Is online homework fair? Is it effective?

I am noticing that more and more frequently our teachers are asking the kids to go to different Web sites to do their homework. They are still assigning written homework every day, but the kids are also asked to do stuff online daily.

And while it’s not a problem for our family to pull up a reference site or play math games online, I have been thinking about families that may not have the luxury of a computer or a fast internet connection at home. I’m not sure what those families are supposed to do?

The kids love doing their homework online, so I’m also wondering if it makes homework too fun? Will they be able to stick it out later on hard paper assignments that don’t have immediate rewards and bells and whistles?

Here are some examples of the online work the kids are routinely asked to do:

  1. Almost all of the teachers at our school have extensive individual school sites where they link to reference material and other sites. For example, Rose researched a report on habitats off her teacher’s links. She also researched a paper on the rock cycle from her teacher’s links. (I guess by putting these links the teachers know they are finding reliable safe sites.) The sheets pretty much followed verbatim the links she had. I guess a child could have used a book but it would have been harder to hunt and find the exact info the teacher was looking for.
  2. The teachers post reminders and homework assignments on their sites as well. (Our favorite fill-in host Keith has mentioned several times that in middle school the parents and teachers communicate almost exclusively through the teachers’ online Web sites. I guess because you have six teachers instead of just one. She said the kids are expected to look there for their assignments in they miss a day.)
  3. The kids also are asked to work math problems on the McGraw-Hill math site Everyday Math each day. They love this site and there is a competition in each class to earn the most play time on the site.
  4. With the Boosterthon money, our school bought access for all the students to the Renzulli Learning site. Renzulli figures out what kids like to do best and then loads up literally hundreds of safe educational sites for the kids to visit. It also has online book and field trips the kids can take. The idea of this service is that it’s tailored the kid’s level of skill as well as interests. It’s supposed to get harder as they improve. The kids can play at school during any downtime but are expected to play online at home. The site tracks their time online.  (This is definitely enrichment as opposed to curriculum, but the school believes it will strengthen their skills.)

I called the Gwinnett County Public School office to find out what is the county’s policy if kids’ don’t have access to computers at home. Here’s what Jorge Quintana, Director of Media Relations, told me:

“The school system does not have a districtwide Board policy on access to online school work as we provide our local schools with that flexibility based on the needs of their own communities. Each Gwinnett
school might take a different approach to doing school work online based on the makeup of their individual communities. When a student is registered, schools work with parents to find out if there’s online access at home. If a school decides to implement digital work to enrich the curriculum, and a student does not have access at home, the school works with the parents to accommodate the needs of each student. That could include providing access during the school day.”

I’m afraid the kids would miss something in class if they were doing their homework at school though. Our teachers are moving pretty fast.

I know I see kids online at the public library all the time and another friend suggested that maybe some after-school care centers had computers where kids could do their homework before they go home.

What do you think? How much online homework does your school assign? Do you think it is an effective way to educate and practice concepts? Do you think it’s too much fun? What about families that don’t have a home computer or a fast Internet service? Those games would be super frustrating on dial up? (Does dial up still exist?) Have online assignments ever been a problem for your family to complete?

206 comments Add your comment

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January 19th, 2010
9:29 am

No, its not fair, but nothing in life is fair. Life isn’t supposed to be fair. If it was, then the lion would flip a coin to choose the antelope to eat instead of the slowest.

That written, I feel bad for those parents who are struggling to provide for their children and after working many hours are then sitting at the library waiting to get a computer for their child to do his homework. In the end though, the parents who put those kind of hours in will succeed.

cld

January 19th, 2010
9:32 am

I can’t speak for what the schools are assigning, because our son is only a toddler. However, it doesn’t seem right for teachers to require internet time at home. Sure, public libraries have high-speed internet. But what about the working class that barely makes ends meet? Are they supposed to take a family trip to the library EVERY night? Plenty of people don’t have internet; plenty more don’t have high-speed access. I know a number of people who have cut back or cut out their internet in the last couple years. Requiring school supplies is one thing; requiring $30+ per month for home internet is another. And while I realize the schools SAY they will accommodate . . . come on. Are they really going to? Are the teachers and administrators really going to be okay with pulling little Susie from instructional time so she can play online games, while the rest of her class learns about prime numbers? No, if teachers already are pushed to cram instructional time, they aren’t going to disrupt their classes to allow students to enter and exit throughout the day simply because their families don’t have home internet. It’s not fair to the kids who miss instruction, or to the kids who don’t get that “out”. It’s not fair to the teachers who have to allow the in-and-out, or to the parents who then feel pressure or inadequacies for not supplying the tool at home.

