Do kids still love Sesame Street 40 years on?

If you have school-aged children, like I do, you may have missed the news that this year marks the 40th anniversary of Sesame Street’s first television broadcast. A new season with updated characters and segments will begin broadcasting next week, giving preschool parents tired of re-runs something to look forward to on November 10.

I wouldn’t have known about this major anniversary in children’s programming if I hadn’t randomly used Google yesterday. The Google “doodle” featured Big Bird, which made me search Sesame Street news to find out what was up.

As a child, I well remember watching Sesame Street. I loved that little kid John-John with the massive chubby cheeks who would sit on the wall and talk to Herry Monster about numbers and letters. I adored the Twiddlebugs so much that my parents nicknamed me Twiddlebug. I did not like Bert – he scared the dickens out of me.

This was back in the days before Elmo, Zoey and celebrity/political/pop artist cameos (that I can recall) – and before anyone on Sesame Street met or even believed Big Bird’s best friend, Mr. Snuffleupagus, existed outside of the tall yellow guy’s imagination. This was also back when kids growing up in Atlanta had only four television channel options – 2, 5, 8 and 11. We had Sesame Street, Electric Company, Mr. Rogers, Captain Kangaroo, Saturday morning cartoons and little else in the way of children’s programming from which to choose.

By the time my children came along, Elmo and Zoey had become regular “people in my neighborhood”; everyone could see Snuffie; and bands like R.E.M. were dancing around, singing “Furry, Happy Monsters” on the Street. All of my kids enjoyed Sesame Street for a while. But with so many children’s programs on so many different channels, Sesame Street faced stiff competition and was never really the favorite.

My older daughter probably watched Sesame Street the longest. The younger girls always wanted to watch what the oldest watched and quickly learned that certain shows (like Sesame Street by that time) were considered “baby” shows by the number one Big Sis in the house. Even early on, however, Big Sis often preferred other children’s programs to Sesame Street if given the choice. In fact, Arthur and Teletubbies reigned supreme in our house when my oldest child was a preschooler. My middle daughter loved the Tweenies, Blue’s Clues and Franklin. Our youngest was enthralled by Barney and a Scottish show we stumbled upon called Balamory.  When we couldn’t find Balamory on the schedule any more, she moved on to Sid the Science Kid and Toot and Puddle.

All of this has gotten me thinking, what do you as parents think is the best children’s (preschool/early childhood) program out there? And which programs do your (or did your) young children prefer? What were your prerequisites for children’s shows?  Do you go for maximum educational value? Maximum social learning? An even balance? Pure entertainment value? Do you ever steer your children away from programs that annoy you personally, or do you let them make their own choices as long as they are age-appropriate?

Do you still enjoy watching Sesame Street with your kids? How do you think Sesame Street has changed – for the better or worse – over the years?  How has children’s programming in general changed – again for better or worse – in the past 40 years?

192 comments Add your comment

anonymous

November 5th, 2009
7:20 am

that is gorgouss i

Vork

November 5th, 2009
7:22 am

Sesame Street always seemed so irrelevant and out of touch with reality to me. I grew up watching shows like “Dusty’s Treehouse,” “Pinwheel,” and “Today’s Special” on Nikelodeon.

mr ajamanan

November 5th, 2009
7:23 am

they increase phedophiiles in society

seasme street

November 5th, 2009
7:24 am

I thought i loved seasme street
it was so much fun.
i used to love the cookie monster
i watch it with my kids now

mr ajamanan

November 5th, 2009
7:24 am

Enter your comments here

motherjanegoose

November 5th, 2009
7:27 am

My children both enjoyed time watching Sesame Street and my daughter saw the anniversary plug on Google too. She is the one who told me. My daughter was actually more into Barney. I am not “in the know” on the current shows, so I cannot comment on them here.

While I do think educational TV has A PLACE….children spend WAY to much time in front of TV and not sitting down reading books, making puzzles, legos or having conversation with parents. Do not get me started on children in the car with DVD players going while the parents are on their cell phones. This is the perfect place for parents to talk to their children and ask questions about the environment.
Once, I saw a billboard with a HUGE purple circle in the middle of it…I was wondering what it was and as I drove closer…it read “THIS IS A BIG PURPLE CIRCLE…..parents…talk to your children!”
Sponsored by a literacy group…I loved it!

My topic is oral language and how it connects to reading. Children who watch a lot of TV are typically not as verbal as those who are engaging in conversation with their parents and peers.In a nutshell:

The preschool years are critical to the development of emergent literacy skills that will ensure a smooth transition into formal reading. Phonological awareness, print awareness, and oral language development are three areas associated with emergent literacy that play a crucial role in the acquisition of reading.

While Sesame Street and other educational programs can play an important role by introducing vocabulary, nothing takes the place of good old fashioned talk. Think of the children you may know who TALK all the time. Yes, they may be annoying but they are inquisitive and more aware of their environment and able to ask an answer questions with ease…a skill that translates typically into being a better prepared student. Our neighbor, who scored a perfect SAT, talked non stop as a child! He is very bright and I wish him the best!

CONGRATULATIONS to Sesame Street for 40 great years!

jake felstead

November 5th, 2009
7:28 am

i think it is about time sesame street went of air- GOOD GOD!!! either refresh yourself or get out

tessa

November 5th, 2009
7:29 am

i am only 16 years old and when i was little sesame street didnt really do it for me, i dont no wether it was because it was after playschool (my favourite program at that time) or because i didnt really like big bird. However looking back i much love those characters more then i like the characters now. I dont like how the elmo segmeant is done now and i dont really like all the controversy over Bert and Earnie, (my fave characters), but i am proud of sesame street it has done well and im sure it has another 40 years in it.

fatman

November 5th, 2009
7:30 am

i am 23 and i still watch sesame street

matt lyon

November 5th, 2009
7:32 am

i used to love seasme street as a kid. i still think its awsome

Momotoddlers

November 5th, 2009
7:32 am

I watched Sesame street as a child and I’m happy to have my kids watch it now. All of PBS programming is great!

JATL

November 5th, 2009
7:39 am

I loved Sesame Street, but my 3.5 year old likes it but isn’t nearly as into it as I was. I blame it on “too many choices”! When I was a kid, there was no Nickelodeon, Disney TV, Sprout, etc. We don’t allow very much tv watching around here -maybe an hour every few days- but I tried to really get him into Sesame Street and it’s just not his favorite when Diego, Spiderman, Scooby Doo and all the rest are around. He DOES really like a lot of the characters though (go figure). We have some Sesame Street stories, he chose Elmo fuzzy slippers, etc. My youngest is only 1, but he already seems a little more into Sesame Street items.

One thing I do love -when I absolutely must occupy the 3 year old for 20 minutes or so, we go to hulu.com and he REALLY enjoys the old cartoons -Rocky and Bullwinkle, Inspector Gadget and the kid is addicted to the Looney Tunes DVDs we have. Even if it’s not Sesame Street, I really prefer the older stuff!

Tamra

November 5th, 2009
7:40 am

You match my sentiments EXACTLY!!!! Okay, my channel numbers in Ohio were different, but that’s all. I loved Sesame Street (Electric Company and all the others) and am disappointed to say that my kids never bought into it much. Of course, when I controlled the TV early on, I was able to tune the oldest one into Sesame Street, but as you noted that was my only winning battle. Sadly, Electric Company wasn’t even an option 10-15 years ago. However folks, please note that a new Electric Company is back on the air and it is kind of cool. As an educator, I have used it at school. (And for the record, my nostalgic mother bought me the classic set on DVD. Of course, my kids have no interest in watching it.)

Side note – my daughter recently asked for “green jeans” and every time she said it, I kept thinking of Captain Kangaroo. Naturally, she doesn’t know him, but rest well Cap’n!

bob

November 5th, 2009
7:41 am

i have never herd of sesame street but im in ict and dont like iut…

karen

November 5th, 2009
7:42 am

I am nearly forty and still love Sesame Street … Elmo Elmo Elmo …

Lori Anne Franklin

November 5th, 2009
7:42 am

Considering the caliber of today’s programing, it would seem logical that parents everywhere would flock to buy Sesame Street videos. All of them. I grew up with this fantastic show as did my children. Do I think it made them smarter, more tolerant of diversity, and funnier? Well yes, of course I do. The brains behind this show and others like it (Mr. Rogers, Electric Company) were, well “spot on”. We are better for it! Thank you Sesame Street for 40 Wonderful years!

Matt

November 5th, 2009
7:43 am

While it’s true that there are many good educational programs out there these days, I don’t think that any of them offer the variety that sesame street does. My 3-year-old twin daughters are nuts for Elmo, and they can readily identify a good hanful or more of the other charecters, including some of the human ones. Oh, they may not always pick Sesame Street, but eventually they come back to it, and if Elmo is on, they are all about that. Congratulations to Sesame Street on 40 years and to the Children’s Television Workshop for making it great, keeping it updated, and giving parents an always safe choice for their children!!

bob

November 5th, 2009
7:45 am

i dont know what it is but im in ict and dont like it…

Toddler

November 5th, 2009
7:47 am

I can remember the days of the learning numbers from the count, craving cookies after watching cookie monster goobles up a plate, and trying to remeber the number, and letter, of the day. Now, I’m 25, and when i see commercials for Sesame Street I am rather disappointed in what its become. Also, they have changed alot of things, like I heard they make cookie monster not eat cookies now.. Then why call him Cookie Monster? Its things like that that destroy child hood memories. I mean Sesame was only my second favorite show to Fraggle Rocks, which ROCKS, crazy underground puppetry and Jim Henson’s Muppets, and Muppet Babies. Eat one had alot educational points in them.
However, I am not a father, thought I am an uncle a few times over and was around my sisters kids the first couple years of their lives and Sesame was NEVER on the TV, it was always Dora or that other Spanish kid. What happened to the good old fashioned cartoons that kids understood? The boys still don’t know any spanish other then what their father or I have taught them. those shows were useless. I say bring back the shows that inspired imagination and learning, instead of shows that focus on purely entertainment.

