Atlanta ranks 31 out of 50 for working mothers

Forbes has released its list of the top 50 cities for working mothers and Atlanta ranks 31.

The list examined things like: Income, Unemployment, Living, Cost for Health Care, Pediatricians, School Quality, Per-Pupil Spending, Child care, Violent Crimes, and Property Crimes.

Heidi Brown writes in Forbes magazine:

“So while it’s safe to say that all moms want a secure and protected place for their children to live in, first-rate medical care and excellent schools, if they’re running a business or earning a paycheck, there are other important considerations.”

“The potential for a relatively high income, job opportunities and family-friend cost of living are obvious ones. But childcare is way up there too. Some big cities that seem like choice places to raise a family, such as Salt Lake City, Utah, and Orlando, Fla., offer comparatively fewer childcare options–including daycare centers and pre-K–for moms who work.”

New York was No. 1 and Austin was No. 2 on the list.

Here’s the full story.

Here’s the full list with how each city ranked in each category.

Here’s a slide show of the Top 20 with explanations by each.

What do you think of the list? Do you agree with where they ranked Atlanta? Do you agree with New York being No. 1? Do you agree with their top 20? Do you agree with the categories they used to evaluate the cities? (I particularly liked the knowing the online resources they used to evaluate these items. I will be bookmarking for my reference later if we ever have to move!)

70 comments Add your comment

fk

August 8th, 2009
4:29 pm

DB: Hon? No, the debate is convenience, accessibility, culture and safety regarding the reason NYC is ranked #1 for working mothers, and why Atlanta is ranked where it is. Not quite sure if you get the fact that Manhattan is only a part of NYC. Actually, NYC and Atlanta are not comparable to each other. They are totally different, and different is good. What is being compared is the “desirable-ness” of each city on the list to the working mother. Atlanta officials need to wake up and pay attention.

My first job in mortgage banking dealt with FNMA, FHLMC, VA & SONYMA loans. After getting my feet wet, I went on to become the Operations Manager for the NY office of a $275M (that was a lot of $$ back in the 80s) indirect mortgage banking program for a major, but conservative, national lender. (We were the ones who funded the jumbo loans, and bought and sold them in the secondary market, no originations). Although I was responsible for production, i.e., reviewers getting the loans into underwriting, I had authority to review AND sign off on (underwrite) loans to a certain amount…unheard of back then. BTW, we had an all female office and I’m fairly certain we were the highest performing group in the company, at the time. However, they could not pay me enough, or offer enough PTO, to keep me when I realized I was pregnant. I was an officer of the bank, it was a great job, but I wanted to stay home and raise my baby. At the same time, my husband was transferred. It could not have worked out better for us.

DB

August 8th, 2009
5:43 pm

fk – YES, I am well aware that Manhattan is only one borough of NYC, but frankly, I’ve never been moved to spend a week’s vacation in Brooklyn, Queens, Staten Island or the Bronx. I learned that in U.S. geography in 5th grade, and as far as I know, nothing’s changed much in the last 45 years in that regard, except the addition of quite a few more area codes. In fact, one could make the argument that when I moved to Miami, I was actually moving to the “sixth borough”, as it was often laughingly called, due to the influx of New Yorkers trying to thaw out in the winter months!

It sounds like we have very similar mortgage careers — my sign-off authority in the mid-80’s was $5 million, which was needed to cover those mansions in Palm Beach and private estates on Star Island in Miami. As the EVP for mortgage policy/procedure, I set interest rates for the bank and its 80+ branches each day (in the time of teletypes and “group faxes”), and I can tell you now, I got mighty tired of living and dying by the .125th of a point! I could always tell if the rates had spiked when I walked into my office in the morning, and my assistant had a Diet Coke waiting for me on the desk next to the print-outs of the secondary market rates. Six hours after my emergency C-section with my first child, my boss had a call put thru to my room to discuss the spread was on a certain class of loans. I was a bit hazy from the anesthesia, but gave him my opinion, and reminded him that my assistant had everything in “The Notebook” I had been compiling for the last six months. Four more phone calls later, my husband disconnected the phone, and put the switchboard on notice that no further calls would be accepted until 5 pm! It made it very easy to decide to dispense with the nanny we had hired and become a stay-at-home mom. :-) I always loved underwriting, but I don’t think I’d enjoy it as much today, with the slavish adherence to credit scores, etc.

fk

August 8th, 2009
7:35 pm

No one is telling you to vacation in any of the other four boroughs; the point is that NYC is a lot bigger than just Manhattan and affords many things to many people. Your attempt at humor and sarcasm is making you look less intelligent than I am sure you are. If you had ever ventured outside of Manhattan, you might find that there is a whole other world out there, still part of NYC, that makes it the great city it is. Oh, but you know it all already, you learned it in the 5th grade. Manhattan is the biggest tourist trap in the world. So, you venture away from the ebb and flow of midtown a few blocks, and that makes you a know-it-all regarding NYC. Right.

