Pick next year’s teacher — How much say do you get?

We have three days of school left this year, and my kids already know who their teachers will be for next year. In fact, they are meeting them at school today.

I love how parents at our public elementary school have so much input into which teachers their children will have next year. We are not allowed to request a specific teacher, but our principal really makes an effort to match the personality and learning style of each student with a teacher.

Here’s the process (partially pulled from our principal’s letter that was sent home explaining):

1. Parents fill out a form toward the end of the year answering questions about the best learning environment for your child, any concerns that you have about your child and any children you do not want in your child’s class. This form is taken very seriously.

2. Then they talk to each classroom teacher about what they feel like the child needs from a teacher and a class – ie. Firm teacher, lots of choices, work sheets VS free form work.

3. Each grade level develops a preliminary list based on child’s academic, social and special needs.

4. Next administrators review the groupings and assign teachers based on student needs and teacher strengths.

5. The special area teachers and special education staff review the list and make recommendations.

6. Finally the grade level teachers reconvene to review the classes to verify optimal placement.

And I’m pretty sure our principal wrote in another letter that she personally reviews each class to make sure she agrees with all the placements. This whole process generally takes two months!

I feel like the teachers’ opinion and the parents’ opinions are respected, and the school is actually concerned with finding a good fit for the year.

I also like that we find out who we’re going to have before school gets out. The idea is that the kids don’t have to spend the summer stressing about who they are going to have. Also some teachers send home reading lists for the kids to work on during the summer.

On the other side of that, I know some teachers that don’t like the kids finding out early -

“I don’t need moms talking about me at the pool all summer,” says one veteran teacher I know.

So, how much input do parents get at your school into choosing next year’s teachers? Do you feel like you are listened to? Do you feel like they are really trying to find the best teacher and best learning environment for your child or just running through a computer and where they land is where they land?

Do you find out before school gets out like we do? If not when do you learn who your child’s teacher will be? Is it stressful to find out later rather than sooner

If you’re a teacher, do you like for parents to know ahead of time or do they pester you when they know?

In a related story, you should know: A new Georgia law will give more parents the power to pick their children’s schools. A controversial bill signed recently by Gov. Sonny Perdue gives parents the ability to cross neighborhood boundaries and select almost any campus in their district — the closest ones, the ones with the best SAT scores, sports teams, etc. As long as there is room to teach the new students. Check out the full story.

54 comments Add your comment

DB

May 18th, 2009
12:36 am

At our private school, if we had concerns, I certainly felt that they were taken into consideration. However, I never felt that there was any strong reasons, other than just personal rapport, to request specific teachers, so I never did. Most grades in the lower school taught by teams, so while my child might have one teacher for reading, they might have another for math, and yet another for science, etc., grouped by ability.

As far as requesting NOT to have a certain child in your child’s class — hmm. What happens if EVERYONE dislikes a certain child? Just curious how they rationalize the placement of the class bully . . . ?

For the first three years, we found out the primary teacher on the first day off school, when we went to school and the class list was posted on the classroom door. They later switched to the teacher calling and introducing themselves about a week before school started, and mailing a short, cheerful note to the child. While I can see where some kids might spend the summer obsessing over which teacher they may get, I would think that it would cut both ways — if for some reason you aren’t thrilled with your teacher, do you spend the whole summer dreading the next school year?

Re: the school choice bill. I don’t see this as being a huge help. On paper, yeah, sure, it sounds good — but as the administration at Walton pointed out, the really good, desirable schools are already at capacity, if not beyond (see the trailers?) So, if they don’t have extra spaces, I can see it getting ugly when upset parents aren’t allowed the “freedom” to move their children “at will.” It’s going to play havoc with sports team recruiting — can’t you just see schools falling all over themselves luring talented athletes? For the hot football or basketball prospect, there will always be a space (she says, cynically) Only in Georgia . . . sigh.

motherjanegoose

May 18th, 2009
6:49 am

This must be something new, is it in all Gwinnett county schools ( where Theresa and I live)?

I requested a teacher ONE time, this was because my son had her first and she was at our daughter’s school when she was the same age…we loved her.