DB

November 5th, 2009
7:48 am

My kids never watched “Sesame Street”, and at one point, when my daughter had speech therapy, her therapist was worried about her cognitive skills because she didn’t recognize Bert and Ernie. The therapist was very careful about discussing it, until I pointed out that there was no reason for my daughter to recognize them, as she never watched the show. The therapist earnestly tried to tell me how educational the show was, and how my daughter “really ought to be watching it.” HUH?! My daughter preferred more sedate shows, shows that used only one or two cameras and recorded longer scenes, such as Barney, Mr. Rogers, the Muppet Show and Reading Rainbow. She just missed the Blues Clues heyday, although she watched it some, and Teletubbies completely passed us by.

I’d always secretly wondered if Sesame Street and shows that tried to copy it have been somewhat responsible for the increase in ADHD diagnoses over the years. The fast pace of the show, the quick cuts and busily flashing numbers, etc. didn’t seem to teach kids how to concentrate, and I could easily see where a young child’s brain in its formative years could be affected by not being allowed to fix on a concept with extended attention. There have been some interesting studies on this, too. Obviously, not every child who watched Sesame Street developed ADHD — but it would be an interesting statistical study to see how many of those that did were Sesame Street fans.

Mimi

November 5th, 2009
7:48 am

I absolutely LOVED Sesame Street growing up in the eighties. I still think those were the best episodes ever. My son who is now nine watched Sesame Street only for a short period of time. He loved Arthur and Dragon Tales more. Now it’s SpongeBob, and Danny Phantom oh and lets not forget The Avatar The Last Airbender. I will be tunning in to see these new epies of Sesame Street. I am just curious to see what new and exciting ideas they came up with. Congrats to Sesame Street 40th aniversary. I will be making my donations on their site!

cchicken fathitds

November 5th, 2009
7:50 am

peg carolan

November 5th, 2009
7:50 am

I take care of my God-daughters 21/2 year old twin girls every Friday and they love Elmo, most of all. Sid and Cyberchase are also a hit, but none compares to their Elmo. My oldest two boys age 46 and 41 grew up on Sesame Street and both are geniuses because of it…..Thanks Jim Henson for creating Sesame Street and all the great characters….He must be in Muppet Heaven by now.

poop

November 5th, 2009
7:50 am

CJ

November 5th, 2009
7:52 am

Sesame Street is still current and relevant, and not as frenetic as many of the other offereings are. Yes, there are many other offerings out there, but there will ALWAYS be a place for the Street.

motherjanegoose

November 5th, 2009
7:53 am

DB…you are correct about the correlation…not necessarily Sesame Street ….glad you brought up the point. Here is a quick read;

http://psychcentral.com/blog/archives/2007/09/08/tv-adhd/

david

November 5th, 2009
7:53 am

I loved Sesame Street, my now 14 loved it but prefered Blues Clues (actualy the book about Blues Clues said it was by a SS guy who didn’t like the way SS was going). She watched SS only when there was nothing else. My 5 yo didnt ever like SS. Her favorites were Charlie & Lola and now iCarly (hardly educational) . We try for a 3 hr limit per week so they have to pick. With the DVR she can alwasy watch what she likes. There are 100’s of kids shows now. Dora was the all time longest watched.

I used to make them watch Little Einsteins and SS and they would get someting out of it. I liked watching numbers chase and word world with them.

There seems to be so many good, well done shows now.

The amazing thing is that when we go to Sessame place, she will wait in long lines to say hi to the ‘people’ rather than going on the fun bouncy rides etc. So it must make some kind of bond.

Favori

Gary W.

November 5th, 2009
7:55 am

I do recall that network tv did not want to run Sesame Street 40 years ago as a special, until NBC took a chance around Thanksgiving weekend 1969 to showcase it. My PBS affiliate was hard to get (pre cable) over the air, so it gave people inventive to pick up a UHF antenna to get the signal. I still remember Mr. Hooper, who was a character from the beginning. Way to go Seseme Street! Happy 40th.!!!

Donetar2

November 5th, 2009
7:58 am

I Loved Sesame Street as a child. Now I don’t even think it is fair to call it that, maybe it should just be called “Elmo and Friends” or “Elmo’s Neighborhood”. The Elmo segment lasts so long it think the other people in the neighborhood have been marginalized.

Graham White

November 5th, 2009
7:58 am

I love Sesame Street. However, considering the incredible amount of spelling mistakes in the comments below; perhaps you should start by watching it again…

Toni

November 5th, 2009
8:01 am

I love Sesame Street! I watched it growing up and even remember seeing the episode when everyone else discovered Snuffleupagus. I was so relieved when eveyone finally believed he was real! I am a 30-yr-old mother of 2 boys. They are 2 and 5. The 2 year old is really into the show now. He loves Cookie Monster the most now I think. He also enjoys The Wiggles. That show kind of drives me crazy but I let him watch it because he loves it. I hope Sesame Street stays around for a long time!

Sharon H

November 5th, 2009
8:02 am

My daughter is two and a half and loves Sesame Street. Two of her favourite characters now are Bert and Ernie, which is funny because they were my favourite when I was young and watching the show back in the late 80’s.
Other shows she now enjoys, when I allow her the option of watching TV, are Dora, Diego, the Wiggles and the Backyardigans.
The best show I ever found was the Little Einsteins and unfortunatly the only channel that aired it where I live in Canada took it off a few months back. She still really enjoys her Baby Einstein movies though which makes me happy as I found they have the BEST educational value of anything out there.
The only show I refuse her to watch is Barney. That show is highly annoying and I find it to be extremely condesencing.
I liked the way children’s programing was when I was younger, Care Bears, Strawberry Shortcake, My Little Pony, etc. While I know they still have these shows out now, they’re just not the same…

sesame street lovers

November 5th, 2009
8:04 am

we are 15 and still love sesame street we used to watch it all the time still. we love elmo the cookie monster and big bird they are some phitt stuff. sesame street is amazing and it should never stop…..we mean EVER….i still have a video somewhere from when i was like 5 xxx

LOVE YOU SESAME STREET XOXOXO

Windflower

November 5th, 2009
8:07 am

My two kiddos, ages 2 and 4, like Sesame Street, not that it’s their favourite. They prefer Little Bear, Big Comfy Couch, Franklin and and especially Word World, since they love spelling the word characters in each episode’s challenge. I would have my children watch Sesame Street over Backyardigans and Barney, since I personally cannot stand the singing and dancing in those shows. I strongly believe that tv shouldn’t be on in a household, whether its adults watching or kids, for a long period of time. There are millions of BETTER ways to teaching our kids educational values.

Ted

November 5th, 2009
8:07 am

Sesame Street always seemed a little bit urban to me, and it was hard to relate — but that was part of the appeal. The sense that I was only getting part of the joke. I watched it every day in the late 70’s early 80’s. I loved Grover’s sketches with the fly in his soup — even though when I watch the same sketches now, there are many humor elements that went over my head. Again, part of the shows appeal. It featured sophisicated humor, like the muppet show did, that challenged its audience to keep up.

It seems like the show has tried to Disney-fy inself since then, making marketable characters, etc., and trying to give the show a broad appeal, instead of the quirky sense of humor it had before. When I watch current episodes with my daughter, it’s not quite as cool as I remember.

katie

November 5th, 2009
8:09 am

Kids will defenitly still love still love sesame street im in middle school and me and my frriends still love it !!!!!

Sam

November 5th, 2009
8:09 am

Yes, kids still love Seasame Street. I have a 5 years old son and he loves to watch it on Treehouse. Even I enjoyed it when watching with my son.

Shajou

November 5th, 2009
8:09 am

w00t Sesame Street congrats!
To be honest if you’ve never seen Sesame Street as a child, i think you were robbed of your childhood in some way (that’s if you grow up in the generation that had Sesame Street on TV), don’t cha think?

Ashlee

November 5th, 2009
8:12 am

i absolutely love Sesame Street.
they have a like amusement park type thing that is based on Sesame Street around where i live and i remember going there as a child and having a blast.
I cant wait to be able to take my children there cause i know they will love it as much as i did.
I really like the Sesame Street google logos too.
The cookie monster one is my favorite.

motherjanegoose

November 5th, 2009
8:14 am

@ Graham….I was thinking the same thing about all of the spelling mistakes today but did not want to be the first to mention it.

This why why children who WATCH lots of TV and do not read print in books/environment are not typically good spellers. Those who read a lot, usually have much better spelling skills due to seeing the words in print and not just hearing them. This even applies to adults.

I do know that every poster here has made a typo at some point….you can be a good ( like me) speller but a terrible typist ( also like me) ….LOL!

@ Sharon H…I have been told that the person who created Barney was a Kindergarten teacher from Dallas, TX. MAYBE she knew something….who knows?

Constance

November 5th, 2009
8:15 am

Garanimals have come back!! And it is to a generation that honestly never knew OLD is NEW. The quality of Sesame Street is simple, clear, and fun. If you sat in a room placing, deeply religious children,
immigrant children,
good kids and bad from single parent/guardian household,
good kids and bad from a two parent household,
mentally challenged,
handicapped,
you get the point..it is neutral safe and honestly allows your child to learn to be creative and develop to see learning is fun, when parents cannot afford to buy them that THING. Imagination, is that dated now too. I am 40 and I grew up with educators within my immediate family; to much on TV condensed in a small time frame is not always good for kids all the time. For those of you who disagree, you were probably the one’s with computer devices constantly in hand. Since I am a dinosaur myself and actually helped patent the ridges now on wheels and tires everywhere, Sesame Street allows you to imagine and discover how just simply using your imagination does not cost money all the time. I love the Show, and missed Electric Company and Zoom.

beth

November 5th, 2009
8:16 am

SESAME STREET ROCKS! (especally elmo big bird and cookie monster!)
ROCK ON!!!!
^-^

Kathy

November 5th, 2009
8:16 am

I grew up with Sesame Street, Captain Kangaroo and the Electric Company also. My daughter LOVES Sesame Street and I think they have done a good job over the last couple of years making changes that are relevant and current with educational trends. Their initiative over the last 2 years has been to bridge the vocabulary gap between the lower and middle classes. They have been introducing lots of different vocabulary words and having the words used throughout the show in a variety of ways. It also cracks me up that they will do segments based on adult TV shows like there is one called Desperate Houseplants (Desperate Housewives) that I just think is hysterical!

