How the GOP needs to change, and how it doesn’t

Tuesday was a brutal night for Republicans.

Incumbent presidents are tough to beat, but Barack Obama was about as vulnerable as they come. The economy is stagnant; his signature legislative achievement is unpopular; his party weathered sharp losses in the midterm elections by now, you know the litany by heart. Yet Mitt Romney appears to have flipped only two states Obama won in 2008 (pending the final result in Florida).

When political parties lose brutally, a lot of new conventional wisdom crops up. Some of it’s right, some of it’s wrong. Here’s an early take on which is which:

1. Republicans have to move toward the left.

Wrong, wrong, wrong. There are two major political parties in this country in large part because they represent two sets of durable, mainstream beliefs. Sometimes one or the other does a better job of representing its beliefs, but neither ideology will be permanently defeated. Which leads me to …

2. The GOP has to ditch the tea party.

Wrong. Just two years ago, the GOP stopped Democrats’ congressional super-majorities in their tracks thanks to tea partyers. America hasn’t changed dramatically in that time, even if a successful tea-party candidate needs more polish than we’ve seen out of some of them (hello, Christine O’Donnell) to attract a broader audience.

The original animating concern of the tea party — halting the rapid growth of the federal government, from bailouts to debt to Obamacare — could have been a political winner Tuesday. (We don’t have to wait for the historians to marvel that the GOP in 2012 nominated the only guy who couldn’t capitalize on Obamacare’s lack of popularity.)

Romney might have made up for that failing if he’d joined the growing ranks of conservatives who support breaking up the biggest banks to ensure none is too big to fail. His comment during the second debate about his party’s devotion to Big Business at the expense of small businesses was his chance. He didn’t take it. A Republican with 2016 ambitions might, soon.

3. The GOP has to reach out to non-white voters.

This one’s absolutely true. There is plenty to criticize in Romney’s lack of minority outreach, but this is not his problem alone. Nor will it go away if the GOP merely highlights the promising, young, non-white stars they already have, such as Nikki Haley, Bobby Jindal, Susana Martinez and Marco Rubio.

Republicans have to explain why conservative ideas are good for minorities. They can’t simply trot out their ideas and expect minorities to recognize their brilliance when those voters have been told by Democrats, many of them for generations, that those ideas are intended to benefit other (read: white) people. When Republicans fail to engage minority voters, they effectively reinforce the Democrats’ argument.

It will take more than talking, though. It will take action. Here’s an idea about one policy that makes minorities most skeptical about the right: voter ID laws. Why not fight the notion these laws are about suppressing voting, rather than reducing fraud, by taking proactive steps to help put IDs in the hands of the people who think they’re being targeted?

4. Republicans must drop social conservatism.

Wrong. Social conservatism isn’t wholly out of the mainstream. Gallup’s long-term tracking of public attitudes about abortion, for instance, show the pro-life position is as strong as it’s been since Roe v. Wade. What’s out of the mainstream is a social conservative who can’t talk about opposing abortion without sounding as if he’s endorsing the act of rape. That cost the GOP two Senate seats and surely hurt Romney’s standing with some women.

Gay marriage may be different. Older voters who oppose it altogether are being replaced every day by 18-year-olds who couldn’t care less — and who don’t seem to change their stance as they get older. There was a time when Republicans could have pushed civil unions to make all couples equal before the law without changing the traditional definition of marriage. That time may have passed.

5. Georgia Republicans are a few years away from facing some of the same issues as the national GOP.

True, true, true. I’ll explain how they can avoid the same fate in a column coming soon to a blog very, very near you.

– By Kyle Wingfield

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883 comments Add your comment

Finn McCool (The System isn't Broken; It's Fixed)

November 8th, 2012
9:39 am

1. Republicans have to move toward the left.

agree. both parties are moderate and both parties have their extremists. Compromise is accomplished by the moderates.

Finn McCool (The System isn't Broken; It's Fixed)

November 8th, 2012
9:41 am

3. The GOP has to reach out to non-white voters.

a Con on NPR this morning said the right’s demonization of non-whites as akin to smoking: “You know it will kill you but you do it anyway.”

Kyle Wingfield

November 8th, 2012
9:42 am

Finn, and to anyone else who isn’t clear: The italicized sentences represent the new conventional wisdom I’m talking about. What follows each of them is my take on whether that conventional wisdom is right or wrong.