DB

August 8th, 2009
9:35 pm

fk . . . why are you so angry? It’s just my opinion! You’re the one that set out to “correct” my views by informing me that there are five boroughs in NYC (which, if you think about it, is pretty darn condescending) and extolling the virtues of country houses in Connecticut, and now you’re angry because I choose to disagree that NYC is the greatest place to raise kids? I have good friends that lived in Brooklyn and Queens when we lived in Connecticut. The friends in Queens had small children, and talked of nothing but moving to Chatham, NJ, to “get out” of NY. The friend in Brooklyn moved to Westchester when they discovered she was pregnant. Etc. Connecticut and NJ are full of people who raced out of the city when they started families, and who apparently agreed with me that it wasn’t their cup of tea.

I love NYC, I loved living in the area, and I visit every opportunity I get. That doesn’t mean that I’d want to raise a family there — but again — JUST MY OPINION. Obviously, many families enjoy it and make it work, but for ME, no, thank you. That doesn’t make me ignorant or sarcastic.

nurse&mother

August 8th, 2009
10:19 pm

Wow, where was I when these discussions took place??

Grammar Police and others -please get a life. No one likes a smart a$$. While I tend to agree that more and more folks misuse the English language, the comments were a bit mean spirited. I try to use English properly. However, I am not perfect either.

Back to the topic…. I wouldn’t want to raise children in Atlanta OR New York. I visited NYC ONCE. While it was an interesting and enlightening experience, I was glad to get home. It was a bit depressing. My favorite place was Central Park.

I live about 25 minutes from Chattanooga. While there is a lot of industry in my town (not so pretty), we are very central to a metropolitan city as well as some nice scenery/mountains. In other words, we have the best of both worlds.

fk

August 9th, 2009
12:31 am

Okay, DB, relax. I did not call anyone, “hon.” I am not using exclamation points. I’m just expressing a different point of view and questioning the basis of yours. Why is it that when anyone poses a differing opinion than that of a regular on this blog, or questions the basis of their opinions, the regulars always claim the other is suffering some sort of emotional issue? Debating is not the same as arguing. Arguing is emotional. I only wish I knew how to italicize my words on this thing.

If I really felt NYC was the best place for me to raise kids, I would be there. City life was not appealing to us when we were younger, but we are seriously contemplating selling our home in a few years. We’ll get a small place inside the perimeter and a house in the country, or closer to the beach.

I do see why NYC is #1 on this particular list, and my opinion is not based on a few blocks of Manhattan, but the city as a whole. And, I see why Atlanta is where it is. I don’t understand the surprise there. These are the only two metropolitan areas in which I’ve lived and worked, so I don’t have any opinions about the other 48 cities on the list. I’ve been to a number of them, but never spent any real time there to form an opinion one way or the other.

DB

August 9th, 2009
9:02 am

fk – I call my daughter “hon”, so no insult intended, there :-) Short for “honey”, of course, and a good ol’ fashioned Southern insertion into a conversation that is meant to convey, if not affection, then at least a measure of “like” — because, with very few occasional exceptions, I enjoy everyone’s posts here, including yours. I was trying to lighten the tone, and if I inadvertently offended you, I’m sorry. I think that the thing that set me aback was when you appeared to presume that I only knew the area from a tourist standpoint, and continued to dismiss my opinion even after I had tried to make it clear that it was a result of living and working in the area. Ironically, I spent the first 25 years of my life in one of the top 15 cities on the list — and I disagree with the placement for THAT one, too, especially school quality. Both my husband and I agree that it is one of the more boring cities on the face of the earth, and it’s only its location near more interesting things (and even those are two hours away in any direction) that give it any cachet at all. (But then again, Forbes put a lot of weight on the “Great Schools” website as a primary evaluator, and it seems that many of the opinions in “Great Schools” are written either by the PTA president, the principal or teachers, or a few disgruntled parents — not much in between from everyday parents.) I’ve lived in five of the 50 areas for at least two years or more — but not all of them as a mother, so my perspective probably differed.