There is a great book that was published this year called Street Gang: The Complete History of Sesame Street by Michael Davis. He explores how children’s programming was basically invented and how Sesame Street came to life. If you loved Sesame Street like I did and still do, you will find this history interesting.

My daughter also loves anything on Playhouse Disney. The Imagination Movers is her favorite and their music is great for kids and adults!

LuckyMom

November 5th, 2009
8:17 am

Not to give away my age, but I was already just a little old for Sesame Street when it started on the air. But, I was lucky. I had younger brothers and got to use that as an excuse to watch the “little kids” show. It was great. I am a little surprised at how many people do not seem to think that Sesame Street is that great. By the way, do you all use spell check?? I agree that it is a little different now than 40 years ago, but so is our childrens environment. With so many choices, they need something to keep their attention tuned to a good program. If that includes guest appearances by celebs and bands, then that’s great. They still get the exposure to counting in Spanish, learning ABC’s, spelling and watching some great characters show that you can have fun learning. I think that’s better than watching the universe get blown to bits in other cartoons on the air. I hope more pre-schoolers get the opportunity to enjoy Sesame Street for at least another 40 years. Congratulations to all of those wonderful Henson creations!

Karen

November 5th, 2009
8:17 am

I have older children in university and a two year old, who loves to watch Sesame Street. Only recently has she wanted to watch the whole hour, but her favourite part up to now has been Elmo and Elmo’s World: the last 15 minutes of the show. We sit and watch it together, this has always been a priority for me, ever since all my children were young.
Sesame Street, compared to other children’s shows is extremely valuable in that it follows the main rules of language acquisition (I teach language at university level), and is brilliant in its teaching techniques. The main one I notice is not the creativity (although nothing can compare to SS in creativity on all levels) but repetition.
Repetition is crucial for children’s development, and you’ll notice they normally never tire of it, but love recognizing things and ideas they’ve seen before. With SS, the whole show repeats itself every day, but with content variants. These content variants, however, are often reshuffled and presented again in other contexts, which is a great way to do it, as the child doesn’t just learn by heart, but learns how to apply the newly learned information/skills within meaning.
I’ve watched some other shows with my daughter, and yes, they’re cute, but none have the pedagogical value of good old SS.

Belle

November 5th, 2009
8:18 am

I remember watching it as a child and I still have a stuff animal of Mr. Snuffleupagus. I tend to keep the Baby Channel on in the background while we putter around the house. I think it is a great teaching tool for the 0-3 ages.

Photius

November 5th, 2009
8:18 am

Yip, yip, yip, yip, yip, yip, yip, yip, yip…. Book, book, book, book, book, book, book…. BBBRRRRRRRRRING! Yip Yip

motherjanegoose

November 5th, 2009
8:21 am

Oh wow…I could stay on here all day….but do have to work ( I know many of you are thrilled).
@ windflower re:I would have my children watch Sesame Street over Backyardigans and Barney, since I personally cannot stand the singing and dancing in those shows.

OODLES OF STUDIES SHOW THAT MUSIC IS HIGHLY EFFECTIVE IN TEACHING and most likely why it is included in Barney. Many adults learned things like the state in the United States by singing; ALABAMA, ALASKA, ARIZONA, ARKANSAS….. I teach kids things all the time with music. Where are you Jesse’s Girl….I am leaving this to you!

motherjanegoose

November 5th, 2009
8:24 am

@ Karen…thanks for joining us and sharing your expertise. I would love to chat with you!

jay

November 5th, 2009
8:26 am

i never liked it… :/ sorry guys :P

K

November 5th, 2009
8:30 am

Sesame Street has always been on for as long as I can remember and I’m 32 years old. I learned a whole lot from this show back in the day. I have 2 little ones, 2 1/2 and 1, and they both love Sesame Street. My oldest has also learned a lot from this show. Sesame Street will always get tremendous love from me. Happy Anniversary Sesame Street!

K

November 5th, 2009
8:32 am

And yes I still watch Sesame Street and thoroughly enjoy it at 32 years old.

Xander

November 5th, 2009
8:32 am

Sesame Street is awesome, I watched it all the time when I was little and I still like watching it sometimes with my younger siblings. Sesame Street is still awesome, but I DON’T LIKE HOW COOKIE MONSTER IS EATING THINGS THAT ARE NOT COOKIES (or pencils, or typewriters, or telephones if you’ve seen the christmas special from when I was younger). But seriously, whats wrong with eating just cookies all the time? (I know childhood obesity is on the rise, but I doubt it is due to Sesame Street)

larryo

November 5th, 2009
8:33 am

At 63 I recall TV back into the early 50’s when entertainment for kids was Ding Dong School. It was a sweet and gentle program, not in color,except as we imagined it. Seasame Street came along long after I grew up. I was happy for my children to watch Buffy St Marie, Mr. Hooper, and Cookie Monster even Oscar the Grouch!

I’ve seen some negativity above here. It amazes me that some are so unhappy to have to disparage even a program that has clearly been sucessful, educational and yes, FUN for so many for so long. Seasame Street, I salute you! Happy Forty Years. Many Many More! : )

Jonsea

November 5th, 2009
8:33 am

sesame SUCKS

John K

November 5th, 2009
8:33 am

Dude sesame-street rocks haha!

Still manage to get a good laugh out of it even years later.

ImFiveyearsoldandstillwatchsesmae

November 5th, 2009
8:34 am

Screw all of you that watch Sesame street

Becky

November 5th, 2009
8:34 am

No one in my family watched SS and none of the little ones now watch it..I was never in the house long enough to watch TV, we were always outside..To this day, I don’t watch a lot of TV..

Andy

November 5th, 2009
8:35 am

I was 40 yesterday so share this with the birth of Sesame Street! Long Live Big Bird and the Cookie Monster!

madmommy

November 5th, 2009
8:36 am

I love Sesame Street and my daughter loves watching it. SS has stayed relevant to todays kids and recently did a special on the economic times most parents are facing. I enjoyed watching it if we were in that situation with a child old enough to understand the changes going on, I would have her watch it for sure.

We also enjoy Fraggle Rock, Reading Rainbow, and the Muppets. I miss Pinwheels, I justed loved that show when I was a kid. I wonder if I can buy copies of it online? Something to think about.

TV is great for kids in small doses and while my daughter does watch her shows, it’s really only 15-30 minutes here and there since she’s only three after all. They can only sit still for so long, so I don’t worry about it. Most of the time if the kids are dancing or singing, she’s all over jumping up and down or dancing around. I wish we could all have been kids for so much longer. Just doesn’t seem right to be an adult for so long when being a kid is so cool. (Ok, maybe I’m sad because my little one had a birthday this week, but I do think kids should be small for a lot longer time than they are. Just goes so fast.)

Michelle

November 5th, 2009
8:37 am

I never watched Sesame Street when I was kid. I just never really liked it. My son (who is 6 now) has never really been interested in it either. They only thing I did like…they had an alphabet cassette tape in the late 70’s early 80’s. It was GREAT for learning the alphabet and letter/vowel sounds. To this day, some of the songs still stick in my mind!

liezel

November 5th, 2009
8:38 am

STILL LOVE SESAME STREET AND SO DOES THE LITTLE ONES

john

November 5th, 2009
8:38 am

it’s like a trusted brand name. i personally let my kids watch it, but i never watch it. i wouldn’t do this if this were any other name of the show i couldn’t recognize.

greatgrett

November 5th, 2009
8:39 am

I loved sesame street growning up in the early-mid 70’s. I lived for it! But that’s when most of the show was dedicated to teaching numbers and letters along with silly puppets doing silly things and fun animated shorts. When my children were little ones, I felt that seasmae street became focused on too many other things like social agendas. I didn’t like many of the band members/artists/people of influence that they invited on the show. Many were not people I would want my children to think were wonderful. Plus the things they focused on now, and still do, are second to academic learning and silly goofy puppets. I think that if the show did not change its focus, it would be more popular today. Young kids are not ready for policatal agendas and such.

madmommy

November 5th, 2009
8:40 am

PS. My little one loves Cookie Monster. When I was a kid I had the SS record and on side two there was the “C” is for Cookie song and I played it over and over on my portable turn table (how old am I?) over and over. Guess I played it too much because my dad came in smashed the record because I wouldn’t turn it down or stop playing it. One of the two for sure. Wish I still had that record to share as it was my favorite.

Just a funny SS story I thought I would share. How cool was I to even have that record? Kids today don’t know what it was like to really want something and have to wait a million and one years before you could get it, if you did at all. Kids today don’t know what it’s like to want or wait which is sad. Maybe with the new economic down turn kids will start to learn that skill again.

JJ

November 5th, 2009
8:40 am

I never watched Sesame Street, because I was about 10 when it started.

However, we loved The Muppet Show……Every night it was on the whole family watched…….I have it on DVD now, and LOVE IT!!!!! It brings back so many memories…..

Patrick

November 5th, 2009
8:41 am

I don’t think I was ever really into Sesame Street when I was at the preschool age. My fortés were whatever was on Nickelodeon, mainly Pinwheel, Today’s Special, and Looney Tunes. I think if Pinwheel ever comes out on DVD, I will be snatching up a copy.

I had seen clips of SS in later years if I was channel surfing during the summer, or whenever I was off from school or out sick. Elmo and Zoe both bug the heck out of me. I remember watching something on A&E about Sesame Street a few years ago where they talked about an episode they were filming where a hurricane blows through, destroying Big Bird’s nest.

In relation to the Cap’n, I had never watched him, but there was another mainstay I enjoyed watching in the 80s: Bozo. Our cable company was nice enough to provide us with the Chicago station he aired on, and I loved it. Cuddley Duddley was my favorite, as was the Grand! Prize! GAME!

