New cost-cutting plan for Gwinnett County: No more personal fridges for teachers!

Last week was Teacher Appreciation Week, and we were so proud that our class collected enough money to buy our teacher a mini-fridge for her classroom next year.

I bought the fridge last Thursday with the plan to give our teacher the present Friday afternoon. I stopped by the school Friday morning around 9 a.m. to ask our head custodian for help lifting the fridge that afternoon. She said I don’t think you want to give it to her. She won’t be allowed to use it next year.

Jaw drops! Mouth agape! What!! But this is our class present! What do you mean she can’t use it next year.

The county sent out a memo earlier that week announcing to help save money it will not allow teachers to have personal refrigerators in their rooms next year.

How much money could that possibly save you might ask?

Well actually quite a bit according to Jorge Quintana, director of media relations for Gwinnett County.

The county estimates it can save $698,000 a year by eliminating the personal fridges and removing personal desk/floor lamps. (I would fight the desk lamps – sometimes you need extra reading light!)

From Quintana:

“Energy audits conducted by utility providers identified the removal of personal desk/floor lamps and compact refrigerators as no-cost initiatives that would have immediate and significant savings. By asking local schools for their participation in removing these items, the district could see a savings of an estimated $698,000 a year. To help accommodate the needs of employees and students, the school system is suggesting full-sized refrigerators to be located on the school campus, in centralized locations such as teacher workrooms.

In addition, the district also is asking employees to turn off lights and computers and unplug all nonessential electronic equipment at the end of each day.

These energy initiatives will help to raise awareness, reduce consumption, save money, and protect the environment.”

As much as I hate for teachers to lose the convenience of the mini-fridges, it seems to be a cut that will affect students the least. If it helps prevent the county from needing extra furlough days or increasing classroom sizes, it’s probably a smart cut to make.

Now I know some of the teachers use it in their curriculum. Our kindergarten class had a cooking center every week and our third-grade class has used the class fridge for storing food for their solar cooking tests.

I guess they will just have to walk further to the central fridges. (I’ve only seen one of the two fridges our school has now and they are always packed! They will definitely need more fridges.)

A friend of mine questions couldn’t the teachers or the class offer to pay the difference so they could keep their fridges? Is that accounting nightmare worth the result of a cold Diet Coke mid-day? Will the class lose teaching time going to the big centrally located fridges?

So what do you think: Should teachers be forced to give up their personal fridges and desk lamps? (Again I would fight that desk lamp! Those don’t run all night like the fridges.) Is that loss of convenience worth a $698,000 savings?

Does your teacher have a fridge in class? What does she use it for? Would she be mad to lose it?

Is this a smart solution or a bad one? What would your solution be?

138 comments Add your comment

Jeff

May 12th, 2010
6:50 am

I think it’s a bad idea. It’s not going to make a significant impact. We’re going to have the exact same discussions next year (or next month) and now you have made life more inconvenient for an already stressed labor force. Given how much money we spend per student and the amount of tax increases over the years that were ear-marked for education, we need an accounting of where that money has been spent.

Interested Participant

May 12th, 2010
7:17 am

They are idiots. Our district just has an appliance surcharge that teachers have deducted out of their paycheck every month (or they can pay the entire year at one time). I think our Supt. went to Lowes or somewhere and figured a ball park figure on what it costs to operate one of those mini fridges per month (and microwaves too) and if we want to use them, then we have to pay the surcharge. Most do, some don’t. For my fridge it’s $5.00 per month. I think it’s a good plan. Teachers were happy to pay to keep their convenience appliances and the district gets money to cover the extra cost of electricity.

G.R.I.T.S.

May 12th, 2010
7:22 am

i think anything that can save money and also be eco-friendly at the same time is a good thing. maybe if they look deper they can find more costs such as this to eliminate rather than eliminating the teachers and courses. honestly i havent given costs much attention until lately, but i am not for furloughs and doing away with certain courses in order to save money…so maybe they can find more hidden costs that dont affect the teachers and students as harshly….

fred

May 12th, 2010
7:23 am

Jeff, I disagree, It will and does make a big difference to a schools electricity and heating bill. We implemented this last year and our electricity bills went down by about 4% across the district. Now i am sure that that is not the sole reason, but still lets think about this for a moment, if each teacher has an appliance that in their room times how many classrooms in a school times how many schools in a district. pretty soon you are talking real money. and lets not forget the amount of heat that fridges are constantly putting out. all for the convenience of a cold lunch (that many teachers will heat up in the microwave and a cold soda. please get yourself a good insulated lunch bag with a blue ice cold pack. and as for the time that the teachers are using the fridge for the curriculum, really how much time is that? a week or two at the most. the food could be kept in a big cooler during that time. This is the type of change that all of us are looking for, it saves a lot of money, does not affect student performance, teacher performance and has the added bonus of being earth friendly.

motherjanegoose

May 12th, 2010
7:55 am

T…what a bummer, as that was a thoughtful gift!

I can certainly see the savings potential but am reminded that a community fridge presents it’s own set of problems. You are in charge of your own fridge and it’s cleanliness and contents.

I remember, many times, being involved in a community fridge and having a CLEAN IT OUT DAY.
Teachers were asked to take their things by noon on a certain day or they would be tossed. No whining about your favorite tupperware bowl being gone.

I think the $5 charge makes sense to me and it was recommended by a teacher, I presume.
As usual, each of us will have an opinion but those who are actually in the classroom now should be able to tell us another story. I remove myself from this pool, as I am not in my own classroom and could never tote a fridge along with me every day….LOL.

Cheri

May 12th, 2010
8:01 am

Is this really an issue? Dozens of teachers are losing their jobs daily, and you are complaining about a MINI FRIDGE?!?! I would MUCH rather not have a mini fridge in my room than not have a room at all! Maybe you could take back the fridge and use the money to buy your child’s teacher a gift certificate to the Schoolbox since we have lost our yearly “Sonny Money” stipend.

Your child’s teacher can walk to the teachers’ workroom and use the community fridge. It’s not a national crisis.

1sus

May 12th, 2010
8:04 am

My child’s teacher has a frig in the classroom. I’ve never seen any personal stuff in there – only things for the classroom. Seems a shame for them to have to do away with them, but I’m all for saving money so that other cuts do not have to be made that would REALLY affect the students.

Theresa Walsh Giarrusso

May 12th, 2010
8:06 am

Cheri – the point is that the county is looking for any way to cut their budget without more furlough days, without increasing class size, without hurting students’ ability to learn — they are going to save almost 3/4 of a million dollars just by saying no fridges — so I’m asking is that good creative accounting or just angering the teachers -

Hey, Theresa...

May 12th, 2010
8:13 am

…you can figure out the savings all by yourself – just look on the tag on the ‘fridge you bought and find the “cost per kilowat hour” – then multiply that times 24 hours a day, then that number by however many teachers there are in Gwinnett County (though probably not all of them have mini-fridges in their classrooms).