Sorry, we do have high-speed internet at home (and work and on our cell phones), but I have a dear friend who teaches at one of the poorest schools in Gwinnett County, and my husband works in a field where he is in constant contact with administrators all over the state, including some of the poorest school systems in Georgia. No way these kids get DSL or cable internet at home – in some cases, it isn’t even available to those locations.

cld

January 19th, 2010
9:36 am

… – Not all the parents who are putting in those long hours, are moving up the corporate ladder. Many are working long hours or multiple jobs in dead-end careers just to get food on the table. When my husband was in construction, many of his subcontractors (I’m talking about the LEGAL ones here) worked from sun up until sun down, for pay levels somewhere between minimum wage and poverty, with no hope of ever moving up in their careers.

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January 19th, 2010
9:39 am

“… – Not all the parents who are putting in those long hours, are moving up the corporate ladder. ”

I wasn’t referring to any corporate ladder when i wrote that these parents would succeed. I meant that they would succeed as parents. If they put in that time with their jobs and then dedicated their nights to getting the children prepared for school, they will be exhausted. However, their children will thrive and thats success when you are a parent.

cld

January 19th, 2010
9:52 am

Sorry about that. It came across as long hours at work = success at work. I do agree about the children thriving. (And maybe it’s even better in that sense, to NOT have internet at home – or at least not have a computer per person. That way the kids can’t retreat to their rooms and spend hours alone, on the computer . . .)

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January 19th, 2010
9:55 am

Everyone knows that its hard to grow up poor, however, sometimes its a blessing in disguise. Sometimes not having much can help you to be appreciative of what you have. And if you grow up poor and acheive some financial success in your adult life, you may be much more appreciative than a person of equal financial success who grew up with much.

Michelle

January 19th, 2010
9:59 am

If it is mandatory on-line time, I don’t really think it’s fair (not in elementary or junior high). Once the kids get in high school, they have schedules that are much more flexible allowing them time to find ways to get on the internet.

As someone mentioned, there are still a lot of families that do not have computers, let alone internet acces! What are they supposed to do? Not only that, if they don’t have them and work full time, at what time are they supposed to take care of family business (supper,etc.) between running all over town to get to a computer!

Now, I’m not saying that on-line homework and games is not educational, because I believe it can be necessary as our society becomes more computer/electronically based! The kids are going to HAVE to be computer literate to get ahead in the future!

Denise

January 19th, 2010
10:13 am

I don’t think that homework can ever be “too fun”. It probably helps students look forward to doing homework. And if kids get excited about homework and are diligent, that can only help them in the long run, IMO.

As for requiring online homework, I think it’s not appropriate to make mandatory for the exact reasons you all have already stated: people cannot be expected to have computers and internet access, esp. in this economy when people are struggling to meet their NEEDS and are not getting any of their WANTS. If online homework is required, it needs to be done in school. If there are not enough computers to go around in school, they should not assume there are enough computers to go around at home. And don’t talk about the public library. Some folks WORK in the evenings. Older kids can stay at home by themselves until their parents come home in the evening but they have no access to transportation (probably don’t have an “extra” car if they cannot afford the non-recurring cost of a computer) unless they bum a ride.

hi there

January 19th, 2010
10:28 am

Ok, I get that homework is part of being a kid and growing up, but to require they log onto so many websites after school is just a bit much to me. Kids are already sitting around way to much as it is and after sitting all day at school without recess, the last thing I want my child to do is sit on the computer once they get home. Hello, have you ever noticed how overweight and out of shape kids are today? I feel for the children who don’t have a computer or do without high speed internet. Growing up I was one of the has-not who had to go to school early to use the computer labs in order to turn in papers in word format. We had a typewriter, but that was to old school I guess for my teachers.

Homework is one thing, computer based homework is another and as a taxpayer, I don’t want this worked in as a mandate and provide computers for all students in the school system. You know this will be coming next, so better watch out. If teachers wanted to recommend safe sites for students to play with, that’s one thing, requirements are a whole other ball game.