JATL

November 5th, 2009
8:41 am

In regards to steering kids away from shows -Caillou!!!!! Creepy bald kid who is the whiniest thing with the wimpiest parents EVER. That show was viewed once by my kid (twice by me to see if we just watched a bum episode), but I find parents everywhere hate Caillou. Don’t start flipping out -I have nothing but pity for kids who are bald from chemo, and at first I thought maybe this was somehow part of the storyline, but no, he’s just a freaky-looking big-headed bald whiner. YUCK!

Another thing I credit Sesame Street with is exposing me to the fact that different races and ethnicities could all hang out and have things in common. I grew up in a very segregated society, and I have to say -starting with Sesame Street and continuing with the good ‘ol 70s and 80s sitcoms -TV did me a favor in that way. I don’t think television is great when consumed by anyone, especially kids and youth, in large quantities, but it really helped plant the idea in my head that people are people and it’s interesting to get to know lots of different kinds of them.

deidre_NC

November 5th, 2009
8:44 am

my first child watched ss a lot..none of my kids have been much on tv..they watch it when theres nothing else to do. for some reason this reminded me of the sid and marty croft things at the omni..does anyone remember that?

Steph

November 5th, 2009
8:44 am

Sesame Street is the same age I am. I totally relate to the whole 4 channels thing – I lived on the east coast also, but in the Boston area. We watched Sesame Street. Mr. Rogers, Captain Kangaroo, Zoom, and the Electric Company. The repetition elements really helped reinforce things like numbers and letters. I remember being so proud of myself when I could figure out the letters of the day the show was “sponsored by”.

Of course I had my favorite characters, Ernie, Cookie Monster, and the Count, and the ones who I thought were just too sappy, like Big Bird and Bert. But that is part of the beauty of the show…there’s always people in life you connect more with, but they all are important parts of the community.

The “newer” programming, ie. anything that came out after 1980, doesn’t seem to have the depth of Sesame Street. I’m probably biased, but I think kids would be better off watching SS than anything else out there.

Ursula

November 5th, 2009
8:51 am

Breakfast wouldn’t be breakfast if it weren’t for Sesame Street. The happy sights and sounds of this program for the past 40 years have become an indispensable part of our family routine. Children learn by repetition, so we welcome re-runs of any and all episodes, they’re just like the comfort of warm fuzzy slippers. Bring on the next 40 years!

Patricia

November 5th, 2009
8:52 am

I’m 26 and still think Sesame Street is one of the best programs out there.
It had the perfect mix of fun and education (no one explains the concept of near and far better than Grover). There were loads of different characters that are still iconic today…not to mention the many musical numbers that are practically a part of pop culture.
I moved to Canada when I was 6 yrs old and Sesame street was so fun to watch that I didn’t even realize I was learning (these days anyone who meets me can’t even guess that I’m from a foreign county since I don’t have an accent, I never even needed to enroll in ESL classes!).
Little known fact: Toronto’s Subway Chime (when the doors close and open) is the first 3 notes of the Sesame Street theme.
It’s a shame that kids are being inundated with random programs that clutter the genius that is Sesame Street. When I have kid’s I’ll be happy to sit with them and reminisce.

John Straub

November 5th, 2009
8:53 am

if kids dont like it 40 years on then its their loss im a bit older now lol and i love it even watching the old early episodes will GROUCH in his dustbin , big bird , and even the laugh a minute bert n earnie ha ha ha

Vork

November 5th, 2009
8:53 am

I think the fact that it is not even 9:00 AM yet and there are already about 80 comments on this topic…….the most of which sound like mongoloid idiots that don’t know their rear end from a hole in the ground speaks volumes about the Sesame Street audience as a whole.

uma

November 5th, 2009
8:54 am

My son aded 19 with severe learning difficulties and the only programme he loves is sesame street, though we don’t get it on TV’s now he still watches on You-tube and he loves them.My vote will br to sesame street as the best Children’s TV programme

Radha

November 5th, 2009
8:54 am

I loved Sesame Street and still do.

I’ll be turning 30 soon.

Over the years I have seen children’s programming devolve into flashy, shallow, commercial, consumer-driven materialism.

What Sesame Street carried were the sensibilities of an older age of more refined values, maturity, innocence, morality and simplicity.

The competitiveness of a flashy screen and the fresh air and sunshine outside the door is a hard choice for a kid to make.

Billions of dollars are spent to study, engineer, produce, market and monetize the fresh minds of our children by selling them on consumer culture “I want that daddy! I neeeed this!”

What this does is set the culture for our children into an ever expanding spiral of dissatisfaction with what they have, and what they expect others to deliver to them.

This pattern leads to frustration in adulthood when people don’t give you what you want, and chasing the leading edge of consumer goods destroys contentment with ourselves seeking inner fulfillment from external baubels. Not to mention it ruins the environment, polarizes the global economy, is unsustainable, and ultimately spiritually depressing.

All from who we choose to expose our children to.

What are the motives of the people who make children’s programming?

Who would you want babysitting your child?

An industrial scientist trying to figure out how to manipulate your child’s mind to crave what they want to sell?

Or another parent, who gets what you’re going through, and who shares your core values?

I believe that it’s our duty as parents to make our own entertainment for our kids.

Spend time with them, make games, dress up in costumes, play make believe, draw in the sand. What kids benefit from most is love and attention from their parents. TV jazzes them up to be dissatisfied with that.

If we choose to live a more grounded life, with less pursuit of unnecessary “necessities”, then we’ll have more time to share with our kids, who will in turn become healthy, balanced, mature and nurturing adults who can help so many people.

Sesame Street was the creation of such a person, Jim Henson, who pioneered the effort to inspire children with his gifts. Now let’s do the same with ours.

BenzMom

November 5th, 2009
8:55 am

When I was a kid, my mom was in her mid-30s and still watching Sesame Street with me. My favorite characters are the Martians (Yip Yips). How could you not love them? My hubby has an aversion to Grover – but only because his middle name is Grove and he used to get teased as a kid and called Grover. Our son Ben is too young for SS yet, but while I’m pleased it’s still on, I prefer old-school SS (show me how crayons are made and other neat clips of real-life stuff) but at the same time, I understand it’s important to remind our kids that you can’t talk to strangers (unless it’s a cop or fireman if you’re in trouble) and some of the other things that might not have been considered “way back when”. I hope I can share the history of SS and other classics with my son but like some of the other parents have said, it’s important to not camp out in front of the tv. Go outside. Read a book. Play make-believe. Have constructive play with your kids.

Bill

November 5th, 2009
8:56 am

I still love Seasame Street. It is the best! I still look out for the letter of the day! :)

Roxy

November 5th, 2009
8:59 am

yes yes yes yes yes i watched it when i was 3 and i still catch a glimpse of it now and again its truely AWSOMESSSSS

Pete_the_cookie_monster

November 5th, 2009
9:00 am

I saw big bird yesterday on google’s page, but since I saw cookie monster (my fav) I decided to click on!!! I definetly go for the educational value SS offers for my daughter! I know cable offers a good variety of choices, but frankly there is many shows now that have little to no educational value in them too! So I do carefully screen what my daughter can or can’t watch. So my daughter has to choose from what I pick for her & if the show has good message or can teach something of educational value then I will add it to the tivo for her to watch! I have seen in my lifetime parents that allow their kids to watch whatever and not really supervise! I’m sorry to say, but tv is not a replacement for a babysitter or a nanny! Many parents choose this anyway!!! Like I tell my wife… need to interact with my daughter more! Programs like SS can really help if interacting together and teach the children too! OHHHH!!! AND THANKS for reminding us about Sesame street’s anniversary! I really look forward to the new show mentioned!!! I do hope Sesame Street can live another 100 years!!! Well of course we grew out of sesame street way back when, and my daughter someday will too, but I hope someday she can use it as a tool to teach my grandchildren when she has some! (someday)

!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!HAPPY 40 YEAR ANNIVERSARY SESAME STREET!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Sell Out

November 5th, 2009
9:03 am

Sesame Street sold out a long time ago when everyone found out Snuffleupagus wasn’t Big Bird’s imaginary friend. That was probably back in the mid-80s. That moment is when Sesame Street became dead to me.

I also desperately wanted to see inside of Oscar the Grouch’s trash can. I mean, from all of the noise he made when he went inside, it sounded like he had this huge underground area with tons of treasures. I dreamt of the day we got to see inside. Did they ever do it? No. Instead, the story lines tried to show Oscar’s softer side with Slimey. I hated Slimey for that – if Oscar’s going to be a Grouch, he better live up to the name.

I also hate to admit it, but when I was young and impressionable, it was rather disturbing to hear Linda speak. I mean the sign language was okay, but I didn’t understand what was wrong.

Bert and Ernie sleeping directly on their faces because their eyes wouldn’t shut was also a troubling concept for me. Their noses got all in the way and you could pretty much always tell their eyes weren’t shut as you could still see the whites of their big eyes with their faces smashed in the bed.

Although when Ernie yanked off Bert’s nose – I lost it. Completely unexpected and awesomely funny.

johnny

November 5th, 2009
9:06 am

Seasame Street rules use to love bert and ernie, okidokie bert lol and big bird should be more kids programs like it

Keke

November 5th, 2009
9:07 am

SESAME STREET IS THE BEST EVER I GREW UP WAHCIN IT AND IF THEY WERE TO EVER CLOSE DOWN THE SHOW I WOULD BE SOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO UPSET!

Nicosmama

November 5th, 2009
9:07 am

My two year old and I watch Sesame Street together. He loves Elmo the most, of course. He has learned to count past ten and is recognizing letters, as well as learning vocabulary. He repeats what he hears and we laugh together. I love Sesame Street for still being around. Their web site is great, also, with games we can play together. Keep going Sesame Street!

Pete_the_cookie_monster

November 5th, 2009
9:07 am

BTW I LOVE COOKIES JUST LIKE COOKIE MONSTER!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Hehe!!!!!Thanks to PBS & all who brought Sesame Street to our living room’s all this time!!! Keep it Coming!!! My daughter does love elmo so… that’s why she loves watching it!!!!! THANKS!!!!!!!

Keke

November 5th, 2009
9:08 am

MY FAVORITE CHARACTER IS ELMO AND I LOVE SESAME STREET!

Keke

November 5th, 2009
9:08 am

I LOVE ELMO!