That will give you a good indication of how much money is really being saved vs your belief that this may just be “creative accounting”.

irisheyes

May 12th, 2010
8:17 am

It is what it is. Unfortunately, we only have one refrigerator for the entire school, so it will fill up quickly. (And it’s just a regular size fridge. Think the bargain model at Lowe’s.) I’m just curious if GCPS will change their policy when the economy improves, or if it will stay this way forever.

BTW, I’m at a GCPS school, and we haven’t heard that yet. Curious when it will come down to us.

Theresa Walsh Giarrusso

May 12th, 2010
8:25 am

I didn’t mean creative as in making it up =- I meant creative as in looking for ways to cut that don’t hurt the learning. my bad for choosing that word — I definitely am NOT saying their numbers are wrong — I think their numbers are right!!

Theresa Walsh Giarrusso

May 12th, 2010
8:26 am

I’m pretty sure our school past along the memo to our teachers because our teacher knew when I was recounting our sad gift story to her.

Kathy

May 12th, 2010
8:28 am

This issue is not new. I taught at 3 different schools in Gwinnett and my husband works for the school system so I have witnessed this problem first hand. This is not just about the mini fridge. Coffee pots, microwaves and lamps, along with the mini fridges are in the majority of classrooms in Gwinnett. With over 100 schools, that is a lot of classrooms, thus a lot of extra appliances. Not only is it costing a lot of money to run those appliances, it is a fire hazard to have that much plugged into the extension cords the teachers are using to plug these things in. The schools have been told that each grade level can have a set of appliances (coffee pot, fridge, microwave) but it is taking time to enforce this policy. Again, this is not a new issue. Your child’s teacher probably already knew that she could not have a fridge in her classroom. The school district has been trying for years to get all the extra appliances out of classrooms. I have a friend that used to work at a school where the principal would go around occasionally to police the appliances. Teachers used to hide them under their desks.

What I can’t believe is that with all of the budget cuts (every GCPS budget as been cut by 7.5%, including instructional materials), the class used money to buy a refrigerator! Why not buy her materials that can be used in the classroom?!?!? Books for the teachers classroom library, paper, pencils, crayons…..not something for her own personal use.

Cheri

May 12th, 2010
8:36 am

It’s a great idea. Little by little does the trick! Take my mini fridge rights. Take my desk lamp (the lights in my room are quite bright). A 3/4 of a million dollars here, 1/4 of a million dollars there… Compared to being jobless, I’ll take doing without a few extra luxuries.

LeeH1

May 12th, 2010
8:46 am

Teachers aren’t professionals and should be treated like other hourly wage and blue collar workers. The idea that elementary school teaching is a profession, or a vocation, belongs with the 1950s view of life in a white community, with June Cleaver and Donna Reed.

The politicians have used teachers as footballs, and teachers have formed unions and picketed for perks, and neither side has maintained any dignity.

So, yeah, tell the teachers what to do, and they’ll do like they are told. Move on.

FCM

May 12th, 2010
8:53 am

Why wouldn’t they just use the fridge in the breakroom? How many people in Corp America have a fridge at their desk/office? I have worked for several senior folks and none of them had one.

We need teachers in class rooms. IF the $600K+ will let more teachers stay in employed get rid of the fridge. This is a no brainer.

What is interesting is that a new study shows that Co-Sleeping with a child is dangerous. (No this is not related to the topic but we have discussed co-sleeping several times).

Bob

May 12th, 2010
8:57 am

Not much savings in the whole scope of things. Think about the teacher who works through lunch or stays after school, they need to be able to store a little food to help them through the day.

Dan

May 12th, 2010
9:00 am

A fridge does use a lot of elec, but the energy surcharge isn’t a bad idea. But I do have a question when teaching ecology do they turn the fridge off? Or do they buy offsetting credits like Al Gore so they can preach to others as they go on using all the energy they like

lwa

May 12th, 2010
9:04 am

Well… if we are cutting back in our own homes, why not expect the school system to do the same.

When we were in Kansas, there was a book fee that every student had to pay… EVERY Student. Now, I was a little taken aback. We couldn’t keep the books, but we had to pay a yearly fee. In addition to paying for books, if you lived within 2.5 miles of the school and a bus was approved for your neighborhood, the parents had to pay. Intersting concept!!!!

Mike

May 12th, 2010
9:09 am

Teachers are professionals. I don’t hear teachers complaining about the rule in my school in Gwinnett. They understand that this move will help Gwinnett keep more teachers in the classroom which doesn’t just benefit the teacher with the job but benefits the students within our community.

fed up in GA

May 12th, 2010
9:13 am

“director of media relations for Gwinnett County” – fire this guy and how much can we save?????

Mike

May 12th, 2010
9:16 am

@fed up in GA

You know Alvin must look good in the media. While he runs Gwinnett into the ground, Alvin must get good press.

JATL

May 12th, 2010
9:16 am

Are you kidding? Since when did teachers start having mini-fridges? This is a GREAT idea! Many, many schools -in fact every one I’ve been in or taught in -had the fridge in the teacher’s lounge, and that was it! I applaud Gwinnett for finding some other way to help save money than more furlough days or shortchanging students in some manner.

As for reading lamps -again, are you kidding? The fluorescent lights in most classrooms are blindingly bright. If you can’t read with that light, then you may be legally blind. I’m still somewhat in shock over the mini-fridges. I have quite a few friends who are elementary teachers, and not one of them has ever had a mini fridge! Looking at possible pre-ks for my son this year took me to 4 different area elementary schools -and there wasn’t ONE mini fridge to be seen in any of the classrooms. Ridiculous!

Beeen-O

May 12th, 2010
9:18 am

We didn’t have any mini-fridges when I went to school. We buried out lunches in the snow outside to keep them cold. Of course, in North Dakota, it snowed throughout the entire school year.

Interesting

May 12th, 2010
9:18 am

I wonder if they will do this in Dekalb. My wife has a tiny fridge in her classroom. If they do, I guess I can use it as a beer fridge for the basement.

So, the school system saves and I get a beer fridge. Win-Win. Oh yeah, the wife… well, she’ll survive.

JATL

May 12th, 2010
9:19 am

Well, my other post isn’t showing up -perhaps because I think mini fridges in classrooms are one of the dumber things I’ve ever heard. Good for Gwinnett for saving money in a way that doesn’t shortchange kids! I know many teachers -most elementary -and I’ve never heard of mini fridges. No one had one when I taught. I just visited 4 area elementary schools in the past month and there wasn’t a mini fridge to be seen.

If you can’t see to read in the blindingly bright fluorescent light that’s in school classrooms, you are probably legally blind.