I wrote the principal a letter and told her that, while I understood it if we could not have her for our daughter’s teacher, we would love to have our daughter in her class…if possible. She did get her and we were thrilled.
I also pulled my son out of ONE class in H.S. and that teacher is no longer around…wonder why ( not due to me LOL).

I had MANY parents tell me that they were requesting me ( when I taught ) but obviously you cannot put all children in one class, nor would I want that many…

Different personalities work better with different teachers and please KNOW that if your child has a reputation, the word is out. I feel, as the teaching staff probably does, that you would need a firm teacher and not someone who is all light and fluffy…he/she probably does not want your child either…just speaking the truth.

Kind of like having a rambunctious child over to play after school every day…that child may need to go home with someone else too.

Desirable schools are due to parents who have children who are desirable ( I am not talking about looks or money here) . If you want to be in those schools, you move there, roll up your sleeves and pitch in. Schools are only as good as the parents who are committed to their children’s education. I know it is not fair that some cannot afford to live in high end neighborhoods, including me, BUT if education is your goal, then you move to the best area you can afford!

DB…thanks for your comments on my last post ( yesterday) on pet peeves. Perhaps I will go to Alaska alone.
My daughter and I love to travel together but my husband not so much as he does not like to get out of his element and is not too keen on trying new things in the area where we are visiting. Our son lives out of the house but will go to the beach with us this summer. I enjoy traveling because I learn so many new things that I would not know if I stayed in GA.

I am interested in what others may think too….thanks to anyone else who wants to give me input!

motherjanegoose

May 18th, 2009
6:53 am

Theresa…spam check…my comment is missing…maybe it is just me or are others lost too?
6:50 a.m. Monday…if that helps.

Photius

May 18th, 2009
8:21 am

This is liberalism and idiotic. The child goes to class in order to learn – not re-shape the educational system around the child’s needs. This is from the same generation of parents who no longer allow little league to keep score so nobody’s feelings get hurt for losing…..

Theresa Walsh Giarrusso

May 18th, 2009
8:27 am

Hey MJG — I think it keeps spamming the first entry because it’s usually longer than your other ones. I think you should post it parts for the first one. Just basically cut your post in half, post the first part and then the second. And I think that will fix it. Let’s at least try one day and see what it does. I know that is frustrating when it just disappears!!!

Theresa Walsh Giarrusso

May 18th, 2009
8:33 am

Photius — think about two bosses — one that you meshed with and one that you didn’t. Didn’t you enjoy working more under the boss that got you and understood and appreciated how you worked and how your mind worked? I had two bosses within a four month time period when I first started at the paper. The first boss would have told you I was the worst employee in the world — the second boss would have said I was the best — I didn’t change what I was doing, it was that the second boss got me and felt secure enough just to let me work without messing with me. He was happy I was an independent worker whereas the first boss was threatened by it. Teachers are just like bosses. It’s better to try and get one you can work well with — it’s not always going to happen, but I appreciate when it does!

DB

May 18th, 2009
8:54 am

Theresa: Mine popped up immediately, so I don’t think it was length, because I’m at least as wordy at MJG! Something is screwy with the AJC servers, for sure. I am always getting “wait listed” over at the Get Schooled — it eventually shows up, but seldom within a couple of hours of when I input it.

alishasue

May 18th, 2009
8:54 am

I’m in my late 30’s so things have obviously changed since I was in school. I have a 3-month old and am new to the parent thing and learning a lot. I can definitely see both sides but feel that schools today don’t teach children about the real world. In elementary school it may be important to put a child with a teacher that is a better fit but after that you get who you are dealt. You don’t get to choose your boss and you need to learn to work with all kinds of people not just the ones you like. I had a co-worker in her early 20’s who got into a lot of trouble with our boss a few years ago and his main complaint was that each new generation feels more and more of a sense of entitlement. They are very vocal and seem to not have a lot of respect for their elders because they are used to being catered to (our boss was not old…in his mid-40’s). I think you should only get to choose your teacher in an extreme situation. I had teachers in school that didn’t like me and some that loved me. If you have a child that excels in certain areas isn’t that what magnet (sp?) schools are for? You won’t always get along with everyone, shouldn’t kids learn that as early as they can?