Mr Nordstrom

November 5th, 2009
9:09 am

In the 70’s the show was innocent, educational and not commercialized. The topics focused on both social and educational issue of the time. I’m not a big supporter of PC programming, or fooling children to think there is one Asian, One African, one Mexican and One White kid at all times in every class, but I get what they were after. I also have my concerns about Government run TV that promotes social issues and opinions. Does are Bert and Ernie now Gay?

The difference today is simply a matter of overwhelming our kids minds with junk stimulation.
Turn on Sponge Bob for an hour and then ask your child to watch Sesame Street.
Simpsons, South Park, or the fake world of “I’ll be the next pop star slut” Disney, once your kids brain is poisoned with this trash there is no comparison to the real world of Oatmeal Sesame street. Where you’re asking the kid to actually think.

The same issue exists with Parents allowing kids to play video games all day, or worse right before school and after all that visual and auditory stimulation they expect the kid to pay attention to Mr. HockenBore’s lecture on History?

Passive Stimulation VS Active Interaction.

julie abram

November 5th, 2009
9:10 am

my kids love the videos and dvds but why is it not on British television anymore??
All the rubbish childrens programmes that are on the wide choice of digital channels nowadays non of which are educational, at least Seasame Street teaches the basics ABC’s 123’s etc, I personally think it should make a come back even if on a digital channel.

Meg Stout

November 5th, 2009
9:12 am

I found Sesame Street to be a bit frenetic. I liked the analysis of Sesame Street in the book “Tipping Point,” cutting edge for its day. But the science of helping kids interact with TV has evolved (again, “Tipping Point” and the science behind Blues Clues).

On the other hand my autistic daughter knew her numbers and most her letters at age 3, a time when we were just helping her regain language. I thanked her school teacher, who confessed they hadn’t been teaching numbers and letters. I presume my daughter learned them from Sesame Street. So for that alone I am eternally grateful.

Dave

November 5th, 2009
9:13 am

Sezame Street RULEZ!!!

me

November 5th, 2009
9:14 am

Happy Anniversary to Sesame Street! Having had my first grandbaby 8 wks. ago, I am not, at the moment totally up on the latest and greatest kids shows. Sesame Street was always a fave with my 4 kids. I also babysat for 5 others and they loved the gang along with Mr. Rogers. (I personally loved The Electric Company, more so now that Morgan Freeman is a major star!} As the kids grew out of Sesame Street I would find myself in the room alone still watching (and staying for the entire show) as they ran off to otherwise occupy thier time. But I believe that the kid’s imaginations, social skills, learning skills, and appreciation for humor were all influenced by this great show. It was sooo much easier to watch a show WITH my kids that made learning fun and did not “dumb down” thier methods. I think the show has changed too much in trying to stay current and find it a shame. Or maybe it’s a sign of the times and has run it’s course. I hope not. Sesame Street proved that television can be a forceful learning tool as well as entertainment. As with everything, balance and moderation is the key. I hope future generations will have the opportunity to appreciate one of the hallmarks of childrens television.
Elmo is adorable, but long live Super Grover!

Leidy

November 5th, 2009
9:14 am

I lerned how to speak English with Sesame Street. I thought it was a good fun and educational program. I was almost like a good prep program while you were going to pr-k. c’mon and who desent love Elmo.. :)

Sesame Street Lovers

November 5th, 2009
9:14 am

Both my children still love Sesame street. My son (18 months)screams everytime he sees Elmo come on and my Daughter (4 yo) likes Zoey. They both love the music and my daughter gets a kick out of answering the questions the characters ask the home audience. I love it too. brings back fun memories for me. Wonderful show and educational with a twist of fun!

new mom

November 5th, 2009
9:18 am

Funny, we just sat down to watch ‘EHMO’ and it’s today’s subject here!
Our two year old loves Elmo, but also recognizes and now likes the other characters. In fact, we use it as a teaching tool: ‘what color is elmo?’ which character is blue?’ ‘what animal is that?’ ‘why is elmo sad?’ I think part of the problem is parents not watching it with the kids and helping them learn from it.
Now that being said, I will admit our little one watches more tv then I had planned, probably because I’m a bit more busy these days with a baby too. But when the show she’s watching is over, we turn the TV off and play.

Anne

November 5th, 2009
9:19 am

I’m 44 and just old enough to remember when SS first came on. I LOVED it – along with Electric Company, Mr. Rogers, Zoom, Romper Room, Captain Kangaroo and Shari Lewis’ Lamb Chop. I preferred watching SS to Speed Racer (the original cartoon) when the two shows were on simultaneously. When my own children were little, they loved SS too. I did 15 years of home day care during the time that Nick Jr. and Disney and other children’s channels were just starting. I think many of the newer shows have some educational value, but they miss the character development that their early predecessors brought to the screen.

Too much of ANY TV watching is unhealthy and should be restricted, while some experts say that children under 2 yrs of age should not watch ANY TV. Parents have to make their own choices there, but understand that the children are the ones who will have the consequences.

Sesame Street Forever!!!!!!!

Somebody

November 5th, 2009
9:19 am

Personally, as a kid, I prefered teletubbies or barney than Sesame street. I guess it’s basically because teletubbies are much more…how do you put it…let me just say that they don’t exactly talk much and as a kid, I find it hard catching up with conversations. Teletubbies are colourful too, for some reason, colourful and absurb things attract me. However as I grow older, I seem to like Sesame Street too, easpecially elmo. I don’t know why. Just so.

AB

November 5th, 2009
9:20 am

I like Sesame Street, and so does my two year old. She enjoys the learning experience, and LOVES Elmo and Big Bird. :o) I don’t know why it has to be up-to-date for a 2 year old, they don’t know and don’t care and repetition is the best form of learning for their little minds.
We limit TV very much, so really she only knows Sesame Street occasionally and Elmo’s World …
I think Sesame Street will certainly stay around after all of the “new” stuff fizzles out, I hope so at least!

Freeway J

November 5th, 2009
9:21 am

My son is 3 and just started watching it about 6 weeks ago. He loves it, we Tivo it for him.

sophia

November 5th, 2009
9:21 am

sesame street rocks
i am 12 years old
and no i do not waqtch it
BUT i do have 4 ernie teddies ( all different )
and an elmo bag which i brought of my friend
she’s had iit since she was 3
LOL.
SO YHH IT ROCKS
i lurrrve elmo and ernieeee(: which channel and what time are the new shows on xx

steph

November 5th, 2009
9:24 am

SESAME STREET ROCKS!

new mom

November 5th, 2009
9:24 am

Hey–speaking of repetition, it seems like there are only 8-10 SS episodes that they rotate through. If I see one more ‘Who can wear the most hats on their head day?” I will freak. OK, I’ll really just sit and count the hats again with her…But they really get their money’s worth out of their episodes.

steph

November 5th, 2009
9:28 am

if you love Sesame Street go to PortAventura in Barcelona as they have Sesame Street shows and you can meet the characters! I <3 BERT AND ERNIE! x

Your Mama's Toast Sandwhich

November 5th, 2009
9:29 am

Hell yeah =D Despite all the stupid concept of turning the cookie monster and such into the vege monster and all that awful shiz, I do belive Seaseme street is pretty much hysterical. Elmo is a creature of the night who has scared many children in the world,his red form a devil in the street; along with the count. Yet, everyone else is cool.

The COOKIE MONSTER! Is cool.

Enjoy =D

And don’t delete this…it’s faintly true ; ) Personal opinion you moos.

<3

Lisa

November 5th, 2009
9:30 am

First off, let me say that Elmo should go into retirement. Why do we not see Kermit the frog the original character who along with Jim Hensen launched Sesame Street’s debut?
Ernie and Bert? The “Odd Couple” who crack me up every time I see an old clip….bring them back too. As for the rest of the show…it is still as great as ever. Let Cookie monster eat cookies and make crumbs go flying everywhere! Bring back the I love trash song with Oscar the grouch.

lmno

November 5th, 2009
9:32 am

Thank God for Public Television.

Whenever people say that government involvement always leads to disaster, I point out Public programming which has consistently been superior to private only funded programming for 40 + years.

If you’ve never seen Mr. Rogers goes to Washington, then you should watch this. One of the greatest moments in congressional history.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yXEuEUQIP3Q

Michael

November 5th, 2009
9:32 am

I grew up on Sesame Street, and know that many of my formative skills in letter naming and lettter sounds and counting were aquired through this TV show. I am now a kindergarten teacher. I haven’t seen the show in years, but since they are revamping and new episodes are starting in Novemeber, I may just have to watch Sesame Street again! Congrats on 40 Years!

Jay

November 5th, 2009
9:32 am

Sesame Street is still the staple of kids shows with one small hiccup: Elmo is too much a part of it – diversity (which is what Sesame Street is all about) is key – Elmo is overdone.

But realize also that Sesame Street isn’t just a TV show and hasn’t been for years – it’s an institution, with games and a slew of books and other educational outlets for kids. I agree with what someone said about not having your kids spending too much time in front of the TV. I say Sesame Street is still the champ – utilize all of its outlets and you will reap the benefits.

Patty

November 5th, 2009
9:33 am

You had to be there at the birth to really enjoy the creativity and explosiveness of the program! I was a senior in high school, and wished it had been around when I was in kindergarten! In college we flocked to the tv in the afternoon to watch it!
How unique-to set up a show like commercials with repeated learning skills instead of product promotion, knowing repetition is the best way to remember information. Jim Henson was a GENIUS!!!
By the way, where is Gonzo on the website?? He was my favorite and the absolute favorite of my oldest son!?! And where is Snuffie? Maybe they will make a comeback in the new season!
Happy Birthday, Sesame Street and all the Muppets!!!

Eadie

November 5th, 2009
9:33 am

Of course kids still like this program
it GREAT!!!
i’m almost 16 and i still like it
:D

80's Gal

November 5th, 2009
9:34 am

My brother and I grew up watching Sesame Street. We would actually look forward to the theme show end credits where there would be a kid going down a big slide. We’d pretend to be going down it as well. We also used to love watching Today’s Special, Read-a-long and Polk-a-dot door. Shows now a days are definetly not what they used to be.

