worse things. btw-My 19 year old was appalled when I merely suggested we get rid of his “Goosebumps”. Maybe it conjures up images of when his life was a lot easier-who knows! Thanks for bringing up some valid points, they were well taken.

deidre_NC

July 21st, 2010
12:23 pm

all of my kids love to read, they grew up watching me read so maybe that has something to do with it i dont know…i do know lots of kids-a lot of them boys- who dont like to read. i try to get all kids i am in contact with to read…if you can read you can do anything!

Cammi317

July 21st, 2010
12:49 pm

Another great series for boys are the Peter and Fudge series. Remember those? We girls read them growing up too.

deidre_NC

July 21st, 2010
1:20 pm

another thing, i never really censored what my kids read…of course no obvious porn but that never came up….but if they wanted to read a book i was reading i let them, sometimes it was too mature for their understanding but a lot of times they got it…and then would read it again when they were older and get a whole new meaning….i think kids should read whatever…comics, classisc modern fiction, not fiction…whatever they want to read…that is how they get and stay interested in reading. imo

Boys Read

July 21st, 2010
1:25 pm

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My Son Loves Fart Humor

July 21st, 2010
1:35 pm

It was the Captain Underpants series that really got my son reading. I read to him all sorts of books as a baby and toddler. At 5 when he could read on his own, I bought him the Captain Underpants series and he would read and laugh for hours. Then he went through the Diary of a Wimpy kid series and the Geronimo Stilson books.

At 7 years old he can sit and read the AJC which is generally written at about a 7th grade level.

penguinmom

July 21st, 2010
1:47 pm

@Old-fashioned – You are right – Andrew Clements is one of our favorites as well. We usually listen to his in the car as a family because we all enjoy them. His book ‘No Talking’ is one of our favorites.

My kids also enjoyed the Jigsaw Jones mystery series and the A-to-Z mysteries. Judy Moody and Stink books (McDonald) are also really good.

I also think audio books are a great way to encourage reading. It gets the kids involved in the story and helps them pay attention to the plot. Also gets them to use their own imagination for what is happening. That, in turn, helps them have more patience when reading a book on their own. We listen to at least one audio book a month as a family.

@Techmom – I agree with you about the nature/nurture. You can read to and in front of your kids and still not spark an interest. We all know well-adjusted adults who don’t read a lot. They may just be more active types who prefer running and doing to sitting and reading. I have several friends who read avidly themselves but haven’t really gotten their boys to pick up the habit. Audiobooks can be a great resource with these kids because they can still get the story without having to be still. Sometimes hearing one story will spark them to find out more about an author or series.

DB

July 21st, 2010
1:57 pm

@newblogger: No offense taken :-) — call it dueling soapboxes!

@penguinmom: I’ve never taken to audio books. I wish I did. I’ve tried several — we went through a period when I thought it might be something interesting for long car trips (since I refuse to get a DVD for the car) — but even though I may have enjoyed them, I never got “hooked” on them. It’s been years since I listened to one. I have no trouble reading in a car, though, as a passenger — so maybe that’s it. I don’t get carsick while reading like a lot of people seem to. I find the slower pace of audio books drives me nuts. Heck, even oral storytellers tend to leave me a little bored. So even if I’m driving a long distance, I’ll either listen to the radio or enjoy the rare slice of silence.

penguinmom

July 21st, 2010
2:05 pm

@deidre_NC – interesting. I tended the other way. I didn’t really want my son reading too much adult material because I didn’t think he really needed to read about seduction or graphic murder at too young of an age. I remember reading things in middle school that still bother me occasionally. (the curse of too vivid an imagination.)

I told

July 21st, 2010
2:55 pm

I told my son the other day the little rhyme “Here I sit broken hearted, came to poop but only farted” and he laughed so hard. Then he said it was the funniest thing he’d heard in his life.

I love how things that have been aroudn forever are brand new to him.

TechMom

July 21st, 2010
3:58 pm

@penguinmom- you’re right, I should try audio books with him. He’s more of a tactile, hands-on learner but he even said something the other day about wishing I would just break down and by a Kindle because it will read to you and then he wouldn’t have to read this book! I don’t know if that’s a feature for all Kindle books or just certain ones but he did seem more interested in listening to the book than reading it. And he is definitely more of an on-the-go than a sit-still-and-read person so if he could pop head-phones in and listen to the book while being free to move about, he would probably have been done with this book weeks ago.

Wayne

July 21st, 2010
4:22 pm

@MJG: Have fun in Boston!

penguinmom

July 21st, 2010
4:35 pm

my son’s literature teacher gave us a website that has free downloadable books/poems. Most of the books are well known ones like ‘Gulliver’s Travels’; ‘Frankenstein’; ‘Count of Monte Cristo’, etc. There are also historical documents like the Emancipation Proclamation or Ben. Franklin’s address to the Convention.
http://etc.usf.edu/lit2go/

@TechMom – even my avid reader is having trouble getting through his summer reading – Fahrenheit 451 – which isn’t even that long of a book.

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catlady

July 23rd, 2010
1:03 pm

My son made his biggest jump in reading the summer between kindergarten and first grade. He read all the Garfield anthologies, and the Charlie Brown anthologies. We had some wonderful discussions about the meaning of some of those (Any of you read “The Gospel According to Peanuts?”)

I encouraged him to follow his interests, so from 4 or 5 on, he read everything he could find about “Marine Archaeology (sunken ships)” and “Air Disasters” and “The Bermuda Triangle” and the various wars. See a common theme?

At 5 he asked me to get him one of Shakespear’s plays–”Helmet”–he had misread the name. I was quite kerflummoxed to try to find an edition of Hamlet that was written so he could understand it.

He also read every car manual he could get his hands on. He studied them for hours, and could discuss the engine displacements, etc, sort of like boys do on baseball cards. When he was 17 he was in the theater production and got all bent out of shape because some other school was doing a play and in the setting was an old car and some parts and IT WAS OBVIOUS THAT SOMEONE DIDN’T KNOW WHAT THEY WERE DOING BECAUSE THAT ENGINE WOULD NEVER GO IN THAT CAR BODY! COULDN’T THEY TELL FROM LOOKING THAT IT WASN’T CORRECT!

The Benz

August 5th, 2010
8:37 am

Wimpy Kid: It’s not a comic book, it’s a novel in cartoons. If it were a comic book it would be thin and have a colorful cover. It’s thinner than an issue of Bride, but thicker than Car and Driver.