Ummm…do they seriously not keep score in little league anymore??

motherjanegoose

May 18th, 2009
8:55 am

fyi…regarding fair and neighborhoods on my previous post, I know that life is not fair and am not jealous about neighborhoods. If I did have a house with 6 bedrooms and 4 baths, I would just have to clean it myself and do NOT want to!
Now, some people do TRY to live in neighborhoods that they cannot afford and we know what is going on with that now. I am gleeful that we have about 8 years left on the mortgage we can afford….yippee!!!

Michelle

May 18th, 2009
9:16 am

At my son’s school, it is similar. The parents write down what works well for thier child and what does not. We also put any special “things” that work well for our children. For example, my son does NOT do well with change! So, when they have frequent substitutes or student teachers, this is very difficult for him. He always feels he has to “challenge” new authority or only has to listen to his primary teacher.

He is finally finishing Kindergarten this week…whew! It has been rough! I am hoping that the first grade will bring much more continuity!

I can remember growing up and hearing about the “good” teachers and the “bad” ones. It’s funny though, because sometimes you get into those classes and the teacher is NOTHING like you anticipated! I really don’t care WHO my son get into class with. I don’t really know anything about any of the teachers since I didn’t grow up in GA!

I just hope they read what I put on his forms! I don’t think they did that with him going into Kindergarten! I loved his teacher! She is great, but I don’t think she was a good fit for my guy! Despite all the “drama” he still learned A LOT! That speaks definitions for the teacher!

DB

May 18th, 2009
9:22 am

Not every house in great school districts have six bedrooms! It’s interesting to see the effect of school strength on housing desirability, though. I work a lot with statistics, and some of housing anomolies are fascinating. There is a neighborhood in North Fulton that sits on the line between DeKalb and Fulton. The DeKalb school is among the best in the state (has been ranked #1 in the past few years, always in the top 20.) The Fulton school — not so strong, due to a large transient community that’s also zoned for that area. The housing in the neighborhood is almost identical in style, lot size and age, but housing on the DeKalb side of the neighborhood will sell very quickly, even in this markeet. Housing on the Fulton side will languish for months.

Interestingly, there are a lot of McMansions being built on the Fulton side, which they can’t sell at a bake sale. If they had just built those houses a couple of blocks over, in DeKalb . . .

sd

May 18th, 2009
9:28 am

I don’t have any input into my son’s teacher for next year.

As far as those concerned about little league score keeping; I am a tee ball coach and while we don’t keep an official score in the instructional leagues (4,5, and 6 year olds) the kids and coaches all know who wins and loses.

While I initially had some issues with the lack of an official score at first, I considered the end results and changed my mind. Whatever we are doing now is better than 25 years ago. I know that simply by the quality of ball players these leagues are turning out.

Your typical allstar 12 year old team today from any local league could compete with the little league world champs from 1985.

b

May 18th, 2009
9:57 am

When my kids were in elementary school we were allowed to write a letter expressing the type of teacher that we thought would be best for our child, but we could not ask for a specific teacher. I never wrote the letter as I am of the opinion that you need to learn how to work with all different types of people and not just the ones you “click” with. When you go to middle and high school there is not such mechanism for choosing a teacher, therefore why do it in elementary?

Well, that worked fine for my oldest, but with my youngest it has been a different story. As a child with learning disabilities, who learns in a different manner than most kids, I have worked with the administration to find teachers that can accept and work with these differences. We changed to a private school for middle school after many meetings with the public school counselors and realizing he was going to be put into a category and everyone would “hope for the best”. The private school has worked “with” us not “against” us and other than one teacher we have been very satisfied. Even that one teacher really tried, but admitted that a change would be best at the semester and the change was made.

High school looms in the fall and while no specific teacher will be requested, placement is based on what the middle school recommends and I have already had several conversations about the best learning environment.

I would not have done any of this for my oldest; she had no learning disabilities and therefore did not need any special consideration. I really wanted to give her the experience of learning how to adjust to different teaching styles, etc., but for my youngest I have had to adjust a lot of my thinking in order to help him succeed. Now that he is in high school, I don’t think I will be as involved in these types of choices….college is just around the corner, and I am not going with him to help with professor choices!

motherjanegoose

May 18th, 2009
9:59 am

DB…interesting comments. I love statistics.

