Do kids still love Sesame Street 40 years on?

If you have school-aged children, like I do, you may have missed the news that this year marks the 40th anniversary of Sesame Street’s first television broadcast. A new season with updated characters and segments will begin broadcasting next week, giving preschool parents tired of re-runs something to look forward to on November 10.

I wouldn’t have known about this major anniversary in children’s programming if I hadn’t randomly used Google yesterday. The Google “doodle” featured Big Bird, which made me search Sesame Street news to find out what was up.

As a child, I well remember watching Sesame Street. I loved that little kid John-John with the massive chubby cheeks who would sit on the wall and talk to Herry Monster about numbers and letters. I adored the Twiddlebugs so much that my parents nicknamed me Twiddlebug. I did not like Bert – he scared the dickens out of me.

This was back in the days before Elmo, Zoey and celebrity/political/pop artist cameos (that I can recall) – and before anyone on Sesame Street met or even believed Big Bird’s best friend, Mr. Snuffleupagus, existed outside of the tall yellow guy’s imagination. This was also back when kids growing up in Atlanta had only four television channel options – 2, 5, 8 and 11. We had Sesame Street, Electric Company, Mr. Rogers, Captain Kangaroo, Saturday morning cartoons and little else in the way of children’s programming from which to choose.

By the time my children came along, Elmo and Zoey had become regular “people in my neighborhood”; everyone could see Snuffie; and bands like R.E.M. were dancing around, singing “Furry, Happy Monsters” on the Street. All of my kids enjoyed Sesame Street for a while. But with so many children’s programs on so many different channels, Sesame Street faced stiff competition and was never really the favorite.

My older daughter probably watched Sesame Street the longest. The younger girls always wanted to watch what the oldest watched and quickly learned that certain shows (like Sesame Street by that time) were considered “baby” shows by the number one Big Sis in the house. Even early on, however, Big Sis often preferred other children’s programs to Sesame Street if given the choice. In fact, Arthur and Teletubbies reigned supreme in our house when my oldest child was a preschooler. My middle daughter loved the Tweenies, Blue’s Clues and Franklin. Our youngest was enthralled by Barney and a Scottish show we stumbled upon called Balamory.  When we couldn’t find Balamory on the schedule any more, she moved on to Sid the Science Kid and Toot and Puddle.

All of this has gotten me thinking, what do you as parents think is the best children’s (preschool/early childhood) program out there? And which programs do your (or did your) young children prefer? What were your prerequisites for children’s shows?  Do you go for maximum educational value? Maximum social learning? An even balance? Pure entertainment value? Do you ever steer your children away from programs that annoy you personally, or do you let them make their own choices as long as they are age-appropriate?

Do you still enjoy watching Sesame Street with your kids? How do you think Sesame Street has changed – for the better or worse – over the years?  How has children’s programming in general changed – again for better or worse – in the past 40 years?

192 comments Add your comment

K

November 5th, 2009
8:30 am

Sesame Street has always been on for as long as I can remember and I’m 32 years old. I learned a whole lot from this show back in the day. I have 2 little ones, 2 1/2 and 1, and they both love Sesame Street. My oldest has also learned a lot from this show. Sesame Street will always get tremendous love from me. Happy Anniversary Sesame Street!

K

November 5th, 2009
8:32 am

And yes I still watch Sesame Street and thoroughly enjoy it at 32 years old.

Xander

November 5th, 2009
8:32 am

Sesame Street is awesome, I watched it all the time when I was little and I still like watching it sometimes with my younger siblings. Sesame Street is still awesome, but I DON’T LIKE HOW COOKIE MONSTER IS EATING THINGS THAT ARE NOT COOKIES (or pencils, or typewriters, or telephones if you’ve seen the christmas special from when I was younger). But seriously, whats wrong with eating just cookies all the time? (I know childhood obesity is on the rise, but I doubt it is due to Sesame Street)

larryo

November 5th, 2009
8:33 am

At 63 I recall TV back into the early 50’s when entertainment for kids was Ding Dong School. It was a sweet and gentle program, not in color,except as we imagined it. Seasame Street came along long after I grew up. I was happy for my children to watch Buffy St Marie, Mr. Hooper, and Cookie Monster even Oscar the Grouch!

