Georgia charter schools amendment gets boost from RNC

In a state as red as Georgia, local suspense concerning the presidential race died with March’s GOP primary. Nor will any coattails worn by Mitt Romney sweep across our red clay: The only contested statewide races for November are the oft-neglected ones for the Public Service Commission.

No, the only question facing everyone from Trenton to Thomasville whose outcome is unclear is the charter-schools constitutional amendment. One surprise from last week’s GOP convention was that champions of the amendment, and school choice more broadly, got a three-pronged boost.

Let’s hope they paid attention. And are cutting ads from the video.

It came from the very top of the party, as Romney himself said education reform would be one of his tools for reinvigorating the economy. Specifically, he said, “When it comes to the school your child will attend, every parent should have a choice, and every child should have a chance.”

Florida’s Jeb Bush, whose gubernatorial record on education reform was second to none, sounded a similar note after reciting familiar statistics about U.S. students’ slipping global competitiveness.

“We say that every child in America has an equal opportunity,” he said. “Tell that to a parent stuck in a school” — i.e., a parent who can’t afford choices for her child — “where there is no leadership.”

“The sad truth,” he continued, “is that equality of opportunity doesn’t exist in many of our schools. We give some kids a chance, but not all. That failure is the great moral and economic issue of our time. And it’s hurting all of America.”

But no one in Tampa made a more eloquent or powerful pitch for confronting the crisis of status quo-ism in education than Condoleezza Rice.

“You see,” she said, “the essence of America, what really unites us, is not nationality or ethnicity or religion. It is an idea. And what an idea it is. That you can come from humble circumstances and you can do great things, that it does not matter where you came from, it matters where you are going. …

“But today, when I can look at your zip code and I can tell whether you’re going to get a good education, can I honestly say it does not matter where you came from, it matters where you are going? The crisis in k-12 education is a threat to the very fabric of who we are.”

Rice pointed to three principles of reform that are anathema to the educational establishment but obvious to many of us:

“We need great teachers, not poor ones and not mediocre ones. We have to have high standards for our kids, because self-esteem comes from achievement, not from lax standards and false praise.

“And we need to give parents greater choice, particularly poor parents whose kids, very often minorities, are trapped in failing neighborhood schools.”

“This,” said Rice, who grew up in segregated Birmingham but became the face of America as our secretary of state, “is the civil rights issue of our day.”

To hear the status quo-ists tell it, to challenge teacher tenure is to denigrate the profession. No, protecting poor and mediocre teachers at the expense of children and learning is what debases the profession.

To hear the anti-reformists tell it, to insist on high standards for children is to adopt the warped priority of “teaching to the test.” No, the idea that well-taught students won’t perform well on standardized tests — or, worse, that measuring success will drive even good teachers to cheat — is what’s warped.

And to hear the educational establishment tell it, to let parents choose where to spend the tax dollars already allocated for their children’s education is to seek the destruction of the public school system. No, whistling past the graveyard of failing schools and wasted potential, suggesting we only pump more money into an educational system that already far out-spends many higher-performing countries, is what’s already causing many parts of the system to crumble around us.

May Rice’s words reach many more Georgians than the ones who watched her speak last week.

– By Kyle Wingfield

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256 comments Add your comment

I Report (-: You Whine )-: mmm, mmmm, mmmmm! Just sayin...

September 6th, 2012
7:15 am

Most parents would rather have their children educated instead of brainwashed and the libs intrenched in the public school system are soaked in the Koolaid.

Run them off and the problem is solved.

Mikey D.

September 6th, 2012
7:47 am

Ah yes, the “small government and local control” republicans pushing once again for an expansion of power at the capitol. I guess hypocrisy is a virtue.

Justin

September 6th, 2012
7:56 am

I agree with the previous comment. Get rid of the teachers that are not teaching and hold all of them to a higher standard. Simply “teaching to the test” is not really teaching. Education is more than just reciting information from a book. Our money should be spent to improve the current school system, not in creating more schools that only exacerbate the current problem of some children having better opportunities than others.

Michael H. Smith

September 6th, 2012
7:58 am

And to hear the educational establishment tell it, to let parents choose where to spend the tax dollars already allocated for their children’s education is to seek the destruction of the public school system.

To let those same voice of that “educational establishment” choose where to spend the tax dollars for the children’s education is to seek the destruction of far too many young minds who are the last best hope for this country’s ability to compete in the global economy.

How many parents or adults without children in this country would prefer to see the waste of young minds and the socioeconomic destruction of the United States in order to save the government monopoly of education known as the public school system?

American children do well against European kids up to about middle school. Thereafter our children trail European kids academically. In Europe, the parents and their kids have school choice, where income, geography, teachers unions, mediocre teachers or the monopoly of a failing educational system can keep the European kids who have school choice from getting the very best possible education from the very best schools. School administrator and teachers in those European schools know they must perform and the children must learn or else the children will find another school and they will be out of a job.

tom paine

September 6th, 2012
8:13 am

A lot of foreign schools route children of different abilities to different schools at a certain age. That way, children who need to learn a trade might learn something useful and children who should go to college go to college prep schools. We might benefit from that sort of thing. I’m not sure even that would be enough for some systems, as support for some public schools has declined and calls for vouchers have increased since the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Moving to the suburbs was the primary solution for years, but now that we’ve created these “fill-in-the-blank” religious schools all over the place, they need an ever increasing flow of students to stay afloat. This further erodes support for public schools.

Michael H. Smith

September 6th, 2012
8:14 am

Our money should be spent to improve the current school system

That approach has been tried as long as I can remember in this state and it has repeatedly failed to produce the desired results. As long as the parents and their children do not control their portion of taxpayer education dollars, there will always be a child who gets trapped in a failing school because of income and geography when they shouldn’t be.

When you have money, as everyone knows, you have choices and the power to change your results.

Michael H. Smith

September 6th, 2012
8:19 am

Moving to the suburbs was the primary solution for years, but now that we’ve created these “fill-in-the-blank” religious schools all over the place, they need an ever increasing flow of students to stay afloat. This further erodes support for public schools.

How does a child who does not receive a penny of public education funds going to a private religious school erode support for public schools when in truth the public schools are gaining monetarily?

Finn McCool (The System isn't Broken; It's Fixed)

September 6th, 2012
8:28 am

Romney himself said education reform would be one of his tools for reinvigorating the economy.

His reform is a plan to siphon off any funds for education for the poor, minorities, etc and funnel that money to the “haves” so their children can go to private schools for a little less money.

Finn McCool (The System isn't Broken; It's Fixed)

September 6th, 2012
8:31 am

A lot of foreign schools route children of different abilities to different schools at a certain age.

Can you see where the corruption would creep in and take this over here in America? Someone with means would not fathom their child being sent to a “trade” school so, next thing you know, checkbooks and favors would start appearing.

Finn McCool (The System isn't Broken; It's Fixed)

September 6th, 2012
8:34 am

have their children educated instead of brainwashed

Yes, and we ARE coming to take yer guns and force Sharia law on you!!!

Michael H. smith

September 6th, 2012
8:35 am

Yes, those poor teacher unions and the lousy teachers they protect that contribute quid pro quo to elect democrats can’t allow that siphon to divert funds from their funnel… Too many children might get an education and become smart enough to vote for Republicans! :lol:

Finn McCool (The System isn't Broken; It's Fixed)

September 6th, 2012
8:47 am

I don’t care who they vote for. This country is based on a consumer society which requires people to have money to buy stuff. Getting everyone educated leads to empoyability which leads to bank accounts which leads to purchase power.