Meme

May 12th, 2010
9:25 am

I never had room in my classroom for a mini-fridge. Wow. Our school system supplies each grade level here in the middle school with a regular sized fridge and a microwave. We are very lucky.

oldteacher

May 12th, 2010
9:28 am

Does that mean we will take out the vending machines in the cafeteria, gym, teacher lounges, etc. ????? If we started school earlier we would only have to serve breakfast and could dismiss school early enough that kids could wait until they get home for lunch. Would that save any money? Administrators issued blackberries, cell phones, other electronic devices????

Roswell Jeff

May 12th, 2010
9:28 am

I don’t think the refrigerators in the classroom is dumb, but I do agree in this time of budget crisis, it’s a good idea to get rid of them. In our school, I know that the PreK and K’s have them… I don’t know about the other grades. Our teacher stores perishable snacks for the kids in hers.

The refrig cycles on and off all day long – sometimes empty. The microwave is used for a couple of minutes a day – it doesn’t matter if there is one in every classroom or just one in the teacher’s lounge. The same amount of electricity will be used regardless.

Theresa Walsh Giarrusso

May 12th, 2010
9:31 am

Hey FCM — we can hit the cosleeping — maybe tomorrow — one of our regulars sent me a note on that last night — we had talked about it before so i wasn’t sure if we would want to hit again but we can –

Theresa Walsh Giarrusso

May 12th, 2010
9:32 am

jatl – i will look for it

Same boat, different county

May 12th, 2010
9:33 am

The same thing happened in Clayton schools effective April 1. No more mini-fridges, personal fans/heaters, lamps, and any other appliances unnecessary for work. Those who are caught with the now-banned items will face disciplinary action.

Theresa Walsh Giarrusso

May 12th, 2010
9:36 am

jatl — found it — I guess I worry about the reading lamps because I am almost legally blind so I do like light when I’m reading.

The Cynical White Boy

May 12th, 2010
9:38 am

Hee hee hee, the reason for personal fridges ain’t convenience.

The real reason for personal fridges is human nature. Somebody always steals somebody’s food.

In the office where I work, if I want to get rid of something, I put it in the central kitchen fridge. Works every time.

future educator

May 12th, 2010
9:41 am

I wonder what the salary is for the Energy Star Coordinator position? Perhaps, we can cut costs by eliminating some positions to benefit the children’s education?

Roswell Jeff

May 12th, 2010
9:41 am

If they really wanted to save a ton of cash on their electricity bill, they would install energy management systems in the older schools.

motherjanegoose

May 12th, 2010
9:42 am

@ old teacher) …or we could make school a 24 hour project and serve 3 meals a day, plus a suitable living environment…LOL.

This way, the money would go to the school and they could serve nutritious/affordable meals and the parents ( who are sitting at home watching TV or on their cell phones and munching on chips all day…who plan on running through the fast food line with their kids for dinner or tossing them a frozen pizza) would not get food stamps or any aid for their kids. They would have to get a job and perhaps pay taxes that might keep our schools moving.

I am not talking about folks who lost their jobs…just folks who never worked at all and do not plan to.

David S

May 12th, 2010
9:49 am

Maybe Ed Begly Jr. can work up a bicycle-powered fridge that the students can take turns pedaling to power?

Plenty of places to cut besides this, but in a politically-operated system, the right decisions will never be made.

Strike another one up for private solutions to government problems.

Jesupjacket

May 12th, 2010
9:49 am

The personal fridges and lights have not been taken off yet. However, we have had a renewed emphasis on lights and other electronics (including personal lights) being turned off last year and it supposedly saved our system over $100,000 last year. We have 9 schools so just imagine how much the larger metro systems could save.

John S

May 12th, 2010
9:52 am

I think an appliance surcharge would make more sense.My wife has a fridge in her room (not in Gwinnett County). Given that she barely has 20 minutes for lunch after walking the kids to the cafeteria, and of course does not have the ability that most of us have to go out to lunch, she needs easy access to her lunch. At least she still gets a lunch break. One of our teacher friends in Gwinnett County is now forced to eat lunch with her students in the cafeteria every day.

DB

May 12th, 2010
9:57 am

I guess I just don’t understand the whole “fridge in the room” thing — I mean, are the teachers really drinking and eating snacks in front of the students? Isn’t that a little rude?

Guess it’s time to pull out the good ol’ Playmate cooler.

Roswell Jeff

May 12th, 2010
10:00 am

Yeah DB – the teachers do that all day long… lol.

Wounded Warrior

May 12th, 2010
10:06 am

Herny County did away with this this year. The elementary school teachers used theirs mainly for their own lunches and extra drinks. One of the students in my child’s 5th grade class last year, kept stealing the cokes and opening them and the principal did nothing about it. This teacher quit, and is now teaching the 2d grade this year.

Catholic School Teacher

May 12th, 2010
10:09 am

Boy, am I lucky! I don’t have to worry about any of these silly budget cutting regulations – as long as the folks keep putting money in the basket on Sunday (and they are VERY generous), we can have all the equipment we need. Our students are not lacking for anything. I feel sorry for the public school kids.

John K

May 12th, 2010
10:10 am

Sure, why not? It’s already difficult enough in the short amount of time available for teachers to grab a bite. Then add in increased class sizes due to layoffs, it’d make it even easier for them to eat!

Anne B

May 12th, 2010
10:15 am

Ban or charge for Fridges and Microwaves.
I work for a publicly held company and we have centrally located Refrigerators and Microwaves. We have also installed motion sensor for overhead lighting and changed the heating and air settings all for that extra amount of energy savings. In corporate business it is imperative that we save money wherever we can.
We HAVE to make a profit or we will fold.
Why should government schools be any different? We need to make publicly funded schools conscience of energy consumption and change attitudes of entitlement to personal appliances.
After all don’t we all teach our children to conserve energy? Where better to start

Old Timer

May 12th, 2010
10:16 am

I am amazed that any district still allows personal fridges. I moved here from another state 3 years ago. Teachers there had to give up all personal appliances about 10 years ago. That is truly one cost savings that has absolutely no effect on students’ education.

Cottmj

May 12th, 2010
10:18 am

What I am concerned about is letting LeeH1 get away with saying teaching is not PROFESSIONAL. Give me a break. Let’s see them try to JUST get certified, let alone teach. What is wrong with this picture, people?

Will

May 12th, 2010
10:19 am

teresa just wrote a blog a few weeks ago where she claimed she was so green that she limited her beef purchases because she was concerned with the amount of methane gas being produced by the cattle, but, now she is willing to add yet another energy sucking appliance to the environment? Let them walk 100 feet to the teachers lounge to get their Dr. Pepper and frozen Reeses!

Theresa Walsh Giarrusso

May 12th, 2010
10:21 am

David S — the student powered bicycle refrigerators will also help with childhood obesity. You are really killing a lot of birds with that one stone!!

Theresa Walsh Giarrusso

May 12th, 2010
10:23 am

Will — read better — I’m presenting both sides and if I’m siding I’m saying it’s reasonable to give up the fridges on many levels.

