Fifteen fateful seconds: The Bulldogs look back in anguish

The heat of the moment: Aaron Murray tells Chris Conley he should have dropped the ball. (AJC photo by Curtis Compton)

Aaron Murray and Chris Conley after the completion that wasn't supposed to be. (AJC photo by Curtis Compton)

Fifteen seconds left, eight yards from victory. We know how the epic SEC championship game played out – for late tuners-in, Alabama beat Georgia 32-28 on Dec. 1 – but what exactly went into those 15 overstuffed seconds? Why did what happened happen?

We begin at the end, or very near it. (All the voices heard below spoke at a Georgia media session this week in Athens.) An apparent clinching interception by Dee Milliner with 45 seconds remaining was overturned by video review, handing the Bulldogs a glimmer of life that would become a starburst. Quarterback Aaron Murray found tight end Arthur Lynch for 15 yards, then wide receiver Tavarres King for 23, then Lynch again for 26.

In 30 seconds the Bulldogs traveled 64 yards against the nation’s top-ranked defense. A game that had seen five lead changes was eight yards from a sixth.

Murray: “We’d gotten a little break (on the non-interception), and we’ve been a good one-minute team all year. And we about did it again.”

Lynch: “They had to be thinking, ‘It’s over, it’s over,’ (on the apparent interception) and then we hit them with two big plays – Tavarres’ catch where he took a shot and my play. They were on their heels. It was like in a boxing match: You hit them as much as you can.”

King: “It was like a movie … We marched right down the field. We thought we were going to win.”

The Georgia Dome was louder than it has been in its 20 years of operation. Murray could have spiked the ball to stop the clock after the restart and allow his team, which had no timeouts remaining, to collect itself. He looked toward the sideline and, asking for permission, made a spiking gesture. Coach Mark Richt signaled for Murray to run a play instead.

Murray: “I thought we were going to call the spike, but I don’t think it was a bad call at all by them. It was there.  It was open. We liked our matchup … We just wanted to get a quick play into the end zone. It was either going to be a touchdown or an incompletion.”

Lynch: “We’re not in the right situation to spike the ball. With a team like Alabama and a coach like Nick Saban, you don’t want to give him any (extra) chance to prepare.”

Richt: “Part of going no-huddle is when you have the defense on the run you snap the ball again. You don’t need to stop play. Play was stopped because we had a first down. With 15 seconds, strategically if you are able to call a play and it’s incomplete you have time for two more plays. You can run three plays. You want to give yourself as many opportunities as you can. If you clock the ball you probably only get two shots.”

As the Bulldogs were rushing to the line, offensive coordinator Mike Bobo, seated upstairs in the coaches’ booth, ordered a play called “Stout.” Bobo would later tell ESPN’s Mark Schlabach that if Georgia had it to do again, it would have spiked the ball. Richt insisted this week that not spiking the ball was the correct call, and as justification he referenced his teaching.

Near the end of the 2001 season, Richt’s first at Georgia, the Bulldogs faced first-and-goal from the 1 trailing Auburn 24-17 with 16 seconds remaining. Richt, then his own offensive coordinator, called a Jasper Sanks run, which was stuffed. Time expired before Georgia could manage another snap. Richt’s first words at his postgame briefing: “That was a bad one, wasn’t it?”

That offseason, Richt sought out Homer Smith, a renowned offensive coordinator who was seen as a master of clock management. Smith, who died in 2011, wasn’t an advocate of spiking.

Richt: “If we spike it, strategically you give them time to gather up and get their senses and get their calls in … We had that Auburn game years ago where we didn’t manage the clock well, and that offseason we go see Homer Smith … He says clocking the ball is for people who don’t have a plan. If you’re prepared and you’ve moved the chains and the clock is stopped and you’ve got the play that you like, then call it. Because if you call it you have a greater chance of getting three plays compared to clocking it and probably only get two plays … As we’re hustling down to the ball, the play was called. It’s exactly what we would have called if we had spiked it. It was the same call.”