Spending money that could help someone who really needs the help is more important than saving an upper class family a couple thousand a year on their private school tuition.

jconservative

September 6th, 2012
8:48 am

We treat kids in the US as if they are to dumb to learn. And in way to many cases they are being taught by teachers who were treated as if they were to dumb to learn.

Every child should be able to speak and read a foreign language by ten years of age. But we do not believe they have the ability.

If that takes charter schools, so be it. If that takes firing every teacher and starting over, so be it.

Ed Advocate

September 6th, 2012
8:51 am

I still don’t understand why some Republican’s are supporting GA’s charter school amendment. It creates new unnecessary state government, diminishes local control, and is 100% unfunded. Local property taxes are sure to rise as a result of passage. We should demand legislators return to the drawing board to come up with meaningful education reform. John Barge, a true conservative, is right on target in his opposition to this plan. The amendment smacks of paternalistic government waste–reminds me of TSPLOST–and we know what GA voters thought of that.

Whirled Peas

September 6th, 2012
8:52 am

When are we going to wake up and rid ourselves of the government run monopoly school system? Monopolies, almost by definition, are slow moving and unresponsive. If we had not boken up AT&T and the Bell System in the 1970’s, we would probably not have an internet today. The biggest obstacle is the teachers unions which spend billions in political contributions defending the host that the teachers have their tentacles in.

Michael H. Smith

September 6th, 2012
8:52 am

Spending money that could help someone who really needs the help is more important than saving an upper class family a couple thousand a year on their private school tuition.

Piffle

It is the other way round, money is being kept from those who really need help/money to get out of a failing school system with lousy teachers.

And you most certainly do care about who gets elected you big liar.

Finn McCool (The System isn't Broken; It's Fixed)

September 6th, 2012
8:54 am

“We need great teachers, not poor ones and not mediocre ones.

Why do you think the best minds of this country no longer go into science, health, teaching? it’s the pay, stoopid!

Herein lies the hypocrisy of the Conservatives regarding schools and teachers. Maybe if you allow teachers to earn a decent wage without harassing them about their unions or trying to take away their benefits you might get a better quality of talent in the teacher pool?

If you took all stock traders and began cutting their pay and began denying their benefits, do you think most of the brighter ones would go do something that was more lucrative?

Finn McCool (The System isn't Broken; It's Fixed)

September 6th, 2012
8:56 am

If we had not boken up AT&T and the Bell System in the 1970’s, we would probably not have an internet today.

LOL. More Republican “gut” history.

Buzzy

September 6th, 2012
8:56 am

The best teacher in the world can’t make up for a parent who doesn’t value learning in the home. I think we have more of a parent problem today than a teacher problem.

Finn McCool (The System isn't Broken; It's Fixed)

September 6th, 2012
8:59 am

money is being kept from those who really need help/money to get out of a failing school system with lousy teachers.

conservative welfare = it sucks when those people benefit but it’s important when we benefit from it.

Conservatives say government is BAD….unless you are talking about funneling money to my upper class bank account.

Finn McCool (The System isn't Broken; It's Fixed)

September 6th, 2012
9:01 am

Somebody give Michael H Smith a handout before his eyes start welling with tears.

“Somebody give me a tax break ALREADY…before I drown”

“I gotta have it…..I gotta have a tax break or I’ll dieeeeeee!!!!”

Finn McCool (The System isn't Broken; It's Fixed)

September 6th, 2012
9:23 am

since 1961, the Republicans have held the White House 28 years, the Democrats 24. In those 52 years, our economy produced 66 million private sector jobs. What’s the jobs score? Republicans 24 million, Democrats 42 million!

~Bill Clinton

And Cons want to go back to that trickle down BS with more tax cuts…..

Just Saying..

September 6th, 2012
9:26 am

Wow, did you see Clint Eastwood?

Michael H. Smith

September 6th, 2012
9:34 am

Finn McCool (The System isn’t Broken; It’s Fixed)

I don’t need a tax break and I, like many others, don’t need your whiny lies to defend democrats and unions.

Finn McCool (The System isn't Broken; It's Fixed)

September 6th, 2012
9:40 am

tsplost? how did we get over onto that? deflecting?

BuckeyeInGa

September 6th, 2012
9:46 am

How much would it cost to attend a charter school? Who decides which students are able to attend?

Aquagirl

September 6th, 2012
9:49 am

how did we get over onto that? deflecting?

For some reason they’re incredibly proud that after more than a decade of Republican rule, we have no plan for handling traffic.

You can spot these people at football games cheering when their own team fumbles.

Michael H. Smith

September 6th, 2012
9:50 am

Finn McCool (The System isn’t Broken; It’s Fixed)

Oh, did I gloat?

Okay Kyle, but it does go to my point that Finn is a socialist democrat hack that will tell any lie for the socialist democrat cause.

Michael H. Smith

September 6th, 2012
9:51 am

You can spot these people at football games cheering when their own team fumbles

You and Finn losing again, got to love it.

Michael H. Smith

September 6th, 2012
9:52 am

Got to go support some AJC advertisers for now.

azazel

September 6th, 2012
9:57 am

the first book a child should read at home with parents is Newton’s Principia, in Latin– a free ibook, but beware it is not for those who believe humans played with dinosaurs

Aquagirl

September 6th, 2012
9:59 am

You and Finn losing again, got to love it.

The whoopfest coming out of the DNC is making you cranky, Michael. Make sure you get a nap in today. That works better than inventing imaginary tsplost balls and spiking them in your own pockmarked end zone.

Del

September 6th, 2012
10:18 am

We have ourselves to blame for the deterioration within our national public school system. The hard-left took hold of our colleges and universities a long time ago and like a cancer there’s been a metastasis of that ideology into our K-12 public school system. We’ve been too apathetic and have looked the other way, while educators who put ideology ahead of education continue to fail our children along with the tax paying public. We’re continually hearing about school board scandals and misbehaving teachers everywhere in the country. The current system is far too broken for repair.

Finn McCool (The System isn't Broken; It's Fixed)

September 6th, 2012
10:21 am

If you Cons were serious about helping American businesses you would be focused on creating a bigger better middle class – the group that represents the true job creators. The more people you have with money to spend the more revenue for US companies.

How do you assist with getting more people up from the lower class to the middle class? Increase the minimum wage, make benefits like health care and 401ks available, quit trying to pull out the stairs as people work to move up into the middle class.

Kyle Wingfield

September 6th, 2012
10:28 am

Finn @ 8:54: Per the most recent data available from the Bureau of Labor Statistics:

Average pay in Georgia, all occupations: $42,590
Average pay in Georgia, kindergarten teachers: $51,110 (20% more than average for all occupations)
Average pay in Georgia, elementary teachers: $53,530 (26% more)
Average pay in Georgia, middle school teachers: $53,520 (26% more)
Average pay in Georgia, secondary (i.e. high school) teachers: $53,510 (26% more)

Not to mention teachers have above-average benefits.

So, how much more would qualify as “decent”?

Gimme Gimme Gimme

September 6th, 2012
10:30 am

Finn gets schooled. Pun intended.

Finn McCool (The System isn't Broken; It's Fixed)

September 6th, 2012
10:36 am

That’s great Kyle, but your next op/ed about teachers will be something along the lines of “we have to break their unions” or “their benefits/pensions are killing us so we need to make cuts to it.”