I’ve seen some negativity above here. It amazes me that some are so unhappy to have to disparage even a program that has clearly been sucessful, educational and yes, FUN for so many for so long. Seasame Street, I salute you! Happy Forty Years. Many Many More! : )

Jonsea

November 5th, 2009
8:33 am

sesame SUCKS

John K

November 5th, 2009
8:33 am

Dude sesame-street rocks haha!

Still manage to get a good laugh out of it even years later.

ImFiveyearsoldandstillwatchsesmae

November 5th, 2009
8:34 am

Screw all of you that watch Sesame street

Becky

November 5th, 2009
8:34 am

No one in my family watched SS and none of the little ones now watch it..I was never in the house long enough to watch TV, we were always outside..To this day, I don’t watch a lot of TV..

Andy

November 5th, 2009
8:35 am

I was 40 yesterday so share this with the birth of Sesame Street! Long Live Big Bird and the Cookie Monster!

madmommy

November 5th, 2009
8:36 am

I love Sesame Street and my daughter loves watching it. SS has stayed relevant to todays kids and recently did a special on the economic times most parents are facing. I enjoyed watching it if we were in that situation with a child old enough to understand the changes going on, I would have her watch it for sure.

We also enjoy Fraggle Rock, Reading Rainbow, and the Muppets. I miss Pinwheels, I justed loved that show when I was a kid. I wonder if I can buy copies of it online? Something to think about.

TV is great for kids in small doses and while my daughter does watch her shows, it’s really only 15-30 minutes here and there since she’s only three after all. They can only sit still for so long, so I don’t worry about it. Most of the time if the kids are dancing or singing, she’s all over jumping up and down or dancing around. I wish we could all have been kids for so much longer. Just doesn’t seem right to be an adult for so long when being a kid is so cool. (Ok, maybe I’m sad because my little one had a birthday this week, but I do think kids should be small for a lot longer time than they are. Just goes so fast.)

Michelle

November 5th, 2009
8:37 am

I never watched Sesame Street when I was kid. I just never really liked it. My son (who is 6 now) has never really been interested in it either. They only thing I did like…they had an alphabet cassette tape in the late 70’s early 80’s. It was GREAT for learning the alphabet and letter/vowel sounds. To this day, some of the songs still stick in my mind!

liezel

November 5th, 2009
8:38 am

STILL LOVE SESAME STREET AND SO DOES THE LITTLE ONES

john

November 5th, 2009
8:38 am

it’s like a trusted brand name. i personally let my kids watch it, but i never watch it. i wouldn’t do this if this were any other name of the show i couldn’t recognize.

greatgrett

November 5th, 2009
8:39 am

I loved sesame street growning up in the early-mid 70’s. I lived for it! But that’s when most of the show was dedicated to teaching numbers and letters along with silly puppets doing silly things and fun animated shorts. When my children were little ones, I felt that seasmae street became focused on too many other things like social agendas. I didn’t like many of the band members/artists/people of influence that they invited on the show. Many were not people I would want my children to think were wonderful. Plus the things they focused on now, and still do, are second to academic learning and silly goofy puppets. I think that if the show did not change its focus, it would be more popular today. Young kids are not ready for policatal agendas and such.

madmommy

November 5th, 2009
8:40 am

PS. My little one loves Cookie Monster. When I was a kid I had the SS record and on side two there was the “C” is for Cookie song and I played it over and over on my portable turn table (how old am I?) over and over. Guess I played it too much because my dad came in smashed the record because I wouldn’t turn it down or stop playing it. One of the two for sure. Wish I still had that record to share as it was my favorite.

Just a funny SS story I thought I would share. How cool was I to even have that record? Kids today don’t know what it was like to really want something and have to wait a million and one years before you could get it, if you did at all. Kids today don’t know what it’s like to want or wait which is sad. Maybe with the new economic down turn kids will start to learn that skill again.

JJ

November 5th, 2009
8:40 am

I never watched Sesame Street, because I was about 10 when it started.

However, we loved The Muppet Show……Every night it was on the whole family watched…….I have it on DVD now, and LOVE IT!!!!! It brings back so many memories…..

Patrick

November 5th, 2009
8:41 am

I don’t think I was ever really into Sesame Street when I was at the preschool age. My fortés were whatever was on Nickelodeon, mainly Pinwheel, Today’s Special, and Looney Tunes. I think if Pinwheel ever comes out on DVD, I will be snatching up a copy.

