Vick’s campaign to win hearts and minds needs a pick-me-up

Michael Vick can’t even go broke properly. A court in Newport News, Va., rejected his financial reorganization plan Friday for being unworkable. Looking beyond dollars and cents, ESPN legal analyst Lester Munson, who was in the courtroom, wrote of Judge Frank Santoro: “It was clear he was not impressed with Vick’s story of true remorse.”

The rest of Vick’s vocational life will hinge on his ability to convince a skeptical audience he’s really and truly sorry. To date, the erstwhile No. 7 is 0-for-1. Munson again: “He will have to show more sincerity and veracity when he speaks to [NFL commissioner Roger] Goodell.”

Goodell has said contrition — meaning remorse for doing wrong, not just for getting caught — will be the key to Vick’s reinstatement to the only league that matters. But the downward spiral of what was once a charmed young life remains awhirl: The same Vick who failed a drug test after pleading guilty just admitted in court to borrowing $150,000 from a pension fund illegally. Is anybody advising him? Is he really sorry for anything?

We on the periphery can’t know. Vick hasn’t addressed the public since Aug. 27, 2007, the day he entered his plea. That seemed a bright start on the rutted road to redemption, but there has since been nothing beyond a roaring silence.

On the stand Friday, Vick said he’d “committed a heinous act,” but “heinous” is a tin-sounding word. Seeking another take, a guy asked Arthur Blank: Does he believe Vick feels “true remorse”?

“I actually planned on seeing him [in prison] twice, but for various reasons it didn’t work out,” Blank said Monday. “I do plan on seeing him when he’s released. The letters I’ve gotten from him have been sincere, and they do show a fair degree of emotion. But at the end of the day it’s not what you say — it’s what you do.”

Blank wants to see Vick back in the NFL — just not with his Falcons. “My own judgment is that, if people feel he has learned and he has definitely paid his debt to society, a man should have an opportunity to work.”

Sorry, there are no polls available at the moment.

Will Goodell feel the same? Blank: “I think Roger will look at it like, ‘Let’s see how you act. Let’s see who you spend time with and how you live your life.’ ”

The thought persists that Vick has wasted more than a year of enforced downtime by saying nothing. That might have been the best legal strategy, but PR-wise it was a mistake. We needed to hear from him, whether in the form of a jailhouse interview with “60 Minutes” or a written mea culpa. We needed to hear him say he’d changed as he was changing, not after he’s released to home confinement in his five-bedroom abode.

Someone should have been doing the groundwork for Vick’s return to society and to football, but his pricey lawyers and agents and advisers have availed him little. He’d had a long time to prepare for his first appearance before Judge Santoro, and apparently he whiffed.

Vick cannot afford any more whiffs. When next he says he’s sorry, he must make us believe.

328 comments Add your comment

Dedrick

April 6th, 2009
3:29 pm

i think they should let him go he made a mistake everybody makes mistakes every once and a while

Corch Myers

April 6th, 2009
3:51 pm

He’s paid his debt to society. As long as he keeps his nose clean he should be allowed to come back whether or not he’s genuinely remorseful. But if he screws up again he should be buried under the jail and never allowed back in the league.

STL Falcon

April 6th, 2009
3:54 pm

Loneliness and complacency are the two worst things in the world, aren’t they, Mr. Vick.

Everything was so easy, at least, I’ll bet it was easy: the women, the game, the money.

Greatness is never easy, neither is forgiveness.

It’s time you got to work.

Jason

April 6th, 2009
4:00 pm

Why is it that people want to see Mike Vick on his hands and knee’s You don’t think he’s SORRY! What you need tears! Do you need him to KILL HIS SELF! I feel sorry for you if you are unwilling to forgive GOD will deal with Vick and you too

Leland

April 6th, 2009
4:15 pm

Dear Mr. MB–I think a lot of people want to rub Vick’s nose in it a little. I include Goodell in my speculation, who may have other shoes to shine, also. There’s little question that Vick might be mostly remorseful for getting caught and humiliated and for losing his wealth. Who wouldn’t be? But wouldn’t it be great if he were to be reinstated, and in the ensuing years learn, after all that’s happened, a real, healthy remorse by adopting a more seemly way of life and by demonstrating it daily in the way he lives? Not only can I imagine Vick growing in this way; but football, too, and all who helped him back on his feet would share in the redemption. Your pal, Leland

matt r

April 6th, 2009
4:19 pm

Great piece Mark. BTW the column about the kid in courtroom with the over-sized blue suit is one of my all-time Bradley faves.