Wounded Warrior

May 12th, 2010
10:29 am

My middle schooler’s teacher would eat Reeces during the CRCT, and did not allow them to have a snack.

RJ

May 12th, 2010
10:37 am

I would hate to lose my fridge. First of all, no matter what schedule I’ve seen posted at schools, everyone doesn’t keep it cleaned or clean it when they’re supposed to, so it becomes filty. And yes, people steal food and drinks! I have a mini-fridge and microwave in my class and I love it. I keep it clean and my colleagues in my area are welcome to use it. I do know of schools within our system that don’t allow teachers to have microwaves or fridges in classrooms though.

RJ

May 12th, 2010
10:40 am

@wounded warrior, what?! I know that’s off topic, but that’s unprofessional. Also, what school doesn’t provide or allow snacks during the week of CRCT? I’ve never worked at a school that didn’t either provide small snacks or allow students to bring them.

Tiger Ochocinco Mellencamp

May 12th, 2010
10:46 am

@Bob and all the others who say and imply “it’s not a whole lot of money in the grand scheme of things”. My mentor had a great line that I still use to this day when discussing budgets and someone comes up with a gem like “it’s only a hundred grand”….his, and subsequently my response, is “well if it’s only a hundred grand, write me a check for it.” Suddenly it’s a lot of money. For those of you who think $700K is not a significant hunk of change, take a collection from everyone on to give the school district that amount so the teachers can keep their fridges. I’m betting $700K seems like an awful lot when you’re spending your own money.

Getting rid of the fridges is a sound financial move in times that call for sound financial moves.

JoeV

May 12th, 2010
10:46 am

LeeH1

May 12th, 2010
8:46 am

YOU ARE AN IDIOT. Are you telling me that my wife, who has a masters degree and a specialist degree, isn’t a professional? What a skewed, high horse you are riding on.

former GCPS teacher

May 12th, 2010
10:46 am

Using a faculty workroom fridge in a Gwinnett high school would make sense if there weren’t so many teachers in trailers and if lunch were more than 25 minutes. Using less energy is a great idea, but I hope the powers that be will give a thought to quality of work life in this time of more students and fewer resources. And I don’t just mean the occasional ice cream party. Being fanatical about keeping meetings short would really help.

And if they’re thinking so green all of a sudden, I remember sitting through presentations looking at handouts with whole zip codes full of white space wondering, “Did the administrator who created this packet give even a little thought to getting as much as possible on one page? Maybe changing margins, shrinking font size just a touch?”

Theresa Walsh Giarrusso

May 12th, 2010
10:46 am

RJ — our classes ate the snacks (or brain food as our school likes to call it) before the testing started. I guess they were worried that if they didn’t get a good breakfast this would help. They are not allowed to snack during the test from what I was told.

Theresa Walsh Giarrusso

May 12th, 2010
10:48 am

GCPS – we do have tons of trailers at our school and it is much harder on those teachers. they’re like their own little island out there.

Out of this for good

May 12th, 2010
10:54 am

No one seems to get the legal issue here. Teachers aren’t supposed to leave their students unattended and to have a mini fridge in the room allows water etc. without leaving the classroom.
And we all know the story on one group fridge located a looong distance from your room. And particularly for those in trailers.

Wounded Warrior

May 12th, 2010
10:55 am

A Henry county middle school teacher…and they can’t have anything during the test, and ate lunch an hour late. The are great teachers in this school, but this one is grossly incompetent.

motherjanegoose

May 12th, 2010
10:56 am

RJ…professional has gone the way of common sense and manners.

I sometimes see teachers walking with their class and carrying a cup of hot coffee with no lid. WE were never allowed to do that, for safety reasons, that was over 10 years ago.

@ Catholic School…surely you jest…this is not the song I am hearing. Everyone is pinching pennies and offering plates are not what they used to be. Some private schools have nose diving enrollment.

It is bad everywhere and I am not seeing any results from those who promised to fix it.

jw

May 12th, 2010
10:56 am

this is fun – little fridges cost the district 698,000 per year – a little fridge uses about 300 kwh per year – at 10 cents a kwh – that’s about 30 bucks per year – that would mean there is 23, 267 little fridges in the district – that is hilarious -

Please – I know budgets are tight, but you really think people are buying that one Gwinnett County Board of Education? Please – just another smoke screen to draw attention away from the dirty tactics used to reduce force! And y’all are going to buy it!

Wounded Warrior

May 12th, 2010
10:56 am

Ther are…what do the teachers that are diabetic do?

vee

May 12th, 2010
10:59 am

the “centrally located” fridge is not a good option here. food is stolen. if it’s not stolen, it’s left in there for ages. no body wants to be in charge of cleaning it. if you get a 30 min break for lunch it may take five min or more to get to & from the central location, etc. my mini fridge just adds a little convenience to a very busy schedule. charge me a utility fee. i’m ok w/that.

Wounded Warrior

May 12th, 2010
11:05 am

Don’t the custodians clean the school?

Fridge Killer

May 12th, 2010
11:06 am

Yes, they do use a lot of power. Think of how many jobs the system can save.

Fridge Killer

May 12th, 2010
11:07 am

Bring a dang gum cooler you spoiled brats.

abc

May 12th, 2010
11:12 am

When I was a child and in public school, there were no mini-fridges or microwaves in any classrooms, and everyone got along just fine. In the corporate world for the past 20 years, I have yet to see such things in offices, cube farms, or conference rooms — only in designated kitchen areas. They get cleaned by employees, or by the janitorial staff. It’s not a problem.

I was married to a teacher. Everything that she brought home that was food was promptly thrown out — why risk health over fudge or whatever it was that was prepared who knows where, and under what conditions of sanitation, or lack thereof? Most of the stuff she brought home, literally by the boxload, was thrown out. She kept the Christmas ornaments, which in the space of only a few years replaced all the family ornaments that actually meant something to all of us. Keep the presents. Teachers don’t need them, nor do they really want them. Their families absolutely don’t want them, they’re a big bother.

No matter what level of education is attained or required, so-called ‘profession’ is unrelated. For teachers that are any good at it, teaching is a calling; it’s no more of a profession than I.T., retail, or office administration — all of which could be characterized as professions. But, comparison to legal or medical fields, etc., is unwarranted. Teaching isn’t like that.

whatever

May 12th, 2010
11:16 am

I could agree with it if it meant saving teacher jobs/furlough days, but the county will just waste that and even more money on additional programs probably implementing their own CRCT test for the lower grades now that the state eliminated them!! If they really wanted to save on electricity, what about shifting the calendar…starting later and ending later. The temps in June are lower than August!! Also, are they doing this in all county buildings or just teachers? Sounds like it is a move that doesn’t affect them, but lets them say that they are cutting the budget, saving money while going green.

motherjanegoose

May 12th, 2010
11:26 am

Years ago, I was teaching Kinder and a First Grade teacher was a friend. Her sister came in from out of town and stayed at their house. She arrived ( at school) while we were on the playground and said,
“I came to take you to lunch.”