I had seen clips of SS in later years if I was channel surfing during the summer, or whenever I was off from school or out sick. Elmo and Zoe both bug the heck out of me. I remember watching something on A&E about Sesame Street a few years ago where they talked about an episode they were filming where a hurricane blows through, destroying Big Bird’s nest.

In relation to the Cap’n, I had never watched him, but there was another mainstay I enjoyed watching in the 80s: Bozo. Our cable company was nice enough to provide us with the Chicago station he aired on, and I loved it. Cuddley Duddley was my favorite, as was the Grand! Prize! GAME!

JATL

November 5th, 2009
8:41 am

In regards to steering kids away from shows -Caillou!!!!! Creepy bald kid who is the whiniest thing with the wimpiest parents EVER. That show was viewed once by my kid (twice by me to see if we just watched a bum episode), but I find parents everywhere hate Caillou. Don’t start flipping out -I have nothing but pity for kids who are bald from chemo, and at first I thought maybe this was somehow part of the storyline, but no, he’s just a freaky-looking big-headed bald whiner. YUCK!

Another thing I credit Sesame Street with is exposing me to the fact that different races and ethnicities could all hang out and have things in common. I grew up in a very segregated society, and I have to say -starting with Sesame Street and continuing with the good ‘ol 70s and 80s sitcoms -TV did me a favor in that way. I don’t think television is great when consumed by anyone, especially kids and youth, in large quantities, but it really helped plant the idea in my head that people are people and it’s interesting to get to know lots of different kinds of them.

deidre_NC

November 5th, 2009
8:44 am

my first child watched ss a lot..none of my kids have been much on tv..they watch it when theres nothing else to do. for some reason this reminded me of the sid and marty croft things at the omni..does anyone remember that?

Steph

November 5th, 2009
8:44 am

Sesame Street is the same age I am. I totally relate to the whole 4 channels thing – I lived on the east coast also, but in the Boston area. We watched Sesame Street. Mr. Rogers, Captain Kangaroo, Zoom, and the Electric Company. The repetition elements really helped reinforce things like numbers and letters. I remember being so proud of myself when I could figure out the letters of the day the show was “sponsored by”.

Of course I had my favorite characters, Ernie, Cookie Monster, and the Count, and the ones who I thought were just too sappy, like Big Bird and Bert. But that is part of the beauty of the show…there’s always people in life you connect more with, but they all are important parts of the community.

The “newer” programming, ie. anything that came out after 1980, doesn’t seem to have the depth of Sesame Street. I’m probably biased, but I think kids would be better off watching SS than anything else out there.

Ursula

November 5th, 2009
8:51 am

Breakfast wouldn’t be breakfast if it weren’t for Sesame Street. The happy sights and sounds of this program for the past 40 years have become an indispensable part of our family routine. Children learn by repetition, so we welcome re-runs of any and all episodes, they’re just like the comfort of warm fuzzy slippers. Bring on the next 40 years!

Patricia

November 5th, 2009
8:52 am

I’m 26 and still think Sesame Street is one of the best programs out there.
It had the perfect mix of fun and education (no one explains the concept of near and far better than Grover). There were loads of different characters that are still iconic today…not to mention the many musical numbers that are practically a part of pop culture.
I moved to Canada when I was 6 yrs old and Sesame street was so fun to watch that I didn’t even realize I was learning (these days anyone who meets me can’t even guess that I’m from a foreign county since I don’t have an accent, I never even needed to enroll in ESL classes!).
Little known fact: Toronto’s Subway Chime (when the doors close and open) is the first 3 notes of the Sesame Street theme.
It’s a shame that kids are being inundated with random programs that clutter the genius that is Sesame Street. When I have kid’s I’ll be happy to sit with them and reminisce.

John Straub

November 5th, 2009
8:53 am

if kids dont like it 40 years on then its their loss im a bit older now lol and i love it even watching the old early episodes will GROUCH in his dustbin , big bird , and even the laugh a minute bert n earnie ha ha ha

Vork

November 5th, 2009
8:53 am

I think the fact that it is not even 9:00 AM yet and there are already about 80 comments on this topic…….the most of which sound like mongoloid idiots that don’t know their rear end from a hole in the ground speaks volumes about the Sesame Street audience as a whole.

uma

November 5th, 2009
8:54 am

My son aded 19 with severe learning difficulties and the only programme he loves is sesame street, though we don’t get it on TV’s now he still watches on You-tube and he loves them.My vote will br to sesame street as the best Children’s TV programme

Radha

November 5th, 2009
8:54 am

I loved Sesame Street and still do.