Mark Bradley

April 6th, 2009
4:53 pm

Thanks, Leland. You make great points.

And thanks to you, Matt. I always liked that one myself, and I don’t like many.

NCFalconFan

April 6th, 2009
4:54 pm

Bradley,
I normally agree with you but on Vick related articles but I think no one can judge Vick on his behavior. I have never been in prison or even in the back of a police car but the weight of being in prison, facing a judge and then everyone in the country reading about your life and the bad decisions that you made has got to be tough. Vick’s legal problems should be the only thing on his mind at this point until it is all resolved and opening himself up to tough questioning could easily land him in a tougher position. I am only about 2k in debt, I can’t imagine being in the millions in debt, facing a uncertain future and from the outside looking in, having taking care of so many people who “supposedly” cares about him (that’s something you can look into).

I am not sure how much of a television interview would impress Roger Goodell, because he is the only one that matters. PETA will forever be a thorn in Vick’s side. Although they are fighting for a great cause, I think they have came off as a little ridiculous in this case as well.

If Goodell does not reinstate him following his release players and the players union should be livid. What do the players union do anyway (another topic you could write about?). How does one judge remorse? Does he have to cry? Work in an animal shelter? Donate money to PETA? Why is Goodell the only and last recourse for players? Why can’t someone ask him and the players union that question. Will Goodell follow any “guidelines” that are in place in considering Vick reinstatement. Shouldn’t their be guidelines or how Goodell feels that particulary day?

Mark Bradley

April 6th, 2009
5:04 pm

I’d agree, NC, that PETA can be overbearing. That bit about Vick submitting to a brain scan? I mean, come on.

Joe Taxpayer

April 6th, 2009
5:14 pm

Isn’t it ironic how people who hate Vick for his cruelty to dogs, now feel entitled to be cruel to him after he’s done his time?

The inability to forgive is another side of the same cruel coin. Vick did not have the ability to feel for those dogs and treated them horribly, and these people who “want to rub his nose in it” still want to hurt Vick, even after he’s been to prison and gone bankrupt.

Enjoying the continued infliction of “punishment” upon a person who has already paid a very heavy price is a special kind of cruel and makes those who want to do, no better than Vick.

Mr. Bradley, shame on you and the AJC for continuing to fan the flames so that you can profit off of Vick’s cruelty and the cruelty of those who enjoy watching another man suffer. The article about Vick’s home confinement was as inflammatory as it could be.

Now we have you with this article with this fake concern over “winning hearts and minds”. Who the heck cares about the non legal opinion from ESPN’s legal expert? There’s only so much PR one can do from behind prison bars!

The judge didn’t like the reorganization plan.Like most of us,you waste a federal judge’s time and they are not going to be nice to you.I think the more salient fact is that Vick has, so far, made it through prison without incident and behaved in such a way that he has earned early release.

Once he gets out and then off of house confinement is when most people will start judging the kind of job he’s doing in his quest for forgiveness and redemption. It’s up to him, not his lawyers, to do the work. If they were conducting some kind of PR campaign before he even got out of prison, that would be annoying and obviously self-serving and no doubt a subject of another article of concern from columnists.

Michael Vick the dogkiller

April 6th, 2009
5:26 pm

Joe Taxpayer,

I take no joy in anyone’s suffering, even Mr. Vick. I sense that the thing that I and probably most people on here don’t like about the man is that he isn’t remorseful over what he did. He’s just sorry that he got caught. I also think a lot of people myself included just have a hard time getting over what kind of a cruel, barbarous person enjoys watching the suffering and pain of an animal being torn apart by another animal to the delight of onlookers. That’s the part that infuriates and angers people. What kind of a sick, evil person enjoys this kind of stuff?

Typical Ignorant Vick Defender

April 6th, 2009
5:39 pm

EVERYBODY MAKES MISTAKEZ.

Mark Bradley

April 6th, 2009
5:51 pm

I’ve never thought Michael Vick was a thug, whatever that might be. I always liked him as a person and was shocked — and I mean shocked — when the charges turned out to be true.