It took Georgia five seconds to snap the ball, surely a couple of beats longer than Homer Smith would have liked. Before the snap, receiver Chris Conley stepped toward Murray, as if seeking clarification. And it was clear a moment after the snap that Georgia hadn’t wrong-footed the Tide. It was also clear that the Bulldogs knew their assignments. Every receiver went where assigned, and each was shadowed. In sum, nobody messed up. In the most frenzied moment of a frenzied game, the nation’s No. 2 and 3 ranked teams showed their class.

“Stout” is a simple play. The Bulldogs dispatched four receivers, with the two wideouts– Malcolm Mitchell on the right and King on the left – running “fade” routes into the end zone. The slot men – Conley on the right, Lynch on the left – ran “speed outs,” which are underneath routes toward the sideline.

Richt: “When a guy runs a ‘fade’ and (another) guy runs a ’speed out,’ if it’s zone coverage cornerbacks are taught not to go to the back of the end zone. They are only going to go so far. If you put a guy in front of him and a guy behind him you put a stretch on him, so you’re trying to throw the ball to what looks like might be the shorter guy, and he freezes and the ball goes over the top. That’s if it’s zone.”

Milliner, an All-American cornerback, took Mitchell man-to-man and appeared to have him blanketed near the front corner of the end zone. Appearances, however, can deceive.

Richt: “To us offensively, there (are) no shutdown corners. There’s no coverage that if the ball is placed properly, the (defender) can win. If the guy does a good job on the jam and doesn’t get beat deep, than he’s more vulnerable to the back-shoulder throw. If he’s lagging for that or trying to be a hero, than he can get run by. The quarterback has to recognize the coverage and throw the ball according to what he sees.”

The best pass Murray throws is the back-shoulder ball, which can seem like an underthrow but isn’t. He used back-shoulder balls to spectacular effect in the comeback victory over Florida in 2011, and it was a back-shoulder ball he loosed on the final play of another furious rally.

Murray: “We throw that all the time. It’s one-on-one. It’s a back-shoulder fade, which we’re great at … It’s definitely one of my favorite throws. Guys have a great understanding of the route.”

Richt: “You throw the ball according to what you see. Murray did right. It was more of a tight coverage. We throw the heck out of that back-shoulder throw … Watch the last two seasons. He’s as good at doing that as anybody.”

The back-shoulder throw calls for a lower trajectory. (The over-the-top fade traces a higher arc.) Murray, who insists he’s 6-foot-1, isn’t the tallest of quarterbacks. This became an issue when linebacker C.J. Mosley, another All-American, blitzed off the right side of Georgia’s line.

There was never a chance he would reach Murray – running back Todd Gurley barred the blitzer’s path – but Mosley did as pass rushers are taught: If you can’t sack the quarterback, get your hands up. Even as he was trying to skirt Gurley, Mosley leaped and swung his left arm.

Murray: “He pretty much stopped his rush. He jumped in the air and got a finger on it. He nicked it.”

Enter Conley, a designated decoy. When Murray delivered, Conley was running toward the sideline.

Conley: “I didn’t see him throw it. I didn’t see it tipped. I just saw it coming down.”

Richt: “You throw it where hopefully we catch it for a touchdown or if it’s incomplete you’ve got two more plays. You don’t want to complete it to anybody in play, but that play is not designed to go to that guy. That guy (Conley) is basically a decoy in zone coverage to try to get the corner to bite the cheese. In man coverage, he’s not in play at all because the ball is going either over the top (on a fade) or a back-shoulder throw.”

Conley: “Initially I couldn’t even see the ball. I saw the quarterback and the offensive linemen looking up, and I reacted.”

Watch the CBS replay, and you’ll see that Murray throws with eight seconds remaining and Conley catches the ball at 0:07. The sophomore receiver, who’s an honor roll student, had less than a second to react to the biggest moment of the biggest Georgia game in 30 years, and it wasn’t a moment anyone could have foreseen.

Conley: “When I saw the ball flipping end over end … you catch it and think about it later.”

Lynch: “Your main objective as a receiver is to catch the ball. For you to process it all – people can say, ‘awareness this’ and ‘awareness that,’ but that had nothing to do with (awareness). He was just trying to make a play.”