Del

September 6th, 2012
10:43 am

Finn,

We don’t have a teachers union here in Georgia.

yuzeyurbrane

September 6th, 2012
10:44 am

Kyle, I don’t see how you see Condeleeza’s Rice’s statement as being an endorsement for state controlled charter schools. And both Romney’s and Bush’s quotes leave them plenty of political wiggle room. But, of course, that is what politicians do, especially Romney. One of the many problems with the Georgia amendment is that it is not designed to help poor kids from failing public schools. It is designed help mostly middle class white kids who mostly are not from failing public schools and to enrich largely out-of-state for profit education corporations. Kind of a a mother lode of k-12 cash for the likes of Capella University, Inc. Not to even mention that education will likely become the new watering hole for thirsty politicians now that the traditional transportation source is no longer user friendly because of the T-Splost defeat. Folks, we are talking billions here and you don’t think you will see a few Deal relatives hired as consultants? Moving from mere logic to fact, more than $400,000 of the $500,000 raised so far to finance the pro-state control Amendment has come from out-of-state sources. Real grass roots! And, Kyle, I don’t understand why you continue to distort the local parent control embodied in elected local school boards. Isn’t this level of government, which is about as close to the people as you can get, the exact thing you conservatives usually scream for? Instead, you want to replace their role in charter schools with a new state board appointed by Governor Deal? And you assume that parents at these state charters will have more control over their schools than a very active PTA? No, the agenda will be set by the state and the for-profit education corporations that will be hired to manage these schools, and he that controls the agenda controls the program.

td

September 6th, 2012
10:56 am

Kyle,

I support Charter schools and I am a conservative and agree with Dr. Barge on this issue 100% and am totally opposed to this proposed amendment.

Can you either answer this question or find an answer to this question:

If we already elect local school boards and they have the authority to constitute charter schools and then there is an appeal procedure to the state BOE (appointed by the governor) and the head of the DOE is an elected official then why do we need another commission (appointed by the Speaker, Senate President and Governor) to do the same job and answer to the State BOE?

This sounds fishy to me.

Finn McCool (The System isn't Broken; It's Fixed)

September 6th, 2012
10:58 am

he that controls the agenda controls the program.

We’re on our way to Texas-style textbooks. Here’s some tidbits:
• Saying Senator Joe McCarthy was correct to charge that the U.S. government was infiltrated by communists.
• Saying Thomas Jefferson did not play a major role among the founding fathers, and removing him from a list of figures whose writings inspired late-18th-century and 19th-century revolutions elsewhere.
• Requiring teaching that the country’s founding fathers were all Christians.
• Questioning the separation of church and state and refusing an amendment declaring that, “the founding fathers protected religious freedom in America by barring the government from promoting or disfavoring any particular religion above all others.”
• Ordering that the word “capitalism” be replaced in all textbooks with the “free-enterprise system.”
http://www.alternet.org/news-amp-politics/6-reasons-we-need-protect-america-texas-politicians?page=0%2C1

Kyle Wingfield

September 6th, 2012
11:00 am

yuze @ 10:44: “State-controlled” is a misnomer. They would be “state-chartered.” And they would be state-chartered because, in too many cases, local school boards are blocking the creation of charter schools because they don’t want the competition.

“it is not designed to help poor kids from failing public schools. It is designed help mostly middle class white kids who mostly are not from failing public schools and to enrich largely out-of-state for profit education corporations.” You have bought the establishment’s faux argument hook, line and sinker. Let me ask you this: If the same amount of money, or less, is spent per student, why do you care whether some of it goes to pay a private school operator or to inflated central-office salaries in a traditional school district? APS spends hundreds of dollars per student more on central administration than almost every other school district in Georgia (I believe it is hundreds more than any district, but I am going off memory here so I will err on the side of caution) and yet under-performs most of them. That’s somehow better than a profit for a company operating a better-performing charter school?

“Folks, we are talking billions here…” — that is an exaggeration of epic proportions. Not only because we’re actually talking, at most, tens of millions, but also because taxpayers spend less on the average charter school student than on the average traditional public-schools student — meaning, whatever is spent will be less than what would have been spent.

“the local parent control embodied in elected local school boards” — I prefer the local parent control embodied in … local parent control. No control is more local than that which belongs to parents. The local school board may create and run schools that are perfectly fine for two-thirds, heck, even 90 percent of the students in their district. The question posed here is: Why stand in the way of letting the other kids and parents have access to options that work better for them? We are going to spend the money anyway; why would we not want it to be spent as productively as possible?

“a new state board”: It is worth pointing out that we are simply returning to a system that worked well for several years, before local districts sued to keep their hands on more state money. Let me repeat that: What local districts disliked about the old arrangement was that it deprived them of state funding (which was offset by the local money they weren’t spending on the students they weren’t teaching, but whatever). It was always about money for them. Now it’s about control. Not students, or learning, or outcomes.

Kyle Wingfield

September 6th, 2012
11:07 am

td @ 10:56: Because, as I explained before, the Supreme Court’s ruling only leaves the state board’s power intact because the state board’s power was not challenged in that particular lawsuit. But if you take the central point of the court’s ruling at face value — that the creation of schools is an exclusive power of local districts, except in the case of a very few number of cases such as state schools for the deaf or blind — then the state board does not really have that power, either. Vote down this amendment, and we are counting on local districts not to sue to overturn that arrangement, too. Given their demonstrated hostility to school choice, that’s not a risk I’m willing to take.

If they do sue, they will almost certainly win, based on the court’s (incorrect, imo) ruling. And then we will be back to needing another two-thirds majority in the Legislature — which wasn’t easy to get this time — and another referendum. Why not just do it now?

Centrist

September 6th, 2012
11:07 am

Although the AJC lists this blog under “Opinion” while Galloway’s Political Insider and Downey’s Get Schooled are listed as discussion blogs – those other two liberal opinion blogs will continue to go nuts over the charter school amendment.

The Georgia electorate outside the perimeter where the AJC has little influence will almost certainly support the amendment. It remains to be seen if the liberal inner city enclaves will overwhelm that support.

I demand to see Cheesy Grits Birth Certificate- Long Form Please

September 6th, 2012
11:12 am

Yeah

Throw out the Science Books boys.

It will be replaced with Religion in Charter schools.

With your tax dollars.

http://www.motherjones.com/blue-marble/2012/07/photos-evangelical-curricula-louisiana-tax-dollars

A sample of what they teach kids in Charter schools in Louisiana.

Georgia is a joke.

td

September 6th, 2012
11:12 am

Kyle Wingfield

September 6th, 2012
11:07 am

OK, I will take your argument about the court and suing. Now, my next question as a conservative is why not write a amendment to give the power to the SBOE instead of a separate commission? Everything I have read on the subject states that the commission will work with the SDOE and be accountable to the SBOE so why should a conservative support this extra layer of government when we already have an apparatus in place to handle these appeals?

I demand to see Cheesy Grits Birth Certificate- Long Form Please

September 6th, 2012
11:18 am

Just more Republican BS.

Ill give you another example.

Republicans love to talk about Voter Fraud and needing an ID to vote.

But they NEVER talk about Voter Fraud with absentee ballots.

Why? Because absentee ballots favor them.

See they dont really care about voter fraud. That isn’t the point.

What a disgrace the GOP has become.

citizen

September 6th, 2012
11:18 am

Has the State made a compelling enough argument that it can prove that the current system is failing? If not, I would look for a lawsuit if this referendum were to pass and any federal/state tax dollars are spent to improve education due to the fact that the present process of educating our youth has failed our students. The Plantiff…a student in the present system up against the ‘Government’ in a new system. Can’t be done without the Government admitting they have failed our citizens based on a constitutional mandate.