REALLY…most teachers get 30 minutes or so, if that, and at that school we ate with our class….no leaving the school premises. The sister could not imagine having to spend your lunch with your class.

As I said, I never had a fridge but my husband, in the corporate world, had one for quite a while…he
also had a microwave. I do not know if he still does as I rarely visit him at work….complete opposite ends of Atlanta.

FYI…I have never heard of the janitor cleaning out the fridge. If you are a teacher and your janitor does this…please let us know. I am interested.

YEARS ago, when I worked at Wal Mart, we took turns cleaning the fridge out and it was not fun prying the science projects out from the back.

@abc, I am not fond of eating food that is not in a sealed box myself, for your very reasons.
I did keep most of the other things and my family still enjoys some of the things I have.

CC

May 12th, 2010
11:26 am

I have worked in two schools in the metro Atlanta area and we have never been allowed to have our own refrigerators (or microwaves) in our rooms or offices. I would love to have my own fridge because I absolutely hate putting my lunch (which I bring daily) in a large fridge with everyone else’s things. People leave things in there so long that they spoil and the smell is horrible! I definitely think that teachers in trailers should be allowed to have their own fridges since they are often a good distance from the building and can not leave their classes unattended.

motherjanegoose

May 12th, 2010
11:29 am

@ abc, when I was a child we did not have microwaves, cell phones, DVD’s, ice cube makers, garage door openers, remote controls, computers/ laptops. Everyone got along just fine. Not sure about this logic. LOL

Joe

May 12th, 2010
11:31 am

Who buys a refrigerator for their teacher? I think we can give those up. For goodness sake, take something that doesn’t need it. A PBJ sandwich is better than a furlough day.

abc

May 12th, 2010
11:32 am

Maybe you think they do, MJG, but I doubt they actually do. What, for instance, would they enjoy? I would constantly hear about the “sacrifices a teacher’s family has to make”, but the kids and I would dismiss all that — it was/is her job, as far as we were concerned, and nothing much more than that to do with us. Anytime it was brought into the house, we considered it to be intrusive. I insisted on having an unlisted phone numbers and absolutely no calls to the house from students and parents.

As far as refrigerators and microwaves in offices in Corporate Atlanta, what a joke. To have something like that would be to invite ridicule. What is it, can’t leave the office for lunch? Work smarter, achieve a balance. I’ve been in Fortune 500’s for a long time, and I’ve never seen anyone bring such things to work.

Writer Offer

May 12th, 2010
11:37 am

Food left in refrigerators during summer vacation can be classified as a “science project” and written off.

Michelle

May 12th, 2010
11:41 am

As a teacher, I had to give up my fridge last year. We have one refrigerator and one microwave for the 90 adults working in this building. We have 25 minutes(on a good day) to go to the restroom, cook our food and eat. Times are tough and it is very inconvenient but I am thankful to have a job. Why do we always cut education and education related things first? I doubt our state govt officials have these conditions.

Unimpressed

May 12th, 2010
11:42 am

Why don’t they just take our toilet paper away from us too? After all, people lived for thousands of years without it. How much would that save?

Unimpressed

May 12th, 2010
11:43 am

AND, I bet J Alvin ALWAYS has access to a fridge in case there is a random day that he is not out eating lunch on the taxpayers’ dime.

Michelle

May 12th, 2010
11:52 am

Well, if it is truly cost saving, I think it’s a great idea. I like the idea of each “grade” or “hall” having their own large refridgerator versus the smaller in class ones. Then, you know who is using it (5-10 people versus a whole building). You still end up with someone having to take responsibility for cleaning, etc. though (more than likely).

I’m sure there are LOTS of things that can be done to save money. Do the schools recycle papers? I know they use tons of it! That might be a good first step as well.

Do the hallway lights need to be on during the hours that kids are actually in classes? Why not make them motion sensitive as someone else suggested? I work in a very large warehouse and when folks aren’t actually in the aisles, the lights turn off! This alone could be a HUGE savings for the schools! We also recycle all used paper (shredding when necessary first), cardboard, cans, plastic, and wood!

I agree with the other poster, too, who said is this being done county wide or just at the schools? It should be utilized throughout the county!

I’m sure there are MANY things that could be done from a county perspective to save money, it’s just a matter of finding a few folks to champion the project!

motherjanegoose

May 12th, 2010
11:53 am

@ abc…when I received the gifts, we used quite a few gift cards to eat a places we could not afford. We went to the movies too. You sound a little annoyed at your wife’s profession, to me. I took phone calls from parents and it was not a problem, nor did it happen often.

Guess the big boys make enough to eat out every day or expense things but some of the rest of us, brown bag it. My husband has been with his company for over 20 years and actually inherited a fridge from someone who retired. As I said, I do not know if he still has that one.

I am not in the league of eating lunch out every day, although I am meeting Michelle today and met Kathy on Monday ( both on the blog). I cannot absorb even $12-$15 per day for eating out everyday into my budget…maybe everyone else here can and that is super…just not me!

Becky

May 12th, 2010
11:53 am

@abc..What about having a refrigerator and microwave in an office is cause for ridicule? I work in an office and we (and have had for years) our own fridge, microwave, coffee maker, toaster oven and air condtioner..As well as a radio..Each dept. in my building (at one time) had their own coffee maker and fridge..When we moved to a new building, that all went by the way side except for the office that I work in..It just makes life so much easier for all of us..

As for the refrigerators in the class room, if it’s really saving that much money that will be put to better use, then yes take them out of the class..If they are just going to blow this money on something else that is useless, let them keep them…

JoeV

May 12th, 2010
12:16 pm

abc…

Sounds like sour grapes from a failed marriage to me.

Michelle

May 12th, 2010
12:23 pm

abc…you do sound a little bitter…for my son’s Kindergarten teacher, I made her a quilt with a picture of each of the kids in her class! Her surprise and loving reaction were genuine! I think it is something she will cherish.

Now, I do agree that sometimes there are only so many #1 teacher things that a person can handle!

HB

May 12th, 2010
12:44 pm

I honestly had never heard of workplaces where individuals have their own mini-fridges in offices. That seems so wasteful to me! Most places I’ve worked have provided fridges (sometimes large, sometimes mini) and microwaves, but only for groups — one per dept or one per floor. And that includes a fancy schmancy law firm in downtown Atlanta. I never saw mini-fridges in the partners’ offices. There was a large fridge on each of 9 floors in a skyscraper shared by 25-30 people. Our floor, the 10th, only had 12 staffers, so we had a mini-fridge with a microwave attached. Surely several teachers could share one mini-fridge if the school is so large that it’s a long walk to the teachers’ lounge fridge.

Meme

May 12th, 2010
12:47 pm

Wow! We don’t have the problem of teacher taking other teacher’s food out of the grade level fridges. Also, we are required by the administration to make sure that the fridge is clean or it is unplugged. Yes, the custodians clean the school but they are not responsible for cleaning out the fridge.