King: “Everyone would have caught it. (He pointed to various media members.) You would have caught it, and you would have caught it, and you would have caught it – especially if you’re a receiver.”

Richt: “For every receiver, his reaction would obviously be to catch the ball. A wide receiver catches the ball. That’s his nature.”

At the 5, Conley turned to track the deflected pass. His back was to the end zone, meaning he had no way of knowing what was behind him. As it happened, two defenders were within a yard of him, though cornerback Geno Smith had fallen after bumping Conley on his route.

King: “If (Conley) bats it down and there’s nobody around him, he looks like an idiot. I would have caught it.”

The trouble with catching it was that Conley had to score or time would expire. He actually made a nice grab of the fluttering ball, but he couldn’t turn and try to fight his way to the goal line. He fell without being touched.

The way it ended. (AJC photo by Brant Sanderlin)

Chris Conley catches and falls. (AJC photo by Curtis Compton)

Conley: “I caught it and lost my footing. You can always blame somebody, but in that moment, in that second … I guess it’s a learning experience.”

Really, though, what’s to learn? That you should ignore every fiber of instinct and every bit of training and NOT catch a ball that falls to you? That any human being should process data faster than an iPhone Siri? Two seconds after he fell to the turf, Conley knew his team would have been better served had he dropped the ball on purpose, but he didn’t have two seconds.

Murray: “With how fast we were going and how everything was happening at once, it’s hard not to catch it.”

The clock hit zero with Georgia five yards short of an SEC championship and a berth against Notre Dame in the BCS title game. The Bulldogs had gone 80 yards in 68 seconds without a timeout against mighty Alabama. They’d needed 85.

Richt: “I think everybody (among Georgia fans) felt like we were there in the game that meant everything. Not many people were in a game like that. There were three teams left (with a chance at the BCS title) and we were one of them. We played a great football team and played a great game. I’d say the same thing I said after the game. I was extremely disappointed in the outcome of the game, but not disappointed one bit in our players and coaches and how we battled.”

Murray: “I can’t sleep at night. I literally replay the entire game every night before I go to bed … It’s a game that will probably haunt me the rest of my life.”

Conley: “The whole Bulldog Nation has been messaging me or finding a way to get in touch with me. I can’t tell you how many people have been congratulating me on the season or telling me it’s not over for me … Some people have sent me Bible verses. I remember the one, ‘Cast your cares upon the Lord.’ (Psalm 55:22.) It helped me realize there was more to life than football, that this was not the biggest thing in life.”

Murray: “Certain songs remind me of the game. It’s like a playlist.”

King: “I’m not fully over it. I’ve still got a bitter taste in my mouth.”

Murray: “I don’t even want to think about how the state of Georgia would have been if we’d have pulled it out. It probably would have been one of the best, if not THE best, wins in Georgia history.”

It would have been, but it wasn’t. And from the moment the classic game ended, we’ve all asked: What happens if Mosley doesn’t tip the pass?

Murray: “Oh, it’s a touchdown. It’s a 50-50 ball, and (Milliner is) facing Malcolm and Malcolm is supposed to go up and catch the ball. It’s not like the guy is facing me where he could have made a play on it. He’d have had to strip it out of Malcolm’s hands. It would have been up to Malcolm to make a play.”

Richt: “It was the play we wanted to call. The problem was that the ball got tipped … You’re talking about one or two digits of a finger. That’s how close a game is sometimes.”

By Mark Bradley

459 comments Add your comment

Weyman C. Wannamaker Jr. (A Great American)

December 14th, 2012
8:17 am

Weyman C. Wannamaker Jr. (A Great American)

December 14th, 2012
8:19 am

The Dawgs aren’t the only ones looking back in anguish.

I don’t know why they threw a pass that looks like it wouldn’t have made it into end zone even if it hadn’t been tipped.

Mark Bradley

December 14th, 2012
8:20 am

Kudos, Weyman.

GDawg

December 14th, 2012
8:20 am

Heart breaking loss GO DAWGS.