I don’t think he’s beyond redemption. I don’t think anyone is. But I don’t think he’s getting very good advice. I don’t think he’s had very good advice for a long time now.

mistake or deliberate?

April 6th, 2009
5:58 pm

When Vick mutilated dogs and tortured them to death, did he do it deliberately, or was it a mistake?

Joe Taxpayer

April 6th, 2009
6:02 pm

Again, Vick is behind bars. Until he get’s out and starts living his life, we don’t know what kind of advice beside financial he’s getting. So his people didn’t do a good job with financial reorganization, it happens. It is not uncommon for judges to reject plans.

And to all those who love calling Vick a “thug”. Who is the bigger thug? Vick, or the folks up on Wall Street we’re now bailing out?We all know that thug is code for another word, but I would say that description better fits other people besides some dumb-dumb dogfighter.

Vick’s victims were dogs, those guys victims were people. I see a difference, may be you don’t.

lawton

April 6th, 2009
6:13 pm

polease, there are people in jail who are there for murder getting more love than vick, its not vick himself what erks his enemies, its what he represented, the dog fighting gave them a excuse.

Jean

April 6th, 2009
6:13 pm

This business of “seeming sorry” is ridiculous. Goodell should just admit that he is afraid of the PETA backlash.

Mr. Vick is ultimately accountable for all of this mess and he is dealing with it the right way from the moment he plead guilty without going through a trial, and started his sentence early. Since that time he has taken the “Empathy Course” that PETA (as if PETA knows anything about empathy…HA) demanded he take. Vick passed the written exam after the course as well. PETA keeps moving the goal posts. They now want him to undergo a brain scan to see if he has the mind of a sociopath. What country are we living in? This truly gives new meaning to “Minority Report”…convict on the suspicion of a brain scan?

His “friends” who masterminded the dog ring got off because they agreed to testify against Mr. Vick. He has had a ton of bad advice (financial and otherwise). No one is left. Just Vick in his cell dealing with his mountain of issues.

Now we are going to judge Vick on how sorry he is, or is he sorry for doing the crime or just getting caught. IT DOES NOT MATTER! He plead guilty and served the time.

After he completes serving his time, he should be allowed to work wherever he is qualified…including the NFL.

The judge did not give Vick a life sentence. He paid his debt to society and has EARNED a second chance.

ernisTbass

April 6th, 2009
6:13 pm

I have never been a Vick fan. He is/was a great athelete but an average QB, you can count his 300 yard games on one hand and 1000 yards rushing is a testament to a QB’s inability not ability. What he has left time will tell but the man has done his time. Let him prove on the field and in life whether or not he has changed. This BS about showing remorse is ridiculous. Where and when has it ever been an issue for any convicted criminal to show remorse as a condition of re-entry into society when the sentence is up? This ain’t a parole hearing. Drug charges, breaking and entering, assult and battery; when the sentence is up the gates open and the offender moves on. It doesn’t really matter if he is most sorry for killing dogs or getting caught killing dogs. I think the latter but it makes no difference.The punishment is doled out to convince the criminal not to repeat the act, which reason one chooses to not repeat the behavior is irrelevant as long as the punishment serves its purpose. For God’s sake, Jimmy Carter admitted that he had lust in his heart for other women but never followed through on his thoughts and was praised for it. I don’t give a rip if Vick dreams about dogs, drugs, or flipping fans the single finger salute as long as he doesn’t follow through with any of it. Give the man a chance, if he has changed we will not be able to help but notice as he will be under a huge microscope, if he hasn’t he has a future swinging a hammer for 10 bucks an hour. There is less than 2 minutes in the fourth quarter with no time-outs and he is down by 6. Let him scramble, it would be good for him and the NFL if he can pull it off, if he can’t it will only be bad for him. If he has learned nothing else the past two years he is aware that the game will march on without him.

apples and oranges

April 6th, 2009
6:18 pm

Michael Vick spent several years torturing and killing dogs, for his own amusement and to amuse his friends. I dislike him for that. If he had done the same things to human beings, I would dislike him even more.

There are people who steal from other people. There are people who drive drunk or hit someone in the face or shoot themselves in the foot. If they tortured and killed people, I would dislike them more than Mr. Vick.

Stealing, driving drunk, hitting somebody — these are not the same things as torturing and killing. Hitting one person in the face is a bad thing. It’s not as bad as torturing and killing dogs, laughing and betting on it, organizing it and paying for it, for years and years and years.