Becky

May 12th, 2010
12:55 pm

@Michelle..With some help from my Mom, I made my 4th grade art teacher a wreath..I saw this teacher right before I finished my Junior year, she hugged me and told me that to that day, she still hung that wreath on her door every year..Yes, she may have just told me that, but boy did it make me feel good to hear that..This is why, I try to give gifts to the teachers that they might keep for years to come..

jw

May 12th, 2010
12:58 pm

I meant “are” instead of “is” in my post – way back up there!!!!! LOL! I understand the need to cut back, and yes, our district did the refrigerator thing about 5 years ago – but quoting 698,000 dollars of savings is not true – no way – that’s a lot of refrigerators in the schools – the formula in the excel sheet is all wrong – 20,000+ refrigerators and lamps in 213 schools – come on – bet there is a reason to use that smoke screen to hide another line item they don’t want to cut – simple as that –

We all have “good ‘ol day stories” – and they still dust off quite well when we need to use them – but realistically, had the technology and all the devices been around “way back when we walked to school in the snow barefoot in May” they would have been at the local schoolhouse – and we would have had one! Can’t compare then and now – it isn’t a fair fight – sorry.

Guess those folks that had the first electric refrigerators caught all kinds of grief from those that used good old fashioned blocks of ice for the icebox that was on site – and how much money was being wasted having “one of them new fangled thangs here” – just not a fair fight!

RJ

May 12th, 2010
1:02 pm

Theresa, you’re right in that they can’t eat during the test, but there are break after each session. Some schools allow students to snack during the break, others after the entire test for that day. But I’ve never heard that they weren’t allowed to have a snack. It’s the one time of year that they are.

Jaded

May 12th, 2010
1:03 pm

We don’t have a problem with teachers taking each other’s food, but, there are those who will send students into the faculty lounge to get their lunch. I have personally witnessed students going through other teachers’ meals! the thought of some nasty teenager touching my food is more than I can handle!

As other posters have already mentioned, we only get 27 minutes from bell to bell to go to the restroom, retrieve our lunches, and actually eat it. Another problem that I’ve encountered is that some teachers are not very considerate, and will bring those damned Lean Cuisine things that take about 10 minutes to heat up!

Oh well, at least I have a job, right?

Actually, jw...

May 12th, 2010
1:30 pm

…20,000 does sound like a LOT or small fridges; at the same time, based on the $698K figure, that equates to about $35 per fridge, or $2.90 per day (for 12 months). So, with 213 schools, and maybe 40-50 classrooms, that would really be about about 10,000 fridges, IF every room had a fridge – that would double the current projected costs to about $70 per fridge or $6 per month.

Correct, Jaded...

May 12th, 2010
1:33 pm

…you do have a job, and from what I can see about a lot teachers, most could stand to miss lunch every day…so the moaning aobut the 23 -27 minutes to eat and p is not a good argument…

Becky

May 12th, 2010
1:55 pm

@Corret, Jaded..I’m not sure at what school you are seeing a lot of teachers that could stand to miss lunch every day, but at the school where my two little ones go, most of the teachers could stand to eat 2-3 lunches per day..So, post us a picture of your lovely body on here, then let’s talk lunch..

Becky

May 12th, 2010
1:56 pm

Oops..”Correct”

MomsRule

May 12th, 2010
2:02 pm

I have been making and sending lunch to school for 2 kids every school day for many years now. The kids do not have access to refrigeration. At least teachers have access to a community fridge. If you don’t like using it, there are many ways to prepare your lunches so that they do not require refrigeration.

If the schools can save money by getting rid of this luxury, and yes it is a luxury, then it should be cut and everyone should suck it up and be grateful they have a job. I appreciate the teachers but good grief all the “poor me” and griping gets old.

I’d like to see all the schools ban all teachers from having cell phones in the classroom as well. They are JUST as disruptive to learning as the students having cell phones.

Jaded

May 12th, 2010
2:04 pm

@MomsRule – I’m curious; how exactly would you propose that the “no cell phones for teachers” be enforced?

Roswell Jeff

May 12th, 2010
2:06 pm

Enforce it like any other infraction that a teacher might make.

Roswell Jeff

May 12th, 2010
2:08 pm

Our school is a “dead zone” as soon as you walk in the front door. You can’t find a cell phone signal anywhere in the building.

Jaded

May 12th, 2010
2:09 pm

@Roswell Jeff – I guess I should have been more specific. Do you intend to pat down the teachers in the mornings and confiscate the cell phones? That would be a rule that would never work!

Jeff

May 12th, 2010
2:10 pm

Motherjane, there’s a phrase I learned the hard way: Guess what happens when you’re the only player at the poker table NOT cheating?

Well, today, for the most part, you’re the one trying to be logical in a room full of less-than-logical people.

MomsRule

May 12th, 2010
2:13 pm

Jaded, I’m not sure I have the exact answer but I’m certain many things could be done from a disciplinary perspective.

Just to throw something out – they could be taken away, just like the students phones, if they are caught using them in the classroom.

Don’t get me wrong. I’m a huge cell phone user but there is a time and a place. And in the classroom is not the appropriate place IMO. Or during surgery, I don’t think I’d want my surgeon stopping to text while I’m laying open on the table.

Roswell Jeff

May 12th, 2010
2:15 pm

How about, bring your cell phone to school but don’t get caught using it – especially in the classroom? Like I said above, you can’t get a signal in our school. The teachers go into the media room during their free period and make any phone calls they need to on a land line.

MomsRule

May 12th, 2010
2:16 pm

@Jaded, no, I don’t expect that but, the teachers aren’t even making an attempt to hide them or refrain from using them. It would not take long or much effort from an adminstration to put a serious dent in cell phone use by teachers in the classroom. I think most people would be shocked and appalled to know how much cell phone use is happening by teachers while they are “teaching” our kids.

ugh...

May 12th, 2010
2:19 pm

Jeff, good thing that the teachers that you are talking about don’t work in the same building that I do. Have a coworerk that sits at the desk behind mine and every time I look, she’s texting someone. Then if you say something to the big boss about it, she says, I’m surr it’s important. DUH..

JJ

May 12th, 2010
2:25 pm

In the 12 years my daughter was educated in Gwinnett County schools, NOT ONCE did I see a personal fridge in ANY classroom!!!! None in the Elementary, None that I saw in the Middle School, and I never saw one in the High School. Could be one or two may have had a fridge, but not every teacher, not every classroom.