Peadawg

November 8th, 2012
9:56 am

“How the GOP needs to change”

1. Stop thumping the Bible
2. Reach out to non-white male voters.

Pretty simple.

Finn McCool (The System isn't Broken; It's Fixed)

November 8th, 2012
9:56 am

I was agreeing with what you wrote below the sentence so the way I presented it looks wrong.

Peadawg

November 8th, 2012
9:57 am

sorry…came out wrong

Reach out to other demographics other than JUST male white voters

I Report (-: You Whine )-: mmm, mmmm, mmmmm! Just sayin...

November 8th, 2012
9:57 am

You are assuming some Republican will actually want to run what’s left of the United States in 2016.

By then the energy companies, banks, automakers, insurance industry, farming, grocery stores, gift shops and hardware outlets will all be nationalized, so which Republican most closely resembles a Mussolini with a Mexican accent?

Wow, what a great future we have in store.

Peadawg

November 8th, 2012
9:59 am

“mainstream beliefs”

Bible thumping is NOT a mainstream belief.

Jon

November 8th, 2012
10:01 am

Man, Kyle, we finally agree on some stuff!

I find it interesting that conservatives I know couldn’t be further removed from caring about social issues. They’re generally financially minded, and expect the Republican party to be the party that cares about money. Surely people care about abortion, but it’s not nearly as near the top of the issue food-chain as the MSM would have you believe.

All too often though, the Christian right dominates the conversation around politics today. The Republicans need to recognize that, and stop taking their talking point cues from their mega-church pulpits every Sunday. Bill Graham has every right to share his views with the world – the politicians need to stop repeating what he says and focus on the issues that matter.

I Report (-: You Whine )-: mmm, mmmm, mmmmm! Just sayin...

November 8th, 2012
10:01 am

I’m trying to identify the next big liberal campaign of hate and filthy lies, because the national health care system only has so much money that they can suck out of it.

This mindless beast is going to be hungry.

Auto insurance?

Any thoughts?

HDB

November 8th, 2012
10:01 am

Kyle…to further expand your third point:

The GOP needs to ADMIT that their policies have done more to foment racial hostility and marginalize the minority….starting with the “Southern Strategy” (re: Ken Mehlman, Lee Atwater, Michael Steele)! The GOP needs to ADMIT that the party PROMOTED racism (re: Kevin Phillips (”blacks have no place in the GOP!”)…that political conservatism is based in racism…starting with Southern conservatives…and travelling west!! The GOP needs to re-examine its HISTORY…in that the GOP was FOUNDED by a coalition of blacks and abolitionist whites as LIBERALS!! Once you get past that point…then the GOP needs to come INTO the inner city and espouse policies that ATTRACT minority voters, not marginalize, ostracize, nor criminalize them; the GOP needs to CAMPAIGN in the inner city to show themselves as a viable alternative!!

That’s the start!! Being “the “all white party” won’t work!!

ATLien

November 8th, 2012
10:02 am

Kyle here’s one more to add to the list

4. Republicans need to abandon the idiot echo chamber that is talk radio and Fox News.

The idiocy and bigoted views parroted on that network counter the ideals of inclusiveness and diversity. As an example, I listen to Hannity on occaision and othere is no way young people who grow up in a diverse America can agree with the lunacy being propagated on that show. It’s completely geared towards fear mongering amongst the older white population. The talk radio sect is clearly on another planet.

East Cobb RINO, Inc (LLC)

November 8th, 2012
10:03 am

Republicans have to explain why conservative ideas are good for minorities.

That does not sound like change. It sounds like repackaging the same product and trying to sell it as something different. Just like most of the other suggestions. Voters saw though that this election cycle and will see through it again. GOP will have to do better than putting lipstick on a pig.

Euclid

November 8th, 2012
10:05 am

It also might help if the GOP brushes up on how math and statistics work before the next high stakes elections. In this space earlier this week it was alleged that “polls are more art than science.” So the work of statistical modelers like Nate Silver should be taken no more seriously than the gut feelings of people like Peggy Noonan, who counted Romney/ Ryan yard signs on her drive home. As we found out, you can actually make a pretty good stab at an event’s probability when you average 22 trusted state polls and 21 of them predict the same close outcome. It’s like the idea that holds one baseball hitter who reaches first via a walk twice as often as the average during his last 400 at bats will probably do that again in his next 100 at bats. It’s science!