Sergeant Joe Friday, UGA '81

December 14th, 2012
8:23 am

You people take this way to serious. It’s just a football game…no more, no less.

GT

December 14th, 2012
8:23 am

If you are worth your salt you will be back next year, like Alabama does every year, and this was their worse team in three years. A football program is not one play or five seconds or five yards. You got blown out by Alabama and LSU in previous years, not even in the same league, now you are improving. You lose the entire defense next year, you don’t have a rigged up schedule, let see you play some football, don’t make this your finest hour, you are not there yet. You kind of were the receiver of this same Alabama good luck against Florida, so don’t think you are cured. Florida and South Carolina will be loaded for bear next year, you need to be too. This game is over, if you have really arrived it will show next year, if not you are the same old want to bes like the rest of us.

GT Dude

December 14th, 2012
8:26 am

Get over it!
Bama won fair and square,
Self induced lose
UGA will rise up again sometime in the next 30 years and almost get to “The Game” once again
In the meantime just quit whining

MONKATL

December 14th, 2012
8:26 am

SPIKE the BALL.

MONKATL

December 14th, 2012
8:28 am

GO UGA! BEAT Huskers.

AUBDAWG

December 14th, 2012
8:28 am

The bottom line is, Richt can defend his decision not to spike the ball, and that is fine. However,the fact is that there were a lot of things that went wrong in the last 30 seconds of that game (as evidenced by the fact that in the final 30 seconds we only got off two plays!!!!)

After the completion to King over the middle, the clock stopped with 30 seconds left in the game. While TK got off the field and the refs moved the chains, the clock was stopped for about 27 seconds. Yet, when the clock is restarted our staff did not have the play called. We let 9 seconds run off the clock before we snapped the ball.

Then, after the completion to Lynch down to the 8 yard line, (that one play took 15 seconds, as there are now 15 seconds left on the game), we let another 6 seconds run off the clock before we snap the ball (this appears to be due in part to the fact that at the last minute the staff decides to run TK back onto the field, and it does not appear that he heard the play call, so he is unsure as to where to line up).

So, defend the decision of not spiking the ball all you want, but how does one defend the fact that we only got off two plays in the final 30 seconds of the game, and that we let 15 of those seconds tick off the clock while standing at the line of scrimmage??? Anyone wish we had about 12 of those seconds left after the last completion to CC? We could have had enough time to spike the ball and run another play.

Compare that drive to the “Hobnail Boot drive”. Richt and staff stopped the clock (granted, with timeouts, but the same logic applies, does it not?) at every opportunity during Hobnail boot to make sure that everyone was on the same page, and to get their best play in. We didn’t take the approach that “We’ve got Tennessee on the run! Keep after them!”

There is a reason why Saban did not call a timeout…….a running clock was UGA’s biggest enemy. Had Saban felt like he needed to slow down our rhythm or change personnel, then he would have called timeout and done so. No, his best chance to win was for the clock to keep running. Which conversely, means that our best chance to win was to spike the ball and stop the clock. Heck, after the completion to Lynch, Murray is running down to the line of scrimmage looking at the sideline making the “spiking motion” the whole way down there. He knew we should have spiked the ball.

Face the facts, the players were ready to deliver an EPIC win, and the coaching staff choked in the closing seconds . It’s really that simple.

Overall the staff did a good job getting the team ready for this game they had called a reasonably good game up until the final 30 seconds. However, the fact remains that with a shot at the National Championship on the line, that we only got two plays off in the final 30 seconds of the game. That is unacceptable and was a failure of execution from the coaching staff. There is no other reasonable explanation. I don’t condemn them for it, and I agree that there is much to be proud of. But the coaching staff chocked during the last 30 seconds.

It was very much the same awful clock management that we saw from Richt/Bobo at the end for the first half of the Ole Miss game……..just awful. The sad thing though, was that we go bailed out with a hail mary against Ole Miss and the staff didn’t have to learn any hard lessons from their mistakes.

Immediately after the SECC game, Richt made some comments that defended his decision not to spike the ball, but they alluded to other areas of “confusion”. So much has been made over the “spike or not” decision, that hardly anyone has noticed the 15 seconds we wasted in the two plays leading up to the end of the game. The stars were aligned for us to steal that game,and the coaching staff wasted it by being “confused” when it mattered most.