I’ll be turning 30 soon.

Over the years I have seen children’s programming devolve into flashy, shallow, commercial, consumer-driven materialism.

What Sesame Street carried were the sensibilities of an older age of more refined values, maturity, innocence, morality and simplicity.

The competitiveness of a flashy screen and the fresh air and sunshine outside the door is a hard choice for a kid to make.

Billions of dollars are spent to study, engineer, produce, market and monetize the fresh minds of our children by selling them on consumer culture “I want that daddy! I neeeed this!”

What this does is set the culture for our children into an ever expanding spiral of dissatisfaction with what they have, and what they expect others to deliver to them.

This pattern leads to frustration in adulthood when people don’t give you what you want, and chasing the leading edge of consumer goods destroys contentment with ourselves seeking inner fulfillment from external baubels. Not to mention it ruins the environment, polarizes the global economy, is unsustainable, and ultimately spiritually depressing.

All from who we choose to expose our children to.

What are the motives of the people who make children’s programming?

Who would you want babysitting your child?

An industrial scientist trying to figure out how to manipulate your child’s mind to crave what they want to sell?

Or another parent, who gets what you’re going through, and who shares your core values?

I believe that it’s our duty as parents to make our own entertainment for our kids.

Spend time with them, make games, dress up in costumes, play make believe, draw in the sand. What kids benefit from most is love and attention from their parents. TV jazzes them up to be dissatisfied with that.

If we choose to live a more grounded life, with less pursuit of unnecessary “necessities”, then we’ll have more time to share with our kids, who will in turn become healthy, balanced, mature and nurturing adults who can help so many people.

Sesame Street was the creation of such a person, Jim Henson, who pioneered the effort to inspire children with his gifts. Now let’s do the same with ours.

BenzMom

November 5th, 2009
8:55 am

When I was a kid, my mom was in her mid-30s and still watching Sesame Street with me. My favorite characters are the Martians (Yip Yips). How could you not love them? My hubby has an aversion to Grover – but only because his middle name is Grove and he used to get teased as a kid and called Grover. Our son Ben is too young for SS yet, but while I’m pleased it’s still on, I prefer old-school SS (show me how crayons are made and other neat clips of real-life stuff) but at the same time, I understand it’s important to remind our kids that you can’t talk to strangers (unless it’s a cop or fireman if you’re in trouble) and some of the other things that might not have been considered “way back when”. I hope I can share the history of SS and other classics with my son but like some of the other parents have said, it’s important to not camp out in front of the tv. Go outside. Read a book. Play make-believe. Have constructive play with your kids.

Bill

November 5th, 2009
8:56 am

I still love Seasame Street. It is the best! I still look out for the letter of the day! :)

Roxy

November 5th, 2009
8:59 am

yes yes yes yes yes i watched it when i was 3 and i still catch a glimpse of it now and again its truely AWSOMESSSSS

Pete_the_cookie_monster

November 5th, 2009
9:00 am

I saw big bird yesterday on google’s page, but since I saw cookie monster (my fav) I decided to click on!!! I definetly go for the educational value SS offers for my daughter! I know cable offers a good variety of choices, but frankly there is many shows now that have little to no educational value in them too! So I do carefully screen what my daughter can or can’t watch. So my daughter has to choose from what I pick for her & if the show has good message or can teach something of educational value then I will add it to the tivo for her to watch! I have seen in my lifetime parents that allow their kids to watch whatever and not really supervise! I’m sorry to say, but tv is not a replacement for a babysitter or a nanny! Many parents choose this anyway!!! Like I tell my wife… need to interact with my daughter more! Programs like SS can really help if interacting together and teach the children too! OHHHH!!! AND THANKS for reminding us about Sesame street’s anniversary! I really look forward to the new show mentioned!!! I do hope Sesame Street can live another 100 years!!! Well of course we grew out of sesame street way back when, and my daughter someday will too, but I hope someday she can use it as a tool to teach my grandchildren when she has some! (someday)

!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!HAPPY 40 YEAR ANNIVERSARY SESAME STREET!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Sell Out

November 5th, 2009
9:03 am

Sesame Street sold out a long time ago when everyone found out Snuffleupagus wasn’t Big Bird’s imaginary friend. That was probably back in the mid-80s. That moment is when Sesame Street became dead to me.