I am mostly much happy with our schools …they maintain good scores on
great schools.net too! We are in a 4 bdr with 2 1/2 baths and I can barely keep it up…haha.

Many do not understand that investing in the neighborhood schools is an investment in their back pocket, when it comes to real estate. I admire grandparents who work in schools….awesome!

Pride in your family, school and neighborhood go hand in hand. Transient families do not typically get involved in their local schools and this is why the rest of us protest when the apartments go up…I am sure you have some statistics for that too. What are the school trends in areas where most of children come from apartments?

nurse&mother

May 18th, 2009
10:04 am

We were never allowed to request a teacher in elementary school. We were allowed to strike a teacher. Yes, I did strike a couple of teachers while my daughter was in elementary school. I was not looking at personality as much as I was looking at teaching styles and who did not have high standards.

MGJ- I need to apologise to you. On our discussion of elective c/s, I was guilty of skimming the posts and didn’t properly read your post where you talked about your vbac. I misunderstood and thought that you were complaining about a traumatic birth injury after a vaginal delivery. I somehow misread the part about your first c/s. Because the story I was sharing had to do with a patient who had delivered vaginally then wanted an elective c/s for convenience, I thought your first delivery was also a vag delivery. Anyway, my apology is a few days overdue. Once again, I am very sorry. In my field, I certainly hear lots of complaints from those who expect everything to be perfect. Unfortunately all deliveries are not perfect, but you certainly have a right to complain in your situation.

motherjanegoose

May 18th, 2009
10:31 am

thx for the apology …n&m…NO problem.

CPT

May 18th, 2009
10:33 am

DB – I know exactly what neighborhood you are talking about. When we were looking for a house we found many good homes in our price range in the Fulton side of that subdivision – but decided not to make an offer because of the school. We held our for a house in the Dekalb side (and paid more for it too). We have no regrets.

Joyce

May 18th, 2009
10:53 am

At my son’s school, also in Gwinnett, we’ve never been offered the opportunity for input about teacher assignments. I think that parental input might be a good thing prior to kindergarten, when everyone is an unknown quantity. Even then, only as one factor of many that are taken into consideration. After that, I’m fine with a roll of the dice. As MJG mentioned, kids become known among a school’s faculty, especially if they have a “rep”, so teachers may already be doing some selecting, if they’re able. When I was teaching high school, teachers didn’t have input, but sometimes we would get a heads-up on some kids from previous teachers. I know that I usually took this info with a grain of salt, since my experience with a child wasn’t necessarily going to translate to another teacher’s or vice versa. Several times I was warned about “rowdy” types who turned out to work fine with me, for whatever reason.

Theresa Walsh Giarrusso

May 18th, 2009
11:16 am

For those of you working on graduation parties here are some ideas for buffets: http://www.momswhothink.com/easy-recipes/buffet-recipes.html

Photius

May 18th, 2009
12:29 pm

Answering questions on a form to “match” the child’s attributes with the appropriate teacher is another form of parents trying to protect their children from live, and life is not fair. As Theresea raised her point, your child will encounter a boss where there is friction – the same applies to your child in school. Let your child learn about how to overcome struggles.

Remember Field Day? It use to focus on sports but now they have new categories of competition for the couch potato kids which are non-atheletic. Take a good look in the mirror people of how soft you are raising these kids. The real world is going to chew them up down the road…

Theresa Walsh Giarrusso

May 18th, 2009
12:34 pm

Guys – we have a reporter looks for parents leaving a kid home alone all or most of the summer, preferably for the first time. (Or, if they’ve got a great story to share from a recent summer, those are always welcome, too.) You can reach Jamie at jgumbrecht@ajc.com or 404-526-2202.

Denise

May 18th, 2009
12:43 pm

I don’t understand this. I’m not a parent and this was not a concept when I started school in the 70s but I think this can turn out bad. If I was a teacher, I’d wonder how the parents I had no experience with got the information to “strike” or “check” me. Word of mouth…? I understand special needs children needing a certain kind of environment to learn and excel so I have no issue with making requests in those cases. But for other kids…get what you get and work with it. Maybe I’ll change my tune once I get a little Denise or Dennis but I think the school should spend more time ensuring that the students are taught what they need to know and less trying to accommodate parents.