Interested Observer

September 6th, 2012
11:18 am

It’s easy to make Georgia’s education system the best in the country and, if we wanted, the best in the world. How? More hours in the classroom per day, more days in the classroom per year, smaller classes, and attracting the best and the brightest to teach.

What is Georgia doing? The opposite. Across the state, schools are shrinking the length of the school year, laying off and/or furloughing teachers, and increasing class sizes. For years, the state has refused to fully fund local school districts required by the Quality Basic Education formula. Even if fully funded, the QBE formula mandates contributions to k-12 education that are wholly inadequate.

So, here’s what’s happening. The state undermines our schools by significantly reducing needed funding, then suggest that it’s the local school boards are dropping the ball. Having made that argument, Georgia legislators now ask us for permission to use taxpayer money to fund privately-run schools having had mixed results, charter schools, to solve the problem they largely created. They do this, of course, knowing that every dollar they spend for a new state-funded charter school is a dollar that they are withholding from our existing schools.

My opinion? The charter school amendment is a back-door approach, not to better Georgia’s education system, but to slowly privatize our schools. For me, the charter school amendment comes down to this… Vote yes, if you want a privatized school system in Georgia. Otherwise, vote no.

I’m voting no.

Michael H. Smith

September 6th, 2012
11:28 am

Oh let’s see now AquaGirl what was does all that claptrap you fired off at me have to do with this topic other than to deflect.

Well then again for someone who claims the Republicans have been in power for 70 years in this state explains why I like to remind you and Finn of your other loses. At least those have more to do with Finn’s lying than than the BS backslapping from a democrat convention or brucie’s bunk about crying for a tax break.

Interested Observer

September 6th, 2012
11:29 am

I also want to address the idea that some are making about allowing parents and students to decide, or as they say, the ultimate form of local control.

This argument is hogwash, I believe, because the education system doesn’t belong exclusively to parents and students. We’re all vested in our education system, we all pay for it, and we all own it. The quality of our communities, our states, our country, and our daily lives depend heavily on the quality of our education systems. So, I’m not buying into the argument that the rest of us should just pay our taxes, delegate all decisions to current parents of school-aged children, and keep our mouths shut.

Finn McCool (The System isn't Broken; It's Fixed)

September 6th, 2012
11:34 am

Did Todd Akin attend a charter school? a private school?

Major science knowledge someone imparted to that guy.

Oh, he only attended private schools all his life.

mwuahahahahahahahahahahaah

Kyle Wingfield

September 6th, 2012
11:35 am

td @ 11:12: Actually, the amendment itself states that the charter is issued by the State BOE. Here’s the relevant section, which also touches on some of the other complaints mentioned by others this morning:

“Special schools may include state charter schools; provided, however, that special schools shall only be public schools. A state charter school under this section shall mean a public school that operates under the terms of a charter between the State Board of Education and a charter petitioner; provided, however, that such state charter schools shall not include private, sectarian, religious, or for profit schools or private educational institutions; provided, further, that this Paragraph shall not be construed to prohibit a local board of education from establishing a local charter school pursuant to Article VIII, Section V, Paragraph I.”

The commission is established by the “enabling legislation” that spells out how the law would work in practice. Which means two things: 1) it is the way the state BOE would carry out its job of issuing charters; and 2) it doesn’t have to be the way the state BOE does that forever. It’s subject to change, because it’s not part of the constitutional amendment.

But I would point out this: The cost for the commission that Barge has cited is $1M. That sounds like a lot of money, until you realize: 1) it comes out to about 60 cents per pupil per year; and 2) the lower amount of tax money spent on charter-school students will far, far, far more than offset that $1M.

Michael H. Smith

September 6th, 2012
11:39 am

We got this liberal lying bunch on the ropes and they know it Kyle. We got the issue on the ballot and that scares the hell out of these losers, because they know this is one step closer to the complete freedom of school choice, which will defeat a corrupt failing system that should have been destroyed years ago that has mostly served an evil self-serving monopoly that has never given a dang about the education of children.

For them it is all about keeping their power and keeping our money from the children who need it most to get the best education their parents can buy for them anywhere they choose.

WOW

September 6th, 2012
11:40 am

Kyle:
The analysis of teacher pay is greatly skewed. As the husband of a Kindergarten teacher I can tell you that they all don’t make that much. It also doesn’t factor in the furlough days that they have incurred over the last few years or the amount of money that they spend on supplies. We don’t have any children and spend hundreds of dollars annually on supplies and that goes for not only my wife but the other teachers on her team.
It’s also not useful to compare to all occupations when you have low wage service workers decreasing the average. Teachers are all required to have at least a four year degree which is going to naturally make them higher paid. Im not saying they don’t make a decent wage, but they deserve and earn it.

Kyle Wingfield

September 6th, 2012
11:42 am

I demand to see Cheesy Grits Birth Certificate- Long Form Please

September 6th, 2012
11:45 am

We got the issue on the ballot and that scares the hell out of these losers,

No. We can just see past the BS.

All this is going to do is allow them to put Religion in the classroom instead of Science.

When education is privatized in Georgia thats the first thing they are going to do.

This state is already backwards enough.

Ultimately its the kids in Georgia that will lose.

And the country will have yet another reason to mock and laugh at Georgia.

Interested Observer

September 6th, 2012
11:49 am

In an earlier comment, Kyle compared the average pay of Georgia teachers to average pay of all Georgia occupations. That doesn’t appear to be an apples-to-apples comparison. The “all occupations” number, I assume, includes incomes low-skill, low-wage workers. In contrast, Georgia teachers are universally, college-educated. Not that it matters, but I’d be curious to see the comparison of the incomes of Georgia teachers with undergraduate degrees with other Georgia workers having undergraduate degrees and having jobs that require such degrees. I’d be curious to see the same comparison for Georgia teachers having graduate degrees.

I say, “not that it matters,” because I think it’s important that we pay teachers above average salaries and benefits so that, as I previously stated, we can attract the best and the brightest. The benefit being touted about charter schools is that they cost less per student. How do they do that? Charters save money, in part, by hiring less qualified educators, reducing compensation, and working them longer hours. The attitude seems to be that private companies are sticking it to middle class workers; publicly-funded schools should do the same. So much for hiring the best and the brightest to educate our kids.

I demand to see Cheesy Grits Birth Certificate- Long Form Please

September 6th, 2012
11:51 am

As the husband of a Kindergarten teacher I can tell you that they all don’t make that much.

Excellent point.

I know several teachers and they all talk about having to spend their own money so that the children do not go without.

Centrist

September 6th, 2012
11:52 am

WOW posted “Teachers are all required to have at least a four year degree which is going to naturally make them higher paid. Im not saying they don’t make a decent wage, but they deserve and earn it.”

Totally agree.

But trying to discount their pay with a few furlough days and having to buy a couple of hundred dollars of (tax deductible) supplies does not nearly compensate for the vast amount of paid vacation, health benefits, and generous retirement system. There is a supply and demand system at work, too, without union roadblocks. Teaching is an extremely popular second income profession for prospective and existing growing families – offering a vast talent pool when politics, cronyism, tenure, and civil service rules doesn’t interfere.

Kyle Wingfield

September 6th, 2012
11:54 am

WOW @ 11:40: I never said they didn’t deserve or earn it, or that they don’t have a lot of out-of-pocket expenses (my mother was a teacher, so I know all about that). I was responding to the notion they don’t make “decent” pay. It appears you agree with me that Finn was wrong about that.