Georgia

November 8th, 2012
10:05 am

So Kyle thinks the GOP has to reach out to non-white voters. No comment is necessary. The statement itself illustrates the problem for the GOP. The GOP is mired in the Founding Father’s USA, which didn’t have no non-white voters. The country is now about the people, not “in spite of” the people. The GOP speaks at voters. The Democrats speak of, by and for voters. It’s we. Not they. There is no demographic for the GOP except as focused around the vestiges of the slaveholding poets who didn’t found a country as much as they set in motion a civil war, where Uncle Sam was born and baptized in blood. That’s our country. No slaves. United. Every voter created equal. And guess what? Exactly seven score and four years after Lincoln’s successor was sworn in, a black president was sworn in. 1865-2009. 144 years. Cool. (It’s like the Kennedy/Lincoln assassination coincidences, man. )

The old USA belongs in a museum with the GOP and Ann Coulter’s face, and Trump’s Hair. Trump tweeted on election night that the GOP should march on Washington to protest the election and start a revolution. Gee, the million tan march!

Some people are stupid

November 8th, 2012
10:07 am

How about abandoning the “Tax cuts cure all” way of thinking. Had Romney articulated his plan besides cutting taxes for everyone which most hear as “cutting taxes for the top” he had a really good shot.

They BOTH suck

November 8th, 2012
10:07 am

Kyle

Agree on some points and not on others, but overall a good article.

_____________________________________

I see the whining continues unabated. Expected no surprise.
Carry on.

:-)

Centrist

November 8th, 2012
10:09 am

Most Republican House members are in secure districts – especially since there are so many Republican statehouses that gerrymanded them based on the 2010 census. They may give a little more now, but they won’t cave. There was no mandate for that.

The Tea Party is alive and well, and will do another big push for the mid-term elections they did so well in Obama’s first term. It is almost automatic that the presidential party does well in mid-term elections. It will all depend on where we stand on taxes, spending, deficits, and debt then.

They, along with Obama, came close to a “Grand Bargain” when the Tea Party Republicans got elected, but Democratic Senators talked Obama out of it as they wanted to have the issue instead of a settlement. It may happen again – but Democrats have to worry about off year elections when the Republicans might sweep them again. Some of them actually worry about the deficit and debt. Obama doesn’t need to demagogue the issue again since he won’t face the voters. Neither side wants the economy to crater with sequestration and tax increases across the board – so either they punt it further down the road, or (less likely) strike a deal. Everyone will take credit (and flak), but either 2012 or 2013 is the time to get it done to de-escalate these issues and help our economy.

JDW

November 8th, 2012
10:09 am

Kyle, the point you miss in the question Should the Republicans move to the left is just how far the Republicans have moved to the Right since 1980. This at its root is going to be the undoing of the party. On issues such as taxes, immigration, social equality and even defense the party has lost touch.

I am going to pick on taxes for a bit. Every Conservative wants to claim the argument that cutting taxes is good for the economy. Like all distorted arguments there is a kernel of truth…when Reagan cut taxes from a top rate of 70% that was good. When Bush cut taxes from a top rate of 39% that was bad. Cutting taxes is not a never ending process. The only thing you create is deficits which is just what we got. Get off the Grover Norquist mantra of flushing government down a bathtub and create solutions.

Now lets take social equality. Republicans have to get over the concept that they can somehow foist their standard of individual behavior on others. I don’t care if the issue is gay marriage, abortion or immigration Republicans have to move back to the idea of live and let live or they will continue to be isolated.

Now the Tea Party. They are the last gasp of the old, white males that begin to seek refuge in the Republican Party after 1964. This….

“The original animating concern of the tea party — halting the rapid growth of the federal government, from bailouts to debt to Obamacare — could have been a political winner Tuesday.”

is a fallacy. What could have been a winner is smart solutions not Gubment is Bad horse$h!t.

monty

November 8th, 2012
10:09 am

Well in four years if all goes as feared, those moderates(so they say) are going to come streaming back to the conservative fiscal side of things. IF the economy perks up and jobs come back and Obama Care is not seen as a drag on the economy then say hello to Hillary Rottam Clinton for 8 years.Sad to say that the only chance Repubs have is if nothing short of disaster occurs.