Meme

January 19th, 2010
10:32 am

Wow! Many of my students do not have access to the internet at home. I would never think about giving homework that required the internet. If fact, we have been told to be careful what we assign because many students do not have a dictionary at home. As you can probably guess, I teach in a low income area.

Meme

January 19th, 2010
10:33 am

School is the only place where we try to make things fair.

Julia

January 19th, 2010
10:43 am

this may sound heartless but I am not going to hover, I am not going to micro manage his work. he has an agenda with assignments going in there. HE is 14 years old if he cant keep up with his own home work or do his own home work I am not going to do it for him. This is his school career not mine I did my time now he has to do his. If he needs help I will help him but dont ask me to give you the answer to a ? because you day dreamed in class or just too damn lazy to figure it out on your own.

Meme

January 19th, 2010
10:45 am

Good for you, Julia. As a middle school teacher, I have seen way to many helicopter parents. At this age, they need to be responsible for their work. We have agenda and students are suppose to write down assignments and keep up with what is going on.

Julia

January 19th, 2010
10:49 am

I just dont get how its helping the kid when the parents are still spoon feeding them. they need to learn responsibility for their actions as well as no one will hold their hand on their job. I love the boy and I am a good mom but I am of old school.

Wounded Warrior

January 19th, 2010
10:49 am

I don’t have the internet at home, and my daughter has internet homework sometimes, but after speaking to the principal, the assignment is given over a weekend instead of week night. I am barely making it with putting food on the table, so the internet isn’t that appealing. I do have a computer, but no printer. Again the teacher allows her to go and print out her assignments as needed. My oldest daughter is in middle school and the other still in elementary. I only have one tv and I budget for everything.

b

January 19th, 2010
10:50 am

No it is not fair to the students who do not have a PC/Mac at home. I remember asking my oldest about it when she was still on high school and was doing Power Point presentations. She told me that the teachers made it very clear that if you did not have access to a computer, then you should stay after school or come in early and use the systems at school.

My youngest was issued his own flash drive beginning in middle school. Compatible with the systems at school and usable at home. Anyone who did not have a system at home was allowed to use the school’s during Homework Hour. (This is a private school). In high school this has continued. Research papers must be typed in a specific font and size and again, if you do not have a system at home, there is Homework Hour (Study Hall) that you can do this in. Daily homework is NOT assigned online, only long term research papers or projects, the same as my oldest.

I do not know how online homework could possibly work in a low income area where most students have a hard time providing pens and paper, let alone computer systems. I do know that anyone who is looking for work really needs to have some computer skills and the best way to get them is to practice. Perhaps that is why my experience has been only for special projects or papers. Remember, when you get to college, most professors use online assignments, require papers to be submitted online and communicate by email.

Julia

January 19th, 2010
10:51 am

Meme you are a teacher?? let me ask you this. again I love the boy but we had a situation last night where I found a facebook page of his and this is a NO NO right now – there is a huge back story on this. Well I found it and I asked him to just give me the user name and pass word. He denied it, then he got mad because I did not believe him. Now he wants to go to school and talk to the boy whom he thinks that made it and tell him to remove it. Now I was born at night but not last night.. Do you see red flags here???

JJ

January 19th, 2010
10:53 am

Julia I agree with you 100% (10:43 post). At some point you must shift the responsibility to the child, and allow them to suffer the consequences of their actions.

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January 19th, 2010
10:56 am

Apparently, when students take the writing part of the CRCT, they are encouraged to use statistics. Since they do not have access to statistical studies during the test, they are encouraged to make them up as the write. Teachers are then encouraging students to make up statistics in their class assigned writing.

I think this is horrible. Either use statistics correctly and accurately or don’t use them at all.

I think these tests and teachers are doing their students a disservice. When I hear adults quote statistics they just made up it makes me sick.

RJ

January 19th, 2010
11:01 am

Teachers should not assume that children have internet access at home. I don’t even agree with students in elementary school being given assignments that must be typed. I’ve had my desktop get a virus and my laptop out at the same time this year. Had my kids been given internet assignments I would’ve addressed it with the teacher immediately.

@Meme I also teach in a low income school. The reality is that everyone doesn’t have internet access, but I don’t think teachers are giving those kinds of assignments in my school. We have a responsibility to our students to make things fair.

RJ

January 19th, 2010
11:05 am

There is no writing part to the CRCT.