Btw, there are more than 104,000 teachers in the state of Georgia (for 1.6M kids, which comes out to 15.8 kids/teacher on average, which isn’t bad at all — and, yes, I recognize there’s a lot of variation in that figure across the state). To raise every teacher’s salary by, say, $1,000 is a cumulative cost of $104M per year. So, to those who say the answer is higher pay: How much higher? How many multiples of $104M? And where do you get the money?

Michael H. Smith

September 6th, 2012
11:56 am

Yeah, that old religious crowd over in Europe where the education money follows the student has sure made a mess of things with all their BS. That’s why those kids are smarter than our American kids, right?

The only reason to mock Georgia is for allowing 100 years democrat tyranny that has produced such miserable failures in our government schools.

Vote yes, vote for success, vote for school choice.

Matz

September 6th, 2012
11:58 am

The Georgia charter school amendment is a RUSE. It has nothing whatsoever to do with improving the state of education in this state, and everything to do with creative tax loophole creation, whereby the “haves” can cut their taxes even more, while the “have-nots” receive even less than they do now in the way of quality public education. If you’re happy with your state sitting at or near the bottom of every good list, then please vote “yes” to this amendment to futher de-fund already-stripped public schools of the chance to empower our young citizens to participate in an increasingly-competitive global marketplace.

Michael H. Smith

September 6th, 2012
12:00 pm

offering a vast talent pool when politics, cronyism, tenure, and civil service rules doesn’t interfere.

And don’t leave out lobbying unions like the NEA, please.

Interested Observer

September 6th, 2012
12:00 pm

I read that, if the charter school amendment passes, the Charter Commission would spend an additional $400+ million in state funds, per year, over the course of the next several years on the new charter schools that they plan to fund.

So, where does Georgia get the money to hire more teachers for our existing schools and/or increase their pay? It seems to me that we can start by voting no on the charter school amendment.

Kyle Wingfield

September 6th, 2012
12:00 pm

Matz: Please elaborate on the tax implications of this amendment. Because that’s a novel argument you’re throwing out there.

I demand to see Cheesy Grits Birth Certificate- Long Form Please

September 6th, 2012
12:02 pm

The only reason to mock Georgia is for allowing 100 years democrat tyranny that has produced such miserable failures in our government schools.

Ill let you in on a little secret. The Republicans that run this state now.

Were all Democrats back then.

Thats a fact. Jack.

Kyle Wingfield

September 6th, 2012
12:05 pm

Interested @ 12:00: And if you read my last column on this topic, you know the local districts will retain a whole lot more than that in funds they don’t have to spend on students.

Btw, if that $400M figure turns out to be correct, then it means a whole lot of students have moved out of the existing schools. Which means a fair number of teachers will not be needed there any more. (Actually, it means teachers stand to gain as much in the way of choice as parents and students; after all, anywhere a new charter school is opened, teachers will be gaining a new option for employment, too.) Which means the impact on pay for teachers who remain at existing schools should be negligible.

I demand to see Cheesy Grits Birth Certificate- Long Form Please

September 6th, 2012
12:06 pm

Bill Clinton knocks it out of the park.

Markets are up. People are optimistic about latest jobs report.

Makes for a pretty slow news day over at Fox.

Interested Observer

September 6th, 2012
12:08 pm

RE: “The Georgia charter school amendment is a RUSE. It has nothing whatsoever to do with improving the state of education in this state, and everything to do with creative tax loophole creation, whereby the “haves” can cut their taxes even more, while the “have-nots” receive even less than they do now in the way of quality public education.”

I think that Matz is conflating the charter school amendment with what’s happening with the tax credit that Georgia provides for donating money to private schools:

” When the Georgia legislature passed a private school scholarship program in 2008, lawmakers promoted it as a way to give poor children the same education choices as the wealthy.

The program would be supported by donations to nonprofit scholarship groups, and Georgians who contributed would receive dollar-for-dollar tax credits, up to $2,500 a couple. The intent was that money otherwise due to the Georgia treasury — about $50 million a year — would be used instead to help needy students escape struggling public schools.

That was the idea, at least. But parents meeting at Gwinnett Christian Academy got a completely different story last year.

“A very small percentage of that money will be set aside for a needs-based scholarship fund,” Wyatt Bozeman, an administrator at the school near Atlanta, said during an informational session. “The rest of the money will be channeled to the family that raised it.”

A handout circulated at the meeting instructed families to donate, qualify for a tax credit and then apply for a scholarship for their own children, many of whom were already attending the school.

The exchange at Gwinnett Christian Academy, a recording of which was obtained by The New York Times, is just one example of how scholarship programs have been twisted to benefit private schools at the expense of the neediest children.

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/05/22/education/scholarship-funds-meant-for-needy-benefit-private-schools.html?pagewanted=all

Bruno

September 6th, 2012
12:10 pm

Kyle–I’m a little surprised you didn’t write a column about Clinton’s speech last night. PB and I watched just for the entertainment value……

There’s no doubt that Bill is a talented speaker, able to connect well with his audience with his folksy aphorisms. However, once the glow of the moment died down, the raw message came across as a little depressing on the Dem side. Our economy isn’t anywhere where we need it to be, and Obama’s policies haven’t really helped much.

On a personal note, I couldn’t shake the image of Clinton wagging his finger at the camera 13 years ago. IMO, his credibility is still in the 0% range.

I demand to see Cheesy Grits Birth Certificate- Long Form Please

September 6th, 2012
12:11 pm

Notice all the diversity at the Democratic Convention.

That’s America.

Michael H. Smith

September 6th, 2012
12:12 pm

Ill let you in on a little secret. The Republicans that run this state now.

Were all Democrats back then.

Thats a fact. Jack.

Let you in on a bigger secret, even Ronald Reagan repented of his socialist democrat ways.

Oh and that’s a recorded fact captured on tape not just a broad brush catch all here say statement.

Just Saying..

September 6th, 2012
12:13 pm

Man, that Clint Eastwood told ‘em, didn’t he?

Interested Observer

September 6th, 2012
12:16 pm

Here’s another piece on this subject that’s worth reading:

“A new study released today by the Cato Institute Center for Educational Freedom [found that ] despite their intention to target poor and under-served students, charters schools draw nearly a third of their elementary school enrollments from students who would have attended private, not public schools. This exodus from private schools to public charter schools costs taxpayers $1.8 billion a year, according to the study.”

http://blogs.ajc.com/get-schooled-blog/2012/08/28/new-study-urban-charter-schools-draw-nearly-a-third-of-their-students-from-private-schools/

Centrist

September 6th, 2012
12:20 pm

@ Cheesy – I rarely respond to partisans, but it is laughable that you could equate the market response to the ECB bond support to a partisan speech by Bill Clinton.

Interested Observer

September 6th, 2012
12:25 pm

RE: “Man, that Clint Eastwood told ‘em, didn’t he?”

Do folks not think that the topic at hand isn’t important enough and substantial enough to discuss? I have no doubt that their are plenty of blog posts out there on Bill Clinton’s speech. Why not got there to discuss it?

Interested Observer

September 6th, 2012
12:26 pm

Let me reword that–

Do folks not think that the topic at hand IS important enough and substantial enough to discuss? I have no doubt that their are plenty of blog posts out there on Bill Clinton’s speech. Why not go there to discuss it?