East Cobb RINO, Inc (LLC)

November 8th, 2012
10:10 am

GOP needs to devote all of the time and energy to coming up with real solutions and ditch the scorched earth attacks from the fringes of the party. They need to get back to serving the people of the USA first and only and not signing pledges to unelected officials that handcuff them from doing their jobs.

Finn McCool (The System isn't Broken; It's Fixed)

November 8th, 2012
10:11 am

Rachel Maddow last night begging Cons to embrace more reality-based news sources because the country needs them to be informed so they can operate in the democratic process.

Kyle Wingfield

November 8th, 2012
10:12 am

Jon @ 10:01: Both major national parties include people who think about various issues differently. To your point about abortion and the MSM: Why did Obama’s opposition to a ban on partial-birth abortion not make it into the headlines the way Akin’s and Mourdock’s comments did? Supporting a measure to kill a baby outside the womb that survived an attempted abortion is the position of an extremist. Yet only one side is portrayed as being ideologically extreme on the issue. That said, you have to recognize that’s the way the game is played — and learn how to express your beliefs in a way that doesn’t hurt your own cause.

Road Scholar

November 8th, 2012
10:12 am

Let’s take on the easy one:
I Report: Whaaaaaaa! You couldn’t be more wrong!

Kyle: Republicans must drop social conservatism

No, but stop legislating it to all. Your party acts like all are arch christian men. That they are the ONLY ONES who will tell us how to live our lives.There are many more religions, religious beliefs, and some w/o religious affiliation. Recognize not all have or should they have your views.Embrace diversity in lifestyle and race. You can be right to life…but do not legislate it to those who do not share your views. God is the ultimate judge. People need to be responsible for THEIR decisions when it comes to abortion.

Republicans have to move toward the left.
No. Just closer to the center. They must also have a clear opinion of what they stand for and what they will do.

flagboy?

November 8th, 2012
10:15 am

1. Agree.

2. Tea party needs to get back to what it was originally, about holding politicians accountable, whether they be Democratic or Republican. I think some of the demonization of the Tea Party is stupid, some of it is self-imposed. . . some.

3. Of course. Rubio is a good start. I honestly think he’s the next candidate. Come up with a viable solution for dealing with the illegals that are here already (amnesty. . . ), THEN come up with a plan for stopping more illegal immigration. Never going to happen entirely, but most people will support controling/policing the borders.

4. Fighting gay marriage is a loser. Abortion is a personal issue and really shouldn’t have government involvment.

5. I think a few years equals about 10-15.

Peadawg

November 8th, 2012
10:15 am

Stop trying to turn this country into a Theocracy. Believe what you want to believe. But when we try to force our beliefs on other and try to turn this country into a Theocracy, we’re no better than the countries in the Middle East.

Kyle Wingfield

November 8th, 2012
10:15 am

East Cobb RINO @ 10:03: You’re right, I’m not suggesting the GOP abandon its principles — because I think those principles can work for, and attract, a much wider variety of people than the GOP now tries to attract. But the burden is on Republicans now to try to demonstrate that to more voters.

carlosgvv

November 8th, 2012
10:16 am

Kyle

1. The Party needs to move closer to the center.

2. The Tea Party IS the far right and must go.

3. Social Conservatism must be modified.

Your essay shows, essentially, you’re not willing to give up much, if any of the ideology which caused this defeat and will surely cause another defeat in 2016 if changes aren’t made.

Kyle Wingfield

November 8th, 2012
10:18 am

Euclid @ 10:05: No, likely-voter polls still are more art than science. That’s why every pollster doesn’t come up with the same numbers — they have different opinions of what the electorate will look like, i.e. who the likely voters are. Many of us felt some pollsters were being unrealistic to expect the electorate to look more or less the same, in terms of partisan breakdown, as in 2008. It turns out they were right. But that certainly doesn’t mean they’re infallible.

Kyle Wingfield

November 8th, 2012
10:19 am

Some people @ 10:07: No conservative I know believes or says “Tax cuts cure all.” That’s a caricature of supply-side economics. A successful caricature, but a caricature nonetheless.

barking frog

November 8th, 2012
10:19 am

Doesn’t seem to be much the Republicans can do except drift farther
right and accept management similar to the Democrats which has been
a coalition of many ideologies for years. Control has been lost.