Leslie

November 5th, 2009
9:35 am

Of course its as relevant as ever! The question is getting rather annoying actually, and I find some of these answers to be depressing, judgmental and obviously uninformed. When adults gripe about it’s inability to hold their own attention, I have to laugh because the show is not FOR them. Never was. My 2y.o. loves it (especially Elmo) and I am pleased as ever to enjoy it with him. However, there are many jokes for adults if one has a subtle sense of humor.
Television isn’t to blame for the world’s ills. Nor is it to blame for parental neglect. Its simply a tool and the lack of DVD players did NOT a better parent make. Do not judge a parent’s choices, inspire good parenting.
We have other choices (though remember this has always been for the people- a free and smart show for those of us that cannot afford cable). But we’d watch it even if we did have Nick, etc. Those shows all seem lackluster and frankly rather idiotic compared to Sesame.
Thank you Sesame Street for bringing me, and now my son smart, thoughtful and loving programming.

steph

November 5th, 2009
9:36 am

im the same as Eadie x

sagat

November 5th, 2009
9:36 am

I used to watch it when i was growing up in the early/mid 80’s. Now i am 30 but i would love to congratulate the team on a job well done

Kathy

November 5th, 2009
9:37 am

I was a little too old for Sesame Street (preferred ZOOM, I think) but watched it and Mr. Rogers and Captain Kangaroo along with my younger sibs and loved them all. My son (now 17) learned to read by the age of 2 – partly because of SS. We couldn’t travel anywhere without his buddy Elmo. I haven’t seen it in several years, but still can sing most of the old songs. Long live Sesame Street!

JATL

November 5th, 2009
9:37 am

@deidre_NC -LOVED Sid and Marty Kroft at the Omni!

bino

November 5th, 2009
9:39 am

I always loved sesame street as a kid, but then how many choises did we really have then?
Anyway, I really appreciated sesame street recently when I found out the effort and research that went into its production …. you really need to take a look at this (read the production section):
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sesame_Street

Sanura

November 5th, 2009
9:42 am

I love Sesame Street! I, too, didn’t know of the monumental 40th anniversary until I saw the Google doodles. I’m 29 and I will always fondly recall the days my grandparents babysat me and my brother and we watched Sesame Street and Mr. Rogers. I loved the Martians, Grover, and Slimey the best. I think it’s a great show that is fun and educational for kids and entertaining for adults too. As I grew up, I realized the humor in characters like the Count and Sherlock Hemlock and the segment where the letter “U” is in love with Smokey Robinson. I had the impression that the Sesame street versions were the originals and the adult versions were remakes, but now I know it’s the other way around
:-)

Allie

November 5th, 2009
9:43 am

My son is 3.5 and he will inevitably choose Sesame Street for his once-a-day TV show. The Count and I have taught him how to count to 20. Telly, Rosita and Zoey have helped us talk about feelings and cooperation. Elmo and I have taught him about brushing teeth, going to the doctor, using the potty and many, many other experiences relevant to preschoolers. Cookie Monster still eats cookies, which has not influenced my son to ignore vegetables – that’s my fault (Mommy does not eat enough of them).
My son actually spends more time on the computer at PBSKids.org than he does in front of the television. He prefers interacting with the online characters to sitting on the couch watching the show.
So yes, Sesame Street is a big part of our lives, and as a first-time parent, I believe I have learned more from the show than my son.
Congratulations to all the people who have helped create this wonderful program every season for 40 years!

Matt W>

November 5th, 2009
9:43 am

IHate U all!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! But not Sesame Street ;)

Cesth

November 5th, 2009
9:46 am

Still the best! You may not love every minute, but even as a parent, you can sit and watch with your child and not feel insulted, nauseated (ex. Barney, tellytubby) or feel whatever (spongebob). And guess what, the kids do learn something. S St. did teach my kids how to read (by age 3!), numbers etc!

Jon

November 5th, 2009
9:47 am

I still love Sesame; it was the family favorite growing up in my house hold. When I get to gather with family members, we still talk and laugh about episodes that we saw twenty years ago; such as, “there is a hold in the bucket there Henry.” I still think it’s funny. I hope the show stays on another 40 years.

Aleshia

November 5th, 2009
9:47 am

I still love Sesame street and i am 16. If i could watch it all the time i would especially Elmo’s World.

sesame street veteran

November 5th, 2009
9:47 am

I am 24 and remember watching Sesame Street when I was younger. I loved the diversity of the show and its segments. Spanish was my first language and the show actually helped me to learn English!

sesame street veteran

November 5th, 2009
9:48 am

Enter your comments here

Jess

November 5th, 2009
9:48 am

i am 17 and i still absolutely love sesame st. as a kid i loved and now i watch it with my baby brother. sesame st. is a timeless show. it is simply amzing.

the year 1971

November 5th, 2009
9:49 am

I loved loved loved Sesame Street and I am proud to say- it is older than me…by a year and a half…but, we’ll just pretend the number 10 is as high as we can “Count”…thank you.

I really liked Electric Co. – that was a cool show.

ok, kids these days…well…is it relevant stuff – YES. but the fact of the matter is – you dont take your kids to go see Transformers and then try and convince them that the “Clash of the Titans” has the bestest visual effects ever!! Night and Day. it’s like putting the Brady Bunch up against Married with Children- very relevant and wonderful shows…BUT – sort of dated in their own right- but everyone will ALWAYS love them. You dont ever stop watching Sesame but, it will loose its staying power as a day to day show and become more of an iconic thing like- Howdie Doodie or something…

Mike

November 5th, 2009
9:51 am

I hadn’t watched Sesame in probably close to 20 years until my wife, daughter (22 mos), and I started watching it in the past month. I am disappointed but also a little nostalgic to see the same clips in some of the segments that I saw as a child growing up. I still think the show is very educational and obviously with the Elmo’s World segments at the end of the shows they are “trying” to make things more 21st century but I think they’re “old school” methods of instilling values in our children are just fine.

Kathy

November 5th, 2009
9:57 am

@Radha….Jim Henson did not create Sesame Street. Go read the book I noted in my post @ 8:16.

valerie hardoon

November 5th, 2009
9:57 am

Cookie monster rocks!

Yari Orellana

November 5th, 2009
9:57 am

They should put ELMO up on google =P

I LUV U ELMO !!

Anthony

November 5th, 2009
9:59 am

I have read over many of the comments that have been posted by, what appears to be a great variety of the demographic. Two things rang very clear.
One being that most people that mentioned Sesame Street did little for them had terrible spelling and weak grammer skills. These people also had comments about shows known for bright colours and no language of any kind used, were the programs they prefered.
The second person that really ruffled my feathers, was a woman that enforced the idea of conversation was by far more important than watching television. I agree that open dialogue is very important, it is also important that a child must be axposed to elements in order for a conversation to begin. Sesame Street offered math, reading, imagination and child friendly viewing that provided entertainment without insulting their intelligence.
I wish to thank PBS and Jim Henson for providing me with the building blocks with which to be a functioning member of society. I am 38 years old and very proud of parents, including mine, that used Sesame Street as a spring board for increasing their childs awareness of the world from a toddlers point of view.

LissaMari

November 5th, 2009
10:00 am

my daughter is 14 months and absolutely loves sesame street she watchies it every day. she tries to sing along with the song and learned alot fo stuff from it. we get it on demand for her and we record it from direct TV and she watched at least 6 episodes a day. it helps her eat her meals because she watches it and stays still rather than running around with a peanut butter and banana sandwich making a mess. it is convenient for me as well. keeps her busy while im cleaning and it is educational. i love it just as much as her. i find myself singing its catchy tunes.

Steve C

November 5th, 2009
10:01 am

To this day i still sing that song “1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11,12″ which has the ball in a pinball machine going around while its playing. Plus i still imitate “The Count” (guy who looks like dracula) while teaching the little ones in my family how to count “1 mwuah ha ha, 2 mwuah ha ha”. So much fun. I’m 34 by the way!

Leslie

November 5th, 2009
10:02 am

I have to admit that I just skimmed many of these comments. However, the overall theme that I saw was that the people who loved Sesame Street or talked about their kids watching it – had better grammar, punctuation, spelling, etc. The people who said they didn’t like it tended to not capitalize anything (include i)and misspelled words.

It’s the only show I really remember watching as a kid; however, I preferred to go outside and play.

Kathy

November 5th, 2009
10:05 am

PEOPLE…….Jim Henson DID NOT create Sesame Street!!! Joan Ganz Cooney and the geniuses at the Children’s Television Workshop were the creators of Sesame Street. Jim Henson only created SOME of the characters….not the whole show!!

Kathleen Lai

November 5th, 2009
10:11 am

I personally feel that Sesame Street lost it’s orginallity when they introduced veggetables and fruits to cookie monster. They killed it.

momtrolfreak

November 5th, 2009
10:21 am

I was a Sesame Street Fanatic, and still have my SS lunchbox (aluminum, with a matching thermos). My 3YO prefers Little EInsteins and Dinosaur Train and they are both educational (one about music, one about paleotology) so I allow those. I won’t let him watch THomas because the characters are rude to each other, no matter how much he begs (maybe when he’s a teenager he’ll rebel and watch Thomas all the time haha). In response to Mr. Nordstrom, I doubt Bert & Ernie BUT I would not be surprised to have a gay couple on Sesame Street. Of course they wouldn;t touch on the word gay or the definition of homosexuality–they don;t deal with what marriage means for hetero couples either, the kids are young–, but two male (or two female) characters who are always together and live int eh same house? What would be wrong with that? INterestingly, I put Sesame Street on this morning for my son while I was getting ready for work (he hasn’t watched it in over a year) and he complained at fist that it wasn’t Dinosaur Train, but he was RAPT. it still has the power to entrall, and I mean that in a good way. Everything I overheard from the other room was educational, and when I popped my head in, he explained to me what was going on with a real comprehension. I’m putting it back on the rotation!

Zaboo

November 5th, 2009
10:37 am

Sesame Street SUX. Pinwheel RULZ!!!!

And YES I meant to spell them wrong and know full well how to spell them correctly so all you grammer nazi’s out there can suck it.