Julia

January 19th, 2010
11:11 am

These kids need to learn to type so I can see using the computer on some of it… Another thing that annoys the snot out of me now is my sons math class, the teacher gives them all 100’s for doing the home work. Not if its right or wrong.. just for doing it. Then the kids flunk the test. HMMMM well DUH!

cld

January 19th, 2010
11:21 am

Julia, I agree kids need to know computers. When I was in elementary and middle school up north (late 80s to early 90s), we had computer lab instructional time a few times a week (every other day or something). Are these programs not in place anymore? Have we squeezed computer instruction out of the school day, in favor of more of the “big four”? If so, that’s a shame . . . you can’t even be an administrative assistant without computer and Microsoft Office skills.

JATL

January 19th, 2010
11:21 am

I think it needs to be limited due to the kids who don’t have internet access at home. I don’t think it hurts anyone to have to go to the library or stay after school or come in early to use a computer, but several times a week would be a bit much. However, all students need to be spending a decent amount of time using computers and working with the internet because so many jobs require it.

Jane

January 19th, 2010
11:35 am

Julia – I’ve done this before and still have it. Make up a facebook page for a child your son’s age. Make it look real and have the kid going to a nearby school (not the same as your son’s). Add stuff to make it look good, then send out lots of friend requests to kids at that school and at your son’s school. Then, when the profile has about 50 (or more) “friends”, you can send a friend request to your son.

He’ll accept (kids LOVE to see how many friends they can get) and then you’ll be able to keep tabs on his page. This can be your little secret.

And to those (I know you’re coming) who are appalled at invading his privacy…it’s not privacy – the info is there for 100s of kids to see and it’s no different from checking out his room from time to time.

Jane

January 19th, 2010
11:42 am

People keep mentioning that the kids without computers could just go to the library. Have you been there in the evening lately? Most of the computers are occupied. And, you’re talking about LOTS of kids that would need to go. Between waiting your turn and doing the work, it could easily be several hours each time, yuch.

Julia

January 19th, 2010
11:45 am

Jane he does not know that I have send a message to him to add me as his mom yes please god open this in front your friends to see my message saying you are busted.. come talk to me when you see this. I am the parent and his trail, he has no privacy right now.. he can get that when he gets his own place. I am not abusive but Homey dont play!

JMP

January 19th, 2010
12:11 pm

Good one Julia, you took me back w/that ‘Homey don’t play’…stay vigilant!

Meme

January 19th, 2010
12:29 pm

Yes, Julie, I see a red flag. I have been a middle school teacher for more years that most of you ladies have been on earth. Peer pressure may be the reason that he has a Facebook page. Also, even though it says you are suppose to be 18 to have an account, there is no checking up. I wish more parents paid attention to what their children did on the computer and on the phones. I have a friend who takes cell phones as the kids come in and they are plugged in overnight in her room. There is one central computer in the family room and each child is allowed so many minutes (she does this by age). You have to keep an eye on them. I know that there are mothers out there who will tell me how honest their kids are and that they would never do anything they weren’t suppose to do. You may think that your child is totally honest with you, but I wouldn’t bet on it.

Yes, some kids do open accounts in other kid’s names.

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January 19th, 2010
12:39 pm

“There is no writing part to the CRCT.”

Well, then its the other test they have to take in the fall. One of those tests has a writing part and students are encouraged to make up statistics.

Julia

January 19th, 2010
12:40 pm

well he had every option to come clean this morning when I said give me the user name and password. If you want it, I will monitor it for you… Its not that I use everything he does against him I was not born last night and I was not a trouble maker either.. but I can smell bull crap a mile away. We will see :)

HB

January 19th, 2010
12:50 pm

Actually, Meme, the user agreement says you must be 13 to have an account, but I agree that probably little to nothing is done to check up on that. Users also must agree not to post false personal info (no aliases), so parents are forbidden from establishing fake kid accounts and kids are forbidden from stealing other kids’ identities and creating fake profiles. But of course, rules are broken, so please everyone, make sure to educate your children about the internet in general so that they know things are not always what they appear to be. They should also know that even without breaking user agreements, more people than they’ve imagined (including college admissions officers and HR people) may be able view their profiles, or at least their pictures, if their privacy controls are not on very tight settings (no network views, no friends of friends, and no tagging in others’ photos).

A post I sent earlier didn’t show — Theresa, could you please check for it? Thanks!