Michael H. Smith

September 6th, 2012
12:27 pm

Centrist,

This leftwing bunch has done that sort of thing before. Like crediting a big gain on the Dow as a sign obama is an economic success, when it was due to Spain getting a backdoor bailout loan from the EU that was responsible for that day’s gains on the Dow.

Hillbilly D

September 6th, 2012
12:30 pm

I don’t really have a strong opinion on charter schools one way or the other. The state nor the feds need to be involved in it, in my opinion.

A great many counties in Georgia only have one high school and many only have one middle school. Don’t see how this would work for them. It’s another of those state solutions to a Metro problem.

And speaking of ol’ Clint Eastwood, what’s the difference in his empty chair and Gary Trudeau’s Dan Quayle feather, Bush point of light, etc. Seems like six of one, half dozen of the other to me. Much ado about nothing.

Michael H. Smith

September 6th, 2012
12:34 pm

Do folks not think that the topic at hand IS important enough and substantial enough to discuss?

Many of us have, you must be unaware of that fact. Everything you brought up I’ve countered with materiel that defeats your arguments. Anyone that did get that info the first five or six times I posted it can easily do an internet search of their own, on the topic of school choice or John Stossel’s Stupid in America for themselves.

The matter is settled for me, it’s time to to vote.

Michael H. Smith

September 6th, 2012
12:37 pm

Going to a Charter School is an option, not a mandate Hillbilly D.

As a conservative I’m all for the individual liberty of more options and less government mandates.

I demand to see Cheesy Grits Birth Certificate- Long Form Please

September 6th, 2012
12:38 pm

@ Cheesy – I rarely respond to partisans, but it is laughable that you could equate the market response to the ECB bond support to a partisan speech by Bill Clinton.

I didn’t.

I demand to see Cheesy Grits Birth Certificate- Long Form Please

September 6th, 2012
12:42 pm

Its not about choice. Its not about the poor inner city kid.

Its all about them getting control of the curriculum.

And if they privatize its hello creationism bye bye evolution.

Jefferson

September 6th, 2012
12:43 pm

You have so much to learn. I hope you do.

Rush

September 6th, 2012
12:44 pm

What exactly does Finn add to a discussion? Seems to be a chain puller without a job….oh that’s right he/she/it is in school and somehow finds time to blog all day long…..

Is there any doubt that public education in GA is broken? Is there any doubt that something should change? More money for schools will not solve the problem….Look at DC schools and how much they spend per pupil. Still same old results where most of the students could not spell their own name.

The Great Society

September 6th, 2012
12:47 pm

Ohh…the poor inner city kid who wants so desperately to learn the three R’s….all we have to do is spend the money for these future rocket scientist and they will no longer be poor, unmotivated, leeches like their parents. Where do I sign up today to pay more into the general fund?

Cactus

September 6th, 2012
12:53 pm

The hubris that now guides the Republican Party commands its minions to consciously promote the distribution of misinformation and outright lies on the presumption that the end justifies the means, and in their small minds no one could possibly be right other than them. This column is one more example of misstatement of fact. Critics of the amendment are actually champions of high academic standards; unlike many amendment supporters, though, critics think high expectations should extend to all students. Amendment supporters would deprive the majority of Georgia students the resources needed to achieve those high standards. GOP leaders, working in league with their counterparts in other states, have deprived local public schools of adequate funding for several years going back to Governor Perdue, the great knuckle dragging champion of market-based solutions to every problem except “Go Fish.” The idea for years has been to render public schools ineffective by gutting their budgets, something that has now been done to the tune of greater than $4 billion. Critics of the amendment also see it for what it is, and children have very little to do with it. It is all about diverting state tax money to education management corporations that will make huge profits and who will make sure the political leaders who made their profits possible have their palms greased in under the table payment arrangements or outright political campaign contributions. Ask yourself why the Governor and his agents are willing to expend so much political capital in support of this amendment; ask yourself what would be so valuable that the Governor and his legislative agents would threaten the Gwinnett Chamber with loss of funds for Gwinnett Tech if their opposition to the amendment wasn’t reversed. In my opinion, the only answer is money and lots of it. Ask yourself about the record of ethics violations by the Governor and key leaders of the state legislature, and consider whether you should believe them or the teachers, principals, superintendents and school board members who work selflessly every day to make sure Georgia’s children get the best education possible. Charter schools are good, and should grow in Georgia, but they should be under the authority of people elected at the local level to serve on local school boards; they should not be under the control of unelected state agents appointed by the corrupt and self serving. Let’s also read carefully what the mouthpieces for the GOP say publicly and check those statements against the facts. More and more we are seeing that those who consider themselves more patriotic, more spiritual, and more intelligent than the rest of us are also more apt to lie and mislead. The ends do not justify the means, especially when your idea of the “ends” only reflects the narrow views of one segment of the citizenry.

Hillbilly D

September 6th, 2012
12:54 pm

Going to a Charter School is an option,

I understand that but what of the county that has only one school? It’s either a charter school or it isn’t.

Like I’ve said, I’m not necessarily opposed to charter schools but the way this amendment is set up, it looks to me like another way to mingle public and private funds and for somebody’s buddy to get well off of it.

Anybody can send their kids to private school now, if they want to. If they can’t afford it, well c’est la vie.

The Great Society

September 6th, 2012
12:55 pm

Let me correct myself….I had said leeches like their parents. Parents is plural when in fact I should have said parent as so many are raised/used for government checks by only one parent.

Del

September 6th, 2012
12:58 pm

O.T. on Clinton. Interesting comparison last night we had Bill Clinton who at the time of the Lewinsky affair was an embarrassment to the country and a bold faced liar who committed purjury. He’s been shamelessly presenting himself to the public ever since he left office and Democrats hold him up as a hero and a presidential role model. Looking back in time we had Richard Nixon who also lied to save himself and has been vilified as a national disgrace and a villain ever since as well he should be and so should Bill Clinton.

@@

September 6th, 2012
1:06 pm

Rush

September 6th, 2012
1:07 pm

Good points, iggy.

GOP left the country in a mess. They said Obama did not clean it up fast enough. Kick him out and let us back in.

September 6th, 2012
1:12 pm

“It came from the very top of the party, as Romney himself said education reform would be one of his tools for reinvigorating the economy. Specifically, he said, “When it comes to the school your child will attend, every parent should have a choice, and every child should have a chance.”

************************************************************************************************************
“It came from the very top of the party”?

If you CONS believe this…..I have some PRIME land with gold nuggets

that I won’t to sell you for $1.00 an acre.

@@

September 6th, 2012
1:12 pm

And Cheesy?

I, too, have to spend my own money at the private school where I work. ‘Ya don’t see me complaining. It’s more about the kids than it is about me.

Kyle Wingfield

September 6th, 2012
1:12 pm

Cheesy @ 12:42: “Its all about them getting control of the curriculum.”

Who is “them”?

They BOTH suck

September 6th, 2012
1:15 pm

HillbillyD

Great point. Regardless of where one stands on the issue, there will not be much impact in the rural areas of the state.

Metro Atlanta, Macon, Augusta, Columbus, Savannah, Albany mostly and maybe a few other areas, but that will not change much for the rural areas.

Kyle Wingfield

September 6th, 2012
1:16 pm

GOP left @ 1:12: Which part are you disputing? That Romney said it, or that, as the GOP’s presidential nominee, he’s at the very top of the party?

Or is this more of your usual nonsense?

Kyle Wingfield

September 6th, 2012
1:16 pm

Finn and iggy: Both of you need to lay off the name-calling.