Some people are stupid

November 8th, 2012
10:19 am

And you probably shouldn’t highlight your minority stars just because they are minorities. How about just highlighting your stars regardless of race. Kinda sounds like the guy who says I’m not racist because I have black friends.

Rafe Hollister, suffering through Oblamer's ineptocracy

November 8th, 2012
10:20 am

Kyle, everyone but Finn recognized what the italics meant.

I’m afraid that we have taken a fork in the road and that there is no going back. The fork was for more government programs and entitlements and more taxes to fund those. As Rush says, it is not possible in a nation of children (uninformed, not experienced in the harms of debt, and used to being given things/instant gratification) to defeat Santa Claus, when the alternative is work hard, delay your gratification, save, and be your own Santa.

The GOP will have to evolve to a Dem light philosophy, that will leave many of us without a party, in order to survive the new makeup of America. They absolutely have to attract hispanics, maintain their hold on white voters, and educate those who will listen to the harm of debts and deficits. I don’t think they can continue to try to reform Soc Sec and Medicare, those programs seem to be beyond reform, even if they go broke. They are going to have to work with Hispanics on immigration reform and get something done and appear to be the ones making it happen.

I’m like Dennis Miller, America has taken a turn. I nor he like the direction it is heading, more socialistic and more government control, but obviously that is what people want. They seem to want security and stability and if they have to give up some of their freedom, so be it. And like Miller, those who are killing themselves in this economy to work two jobs and make 40K a year, ought to just let it go, start enjoying life for once, spend time with their families, and take the government handouts. When you eliminate all the expenses of working, commuting, payroll taxes, gasoline, etc., they are going to be better off with the handouts.

I’m afraid at some point it will all come crashing down, but you are not going to convince the majority of that fact. No one in todays generation seems to be willing to put off life’s conveniences, for a better life for their grandchildren. The old timers like me that believed in hard work, delayed gratification, leaving your children better off than you were, are dying out and will not be replaced.

You can fight a battle you can’t win and be miserable or just say que sera que. I will still vote for the most conservative candidate, but even in Georgia, you can see the inevitability of the coming change. We will have two parties, liberal to the extreme, and liberal lite, I’m afraid. Just my take on the current situation.

JF McNamara

November 8th, 2012
10:20 am

Only one thing needs to be done. Stop being hateful. That goes over well with the base, but flops with everyone else.

Here is you message (from outside the echo chamber) on minorities:

Black people are stupid and vote Democrat only. In addition, they are all lazy and want government assistance. Latinos are all criminals and need to be deported. They are also stealing our government services. Women aren’t smart enough to figure out what’s right for them. We need to tell them, and back that up with some rantings on Jesus. Young people are also stupid because they are young. They’ll turn Republican when they get older.

It comes off like, “We are smarter and better than everyone else, but they don’t realize it. What’s wrong with you people.”

Travis McGee

November 8th, 2012
10:22 am

My guess is the analysts will determine that the Republican Cause failed because Romney was not conservative enough. As a life-long Democrat, I hope that is the conclusion they reach because that erroneous assumption will allow Democrats to occupy the White House for the foreseeable future.

My wife has voted Republican since 1964 and the Tea Party was able to accomplish what I’ve been unable to do in 51 years of married life — the radical positions of the Tea Party caused by wife to join with me in electing Obama!

Thanks, Tea Party!

Easy E

November 8th, 2012
10:22 am

Great blog Kyle. However, I disagree with your #1 Point:

The GOP dont have to move to the left, they have to inch towards the center which means that they have to move left. Herein lies the problem which I see with the GOP which is the way their message is crafted and absorbed by the voting populace. (by the way I cant vote because of my nationality so I am neither Democrat nor Republican).

The message about abortion, immigration, taxes, economy issues that the GOP have are reasonable. It is the way they are crafted that turns people off…or the way the Democratic party HELPS the GOP party craft their message is what makes people rethink voting for the GOP party..(and it does not help that you have politicians like Murdock et al essentially reinforcing that message).

There was something interesting I read the other day: That most right-leaning media networks are not helping the GOP..in that they FOCUS on telling their audience ONLY what they need to know/hear or what fires them up. Considering that that fervent base is ever shrinking due to the changing ethnicity of this country, this is not a good look for the GOP. Again the GOP can change this by crafting a “we are not AGAINST you message, we are FOR you” message. How?