Meme

January 19th, 2010
12:55 pm

Thanks for the correction, HB. My 16 year-old great-nephew put that he was 18 when he opened his account so I just guessed 18 was the age. Of course, I didn’t have to worry about that. lol

Julia

January 19th, 2010
1:04 pm

I have already spoken to his assistant principle and she said it sounds like he knows more than he is coughing up… I knew that….

Wayne

January 19th, 2010
1:06 pm

Hello everyone! I’ve been away for a little bit (I had a bout with pneumonia)

As I’ve mentioned before, I’m in Western Massachusetts, foothills to the Berkshires and all that. Where I live, you’re extremely lucky to get internet service – even over dialup. Folks mention going to school early, but if your child is bussed, that isn’t an option. If you’re lucky, you have a library – if it hasn’t been closed due to budget cuts. Or you may find that that library is only open, say, M-W-F, from 5 to 8. If you’re lucky… The school has a laptop program, so you can lease it for the school year and buy it at the end of the school for cheap money, but if you don’t have internet service (heck, some towns out here, you don’t even have cell service!) it doesn’t do a heckuva lot.

I hope my 6 yo isn’t going to get online homework anytime soon. I’ve got internet access, but wouldn’t consider it high-speed because it’s town run and they don’t have the money to upgrade it.

JH

January 19th, 2010
1:21 pm

I am hardly in a low income area, but our family is cutting back. We are actively discussing ditching hign speed Internet because its just too expensive, along with cable. We may go to a dial up service and basic cable. Our culture is relying too heavily on technology and in turn our society is becoming very anti-social and impersonal.

Dar

January 19th, 2010
1:21 pm

For gosh sakes, folks, get a cheap computer and some internet access for your children. You can even get a used computer and have your child go to a cafe with WiFi. They NEED it in order to grow into successful adults in this day and age. It is like going back in time and saying you cannot afford to provide paper and pencils or a dictionary so your kids are out of luck for school and it is unfair that the teachers require homework in writing. This is the brave new world. Kids need to be exposed to computers early and often so they can function in tomorrow’s (and today’s) working world. I know that if you look around you will find something else to cut — cable, cell phone, cigs, eating out, new clothes….something. Have your child make friends with a classmate with computer access if there is nothing else you can do to get them access.

Julia

January 19th, 2010
1:27 pm

Dar that is a luxury for many families today… and in some places you cant get it with out a phone line.. so FOR Gods sake you pay for it then. Some people really in this day and age, dont have money to pay for food

JMP

January 19th, 2010
1:32 pm

JH, ditto. Our family has had to take a long, hard look at everything in our budget and high speed internet access is always on the table… hadn’t been cut yet, but that along w/cable, etc is always part of the discussion. Things may be turning around, but it hadn’t trickled down to our household, yet. Just don’t think it’s fair to require… recommend is fine but to require is not fair to all children, even if our child could meet the requirement–each households circumstances is different. Also as Wayne mentioned access may also be limited.

Dar

January 19th, 2010
1:33 pm

There are options, Julia. My son has some friends whose families are not doing so great…they come to my house and use the computers and internet. I have no problem with that, in fact I encourage it and I can help them all with their homework. Yes, I am THAT parent who asks all of my son’s friends how school is going and inquire about the status of homework assignments. I also believe that teachers who assign online should have an alternative for extreme cases — for example, they could print a handout with the online assignment so that those kids who absolutely cannot get access can do it handwritten. That all being said, folks really should do all they can to get their children access because without it they will likely be left behind in the workplace.

Theresa Walsh Giarrusso

January 19th, 2010
1:35 pm

A very smart AP investigative reporter left these stats about Internet Access in Gwinnett County on my husband’s Facebook page! I appreciate that he’s a better reporter than I am!!

Internet Access in Gwinnett County
No data exists specifically for Internet Access in Gwinnett County. However, a logical interpretation of available national & state data is as follows:
 A range of 51% to 68% of households has broadband Internet access.
 A range of 44% – 54% of households do not have broadband Internet access.
 If extrapolated from Gwinnett County household income, 34% do not have Internet access.
Census.gov 2007 data
 National households with Internet: 67.1%
 National households with broadband: 50.8% (49.2% without broadband)
 State households with Internet: 66.2%
 State households with broadband: unknown
 Percent who connect to the Internet at public library (2004 data)
 Total: 7.5%
 Ages: 15-24 – 19%
 White: 6.8%
 Black: 10.8%
 Asian 11.1%
 Hispanic: 6.8%
 South: 7.1%
Internetworldstats (NTIA) 2007 data
 Total households with Internet 61.71%
 Total Households with broadband: 50.79% (49.2% without broadband)
 Georgia households with internet: 61.73
 Georgia households with broadband: 53.91% (46.09% without broadband)
 Georgia urban households with internet: 62.74%
 Georgia urban households with broadband: 56.15% (43.85 without broadband)