MONKATL

December 14th, 2012
8:29 am

It Does HURT.

yep

December 14th, 2012
8:31 am

maybe if that Bama guy had got 3 fingers on it then it would’ve fallen incomplete

DP

December 14th, 2012
8:32 am

Milliner had Mitchell covered up a step from the sidelines. He was not beyond Mitchell or moving toward the back of the end zone like you want a DB to be on the back shoulder throw. Murray’s comment a day or two ago that it would have been a touchdown had Mosley not tipped it is nonsense. The throw would have to have been perfect, in a box maybe a square foot wide, Milliner would have had to not make a play on the ball and Mitchell would have had to catch the ball cleanly with a foot inbounds and hold it through the ground. What is the likelihood of all three of those things happening, particularly given that Milliner, a first team All American corner, was in perfect position?

To stop the excuses from Dawg Nation, you not only have to beat Georgia, you have to beat them by such a wide margin that they can’t blame it on a play or two, a missed call or two, etc.

The game is over. Georgia lost. If they don’t look ahead and get ready to play, they’ll get embarrassed by Nebraska in the bowl game like Alabama got embarrassed by Utah after a close loss to Florida in the 2008 SEC championship game that kept them from playing for a national championship.

Gene

December 14th, 2012
8:32 am

Instead of all of this rationalization, Richt should just say “I blew it,” and let it go. It was a great effort. Georgia lost. End of story.

archie

December 14th, 2012
8:33 am

Mark, how about spotlighting the other 59 minutes and 45 seconds of that game? You know, the part where Bama rolled up 350 yards on the ground, despite everyone in the nation knowing what was coming up next, on every play. Got any excuses for that one?

Bama14

December 14th, 2012
8:35 am

One unacknowledged reason that UGA moved the ball down field is that Bama played a prevent defense (3 man rush) when Georgia go the ball on their own 15 with a minute to play, and no timeouts. The Dawgs had no option but to throw. The Tide should have been putting some hot sauce on the QB instead of laying back and letting passes get completed. Maybe our coaches didn’t think we had enough legs left, but i prefer pressure on the quarterback.

Flat Tire On Hwy 441 in Athens

December 14th, 2012
8:36 am

Next year will show us if we finally arrived

Bama lost a lot from their championship team last year and this was considered a rebuilding year
Yet they are still playing for the national title again

With next years schedule I see us losing 3 games

If we lose only 1 game then we can say we have made a great step toward being a top program

Dave

December 14th, 2012
8:37 am

It was a great game, but I’m miserable about the “what if’s”. If we had spiked the ball and lost, people would have screamed that we had the momentum and to catch Bama on the heels with a quick play. As it is, we ran the quick play and the ball just got tipped. That’s what killed the play. It was a good call, but it didn’t work out.

But bottom line, the best team won. We had no answer for their run game and their Oline was just dominant. Even so, UGA kept coming back with surprise/big plays. We were up by 11 points in the third quarter, but couldn’t hold on. I’m sure that there were many Bama fans screaming at the TV when UGA went right down the field. If I was a Bama fan, I would have been sheet white watching the last minute. Both UGA and Bama would have/will beat Notre Dame. The one big glaring weakness in UGA was the run D. But….the season is over and I look forward to the bowl game and August 2013. Once a Dawg, always a Dawg! How sweet it is!

SawThat1nce

December 14th, 2012
8:39 am

If a poll of the top 100 coaches was taken(and Richt is one of those top 100), what percentage of that poll would have spiked the ball?
I think that it would have been 99%, that would have spiked the ball.

DP

December 14th, 2012
8:47 am

Bama14, Saban noted after the game that early in the last drive the Alabama defenders failed to execute properly on taking the sideline away. The defense they were in was designed to keep Georgia players from getting out of bounds on completions that were short of the first down marker. Alabama let Georgia receivers get out of bounds twice on short completions at the beginning of the drive. Had they been properly positioned to tackle the receiver in bounds on either of those plays it would have run 20+ seconds off the clock and Georgia wouldn’t have gotten close to the goal line at the end. I’ll go with Saban and Smart making the defensive calls. You can’t blitz and let a receiver get deep or give up a huge play on a crossing pattern in that situation.