Roswell Jeff

May 12th, 2010
2:28 pm

Talking about inappropriate times to use a cell phone – One time I had to get a drug test and physical for employment and the “doctor” (I use that term loosely) takes a phone call during the exam. He keeps jawing away on his cell, while continuing the physical. I guess he was confirming dates for a condo rental in Destin – he even told me to “cough” while he was making his plans.

abc

May 12th, 2010
2:31 pm

Sour grapes? Not at all. She left me and the kids, and it was like getting out of jail from a very long sentence. All of a sudden, we could keep the house clean. Money didn’t simply disappear for no reason. Years later, I’m now married to a woman who cares more about her family than her job. A teacher that will put their family first is a rare thing, in my experience.

Microwaves in offices and cube farms, sure sounds suboptimal… sorry you can’t get away for lunch, but I’d imagine that with the smell that multiple microwaves simultaneously heating lunches must inspire a lot of your co-workers to be sorry you can’t get away for lunch, too!

Now, come on. You can take a little kidding.

JATL

May 12th, 2010
2:39 pm

When I taught 10-15 years ago in two different school systems, NO ONE had a mini fridge -in either school system. One was a South Dekalb high school and the other was a hot-shotty East Cobb high school. I was in trailers at both places, and either you remembered to bring a water bottle full of water, or you went thirsty until you had some type of break. Not the greatest, but this is an effective way of eliminating hundreds of thousands of dollars of expense! There’s just no good argument against it.

TechMom

May 12th, 2010
2:40 pm

If it will work, even if it only saves half the money they say it will, then ban them. Teachers, bring a cooler or make a lunch that doesn’t require cooling & heating. People used to steal stuff out of our company refrigerator all the time but I learned as long as you put it in an ‘individualized’ bag or container, people wouldn’t take it (i.e. if you leave a can of Coke on the shelf, kiss it goodbye. But if you put it in a hot pink lunch sack with your name on it, no one was going to spend time to rummage through it). Also once they made it a policy that the refigerators would be emptied EVERY Friday, people learned not to leave stuff. People complained about forgetting stuff the first couple of weeks but less of us complain about how nasty the frige is anymore.

I’m with the person who questions the vending machines. Unless the vending machines are making the school enough money to make up for the use of electricity and more, then those should go to.

And I don’t kow Gwinnett’s policy on lights at the schools at night & on the weekends but the public schools in my county are like a beacon after hours. Why they can’t just use motion sensors is beyond me. And I wouldn’t be surprised if the heat and A/C runs all weekend too.

Roswell Jeff

May 12th, 2010
2:42 pm

Maybe they could make a competition out of it. Whoever is “teacher of the year”, not only gets their own special parking place but – they get to keep a mini-fridge in their room.

JATL

May 12th, 2010
2:46 pm

Also -I think LeeH1 is a troll who is trying to flame up the board. Either that or he/she is dumber than a rock and should be dropped into one of our “rougher” high schools a week before Christmas break or the end of the school year and forced to “teach/monitor” a full day’s class load for a week. It would be great reality t.v. to see if Lee actually survived! Let’s see how professional Lee is by day 3. Let’s see Lee realize that if nothing else, people who don’t go completely ballistic and kill the kids are REALLY professional -on par with attorneys, psychiatrists and CEOs. Let’s watch Lee try to balance the actual classroom with all of the paperwork and administrative B.S. he gets to handle -and let’s not forget -since Lee is new -he/she will need to coach or sponsor at least one extra-curricular activity. Have fun Lee! It’s sooooooooo easy being a teacher, I’m sure even a moron like yourself could do it!

Well, JATL...

May 12th, 2010
3:03 pm

…with your attitude, I certainly hope you are not still teaching, for your sake and the sake of the kids. If you are still teaching, how do you have so much time, based on your 2:46pm post, to rant several times a day if you are so busy?

MomsRule

May 12th, 2010
3:07 pm

@Roswell Jeff — see! That’s just wrong! And gross. (But I did giggle at your story!)

Didn’t you want to say something? You were in a hard place though with it being a physical for a job though…ugh!

irisheyes

May 12th, 2010
3:08 pm

OMG! I can not believe the nerve of some people here. Teachers aren’t allowed to have lunch because they could stand to lose a few pounds! They aren’t professionals because they’ve had the audacity to organize for better working conditions? (BTW, for anyone who is STILL misguided, GA is a right to work state. THERE ARE NO TEACHER UNIONS IN GA!!!) Look, pull the fridges, I don’ have one, so I don’t care. I do have a microwave, because I get 25 minutes for lunch, and that starts the minute my kids start going through the line and ends usually a couple of minutes early since I have to go help them clean up their tables, so I heat my food up in my microwave so I don’t have to wait as long to eat. Plus, I used my microwave to pop popcorn for my kids as a reward and to heat up water to make hot chocolate the day before winter break while we were watching The Polar Express. But, whatever, I’m not a professional, so why should I care?

JATL

May 12th, 2010
3:22 pm

@Well, JATL, as I stated in a previous post, I taught 10-15 years ago. Hell, no I’m not still teaching! If you think I’m exaggerating or snarky though -you should do the same as I suggested for Lee (you probably ARE Lee). It’s one of the toughest jobs there is -period. No, I actually work in a calm and peaceful environment and get paid much more than what I was making as a teacher, which is actually sad, because the work I do now will certainly not change anyone’s life. However, when I go home I’m done, and I don’t have to put up with a bunch of kids whose parents don’t care unless you fail them, and then they’re all over the place going nuts because their kid should deserve to skip class, skip school, never turn anything in and PASS. Funny how they’re NEVER available when you’re trying to contact them 3-4 times per week while this is going on…. But I digress -no I don’t teach anymore, but don’t DARE pass judgment until you’ve done it in tough schools for several years!

JJ

May 12th, 2010
3:46 pm

Has anyone ever seen the episode of Two and a Half Men, when Charlie goes in for a Vasectomy, and the doctor is on the phone with his wife who’s in labor……hysterical!!!!

Kris

May 12th, 2010
4:36 pm

JJ, I love Two and a Half Men – watch it every chance I get. I just have to squelch the opinion I have
of Charlie Sheen being a liberal, pompous a–!

Becky

May 12th, 2010
4:53 pm

@Kris..lol..He might be tht, but he could eat crackers in my bed anytime..

Becky

May 12th, 2010
4:55 pm

wow..sorry for all the typos and misspellings in my post today..

Meme

May 12th, 2010
5:09 pm

@MomsRule – I don’t know about others, but my phone is turned off and in my desk as soon as I get to school. I might check it during planning. I turn it on just before I walk out the door. It does not interrupt my classes.

jan

May 12th, 2010
5:42 pm

Last year my sister-in-law, forsyth co teacher, gave us an aquarium. She had it in her classroom for the kids but all of that was cut out last year for them. No add’l electricy used in classrooms. I thought it was harsh re: the aquarium but a mini-fridge – really not necessary. There is nothing wrong with having a cooler. Pampered much?????

Jaded

May 12th, 2010
6:01 pm

I have my cell phone with me everyday, but, I would wager my entire meager paycheck that any of my students have ever seen me use it! It is off and away during my classes. Lately, the only time I HAVE used it during the day was to return a parent’s phone call when the department phone was already in use.