Kyle Wingfield

September 6th, 2012
1:17 pm

HillbillyD: The potential advantage for rural areas is in virtual education. It doesn’t work for all kids, but it is a better option for some — and it makes more sense for a virtual school serving students across the state to have a state charter.

GOP left the country in a mess. They said Obama did not clean it up fast enough. Kick him out and let us back in. (Huh)

September 6th, 2012
1:17 pm

CORRECTION PLEASE;

“It came from the very top of the party, as Romney himself said education reform would be one of his tools for reinvigorating the economy. Specifically, he said, “When it comes to the school your child will attend, every parent should have a choice, and every child should have a chance.”

************************************************************************************************************
“It came from the very top of the party”?

If you CONS believe this…..I have some PRIME land with gold nuggets

that I WANT to sell you for $1.00 an acre.

Kyle Wingfield

September 6th, 2012
1:19 pm

Again, GOP left, what are you disputing? Because your habit of coming on here with a different name every five minutes and doing nothing but changing the subject or stirring the pot is getting very old.

@@

September 6th, 2012
1:21 pm

And I don’t even make $42,000 a year, much less $51,000 a year.

Maybe I’m in the wrong profession???

Naahhhhh, I’m right where I wanna be…where I need to be.

@@

September 6th, 2012
1:23 pm

Because your habit of coming on here with a different name every five minutes and doing nothing but changing the subject or stirring the pot is getting very old.

And by what name (original) would we all know this mysterious person afflicted with MPD?

@@

September 6th, 2012
1:24 pm

GOP left the country in a mess. They said Obama did not clean it up fast enough. Kick him out and let us back in. (Huh)

September 6th, 2012
1:28 pm

Georgia charter schools amendment gets boost from RNC.

Charter schools were THE ONLY THING THAT GOT A BOOST.

Did Mitt?

Hillbilly D

September 6th, 2012
1:30 pm

Kyle

We’ll just have to agree to disagree on this one.

Hillbilly D

September 6th, 2012
1:32 pm

I have some PRIME land with gold nuggets

If it’s in Georgia, you better make sure you own the mineral rights before you go trying to sell it.

Finn McCool (The System isn't Broken; It's Fixed)

September 6th, 2012
1:32 pm

Remember, Republican economic policies quadrupled the debt before I took office and doubled it after I left. We simply can’t afford to double-down on trickle-down.

~The Big Dog

GOP left the country in a mess. They said Obama did not clean it up fast enough. Kick him out and let us back in. (Huh)

September 6th, 2012
1:38 pm

@Kyle Wingfield

September 6th, 2012
1:19 pm
Again, GOP left, what are you disputing?
***************************************************************************

I am disputing this:

As Romney himself said education reform would be one of his tools for reinvigorating the economy.

***************************************************

As a retired school system employee (administration)

have heard and seen it all about education reform.

Education reform is not a revigorating tool for the economy, it is just the opposite.

It sucks millions of tax payer dollars out of the budgets of institutions and puts

that money into the pockets of the greedy.

I have seen it happen.

Kyle Wingfield

September 6th, 2012
1:45 pm

GOP left @ 1:38: Well, he said it. Link to the transcript is in the OP. I suppose you think spending more money on administrators is the way to boost the economy?

GOP left the country in a mess. They said Obama did not clean it up fast enough. Kick him out and let us back in. (Huh)

September 6th, 2012
1:51 pm

@Kyle Wingfield

September 6th, 2012
1:19 pm
Again, GOP left, what are you disputing? Because your habit of coming on here with a different name every five minutes and doing nothing but changing the subject or stirring the pot is getting very old.

*****************************************************************

Is it against the rules to use a different name?

Blogging is my own voice.

It is my personal spin and my views.

It is all about how I see the world around me.

It is my perspective. It is my take on life.

It is what I bring to the table like everyone else.

Mary Elizabeth

September 6th, 2012
2:07 pm

It is no incidental matter that the necessity for “school choice” was highlighted in the Republican Convention last week by the Republican presidential nominee, as well as by a former Republican Secretary of State. The same political forces that want to give citizens “Vouchercare” for Medicare (and thereby, in essence, dismantle Medicare as we know it) are the same political forces that want to make public education voucher-based, which will also, in essence, dismantle public education as we know it – by allowing public tax monies to be used for the privatization of much of public education. (Read the Sarah Knopp article in full, in the link below.)

Secretary Condoleezza Rice said, “This (school choice) is the civil rights issue of our day.” I would alter her statement, as follows: “Education is the civil rights issue of our day.” There is a difference in the two statements. I have not given up on traditional public education. I believe that it can be transformed for the better from within, with charter schools complementing that improvement process, instead of working in opposition to traditional public schools. I believe that public education is one of the primary foundations of American democracy. I am as concerned about the many students who will be left behind in traditional public schools, when a few students flee from them to attend charter schools, as I am for those few who leave. I desire that all students in Georgia achieve their individual academic potential. We must sustain our traditional public schools and work toward making them better. We can no longer afford to cut funding to traditional public education by over 4 billion dollars in five years, as Georgia’s Legislature has done, and expect Georgia’s traditional public schools to improve.

Moreover, there already exists, by law, a means for parents to appeal decisions made by their local Boards of Education, regarding a denial of a specific charter school’s application, to the state Department of Education via Georgia’s Superintendent of Schools . We do not need a parallel educational body making decisions in education based on an ideological political agenda to dismantle traditional public “government” schools, imo.

Below are my additional concerns:

(1) FOLLOW THE MONEY. I want to highlight these remarks from the Sarah Knopp’s article on the charter school movement in America. Link below.

“And then there is corruption. Celerity, a nonprofit charter school that made an attempt to co-locate on the campus of Wadsworth Elementary in Los Angeles, contracts out all its services to a for-profit firm, Nova, run by the same owner. This backdoor model—of a nonprofit funneling dollars to a separate, for-profit entity—is common. Kent Fischer explained it in the St. Petersburg Times:

‘The profit motive drives business…. More and more, it’s driving Florida school reform. The vehicle: charter schools. This was not the plan. These schools were to be ‘incubators of innovation,’ free of the rules that govern traditional districts. Local school boards would decide who gets the charters, which spell out how a school will operate and what it will teach. To keep this deal, lawmakers specified that only nonprofit groups would get charters. But six years later, profit has become pivotal…. For-profit corporations create nonprofit foundations to obtain the charters, and then hire themselves to run the schools.34″”

http://www.isreview.org/issues/62/feat-charterschools.shtml
———————————————————————————–

(2) POLITICS IN EDUCATION. One has to question why the proposed Constitutional Amendment to re-create a state Commission for Charter Schools has become so political in nature. Usually, when educational matters become heavily political, someone has something to gain. I would urge citizens to look as deeply as possible into reasons for this proposed amendment’s having become so political.
——————————————————————————–

(3) THE RESEGREGATION OF SCHOOLS. As the charter school movement grows in Georgia, conscientious citizens must be concerned about those students who will be left in the traditional public schools. Will those remaining students have access to equal quality of their educational delivery? In creating increasing numbers of autonomous charter schools, will Georgia’s citizens, inadvertently, be resegregating society, if not by race, then by class status and by wealth/status?
———————————————————————————-

(4) LACK OF COHESION AND COORDINATION. Will the increased numbers of state charter schools – away from monitoring by the close-at-hand traditional public schools within their districts – create, inadvertently, a large number of relatively disjoined charter schools that might lack the coordination with one another that would bring an optimum level of cohesion to Georgia’s instructional delivery for all students in Georgia? Georgia’ students will, no doubt, continue to transfer from one educational setting to another in our highly mobile society. The relatively disjoined nature of state charter schools, to one another, concerns me, in this regard.