Zaboo

November 5th, 2009
10:39 am

And that would be grammar not grammer. STFU!!! Nazi’s.

Indy

November 5th, 2009
10:43 am

I am an adult woman with no children; however I do still, occasionally, watch Sesame Street when I am home on days off. I grew up with Big Bird, Oscar, The Count, Cookie Monster, Snuffle…? and so on; I love those characters and have even come to appreciate many of the newer ones. I can remember when Sesame Street wasn’t so much “for profit,” but I understand; in today’s world you have to do what you can to keep up and survive and Sesame Street is a PBS broadcast unlike strictly profitable networks and programs such as Disney and Dora (although I think her popularity has fallen). I do love Disney and many characters and programs, but, honestly, with all of the music/musicians, actors; shows and movies, and cartoon characters in movies and television programming, how much more “profit” can Disney stand; after all, they did just purchase one of my favorite comics, Marvel Comics–I hope they don’t destroy its essence. But this is about Sesame Street: Hail, Hail! Long Live Sesame Street!!

Vork

November 5th, 2009
10:49 am

Does anybody else even remember Dusty’s Treehouse or Today’s Special? Or even Pinwheel?

HB

November 5th, 2009
10:56 am

I’ve always loved Sesame Street, but I was sorry to see it seemed “dumbed down” a bitlast time I watched it a few years ago. Still probably better than other kids’ shows though. Personally, I think kids watch too much TV and that PBS should show fewer of the cartoons where the primary purpose is to teach “social skills” but are basically animated children’s sitcoms — Arthur, Clifford, etc. There are too many better ways to tackle that — unstructured play time, reading books with similar stories, etc. The best kids ed shows focus in large part on academic skills and show them things they may likely will not see otherwise (like Mr. Rogers’ “How People Make Things videos).

Just a little history here about the 40th anniversary — 1969 was a big year for informal education. A lot of very creative people were focusing on finding ways to inspire children to explore their world through educational songs, TV, and hands-on learning. That year marked the beginning of the modern science museum movement with the opening of the Exploratorium in San Franscisco and the Ontario Science Centre in Toronto. From Frank Oppenheimer to Jim Henson to Fred Rogers (whose show began a few years earlier, but went national in 1968), these new age educators wanted to spark curiosity and imagination.

Indy

November 5th, 2009
10:59 am

I forgot to respond to “Do Kids Still Love Sesame Street 40 Years On?” I certainly hope so because Sesame Street “hoots straight from the hip” without a lot of hoccus poccus. It is simple yet interesting, basic yet full of information and knowledge, colorful but not too busy, comical at the child’s level while adding a little something for the adult, predictable enough for the child while still lending way to curiousity, and much more. I am an ECE (Early Childhood Educator) so I do not much believe in proping a child in front of the t.v. but I know and understand that not all children are in pre-school and that parents have responsibilities and duties at home so given no choice I would certainly sit a child in front of Sesame Street before some of the other children’s program because I know that they will definitely be learning to read and count (Language and Literacy and pre-math concepts). Sure there are many other choices these days, but that does not take away from the essence, character, and quality of Sesame Street. They are still a dynamic program. Happy Birthday! and many more.

K10

November 5th, 2009
11:01 am

I am 36 years old and I am STILL a Seseme Street addict! When I’m having a bad day, I go to You Tube and download clips from old-school Sesame Streets because they make me laugh. I learned so much from that show (my first words of Spanish, how milk was made, all about Hawaii!) and some of the best memories of my childhood are connected to it – we would sit down as a family and watch it on the weekends. Happy Anniversay Sesame Street!

Indy

November 5th, 2009
11:02 am

Error correction from above: Sesame Street “shoots…”

still a kid at heart

November 5th, 2009
11:03 am

OK so I had just started kindergarten the year SS started but I still remember watching it in the mornings. I loved Oscar and wanted to see the inside of his trashcan. Also when Kermit was the reporter interviewing people from fairy tales (I had to wait until I was a bit older before I really started getting all the jokes). I also think I had a bit of a childhood crush on Maria (ok maybe I still do) and to this day I know all the words to Rubber Ducky (you’re the one….you make bathtime lots of fun)….Congrats SS on 40 years…..and I hope you have another 40 years on the air.

Yuck

November 5th, 2009
11:10 am

Hated it as a kid. Hate it as an adult.

Donna

November 5th, 2009
11:17 am

My two year old daughter loves Seasame Street, especially Cookie Monster. I find the show to be educational and fun for her. She also loves Barney. For the little time we allow the TV on, she has learned a lot from the shows about letters, shapes, colors, singing, etc. Thank God for shows like this!

Stephanie

November 5th, 2009
11:27 am

I agree with motherjanegoose, I think children watch too much tv. We will NEVER have a tv in the car–that is absurd! We don’t allow our kids to watch tv everyday, and when when the television does go on, it’s only for an hour. We watch any of the PBS shows and Discovery Kids. My kids also love VeggieTales. Mostly though, we talk with our kids, play games, cook, go for walks, do arts and crafts. I am a homeschooling mother, so we have to stay engaged or we’ll drive each other crazy :o) People are always commenting about how well-behaved, well-spoken, and mature our children are; which probably has a lot to do with the level of personal interaction we have with our kids. Our, and like many of you, we have exposed our kids to the “classics” like Fraggle Rock, Muppets, and School House Rock. The “oldies” are some of their favorites!

VA librarian

November 5th, 2009
11:46 am

RE: message from tessa: You wrote “…sesame street didnt really do it for me…” That much is obvious, as your spelling and grammar are atrocious. Oh, I’m sorry, you probably don’t know what ‘atrocious’ means, so I’ll take it down to your level: you spel bad. [And yes, that's intentional.]

RE: motherjanegoose: Great comment! I completely agree.

Witchie Poo

November 5th, 2009
12:03 pm

I actually preferred HR Puff-n-stuff. Jimmy! Help!! Help! These idiots here are talking about Sesame Street!

Tessa's Shadow

November 5th, 2009
12:05 pm

VA Library, don’t you got some books to file? How ’bout straigtening them glasses on your nose?

motherjanegoose

November 5th, 2009
12:15 pm

VA librarian …hang in there. It’s nice to have someone here who can spell and articulate….LOL!

Not too common here today is it? Thanks for the support. Some posters rag on me no matter what I share and it is refreshing when others affirm that my ( sometimes old fashioned) ideas may be worthy.

BTW…I love librarians and would like to check in to see if you would like to connect. Send Theresa your e-mail, if you want and I will touch base. Maybe I could come up for story time?

The Shadow

November 5th, 2009
12:43 pm

MJG…are you kidding? You want to “connect” to a total stranger? You sound like stalker.

Vork

November 5th, 2009
1:04 pm

So this blog has become a place for people to peddle their wares apparently. Interesting.

The Shadow

November 5th, 2009
1:09 pm

MotherGoose….quack quack. How can you quack when you sound like a windbag?

Vork

November 5th, 2009
1:12 pm

@The Shadow

Don’t forget “Old fashioned” and “Pompous” windbag.

I told you not to poke the bear crazy lady.

The Shadow

November 5th, 2009
1:44 pm

MotherGoose! There’s a lonely rocking chair sitting on a lonely porch that’s calling out to you!

The Shadow

November 5th, 2009
1:50 pm

You can tell the squirrels all about your speaking engagements!

Tina

November 5th, 2009
1:54 pm

I agree with Vork & Shadow MJG…sometimes your pretty creepy to say the least! You really shouldn’t play with strangers you know?

Durka Durka

November 5th, 2009
2:15 pm

Most of the kids that watch it growing after 40 years are most likely still living with their parents.

Tiffany

November 5th, 2009
2:18 pm

I love Sesame Street! I watched it as a kid- and watched it with my own kids. I hope it stays on for a long, long time! A true CLASSIC.

Divine

November 5th, 2009
2:56 pm

Sesame Street is 40 years old; it debuted on this day in 1969. I was too grown-up by then to watch the show, but my students were then being born and Sesame Street, in its supposedly fun and radical way, aimed to teach them to read and think: “edu-tainment,” they called it.

I began teaching freshman composition in 1986; most of my students had been born 1968-69. Freshman comp isn’t a romp for teachers or students, but students just a few years younger than my first ones appeared to have attention spans accustomed to Sesame Street’s rat-a-tat pacing (modeled on network TV’s Rowan and Martin’s Laugh-In), and their primary concern in the classroom was entertainment. Their ideal instructors would have been singers, guitarists, bongo-players and tap-dancers, and guest stars such as Bill Cosby. Their ideal teacher was most concerned not with communication but with students’ personal comfort levels and self-esteem. Over a span of about five years these ideas rose to epidemic levels. The students spoke in quips or in the disingenuous tones of children’s public-television programming — and to this day, dialogue on PBS kids’ shows can drive me nuts.

I don’t complain because the students in my college classroom couldn’t write; most people can’t and don’t want to write. It worried me more that most couldn’t think, except about games and sports teams.

I don’t celebrate Sesame Street.

Your MOM

November 5th, 2009
3:05 pm

hello AHHHHHHHHH

Leilani

November 5th, 2009
3:25 pm

I watched Sesame Street as a child and I loved it. I especially loved cookie monster and the Count! For me it was educational and I did learn a lot from watching it. I would like my children to watch it, too. Everyone is different and has their own opinions. Someone is always going to have something negative to say about every children’s program but it doesn’t mean that those programs are bad. It just depends on the person. There are a lot of programs that I didn’t watch because they weren’t for me but I’m not going to put them down. I think Sesame Street is great and glad that it’s still around…Hopefully it will be around for a long time…Happy 40th Birthday, Sesame Street!!

Ding

November 5th, 2009
6:35 pm

Not a mom–loved Sesame Street growing up. Of course the show can’t be the same as it was 40 years ago. However, I think that it still has a lot to offer kids. I love the characters. I know that there are TONS of other learning programs out there today, and because I have no children I’ve only seen a few of them. Ok, so some people are not fans of “SS”. But let me tell ya, I’m really happy that I grew up with a big yellow bird and not some big purple dinosaur. BTW, I watched a little tribute to Sesame Street this year on the Daytime Emmys…it was touching. Here’s to another 40!