New York being what it is, everyone has their own conception of New York City — most people have a very skewed and one-dimensional idea, from watching too many “Sex In The City” reruns, too many “Law & Order” reruns, and too many “Godfather” movies,sprinkled with a few “The Devil Wears Prada”’s :-) My husband hates the crowding and the large pockets of urban blights with a passion. I love it, and absorb the energy and variety.

Italics: Type the following string of characters(HTML code) before a word, with no spaces: . After the word, type this string of characters, again without the spaces: . You can substitute the letter “b” for “i”, if you want to make it bold.

DB

August 9th, 2009
9:08 am

Hmm. That HTML lesson didn’t work the way it was supposed to. Let’s try it this way: To turn on an HTML code such as an italic or bold, you use the “less than” sign . After you type the word you are coding, you type the same “less than” sign, but turn OFF the coding by typing a slash (/), followed by the same letter, followed by a “greater than” sign. (I guess this HTML engine isn’t as sensitive to spaces as some others!) italic. bold

DB

August 9th, 2009
9:09 am

…and it doesn’t like the “bold” code. Bah.

fk

August 9th, 2009
10:33 am

<Thanks DB!</, but as with every lesson involving technology and me, I can almost guarantee that I am missing something…and I’m thinking it has to do with the turning off of the coding or everything.

fk

August 9th, 2009
10:33 am

I was right.

nurse&mother

August 9th, 2009
2:10 pm

Sorry, fk, but you asked “Why is it that when anyone poses a differing opinion than that of a regular on this blog, or questions the basis of their opinions…” Isn’t this exactly what you did by continuing to question DB? Questioning is one thing (hounding is another).

nurse&mother

August 9th, 2009
2:12 pm

It’s ok to have a different opinion from another. This world would be one big boring place if we all liked houses with white picket fences.
:-D

fk

August 9th, 2009
4:31 pm

n&m: It’s a finished issue. Go back and read all of the posts completely and you’ll find the answer to your 2:10 post. Debating a point or issue is not arguing or hounding. Arguing is emotional; I wasn’t. I respect DB, I have heeded advice from her over the last year or two. She has ventured into waters that are new to me and I have considered her experiences regarding some decisions concerning my teenager, as she had already been there and done that.

You’re absolutely right, it’s okay to have a differing opinions. That’s what makes the world go round.

DB

August 9th, 2009
4:48 pm

Dammit, the HTML code is SOOO easy, and I’m making it SOOO friggin’ hard by screwing up the directions . . . .!

“i” means italic

So, to turn on the code, type the following three characters:

Type

Everything you type after that will be italic, UNTIL you turn the code off by typing the following four characters:

Type

Thus endeth the lesson . . . :-)

DB

August 9th, 2009
4:49 pm

ARGH!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! NEVER MIND!!!!!! hehehe! The HTML engine on this blog is incredibly sensitive!

nurse&mother

August 9th, 2009
7:57 pm

fk, it appeared to me that you kept hammering your opinions, but I suppose that is how things can be misconstrued. I hope you have a good evening.

nurse&mother

August 9th, 2009
7:58 pm

fk, I meant to say that what one says and how another interprets that communication can be two different messages. Peace out.

motherjanegoose

August 10th, 2009
8:39 am

nurse and mother…thanks…you have made excellent points.

I am typically opinionated in my areas of expertise…I know this to be true. There ARE topics that I do not post on…I know nothing about them.

I am going to add your:

what one says and how another interprets that communication can be two different messages.

Thanks for sharing. It befuddles me that my clients are thrilled with my practical ideas and some on this blog act like I am nuts!

This came in today from Wyoming:
“I saw you in class, and as the keynote speaker, what a NEAT and informative time we had!”

Fortunately, those who pay me are interested in what I have to say and I guess I will just stick with that. No one on this blog is paying to hear my ideas…many are NOT at all interested in them… and if they think I am nuts… so be it.

We watch our neighbor’s son and took him to the chiropractor with us several times, this summer. She asked me, …does his mom KNOW how lucky he is to be with you and your daughter? Every day is an educational experience….

Those who KNOW me may be able to understand more about me.

For the record, I always appreciate your medical perspective and respect your opinion as this is something I know little about. Many of the regulars here have a wide spectrum of expertise, that can be helpful to the rest of us. It is also refreshing when a new poster joins us and shares something that will pique our interest.

Some understand this concept and some do not.

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