Who can’t understand this?

Jean

April 6th, 2009
6:19 pm

He is accountable for this mess, and he has taken responsibility for his crime. He plead guilty without a trial. Took PETA’s empathy course while in prison and passed the final exam. Denying him the right to try out and play (if qualified) is wrong.

Vick the humanitarian

April 6th, 2009
6:20 pm

Joe Taxpayer,

I think you’re glossing over the desensitizing of violence effect that dogfighting has on people. People exposed to that kind of visciousness lose their sense of humanity, of kindness, of gentleness. People who regularly engage in it become enured to the violence, they get used to it and as I’ve stated they become desensitized to overall violence. In my opinion you are underestimating the psychological effects this activity on people and especially youngsters.

What is it with people saying he made a mistake. A mistake is a spur of the moment decision of poor judgement such as driving after drinking one too many beers or doing something in the passion of a moment such as hitting someone after a heated argument. Those are mistakes.

Engaging in the systematic torture and mutiliation of dogs as a poster mentions above is a repeated, deliberate, pre-meditated act that he did over and over. It wasn’t a one time mistake made at the spur of the moment. Have all these Vick defenders lost their minds when they say this was just “a mistake”. Do they not understand the difference as the poster above clearly noted?

Mark Bradley

April 6th, 2009
6:21 pm

I, on the other hand, am a Vick fan. And I hope he plays in the NFL again soon, and I hope he lives an exemplary life.

gp295

April 6th, 2009
6:22 pm

If Vick was a white quarterback, there would be no comment like that quarterback who left ohio state they gave him chance after chance and he stil screw up. Was it because he was white or have things change, any way he who without sin pasts the first stone lol AIG.

GooD316

April 6th, 2009
6:23 pm

It’s funny, that nobody has really talked about Stallworth killing a human being recently. We still talk about Michael Vick the Dog Killer. Seems like we put more value on what we feel is the biggest “story”. Just because a lot of people didn’t like Vick to begin with, they are still throwing stones and dragging him down rather than trying to pick him up. Yeah, he messed up, and a LOT of NFL players have done horrible things to fellow human beings and are still playing, look up all the spouse abusers and assault charges. Stallworth killed a man driving drunk and it seems people are more concerned with a two year story than this man that took another HUMAN life. Nobody is perfect and I feel the man needs a chance to redeem himself and prove everyone wrong. He has definitely had a life changing experience. Give him a shot.

Jean

April 6th, 2009
6:26 pm

If you don’t like the sentence that Vick got and think a lifetime ban is appropriate, go see your local politician. He served what the judge deemed an appropriate sentence for his crime. PETA and other want to keep moving the goalposts.

Vick will play again and he will hear the scorn from people for the rest of his playing days and beyond. He will become more sorry as the years (and jeers) mount.

Vick the humanitarian

April 6th, 2009
6:27 pm

Well at least some people like the poster apples and oranges and a few other posters understand the difference between “a mistake” and the ongoing organized, systematic torture and mutilation of animals for one’s amusement over many years.

enough time?

April 6th, 2009
6:27 pm

If Hitler had not killed himself in 1945, and if he had gone on trial, and if he had been sentenced to 30 days in the County jail, would he have paid his debt to society? Would you forgive him? Would you say that he should get his old job back as Chancellor of Germany?

Some people would, of course. And some people wouldn’t.

And that’s what we have here. Some people think that Vick has paid his debt, and some people don’t. We can get mad at each other and call each other names. Or we can disagree in a courteous fashion.

GooD316

April 6th, 2009
6:27 pm

To apples and oranges. You are saying those dogs lives were worth more than the man that Stallworth killed, while driving drunk? Most of the people that hate Vick now didn’t like him to begin with. Most others hate what he did and might dislike him also but aren’t condemning him to poverty for the rest of his life. Forgive and forget, move on to the future and leave the past.

Mark Bradley

April 6th, 2009
6:29 pm

You’re talking about Art Schlichter, GP. And he was given a second (and a third) chance. But no more. Here’s his Wikipedia page.