Look at everything that went wrong for Alabama on the last drive. Failing to keep receivers in bounds on short completions twice. The near interception by Milliner that was an inch or two from being game over. The great throw and catch on the play to King and then a great play by Murray on the throw for Lynch to move. And Alabama still stopped them from scoring. I’d say that validates the defensive strategy.

Concerned

December 14th, 2012
8:47 am

99% of the coaches were not in a position to go to the national championship game – who cares what they thought. Time to stop reliving this one and let’s get ready for Nebraska! Go Dawgs!

CLIFF

December 14th, 2012
8:47 am

Hey GT DUDE at least we can look forward to beating your ass every year.

Son Of Bart

December 14th, 2012
8:47 am

Watched the game. Great game. My only question is if one or two digits, meaning the tips of the defender’s fingers, can deflect a pass that was intended to go another six to seven yards — well that defender has some kind of strong digits! Looked like a “flutter ball” choke to me.

Bo Duke

December 14th, 2012
8:49 am

oh sweet lord, MB and the entirity of Bulldog nation it is way past time to give it up.
Bama won b/c they are a superior team.
could’ve should’ve would’ve didn’t paly that day.
time did not just run out, they played 60 minutes just like every other game.
MB could not help but notice you did not post for more than a week after your posted your homage to the noble dawg effort……………which ended in defeat.
now 2 weeks later its time to cry again?

georgiadawg93

December 14th, 2012
8:50 am

AUBDAWG sums it up perfectly.

Wow, Mark, that was cool...

December 14th, 2012
8:52 am

…I got goosebumps reading that, like a great novel with real drama,even though I knew the ending – thanks!

lizard

December 14th, 2012
8:53 am

looked like to me they could have run the ball in the end zone—what is the big deal—–they got 2 good running backs and it is always passing passing passing passing passing passing passing passing passing passing passing passing passing passing passing passing passing passing passing passing passing passing passing passing passing passing passsing —-more passing more interceptions—————then more passing passing passing and then passing. Why not just try to build a good running team and then pass the ball now and again and leave it at that—Alabama is just another team—spike the ball —regroup and pound the ball into the end zone——

Wow, Mark, that was cool...

December 14th, 2012
8:55 am

..and after reading what Homer Smith said, and how CMR was thinking re: “spike or don’t spike” I can better understand why he chose to do what he did – I still may not agree, yet his rationale was not “stupid”…

lizard

December 14th, 2012
8:55 am

Georgia better get a coach that wants to run the ball more or they will never ever ever ever ever—————–win the national championship———plus they need a quarterback from the state of georgia—-with out that they will never ever ever ever ever win another SEC game——-forget it!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Dacusville Bill

December 14th, 2012
9:00 am

Georgia Choked–sorta like the Gamecocks used to do before Spurrier arrived

robodawg

December 14th, 2012
9:01 am

I don’t see how spiking would have helped. Either way we get two shots to the end zone. Tipped ball is what made the difference … it could’ve just as easily been tipped into a Bama player’s hands. And it could’ve just as easily been tipped on the play after a spike.

“You’re talking about one or two digits of a finger. That’s how close a game is sometimes.” We played a game for the ages that someone had to lose.

If you want to look at what we could’ve done better, you’d have to start with building more depth on the defensive line 2-4 years ago. We missed Abry Jones badly in this one. But despite all those rushing yards, we played to our strengths and nearly pulled it out.

GT

December 14th, 2012
9:06 am

As long as they have a press that is soft on them they will except this moral victory as a championship. Saban wouldn’t be able to sleep for months if this was his team. But Saban would have won this game by 14 points if he was coaching Georgia.