The Truth

May 18th, 2009
12:46 pm

Re: the new state law

In Atlanta Public Schools, you could always send your child to another school as long as that school had poor academics, a poor discipline record, and/or low-income children making up the majority of the students. They always have plenty of space and the doors are wide open! The real challenge has always been to get your talented, high-achieving student into an environment where they will be challenged academically, feel safe, and surrounded by highly motivated peers. The new law will not circumvent the old way of transferring students to better schools – if your child can play ball or you know someone of influence, you’ve got a great chance of getting them into a better school. If you have a talented and gifted child, start planning your move to the suburbs or moving into an apartment to pay for private school because you will get no relief under the new state law.

Texas Pete

May 18th, 2009
12:46 pm

Since my wife travels a lot for work, I try to get my children into the hottest looking teachers room. Then I spend as much time as possible to hook up with them on the side. Works sometimes fails sometimes, but the pursuit is an excellent diversion for me.

catlady

May 18th, 2009
1:27 pm

I can’t believe they would ask parents what kids they didn’t want in their child’s room! I really cannot believe that would be looked upon well by the legal folks!

And, of course, it is a subtle way to keep “those kids” away from “my kids.”

Cammi317

May 18th, 2009
1:30 pm

I have never had any input regarding what teacher my daughter gets.

RE: “Guys – we have a reporter looks for parents leaving a kid home alone all or most of the summer, preferably for the first time.” I don’t foresee being comfortable doing that anytime soon. My daughter is 11and I don’t know what I am going to do in a couple of years when she is too old for camp. I am the oldest of six, so there was no home alone. She is my only child and just the thought is panicking me.

motherjanegoose

May 18th, 2009
1:41 pm

texas pete…when our son was in 2nd grade…we walked into the classroom and I thought I would die…a BEACH BABE. Needless to say, she was a GREAT teacher and he had a super year. Who woulda thunk it LOL. I am fairly sure that my husband did not request her as we were both surprised.

Teacher, Too

May 18th, 2009
1:58 pm

Parents getting to decide who they don’t want their child around? Huh? Unless it’s a severe bullying problem that is well-documented, then un-uhh.

One thing I’ve noticed in talking with parents is that it’s always other kids who are the “bad” influence. Sometimes, your kid is the “bad” one. But, who wants to admit it?

This happened this year with one of my students. The child’s mother was all about the other kids’ bad influence. Ummm, her child was one of the main problems. How about his influence over the other kids?

We all have to learn how to get along with, or at least tolerate, people. We don’t have to like them. And, hopefully, if you’ve done your job as a parent, those “bad” kids won’t have any undue influence over how your child behaves. Of course, kids do have a mind of their own, and sometimes, even if you’re the best parent in the entire world, your kid might go down the wrong path.

It happened to my parents…one kid who is a teacher, stable, works hard, and is ethical, and one kid who made a ton of mistakes, went the wrong road to the path of addiction. As a result, she lost one of her children, her home, her car, and her career due to drug additcion (and she blames everyone except herself).

The Truth 2

May 18th, 2009
1:58 pm

The Truth, I am a graduate of Atlanta Public Schools and I went to schools on the northside of town. It’s a shame if things are this way now, but they haven’t always been. BTW, I’m 35.

Stacey

May 18th, 2009
2:06 pm

We aren’t given any say in the classroom assignments at my son’s school. We find out who the new teacher is at open house (the week before school starts). I’m sure if I had a problem with a particular teacher I could get him moved but fortunately I haven’t needed nor wanted to do that. There are a couple of students that I would request to have him separated from if given a choice. These kids aren’t bullies but rather his best friends who he spends more time playing with than paying attention in class. If they end up in the same class again next year I will ask the teacher not to sit my son near either of them.

Stacey

May 18th, 2009
2:34 pm

Cammi317…Check out the Boys & Girls Club. My county has the traditional day camp set up for 6-12 and a separate program for 13-17. This will be my son is only 8 and this will be his first year going there for the summer though he attended Christmas Break & Spring Break. I think the teen program might be new judging by the posters the have hanging up at the center.

Teacher, Too…My issue with the kids I want my son separated from (if I had the choice) is that they are a bad influence on each other. Individually, they are all fine but when you get them together they talk, play and draw pictures instead of getting their work done. I don’t mind them playing together after school and on the weekend but I honestly hope they do not end up in class together next year.