Najeh Davenpoop

April 6th, 2009
6:30 pm

23 months in federal prison and over $100 million lost is a much bigger price than anyone should have to pay in the United States of America for killing animals. Michael Vick shouldn’t have to apologize to anyone at this point, and if Roger Goodell approaches the question of his reinstatement without letting his considerable ego get in the way it will be pretty obvious that Vick should be reinstated and allowed to sign with any team that thinks it’s worth giving him another chance. And you better believe that even after Stafford and Sanchez are drafted, there will be NFL teams with considerable question marks at the quarterback position that would be instantly upgraded by signing Vick.

As far as this bankruptcy filing, I don’t think it’s an indication of his level of remorse at all — it looks more like an indication that he is still hopelessly unqualified to do anything in life other than play football. He has no clue how to manage money and no clue how to hire qualified, trustworthy people, and it’s kinda sad.

Oh yeah, and I’d be willing to place a pretty large bet that Donte Stallworth won’t be in jail for 23 months. The justice system in this country is f-cked up.

Vick the humanitarian

April 6th, 2009
6:30 pm

Mark Bradley,

I hope Vick does live an exemplary life. I just wouldn’t bet on it or hold my breath for it. I just think he’s a generally bad person. I just hope I’m wrong about that.

Stallworth

April 6th, 2009
6:31 pm

Did Stallworth kill somebody deliberately, or was it an accident? Did he have a good time doing it? Did he laugh about it? Did he invite his friends over to bet on it? Did he do it again and again?

Najeh Davenpoop

April 6th, 2009
6:32 pm

People comparing the murder of six million humans to the killing of eight dogs should be removed from the gene pool.

GooD316

April 6th, 2009
6:33 pm

30 days? Come on now. The punishment fits the crime and Vick more than enough paid his debt. I know black, white, mexican, and puerto rican’s who have been put in jail for dog fighting and cruelty to animals and served way less time. PETA blew this up and everyone jumped on the bandwagon. Where are the associations against drunk driving and spousal abuse to shine the light on many NFL players that are STILL playing right now. let it go.

Vick the humanitarian

April 6th, 2009
6:36 pm

gp295,

Are you trying to be funny? I don’t know what’s funnier between your poor grammar and spelling or your ridiculous point about some white qb from Ohio State. But I guess sooner or later someone who can’t spell or use proper singular-plural agreement would try to make this into a racial thing. You’re typical. You can’t spell and use proper grammar but you probably blame whitey for never getting a job when you turn in hundreds of resumes with poor grammar and spelling don’t you?

GooD316

April 6th, 2009
6:36 pm

Well, Stallworth……..I guess cause he didn’t mean to drive drunk and kill a fellow human being means we should pat him on the wrist and say it’s ok. A crime is a crime and I am not condoning Vick one bit. But his celebrity status is what PETA went after. Otherwise they could have thousands more locked up for years with Vick.

ernisTbass

April 6th, 2009
6:40 pm

Art Schliester did have a gambling problem and it did wreck his career, however he only bet on games of chance, not torture, big difference. Trashcan the color BS, ever hear of PacMan, Tank Johnson, Ray Lewis, etc. I think Matt Jones is toast by the way. Selective memory will justify all opinions. While not a fan of Vick on the Falcons he can add excitement to the game and I would cheer him in life. I hope he gets a shot and makes the most of it but he better learn to be a pure QB and not rely on scrambling if he hopes to play 8-10 more years.

Saul

April 6th, 2009
6:41 pm

This thing reeks of hypocrisy. Let the man live! Let the man work! He went to Levanworth for crying out loud! Many have committed an been forgiven for worse crimes since then.
Also dont forget how Goodell sent special investigators to help the state’s case. Can you imagine the National Association of Realitors (if you were a realitor) sending someone to investigate you if you were being investigated for tax fraud or domestic violence?

Vick the humanitarian

April 6th, 2009
6:45 pm

Good316,

You’re missing the point dude. Donte Stallworth made a dumb, horrible mistake by driving drunk one night and as a result another man died. This was a tragic mistake that he made one night and he will probably end up going to jail for a long time. What Vick did was done for years, was pre-meditated, and was just cruel and viscious behavior done over a long period of time. I’m not excusing Stallworth. I’m just making the point that most people except for a couple simpletons understand the difference between a mistake made one evening as opposed to conscious, deliverate, cruel behavior done year after year.

Mark Bradley

April 6th, 2009
6:48 pm

There’s nobody who’s without sin. That said, we do have laws. And Vick admitted he broke the law.