Ding

November 5th, 2009
6:38 pm

Not a mom–loved Sesame Street growing up. Of course the show can’t be the same as it was 40 years ago. However, I think that it still has a lot to offer kids. I love the characters. I know that there are TONS of other learning programs out there today, and because I have no children I’ve only seen a few of them. Ok, so some people are not fans of “SS”. But let me tell ya, I’m really happy that I grew up with a big yellow bird and not some big purple

dinosaur. BTW, I watched a little tribute to Sesame Street this year on the Daytime Emmys…it was touching. Here’s to another 40!

mystery poster

November 5th, 2009
7:11 pm

What I liked best about Sesame Street is that my children didn’t have to endure commercials. Advertising aimed at children on network TV is rarely something that’s good for them.

lmno

November 5th, 2009
7:39 pm

Kimberly

November 5th, 2009
11:33 pm

I have a 2 yr old son… Every morning when we get home from taking his big brother (6th grader) to school we watch Sesame Street while we eat breakfast. This is our daily routine. It’s something we enjoy together. I personally appreciate & adore Sesame Street. From the repetition of letters & numbers & the alphabet song to social skills & manners… It’s very educational. I’m not kidding when I say that Sesame Street taught him to sing the abc song… I didn’t even know he was ready for that! As a parent, I trust most of the children’s shows on pbs. We love Sid the Science, Curious George, Word World… just to name a few.

motherjanegoose

November 5th, 2009
11:33 pm

@shadow….I work with children’s librarians all over the county and have been invited to speak at literacy and library conferences. I also work/play with total strangers nearly every week…I even get into their cars when they pick me up at the airport to take me to my hotel and speaking venue.

So many take a look at what I can offer and are thrilled to have me come and share what I know.

I am in strange schools nearly every day and working with children, I do not know. I do have some credibility! Contrary to what many here think.
For those of you who go to the same job every day, this may seem odd.

I met DB and Newmom for lunch….contacted off of this blog. None of us were creeped out with each other and we were all total strangers. To those of you newbies…I am all over the country ( Colorado as I type) and work with different folks every week. I do even have a few stories about squirrels…haha!

Thus, I have friends all over the country and not just in the state where I live.

Eebee's Grandmother

November 6th, 2009
12:03 am

I loved Sesame Street as a kid and still enjoy it everyone once in a while. My 15-month old granddaugher loves Eebee (as do I). She loves WordWorld on PBS along with Sid the Science Kid. Haven’t seen the new updated “Electric Company” but loved it as a kid along with Zoom. I still like cartoons but they sure don’t make them like they used to. I will tune in to see new Sesame Street shows to see if they are worth watching. I love Elmo and have even watched older show on You Tube and my granddaughter and I enjoy watching them together. Especially the “What’s the Name of That Song” song and Ernie and doing the “Rubber Ducky.” Oh the simplier days ;0),

Mike

November 6th, 2009
2:48 am

Anyone else notice that a lot of folks who say they don’t watch Sesame Street have a lot of gramatical errors in their posts?

Ms. Mel

November 6th, 2009
3:52 am

I am 19 years old,and also I am a perschool teacher. I know that as a kid I loved Sesame Street, I also watch other children shows but that was one of my favorites. And I look at when my class and I watch T.V. together. I see that Sesame Street has a lot of to live up to. My children watch Sesame Street on some days but they will perfer Sid the Science Kid or my favorite Backyardigans. The difference between me liking the show and my students is that Sesame Street is still trying to teach children the way that I learned and not the way that children learn today. Just having a letter and a number of the day is not getting it. With the two shows that my students like to watch there are songs and dancing they they like. When Sid comes on and sing “I am Looking for My Friends” We all get up and sing and dance with them. Now we look at Sesame Street and they are talk the whole time their is nothing funny but Elmo. We LOVE Elmo. Our favorite movie to watch is Elmo in Grouchland. But we only watch T.V. at the end of their day when it is time to be picked up and releaning what you been doing all day is not something they like. See my class is adding and spelling word now and the words we started with in September and know with out any problems are the word that Sesame Street is still trying to teach them. What I honestly think is that Sesmae Street needs to step up, children are no longer learning their alphabet at 5 they are now learning these things at 2. So to keep children wanting to watch they should move up three steps and challenge what the children should know or are learing at that time.
Ms.Mel

smh

November 6th, 2009
5:52 am

Haven’t watched Sesame Street in years as I have older kiddos. Until yesterday I would have recommended it that was before I saw a clip on Fox News where the SS characters called the network “trashy”. My husband looked at me and said no more. I miss Electric Company and the original Zoom.

sagat

November 6th, 2009
9:17 am

Good spot Mike:)

motherjanegoose

November 6th, 2009
11:23 am

@ Mike…I believe it is grammatical….the root word is grammar….sorry.

Just curious…how many of you know someone who met their partner on the internet….a TOTAL stranger. I am not marrying a stranger…just working with them. Methinks there are those who travel all over the country and have meetings with total strangers every day. I sit next to these folks on airplanes.

Becky

November 6th, 2009
1:18 pm

@MJG..My nephew met his wife over the internet..She’s from Montana..They met in person for the first time 2.5 years ago when his Mother was in the hospital..She came here for a week, a month or so later, he went there..A couple of months later, her and her three children moved here..They just got married in Aug..She is a really great person, as are her children..

motherjanegoose

November 6th, 2009
1:46 pm

@ Becky…yes strangers are sometimes friends we have not yet met.
I would have missed out on an awful lot, if I had never met most of those who were complete strangers prior to me contactng them and then thme hiring me.
Still holding out to go to Montana this year and I have some prspects!!!

It cracks me up how some posters here must live in a very small circle and would not consider meeting new folks from other states! I love meeting new folks!

Jarred

November 6th, 2009
3:14 pm

Its friggin Awesome

motherjanegoose

November 6th, 2009
4:54 pm

oops typos from an awful typist!

foeverbigbird

November 6th, 2009
7:24 pm

When you compare the wit and artistry that went into Sesame Street, today’s shows like WoW WoW Wubzy and Backyardagins are pathetic. Did creativity go out of style?

Seriously'~?

November 6th, 2009
9:26 pm

Wow Motherjanegoose- I’m surprised you can see all us little people from WAYYYYYYYYY up there on your high horse. Thats gonna be one heck of a fall…

mwagner

November 6th, 2009
10:34 pm

I think it horrible that someone up above would say that sesame street would bread pedophilles. I think the show is great and teachers children diversity and manners. They actually tell ESL students or their parents to watch it because it teaches them many things. My daughter loves all the characters and I am convinced that it has taught her letters. I go over her letters, but she started watching seseame street she is not singing the song. So all you people whi did not watch it you missed it. It is great for kids on so many levels. It is better then those stupid cartoons that flash things on the screen and does not really teach them anything. so congrats seseame street can’t wait till nov 10th for the new ones to begin.

motherjanegoose

November 7th, 2009
9:39 pm

@ seriously, listen for my LOUD scream on the way down…can you hear it, not yet? Please also get over yourself and share something we can actually use, instead of attacking. I know folks in all aspects of life. I love those who have something good to share, things we can all learn from. I learned some neat things today from those who stopped to chat with me after my presentation! Those who have nothing better to do than attack others, are wasting everyone’s time and I think that has been mentioned in so many ways by other posters.

Please find something interesting to contribute and check back. If I missed your thought provoking posts, I apologize.

Criticisms are easy to come by…contributions take more thought and intelligence. I speak about this in nearly every presentation I make and I am still employed…imagine it.

Night all…I have been talking for 6 hours and am pooped.

Sarai

November 8th, 2009
10:45 pm

I never really watched it when I was young BUT in my (high school) class we watched big bird goes to japan, and we didn’t finish it, I rented it from my library to watch the rest I loved it so much! I then read Caroll Spinney’s book about big bird, so big bird is now my idol~

Kayla

November 10th, 2009
8:59 pm

I’m not a parent, but i do babysit alot. And when i do go and watch kids the majority of them watch Sesame Street. I personally love it, I’m 15 and when i was little it was one of the only shows that didn’t freak me out! My mom watched the show when she was little and me and my two brothers watched it. The kids i babysit watch it and god knows, if it’s still on air, my kids will be watching it too.

Patrick

November 13th, 2009
4:37 pm

In relation to what someone said about using it as a teaching tool: My TV has a built-in on-screen guide of its own, although it’s a bit outdated. I haven’t used it since it wouldn’t play nice with the cable box I had at another house I lived in.

Anyway, one thing I liked was when I’d scroll through the guide, and would select “Sesame Street”, it would give the subject of the day’s episode, and what this character or that character was doing. It then gave a parenting tip on how to incorporate that episode’s subject to teach your child by example, or to expand on the subject. For example, there was an episode where Baby Bear wanted to send an e-mail to a friend, and the tip read for the parent (more than likely the mother) to take the child with them on daily errands, and show how computers are used everywhere, like at the grocery store, the bank, the library, etc. I thought it was very neat. Other tips included maybe having the child help bake something or clean house, if the show’s subject was either of those, or certain activities to show opposites, colors, shapes, textures, etc. That’s one thing I’d give Sesame Street credit for: encouraging not only children, but parents to interact with each other, and to use the show as a springboard in educating their children of the world around them. I think SS even has a parenting magazine that would have a summary of upcoming episodes, and would feature tips on what to do with the child in relation to the episode.

Candice

November 15th, 2009
8:37 am

I’m 37 and I loved Sesame Street as a child. I think it’s still relevant because it teaches the basics: ABCs, numbers, and good manners. It reinforces what my 2-year-old is being taught at home and she enjoyes it. The diverse cast always exemplifies unconditional love and respect for each other. Why wouldn’t we want to expose our children to these wonderful qualities? I hope it sticks around for another 40 years!

motherjanegoose

November 15th, 2009
4:36 pm

mr tom gones

November 19th, 2009
8:04 am

its burning like fire, stop talking about crappy sesamme street. it encourages pedos and incest. i donot want my kid beenm raped by some tramp in the high street. sesame streeet go away