(1) Repudiate that 47% message that Romney brought up. Most polls mentioned that there is a growing percentage of independent voters. When I hear a candidate say “Oh 47% of you dont matter to me because you are constantly on the government’s dole, it makes me really think twice about voting for such a candidate. And the other problem with such a statement is that it is flat out WRONG and insulting. No need to go to specifics here, maybe another day.

(2) Recraft the immigration message- 75% of Hispanics voted for the Dems vs 25% for the Repubs. Especially since that they are one of the fastest growing demographics, it is almost impossible to be seen associated with a message that immigration reform that people percieve as all illegal immigrants being booted out of the US. Recrafting it can mean having buck the GOP party mantra and figure out immigration policies that can make hispanics go hmmn..maybe this candidate/party isnt against me after all. Failure to do that will amount to an ever increasing electorate that shuns your party’s candidate.

(3) Big business is not your friend. For all the insane and unbelievable amounts of money poured into the general election by Super PAC’s and corporations at the end of the day, the voters are the one who matter. If you have a candidate who is all pro-business, he or she will NEVER have the interests of the people (read:we the PEOPLE or we the voters) at heart..and vice versa. The Dems have constantly crafted the message that they are for the people, and the GOP have not been really savvy on creating such a message. Now being for the people does not mean that big business has to/or will suffer, NO. But when people see a candidate as only representing big business, they go hmmn..maybe I will be better off voting for the other party. A stronger electorate (financially) is always good for business anyway.

(4) Social issues: Again, GOP have staked out their positions on these social issues and that is not the issue. The issue is the way their stance or messages are being percieved (no thanks to Murdock and co). The voters who might support these issues might see the way the message is being crafted and go wow..I dont want to be associated with that..

(5) Be an all-inclusive party: I wish i could paste a picture on this blog: It was a screen shot of both the Dems and Repub’s “victory parties”. One picture showed Americans from all races, while the other picture showed a picture of only white people. Now maybe Chicago is more ethnically diverse than Boston but unfortunately that is a picture that everyone sees. And considering how ethically diverse that America is becoming, that is definitely a picture that you want to change if you want to remain politically relevant in the future.

Kyle Wingfield

November 8th, 2012
10:22 am

Centrist @ 10:09: I think there’s an excellent chance Obama and Boehner re-visit that grand bargain they almost struck in 2011, cutting out Reid once again. If they do it soon, Obama will be able to get away with it in the Senate because of the afterglow of his re-election (that afterglow won’t last very long, as all second-term presidents learn). Boehner will probably be able to get away with it, too, in light of the election results — although he’ll probably also need Obama to twist some House Democrats’ arms. As Woodward recorded in his latest book, Obama hasn’t always been willing to engage members of Congress that way. If he doesn’t change, truly nothing will happen in Congress during the next two years.

Max

November 8th, 2012
10:24 am

The obsession with welfare needs to end. Stick to the core principals.

Bye Bye Cheesy Grits

November 8th, 2012
10:24 am

When you look at the changing demographics in this country the Republicans better do something.

They still have a strong base but it just inst enough to win nationally anymore.

Nor will it ever be again.

detritusUSA

November 8th, 2012
10:24 am

The republican party is the party of the wealthy and have been since the end of the civil war. They are against taxes, unions, social programs that benefit ordinary Americans. They will never change these core values of their party. They don’t need to anyway, because they can influence government through their money given to politicians and quit the charade that conservatism is good for America.

Not Blind

November 8th, 2012
10:25 am

Wizzing into the wind. The libs have taken over the education system, have hijacked the 14th Amendment and have created a huge group of voters dependent on government redistribution of wealth. Add in the unions and you have a winning majority for every foreseeable presidential election. The conservatives only source of “power” will be the congress and even that is tenuous.

Centrist

November 8th, 2012
10:26 am

The election postmortem is missing some key facts. Obama got 10 million less votes than he did last time. Romney got 3 million less votes than McCain. There WAS a drop in voter turnout/enthusiasm.The results were much closer, and it was against an incumbent president. The next presidential election will not have an incumbent. Hillary is the only re-run for the Democrats, and Rubio looks to be positioned for the Republicans.