I also desperately wanted to see inside of Oscar the Grouch’s trash can. I mean, from all of the noise he made when he went inside, it sounded like he had this huge underground area with tons of treasures. I dreamt of the day we got to see inside. Did they ever do it? No. Instead, the story lines tried to show Oscar’s softer side with Slimey. I hated Slimey for that – if Oscar’s going to be a Grouch, he better live up to the name.

I also hate to admit it, but when I was young and impressionable, it was rather disturbing to hear Linda speak. I mean the sign language was okay, but I didn’t understand what was wrong.

Bert and Ernie sleeping directly on their faces because their eyes wouldn’t shut was also a troubling concept for me. Their noses got all in the way and you could pretty much always tell their eyes weren’t shut as you could still see the whites of their big eyes with their faces smashed in the bed.

Although when Ernie yanked off Bert’s nose – I lost it. Completely unexpected and awesomely funny.

johnny

November 5th, 2009
9:06 am

Seasame Street rules use to love bert and ernie, okidokie bert lol and big bird should be more kids programs like it

Keke

November 5th, 2009
9:07 am

SESAME STREET IS THE BEST EVER I GREW UP WAHCIN IT AND IF THEY WERE TO EVER CLOSE DOWN THE SHOW I WOULD BE SOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO UPSET!

Nicosmama

November 5th, 2009
9:07 am

My two year old and I watch Sesame Street together. He loves Elmo the most, of course. He has learned to count past ten and is recognizing letters, as well as learning vocabulary. He repeats what he hears and we laugh together. I love Sesame Street for still being around. Their web site is great, also, with games we can play together. Keep going Sesame Street!

Pete_the_cookie_monster

November 5th, 2009
9:07 am

BTW I LOVE COOKIES JUST LIKE COOKIE MONSTER!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Hehe!!!!!Thanks to PBS & all who brought Sesame Street to our living room’s all this time!!! Keep it Coming!!! My daughter does love elmo so… that’s why she loves watching it!!!!! THANKS!!!!!!!

Keke

November 5th, 2009
9:08 am

MY FAVORITE CHARACTER IS ELMO AND I LOVE SESAME STREET!

Keke

November 5th, 2009
9:08 am

I LOVE ELMO!

Mr Nordstrom

November 5th, 2009
9:09 am

In the 70’s the show was innocent, educational and not commercialized. The topics focused on both social and educational issue of the time. I’m not a big supporter of PC programming, or fooling children to think there is one Asian, One African, one Mexican and One White kid at all times in every class, but I get what they were after. I also have my concerns about Government run TV that promotes social issues and opinions. Does are Bert and Ernie now Gay?

The difference today is simply a matter of overwhelming our kids minds with junk stimulation.
Turn on Sponge Bob for an hour and then ask your child to watch Sesame Street.
Simpsons, South Park, or the fake world of “I’ll be the next pop star slut” Disney, once your kids brain is poisoned with this trash there is no comparison to the real world of Oatmeal Sesame street. Where you’re asking the kid to actually think.

The same issue exists with Parents allowing kids to play video games all day, or worse right before school and after all that visual and auditory stimulation they expect the kid to pay attention to Mr. HockenBore’s lecture on History?

Passive Stimulation VS Active Interaction.

julie abram

November 5th, 2009
9:10 am

my kids love the videos and dvds but why is it not on British television anymore??
All the rubbish childrens programmes that are on the wide choice of digital channels nowadays non of which are educational, at least Seasame Street teaches the basics ABC’s 123’s etc, I personally think it should make a come back even if on a digital channel.

Meg Stout

November 5th, 2009
9:12 am

I found Sesame Street to be a bit frenetic. I liked the analysis of Sesame Street in the book “Tipping Point,” cutting edge for its day. But the science of helping kids interact with TV has evolved (again, “Tipping Point” and the science behind Blues Clues).

On the other hand my autistic daughter knew her numbers and most her letters at age 3, a time when we were just helping her regain language. I thanked her school teacher, who confessed they hadn’t been teaching numbers and letters. I presume my daughter learned them from Sesame Street. So for that alone I am eternally grateful.