Kathy

May 18th, 2009
2:40 pm

The two Gwinnett schools that I taught at did not give parents any say in placement. (And we never had many parents involved in anything anyway)The only parents who got any say were the teachers who had kids at the school. They got to pick their child’s teacher for the next year. The teachers were the ones who initially made the class lists and we were always considerate of the needs of children. We would not put a sensitive child with a very stern teacher, etc. We were also aware of children who did not need to be together in the next class (behavior, bully, friendship issues, etc.) I don’t necessarily agree with letting parents give their input. Too many cooks stirring the pot if you know what I mean. BTW….some children weren’t the only ones with reputations. Sometimes the parents had worse reps than their children!

DB

May 18th, 2009
2:42 pm

Re: little league score. Ha! If you don’t think the kids aren’t keeping score, you’re a bit naive! My 20 year old son can STILL tell you the score of a supposedly “scoreless” church-league soccer game when he was 5 — between the Orange team and their arch-nemesis, the Green team. The adults may lull themselves into thinking that no one cares about the score — but the kids aren’t discussing their kicking technique over the apres-game ice cream!

Sandra

May 18th, 2009
2:55 pm

Parents, quit trying to engineer your child’s life. You cannot wrap your child in a coccoon. Why should anyone be allowed to choose their child’s teacher–especially in public school? Do the teachers get to choose the students they want or, rather, the parents they are willing to put up with? How would you like to be the parent of the child that other parents do not want around their child?

Theresa Walsh Giarrusso

May 18th, 2009
3:13 pm

hey Photius – i believe when they get to middle school and high school it is a computer placing just like college – so they’ll get theirs soon enough — let’s get them excited about learning and help them figure out how they work best before they’re thrown out to sink or swim!

Just a teacher

May 18th, 2009
3:21 pm

I am very concerned with this new law. I see it as an attempt to segregate our schools. What is to stop a parent from placing his or her child in another school simply because he or she doesn’t like the racial mix at that child’s school? The federal government monitors Georgia’s schools because of our state’s segregationist history. I don’t think this law will stand up in a legal battle.

Justmy2cents

May 18th, 2009
4:49 pm

I work for Cobb County schools, and have two kids in the system. As a parent, I can write a letter to request a “type” of teacher; as an employee I am allowed to request a teacher by name. Unfortunately, at the school my children go to, the principal and AP don’t care either way and disregard parental/employee concerns. There are some teachers I would ask do NOT teach my child, based on my observations of their teaching style/classroom control. For next year, I have made no requests, and we will just see how it goes.

deidre_NC

May 18th, 2009
11:01 pm

once a kid is out of kindegarten i think they need to take what they get. people are making it so easy for kids to not ever face reality–not until reality kicks them in the butt and they have no preparation for it. kids need to realize that everyone in the world isnt gonna love them, and that everyone doesnt think they are great. i always made sure my kids know i think they are great-and that not everyone would. just as they dont think everyone is great. my kids have had teachers they loved to death and some they hated. and some i have not liked very well either. but they had to learn to deal with it. now if a teacher isnt teaching them the proper things according to the subject-that is a different matter. they are in school to learn and hopefully end up as an adult that can make it in the world–the world is not a always a nice place and they need to learn that as soon as possible and to learn how to live peacefully and contentedly anyway. they will never learn these things if they arent allowed to.