Obama is the first president as an incumbent to win re-election by a smaller margin than that by which he was elected in the first place. McKinley, Woodrow Wilson, FDR, Eisenhower, Nixon, Reagan, and Clinton all increased their re-election vote share significantly. Obama’s dropped from a 7 point margin over McCain to a 1 point margin over Romney. Such lack of political capital will make him a lame duck faster than any other incumbent term president who never had/has to face the voters again.

Road Scholar

November 8th, 2012
10:26 am

ATLien: Exactly.If the talk show “warriors” are soooooooo right, why do they hide behind their microphones and not run for office. They incite. They feel they educate. But with the venom, pandering, and dismissing others views and thoughts (they rarely LISTEN when a caller speaks unless they agree with them), they slant their arguments to the point of distortion of the truth. You can be opinionated, but respect others points of view.

Oh and stop the insulting. This goes for all sides.

Bye Bye Cheesy Grits

November 8th, 2012
10:26 am

I notice still….

Nary a word on how the New York Times and Nate Silver and all the polls nailed it.

We were told how they were biased and there couldn’t be that many Democrats out there.

Meanwhile Fox and Dick Morris and Kyle’s gut were way way off.

Nary a word.

Aquagirl

November 8th, 2012
10:26 am

Why did Obama’s opposition to a ban on partial-birth abortion not make it into the headlines the way Akin’s and Mourdock’s comments did?

Some of the commentary from Republicans made it clear they are just plain stupid and misinformed. They advocate political policies based on idiot ideas they picked up on the playground in third grade.

People who don’t know what the hell they’re talking about but still want to control your life are damned scary. That’s rife in the Republican/conservative party. Actual stupidity and ignorance are frighteningly common. Creationism, anti-vaccine nuttery, global warming denialism, birtherism….the list goes on and on.

A lot of Kyle’s points could be consolidated under “stop being the party of stupid.”

zinc

November 8th, 2012
10:27 am

1. Stop pandering to evangelicals. Defined religion is no longer a mainstream belief.
2. Accept that the 1960’s nuclear family no longer exist. Families look different today.
3. Drop some of the social issues. Don’t give up but you are losing ground. Stop making them the forefront of your campaign.
4. Get serious about financial reform. Present realistic ideas, not ideological ones.
5. Compromise. Two wrongs don’t make a right.
6. Accept that there are Americans who are displaced due to socioeconomics. They are just as important as a wealthy person receiving a tax break.

real john

November 8th, 2012
10:27 am

Kyle:

While I mostly agree with your views, the biggest area is reaching out to young voters and Hispanic voters. The African Americans, Jewish, and union voters will never vote Repub.

However, as I have mentioned on Jay’s blogs, the night is darkest just before dawn…

The Obama, Pelosi, Schummer, Reid economic policies are 100% destined to fail. The math doesn’t even come close to adding up. The Democratic party will implode our economy and thus insure Repub control for about 10 years.

I think Boenher is about to play Obama and the Dems. Instead of fighting Obama, lets give them what they want. He wants to raise taxes on the weathly, go ahead. With the wars practically done and the “tax the rich,” we will still face trillion dollar defecits..how will the libs explain that???

They can’t. The taxes will barely make a dent in our problem. The Dems know this, but are too afraid to admit that spending is a FAR LARGER issue.

atler8

November 8th, 2012
10:28 am

I Report:
Regarding your “Any thoughts?”
I think that you are either juiced up on caffeine or just over the top. Whichever is the case, take a break & chill please.
JDW
You made some great points a moment ago, as did Jon early on here.
I spoke on the phone with a tea party contact in my locality well over a year ago. After a lengthy & civil conversation with her, she totally lost me when she fell into a rant about the “…Communists in our county government..” As I stepped back & reflected later on, I realized how much of what she had said to me had been a total crock.
.

JPP

November 8th, 2012
10:28 am

Was listening to conservative radio yesterday and the main theme was “We are losing this country of ours, the takers and lazy people won.” Until they get out of that mindset, not much will change……

Some people are stupid

November 8th, 2012
10:28 am

Kyle,

Then why has every Republican presidential candidate argued for tax cuts every time. Seriously, I’ve only been alive since Reagan and let’s see :
H. W Bush: No New Taxes.
Bob Dole:15% Across The Board Reduction
W. Bush: Bush Tax Cuts
Romney: 20 % across the Board reducition