GT

December 14th, 2012
9:06 am

As long as they have a press that is soft on them they will except this moral victory as a championship. Saban wouldn’t be able to sleep for months if this was his team. But Saban would have won this game by 14 points if he was coaching Georgia.

gt4ever

December 14th, 2012
9:06 am

Good Grief… Are we still talking about this game… The bottom line is that, yes your record shows 11-1, but you did it against average competition, and you still have a long way to go to be a national contender… Your defense lost that game. Period.

Nickolas Saint

December 14th, 2012
9:06 am

Agree. AUBDAWG called it just right.

10per

December 14th, 2012
9:07 am

How long has it been and people are still talking about this? Move on.

UGA was playing over their heads the whole game. They were just a few seconds away and a few yards from an upset, but don’t kid yourself in thinking they were *this close*. Those last few yards were father away than they seemed.

Let it go.

Ostrich Racer

December 14th, 2012
9:08 am

Terrific post, Mark. This is what sportswriting is supposed to look like.

Nickolas Saint

December 14th, 2012
9:08 am

Enter your comments here

T-Bone

December 14th, 2012
9:08 am

Face it Dogs. Bama ran all over you. The better team won.

Just Wanna Say

December 14th, 2012
9:08 am

Seriously GT Dude? Please just stop talking. You’re embarrassing yourself. On second though, keep talking. Tech people making an ass of themselves is always funny.

Bottom Line: The loss sucks, and it always will. The Bulldawg Nation will pull through. We still have a really good team that will be competitive once again next year!

Flat Tire On Hwy 441 in Athens

December 14th, 2012
9:11 am

I guess we are going to replay this as many times as Herschel Walker running over Bill Bates

GATiger

December 14th, 2012
9:11 am

How ridiculous is this column? Anguishing over 15 seconds? How about the other 59:45 when you were giving up 350 yards rushing? Or the 60 minutes when you were getting steamrolled by a good-but-not-great USC team? Jeez! You lost the game. Let it go.

Just Wanna Say

December 14th, 2012
9:11 am

Look at the jealous Tech Nerds. Just hilarious.

@10per

Um…it was that close. Are you just that stupid?

Bazooka Joe

December 14th, 2012
9:11 am

Bama14 – I wouldnt say that was the only reason we moved down the filed like we did, we were able to move on you most of the game.However, I do agree with you… I hate the prevent defense – usually the only thing it does is “prevent” you from winning.
Congrats on the win, it was a great game. We’ll be back (as Im sure you will too !). Maybe we can get it on again next year if our D develops quickly.

jeffrey d

December 14th, 2012
9:11 am

Thanks, Mark.

Hindsight’s 20/20. Had UGA scored on a frazzled Bama D we’d all be praising Richt/Bobo. It was supposed to be TD or incompletion. A tip wasn’t a part of the plan.

Coward of Bulldawg County

December 14th, 2012
9:12 am

My god, does it ever end??? It’s not like you aren’t accustomed to losing on the big stage…get over it already…I’m starting to miss Terrence Moore…

Bazooka Joe

December 14th, 2012
9:13 am

oops… field, not filed !

ChopAttack

December 14th, 2012
9:14 am

People will always look back at that drive… but the game was lost on a few 3 and outs by the offense in the 2nd half. The defense couldn’t get a break for a few possessions. If the Dawgs could have moved the chains or scored on one of those possession they would have broken Alabama.

Two great teams, but Alabama is just a little better this season.

If Richt can keep his staff together there will be more chances in the future. You have to play stout defense in the SEC and the team has improved since Granthem was hired. The team has a ton of talent. As a Dawg fan all you can ask for is to have a chance to win and have a little luck on your side.

For fans who don’t like Richt… I’m not always fond of everything he does, but look at UT and Auburn. Finding the right coach isn’t easy and picking the wrong one can doom you to a lost decade. It can happen to any team.

jeffrey d

December 14th, 2012
9:14 am

You people take this way to serious. It’s just a football game…no more, no less.

For real, Mark! Why are you talking about football? You’d think this was a sports section or something.

Besides, the UGA/Bama snoozefest was nothing compared to the big Hawks/Bobcats game last night.

Dog Island Gator

December 14th, 2012
9:15 am

This one will sting for generations. I’m sorry to say.