soccer mom

May 19th, 2009
8:17 am

Class placement based on personality/needs/strengths match between student and teacher in elementary school is great. Those concerned by sheltering kids from the real life conflicts should keep in mind that the room teacher is only the teacher with whom the children spend most of their time at school, but that a great deal of time is spent at specials with other teachers where surely they are exposed to various types of teachers, so the cocoon doesn’t stand a chance. Remember, these are little kids who are transitioning from spending most if not all of their time with their families, to being full time away from home, and to be in the care of a teacher that is not right for them is more traumatic than it would be for an adult to have the wrong boss. As for requesting NOT to have a certain teacher, I don’t see what’s wrong with that either, especially if the parent got the info about that teacher first hand through a bad experience with an older child. It might be because that teacher is too boring, or too mean, or too good looking for having the house husband around her. Whatever the reason of whatever the request, if it works for the family and the school doesn’t have a problem accommodating, then I don’t see why not make the request or the suggestion, also just because we parents don’t pay tuition to public schools it doesn’t mean that it’s free and we shouldn’t be “picky” to get the best out of it for our kids: it is payed by our tax money. Too many teachers shouldn’t be teachers because they’re either not good at it or they don’t like it and if they keep getting on parents’ “black lists” that’s because they’ve earned the bad rep so hopefully they’ll get a clue and re-profile. Being able to request not to have your kid placed in the same class with certain others is all cool, too. As long as the school is able to handle and consider all the suggestions, the teachers’ and kids’ lives are made easier and everyone wins. As adults we can quit our jobs if we are not happy with them, or work from home, or open a business and nobody thinks that we’re wrapping ourselves in a cocoon, yet some see something wrong with providing reasonable flexibility to make the school experience more enjoyable/less stressful for little children. Gladly, not many!

motherjanegoose

May 19th, 2009
8:42 am

Teacher too…could you please break down soccer mom’s comments into PARAGRAPHS LOL and also clarify what this means: “having the house husband around her…” could that go both ways?

Would Dads nix a teacher who is too good looking…I have never heard of this.

Stacey

May 19th, 2009
9:01 am

Is anyone else having trouble getting into today’s blog?

uconn

May 19th, 2009
9:04 am

When I was in school ( a long time ago…YIKES) my parents never had the opportunity to “pick” a teacher… You just went to the next grade level in room A or room B … no distinction between the two, just that where you went in 1st grade is where you went the following years. I think that I agree with most posters… Parents are shielding their kids WAY too much… I work with a sheltered person in their early 20’s and if they don’t like something, well come watch all the foot stomping and pouting that goes on when they do not get their way.

DB

May 19th, 2009
9:09 am

MJG: I think soccermom means that a mom should be able choose to have her child placed with a less-attractive teacher to avoid having the stay-at-home dad unduly tempted. Sheesh.

motherjanegoose

May 19th, 2009
9:27 am

Thanks DB…I seriously did NOT get that at all…I must be too old/dense. I would have never even thought of it. Does this go both ways…hahaha?

I managed to post on the blog today and that is nutty if others cannot…Theresa, this new format is a bit unpredictable…

jct

May 19th, 2009
9:29 am

I can’t get into todays topic. I have nothing to add on this topic since stepson will graduate on Thursday.

Becky

May 19th, 2009
10:25 am

I can’t get into todays topic either..

MomsRule

May 19th, 2009
10:38 am

I can access today’s topic either…

MomsRule

May 19th, 2009
10:39 am

I can’t get into today’s topic either.

Joyce

May 19th, 2009
10:50 am

I can’t get into today’s topic either.

Michelle

May 19th, 2009
11:22 am

I can’t get into today’s topic either! It’s a conspiracy! :)

BlondeHoney

May 19th, 2009
11:31 am

I can’t get in either…blank screen with title wheni click on it.Help, Theresa :)

DB

May 19th, 2009
11:33 am

I used a different browser and got in fine after IE failed me. So annoying . . .

irisheyes

May 22nd, 2009
10:20 pm

We just finished our class lists today. What stress! There are so many things we look at when making the lists. We need to equalize boys and girls, make sure the racial profile is ok (we’re majority African American, so we need to make sure that we don’t have an all AA class with just one white student), make sure that you don’t have all high kids and one low one, and separate all of the behavior and parent problems. It took us two hours! Then, we had to meet again later because the admins weren’t happy about how the reading levels were spread out.
As a teacher at the school, I can specifically request a teacher. I did last year for both of my kids, but this year I didn’t make a formal request. I did go to both of their current teachers and told them who I wanted next year.

Patsy

June 2nd, 2009
9:53 pm

I am sorry, but as a teacher of 14 years, I have already gone through the interview process several times when changing schools or districts. If parents should be allowed to interview teachers, then teachers should also be allowed to interview and choose parents. After all, teachers are not children’s personal servants, as some parents seem to think they should be. I have had enough of overindulged children, who are not expected to think for themselves, and then their teachers attacked for expecting them to think for themselves. If parents want to do the thinking for their children, then they should home school!