And that said, I have to say I’ve been puzzled by his post-plea behavior. I really thought he’d have worked hard to rehabilitate his image through whatever channels were available, even while he was in Leavenworth. And I haven’t seen that.

Then again, I’m wrong about pretty much everything.

ernisTbass

April 6th, 2009
6:50 pm

Stallworth should get 2-5 years minimum (10 if he was poor)for wreckless homicide. ” I flashed my lights” ain’t going to cut it. What, you forgot to blow the horn? If he wasn’t drunk and speeding he might have a chance but I can’t see him walking from this unless there is proof that the victim was drunk too and I have yet to hear that.

GooD316

April 6th, 2009
6:52 pm

Oh, I get your points. But, that is pretty one sided. I am pretty sure that Stallworth didn’t get up and say, “Hey I think I will drink and drive today and today only.” If he hit a child then it would be a whole different story depending on who went after him. The crime is done, it was horrible and deserving of a stiff punishment, but I don’t see anyone crucifying some no name who did the same as Vick. His lackies got off easier and nobody ever mentioned them again. No one is saying that they shouldn’t ever work at McDonalds again because of their invovement. Yes, what he did is way worse than Stallworth, but……he still killed a person and driving drunk is not a mistake. It is intentional and can take the lives of your children.

Mark Bradley

April 6th, 2009
6:55 pm

I’ve always thought the weakest argument — on either side, in any circumstance — is to say, “Oh yeah? What about that guy over there?”

Vick is not Stallworth. Vick is not Schlichter. Vick is not anyone but Michael Vick.

Saul

April 6th, 2009
6:56 pm

Whats wrong with a man shutting his mouth and doing his time. Vick never whined about a setup, or that he was just a poor kid from the wrong side of the tracks. He went a silently did a stretch that would ruin the soul of most.
And he is still getting screwed! His lawyers are charging $13,700 a day for his bankruptcy and he only is 4 mill in debt. And they cant get him a favorable ruling! Those are the type of people who should be condemned!

GooD316

April 6th, 2009
6:57 pm

and yes I sympathize on Stallworths behalf. But he took someones Husband, Brother, Son, or whatever he might have been. I hope he doesn’t get major time. Reality is he probably will because of his celebrity alone. Lol, other NFL players have messed it up for anyone making a mistake or otherwise now. People just enjoy seeing some celebrities suffer.

is he sorry for torturing dogs?

April 6th, 2009
7:01 pm

Mark, your point is very clear, and I have never seen it written anywhere before. Why hasn’t Vick said, “I’m sorry for torturing all those dogs”?

I mean, that’s what people are mad about.

Instead, he says, “I’m sorry for disappointing my fans.” He’s not in prison for disappointing his fans. People aren’t mad at him for disappointing his fans.

Perhaps you’re right: perhaps he got legal advice to talk about his fans and say nothing about his dogs. If so, it didn’t help him much. Maybe he would have done better to say he was sorry for his dogs.

GooD316

April 6th, 2009
7:04 pm

You are right Mark except for the fact that people are making this Vick thing bigger than what it is. Are we still hounding the guys who were physically running this thing when he wasn’t there? He did the most time and spent the least time within the ring. Tell me, what were the accomplices names? Can you remember them or do you have to Google them real quick. He did a bad thing paid for it and should be allowed to make a living doing what God gave him the ability to do……….not the dog killing, lol…….the playmaking that he so uniquely uses better than anyone else. He can’t throw but hey, half the quarterbacks out there now can’t. Let him live now, or meet him outside his home when he gets out and throw stones at him.

ernisTbass

April 6th, 2009
7:04 pm

Oh yeah Bradley, Dave O’brien wouldn’t say something like that

shutting his mouth, not whining

April 6th, 2009
7:09 pm

Quote from Michael Vick, before he pleaded guilty:

“I’m never there. I’m never at the house. I left the house with my family members and my cousin. They just haven’t been doing the right thing. The issue will get resolved. It’s unfortunate that I have to take the heat behind it. If I’m not there, I don’t know what’s going on.”

GooD316

April 6th, 2009
7:09 pm

and actually he can throw…….he just needed a line and good receivers. Glad to see Roddy has matured into a stellar receiver. Kind of hard to throw when you KNOW your line is not going to be able to protect you and your receivers are gonna drop your pass because you throw too hard. NFL should record dropped passes like errors in baseball.