FYI – by law, we cannot take up students’ phones anymore, because the school becomes liable if the phone gets lost or stolen while in our custody. So, they would not be lawfully allowed to take up teachers’ phones either.

smh

May 12th, 2010
6:53 pm

I don’t have a problem with keeping the mini fridges or microwaves. The time for lunch in our elementary school is 25 minutes from the time the class enters until the time they leave. It is barely enough time to get the kids seated, use the restroom, possibly check one’s mailbox and eat. The break room does not have a refrigerator nor is there room for one. In a large school such as ours, teachers don’t even see the break room but before and after school. The just can’t get there.

One teacher who is expecting a child in the fall wondered what she’s supposed to do with her breast milk if she pumps during the day? Good question. Does she store her breast milk along with everyone’s lunch? Can a cooler possibly keep the milk at the correct temperature? Just curious.

motherjanegoose

May 12th, 2010
7:02 pm

Just back from lunch with Michelle and we had fun discussing others on the blog. Am I the only one who has the nerve to actually invite folks to meet, from this blog? It really has been fun to put the face with the name and make new friends too! Thanks Michelle for spending a few hours with me…we’ll do it again! DB, you are up next!

@ Jeff…thanks for your 2:10 comment. I have learned a few things today myself and several posts gave me something to think about. My son is brilliant with numbers and has a photogenic memory but does not have a poker face…we can tell exactly what is going on. We used to tease him and call him “pointy eyebrows” as they would rare up when he was thinking ( too hard) about something.

Amy

May 12th, 2010
8:28 pm

I work in Gwinnett and would gladly give up my fridge, microwave, and lamps if it meant I didn’t have 3 furlough days next year. But you know what? We’re still getting furloughed!

Cindy

May 12th, 2010
9:11 pm

As a teacher who just lost her job, I am all for any cost-cutting measures that truly cut costs and don’t affect the students or classroom size. The reason many teachers opt for personal refigerators is that there is often no central location where a refrigerator or coffee maker is available. Also, we middle school teachers are with children all day (even at lunch), and have planning periods filled with meetings, so a visit to a ceentral location might be difficult.
I do think that schools should make an effort, though, to cut costs and offer just basic fridge space and a coffee maker.

Sally

May 12th, 2010
10:08 pm

LOL at “photogenic memory”!

another teacher

May 12th, 2010
11:13 pm

just 3 furlough days – try 10 – and that’s after the fridges are cut LOL! We have 5 student and 5 staff holidays in the 10/11 calendar – I love how Funny Sonny can stand and say no furloughs for educators this year – but cuts the QBE funding where districts have no choice but release staff and reduce work days for those that survived the cuts – got to wonder how he sleeps at night – but he doesn’t care – just go fishing – that will fix the problem! Have to wait until next year for the license free day!

motherjanegoose

May 13th, 2010
7:07 am

ooops…Sally…my bad…you are right and I am wrong! Photographic….LOL!

csk

May 13th, 2010
9:15 am

My mini-refrigerator allows me to quickly grab my lunch and eat in the 28 minutes I am alloted for lunch. I also grade papers, answer parent emails, and prepare lessons during my lunch time. I understand budget cuts and this will be yet another that cuts a little more into my daily productivity.

BessieBear

May 13th, 2010
9:16 am

What is so hard about bringing your food in an insulated lunch bag with and ice-pack? Never mind convenience, and saving the school’s money, how about just doing that to not use up so much energy, burn so much coal and cause so much pollution. That would be a good lesson for the kids.

Nic

May 13th, 2010
3:24 pm

This is dumb. These teachers are college educated folks willing to make only $35,000 to make a difference in society. Taking away the little things, like fridges, disenfranchises folks and may be the straw that breaks the camels back in terms of leaving for a different profession. $700,000 is a small price to pay for something changes the attitudes of county teachers.

catlady

May 14th, 2010
7:49 pm

Ours were “taken away”, along with anything else that uses electricity (like microwaves) at the beginning of the year. Teachers offered to pay the cost themselves. We have to use 2 common, nasty microwaves. No administrator has figured that using 2 micros 40 times a day is the same as using 10 micros 4 times a day, especially if you unplug the micro when not in use. Teachers are captive audiences and cannot go out for warm food.

I was allowed to keep my minifridge because my dr. wrote a note saying I need it for my diabetes food/access. Who knows about next year.

catlady

May 14th, 2010
7:50 pm

Obviously my blood sugar is low, as I cannot accurately multiply.

catlady

May 14th, 2010
7:56 pm

Not to mention waiting in line for 18 of your 23 lunch minutes to get a shot at one of the two microwaves. 3 minutes to warm up, then 2 minutes to eat. (Did I get the math right that time?)

ready_shoot_aim

May 16th, 2010
7:45 am

Think of middle school and high school. Think of interior rooms. Think of movies or ppt…think of the lights are out. Now, there are no lamps. Um…I don’t think there will be any more movies in windowless rooms!

Kitty

May 18th, 2010
3:19 pm

I am a teacher who had to get rid of the fridge last year. Paid for it with my own money over 20 years ago. Well, there are refrigerators in the teacher’s “lounge” for teachers to use to put their own lunches, etc. in. Both refrigerators need to go to the dump. They do not keep the food cool, and they are not kept clean. I have gotten used to this — I bring my food with ice blocks to keep it cool.

So, it’s not the end of my world. There are many times per week when I could use it for my students — which was the initial reason for purchasing the fridge in the first place. I started out as a kindergarten teacher. Lots of items went into the fridge for my class. I can think of other ways to cut back on a school budget though. (hint: most school systems are top heavy — a few cuts there could keep the botulism out of teacher’s food)

GCPSTeacher

June 25th, 2010
6:12 pm

I am a teacher, and I have a mini-fridge. Yes, I will give it up for the greater good of saving money or pay a fee to keep it, but the idea that it is a luxury is humorous. Comments that state we should only have a fridge in our breakroom are reasonable. Problem is we don’t have a breakroom. It was taken over as a classroom years ago. There is an ancient, grungy fridge in a bookroom on my floor, but it is always stuffed by old forgotten leftovers. In addition, I have to drink a great deal of water due to injuring my vocal cords many years ago. I used to store water in the community fridge. Bottles would disappear and an entire case disappeared between one afternoon and the next morning. I went out and bought a mini-fridge the next day. The community fridge shared by a few administrators in the front office is always pristine – less people and an administrative assistant to keep it in order. The administrators who have offices scattered throughout the building also have mini-fridges in their offices. Will they be taken out as well? Somehow I doubt it. In the end a mini-fridge is a small thing, why get bothered by it? Well our days are made up of small concessions that demoralize us and treat us like children rather than professionals. Frankly it’s hard to find a few minutes between classes and monitoring the halls to go to the bathroom. Now I guess I will add running to the community fridge to that narrow window of time as well.