Pew 2009 data
 Percentage of adults with broadband @ home: 63% (37% without broadband)
 White: 65% (35% without broadband)
 Black: 46% (54% without broadband)
 Hispanic (English speaking): 68% (32% without broadband)
___________________________________________________________________________________
 Gwinnett County Median Income: $64,005 (Georgia QuickFacts)
 NTIA broadband households by income between $50,000 & 74,999 = 65.98% (34.02% without broadband)
____________________________________________________________________________________

Wayne

January 19th, 2010
1:37 pm

I don’t think anyone would argue that computers aren’t important today; reality is that there are a lot of folks that just can’t afford it. This was about a year or so ago, but I asked the -almost- teenager across the street from me what he wanted to do with his life – he replied he wanted to be a truck driver. Now, nothing against truck drivers, but for a kid in my area, that’s about what it comes to. We’re thinking of moving someplace different because my 6 yo wants to be a roboticist. He spent over an hour talking to some kids at an event this weekend who are building robots for a competition, and he was giving THEM ideas. I need to foster that, as much as I can. The school system, and the surrounding towns, won’t accommodate that.

Denise

January 19th, 2010
1:38 pm

I don’t think elementary and middle school kids are thinking about their jobs after college and shouldn’t be. I say that in response to the “they need to learn computers to get a job”. They should learn to type though. High school students do need to know a lot about the computer as they will be using it from that point on for a lot of careers and for entertainment. As for what is “cheap” and what parents “should” be doing to support their kid, that is a very strong judgment. When the choice is food or computer, I’m voting for food. Keep in mind, too, that there are plenty of complaints of hungry children, children who are not groomed, etc. that need to be addressed long before whether they have/should have internet access.

Julia

January 19th, 2010
1:39 pm

Thank you Dr. Dar, that is very comforting coming from someone that is employed while I got laid off in Oct…. I do everything for my son that I can but I will NOT hold his hand on this….

JH

January 19th, 2010
1:42 pm

Thanks JMP. Our family hasn’t been hit either, but we are going to cut back regardless. Again we don’t live in lower income area, but most families I am talking to are considering the same type things. Going back to the basics. The cost of extra curricular activities like sports in going to go up and I’d rather put my money into that. Again, technology is getting cut mainly for family and recreation purposes.

Does anyone in Gwinnett have any idea when they are going put their online portal into action? Has the school system looked into how many families might not be able to use it?

Dar

January 19th, 2010
1:43 pm

I wasn’t saying you should hold anyone’s hand, Julia. I was making a general statement that parents should try to make sure that children have access to the internet – whether that be at home, at a WiFi cafe, at a friend’s house, at school, at a library, etc. We all want our children to succeed…and I think most of us want other children to succeed as well. Personally, I am blown away and a wee bit jealous of the learning my son is able to do with the technology that is afforded him….just, WOW.

Warrior Woman

January 19th, 2010
1:44 pm

Online work requirements prepare students for a real world environment; provide access to more current information than available in published textbooks; and provide a more interactive learning environment that adds an additional way of meeting the diverse learning styles that are typically present in a classroom.

Both my children (HS sophomore and 5th grade in public schools) have nightly homework that requires internet access. At my youngest’s school, there are opportunities to do this work throughout the school day. At my oldest’s school, if you don’t have a computer, you must come in early or stay late to use school resources or use the public library. I have no objection to this approach, as it is consistent with how the schools treat other needs for assistance, such as tutoring, test reviews, etc., but I can see where it could become a burden if you had no access at home

Theresa Walsh Giarrusso

January 19th, 2010
1:52 pm

I think our portal may be up — i got an email about it but I didn;’t click into it yet — I’ll have to find that note.

Julia

January 19th, 2010
1:53 pm

for the kids that ride the bus to school and the parents that work and cant take them early this is just stupid….

Julia

January 19th, 2010
1:54 pm

Well Dar looking at the forum we are in.. MOMS.. do you not think we are doing the best we can for our kids?