Dave

November 5th, 2009
9:13 am

Sezame Street RULEZ!!!

me

November 5th, 2009
9:14 am

Happy Anniversary to Sesame Street! Having had my first grandbaby 8 wks. ago, I am not, at the moment totally up on the latest and greatest kids shows. Sesame Street was always a fave with my 4 kids. I also babysat for 5 others and they loved the gang along with Mr. Rogers. (I personally loved The Electric Company, more so now that Morgan Freeman is a major star!} As the kids grew out of Sesame Street I would find myself in the room alone still watching (and staying for the entire show) as they ran off to otherwise occupy thier time. But I believe that the kid’s imaginations, social skills, learning skills, and appreciation for humor were all influenced by this great show. It was sooo much easier to watch a show WITH my kids that made learning fun and did not “dumb down” thier methods. I think the show has changed too much in trying to stay current and find it a shame. Or maybe it’s a sign of the times and has run it’s course. I hope not. Sesame Street proved that television can be a forceful learning tool as well as entertainment. As with everything, balance and moderation is the key. I hope future generations will have the opportunity to appreciate one of the hallmarks of childrens television.
Elmo is adorable, but long live Super Grover!

Leidy

November 5th, 2009
9:14 am

I lerned how to speak English with Sesame Street. I thought it was a good fun and educational program. I was almost like a good prep program while you were going to pr-k. c’mon and who desent love Elmo.. :)

Sesame Street Lovers

November 5th, 2009
9:14 am

Both my children still love Sesame street. My son (18 months)screams everytime he sees Elmo come on and my Daughter (4 yo) likes Zoey. They both love the music and my daughter gets a kick out of answering the questions the characters ask the home audience. I love it too. brings back fun memories for me. Wonderful show and educational with a twist of fun!

new mom

November 5th, 2009
9:18 am

Funny, we just sat down to watch ‘EHMO’ and it’s today’s subject here!
Our two year old loves Elmo, but also recognizes and now likes the other characters. In fact, we use it as a teaching tool: ‘what color is elmo?’ which character is blue?’ ‘what animal is that?’ ‘why is elmo sad?’ I think part of the problem is parents not watching it with the kids and helping them learn from it.
Now that being said, I will admit our little one watches more tv then I had planned, probably because I’m a bit more busy these days with a baby too. But when the show she’s watching is over, we turn the TV off and play.

Anne

November 5th, 2009
9:19 am

I’m 44 and just old enough to remember when SS first came on. I LOVED it – along with Electric Company, Mr. Rogers, Zoom, Romper Room, Captain Kangaroo and Shari Lewis’ Lamb Chop. I preferred watching SS to Speed Racer (the original cartoon) when the two shows were on simultaneously. When my own children were little, they loved SS too. I did 15 years of home day care during the time that Nick Jr. and Disney and other children’s channels were just starting. I think many of the newer shows have some educational value, but they miss the character development that their early predecessors brought to the screen.

Too much of ANY TV watching is unhealthy and should be restricted, while some experts say that children under 2 yrs of age should not watch ANY TV. Parents have to make their own choices there, but understand that the children are the ones who will have the consequences.

Sesame Street Forever!!!!!!!

Somebody

November 5th, 2009
9:19 am

Personally, as a kid, I prefered teletubbies or barney than Sesame street. I guess it’s basically because teletubbies are much more…how do you put it…let me just say that they don’t exactly talk much and as a kid, I find it hard catching up with conversations. Teletubbies are colourful too, for some reason, colourful and absurb things attract me. However as I grow older, I seem to like Sesame Street too, easpecially elmo. I don’t know why. Just so.

AB

November 5th, 2009
9:20 am

I like Sesame Street, and so does my two year old. She enjoys the learning experience, and LOVES Elmo and Big Bird. :o) I don’t know why it has to be up-to-date for a 2 year old, they don’t know and don’t care and repetition is the best form of learning for their little minds.
We limit TV very much, so really she only knows Sesame Street occasionally and Elmo’s World …
I think Sesame Street will certainly stay around after all of the “new” stuff fizzles out, I hope so at least!

Freeway J

November 5th, 2009
9:21 am

My son is 3 and just started watching it about 6 weeks ago. He loves it, we Tivo it for him.

sophia

November 5th, 2009
9:21 am

sesame street rocks
i am 12 years old
and no i do not waqtch it
BUT i do have 4 ernie teddies ( all different )
and an elmo bag which i brought of my friend
she’s had iit since she was 3
LOL.
SO YHH IT ROCKS
i lurrrve elmo and ernieeee(: which channel and what time are the new shows on xx