I, also, have a concern that the relatively disjoined nature of state charter schools, as they grow in numbers, could create a situation in which the finances of these schools might not be monitored with as close a focus to detail, for each school, as would be desired.
———————————————————–

(5). CONCERNING THE PROFIT MOTIVE IN PUBLIC SCHOOLS – TRADITIONAL AND CHARTERS.

I recommend that independent auditors monitor closely traditional public schools and charter schools to determine the proportion, or percentage (%) of each school’s, or each school district’s, finances which are allotted to for-profit agencies, for services rendered.

It would be helpful if a comparison could be made, for public knowledge by independent auditors – and especially if some limited analysis could be accomplished in this regard before the November election – as to whether traditional public school districts, or charter schools, use a greater percentage of their educational monies for services by for-profit companies.

I would alert the public to watch very carefully the profit motive for those state charter schools that place a major effort toward the expansion of their schools. Each school, functioning as a relatively autonomous unit, could have a different intent, in this regard.

———————————————————————-

Finn McCool (The System isn't Broken; It's Fixed)

September 6th, 2012
2:07 pm

Dow is up 228??

Well, my stocks and 401k are better off today than they were 4 years ago!

“This sucker could go down”
~The Decider

Commonscents

September 6th, 2012
2:10 pm

It is pretty simple:Diverting funds from poorly funded schools only leaves more schools(including newly created Charter Schools) poorly funded.

Someone said it best earlier. John Barge is a true conservative. And we need more of them in this country.

Del

September 6th, 2012
2:13 pm

Kyle Wingfield

September 6th, 2012
2:16 pm

GOP left: I’m more concerned with the subject-changing and pot-stirring.

Kyle Wingfield

September 6th, 2012
2:18 pm

Mary Elizabeth: I appreciate your contributions here, but good grief — that comment is 50% longer than the column itself! Please try to make your points in several shorter comments…it’s in your own interest, as I can guarantee hardly anyone will read your entire 2:07.

getalife

September 6th, 2012
2:26 pm

I read her because she is very informed.

Perhaps we should listen to our President on education tonight.

getalife

September 6th, 2012
2:29 pm

Del,

President Obama said they will study the work of President Clinton for generations.

Both Presidents reach for greatness and icon status.

You got the w disaster.

We are still cleaning up w’s mess that caused our country to move backwards.

Are you tired of going backwards?

I am because we are falling behind other countries thanks to w.

Del

September 6th, 2012
2:32 pm

getalife,

As you know I don’t share your political viewpoint but you’re certainly entitled to view things in the way you choose.

getalife

September 6th, 2012
2:36 pm

Del,

Fair enough.

I would like to apologize if I offended anyone on this blog and thank Kyle for putting up with me.

“Dow is up 228??

Well, my stocks and 401k are better off today than they were 4 years ago!”

They say a good jobs report is coming.

Now, I go back to lurking.

Have fun :)

@@

September 6th, 2012
2:47 pm

Getalife:

I read her because she is very informed.

YOU DID NOT!!!!

You’re just trying to put the moves on Mary Elizabeth, you old “HOUND” DOG.

(ISH)

@@

September 6th, 2012
2:50 pm

Perhaps we should listen to our President on education tonight.

It’s been reported that teachers will be there to protest his education policy.

They’ll be shaking their noodles at him.

Dr. Monica Henson

September 6th, 2012
2:52 pm

Kyle, I posted this yesterday in Maureen’s blog as part of a thread discussing teacher pay.

[A] private- or public-sector exempt employee earning $52K, working year-round except for two weeks’ vacation and about ten paid holidays, puts in 241 days’ of work (365 days in a year – 104 weekend days – 10 vacation days – 10 holidays). At 8 hours a day, that’s 1,928 hours. At $52K, that employee is earning $26.97 an hour, regardless of any overtime worked.

A public school teacher works 190 days a year at an average $52K annually. At 8 hours a day, that’s 1,520 hours. At $52K that teacher is earning $34.21 an hour. Let’s assume the teacher actually works 60 hours a week, even though s/he is not paid overtime. This is not the case every week of the year, because there is a testing window in the spring, when holidays approach there may some “noninstructional” days being factored in (a practice I despise and did not indulge in, but I’ve seen way more teachers do it than not), and after state testing, many teachers let up and don’t assign the volume of work to be scored that they did prior to testing. I estimate (conservatively) that there is an average of 20 days out of the 180 student contact days that teachers do not work any overtime at all. So for 140 days, or 28 weeks, the teacher is logging extra hours at 20 hours per week. 28 * 20 = 560 additional hours added onto the 1520 paid hours, for a total of 2080 hours. Prorated, the teacher earning $52K a year is actually earning $25 an hour, a difference of $1.97 an hour less than the private-sector employee.

I’ll bet that most employees, public or private, earning $52K would be willing to consider taking a $1.97 hourly cut in pay to gain a weeklong break at Thanksgiving, a two-week break at Christmas & New Year’s, another week in the spring, and eight weeks in the summer. Particularly if they have school-age kids.

I Report (-: You Whine )-: mmm, mmmm, mmmmm! Just sayin...

September 6th, 2012
2:55 pm

It looks like education in America really isn’t that bad -

PRIORITIES: FOOTBALL DOMINATES CLINTON IN TV RATINGS

But then again it’s not that hard to figure out what BS is and isn’t.

GOP left the country in a mess. They said Obama did not clean it up fast enough. Kick him out and let us back in. (Huh)

September 6th, 2012
2:59 pm

@@Kyle Wingfield

September 6th, 2012
2:16 pm
GOP left: I’m more concerned with the subject-changing and pot-stirring.

******************************************************************************

Is this what you mean by subject-changing and pot-stirring?
******************************************************************************

I Report (-: You Whine )-: mmm, mmmm, mmmmm! Just sayin…

September 6th, 2012
7:15 am
Most parents would rather have their children educated instead of brainwashed and the libs intrenched in the public school system are soaked in the Koolaid.

Run them off and the problem is solved.

tipster

September 6th, 2012
2:59 pm

Kyle, so do you agree or disagree Mary Elizabeth’s contentions, or is it too long to read? Her post is long because education issues are not easily fixed by bumper sticker slogans or 1-liners. The education issues are wide and varied. The main problem I have with this amendment is the taking of control from the local school boards. If people vote in crooks and incompetents, then that is the decision they must put up with, such as Clayton County and its sheriff, or Dekalb and its BOE. Isn’t that a conservative value, living with the consequences of ones decisions? If local communities want charter schools, then they need to demand it from their ELECTED board members. If they don’t like their decision, vote those members out and new ones in. I have to agree with others that this issue is more about funneling taxpayer money to for profit companies who will be (and who already have been) funneling campaign cash to politicians.

getalife

September 6th, 2012
3:03 pm

Del

September 6th, 2012
3:03 pm

“’ll bet that most employees, public or private, earning $52K would be willing to consider taking a $1.97 hourly cut in pay to gain a weeklong break at Thanksgiving, a two-week break at Christmas & New Year’s, another week in the spring, and eight weeks in the summer.”

Throw in the added value of public sector benefits and that $1.97 cut would be far more than just made up for.

Mary Elizabeth

September 6th, 2012
3:05 pm

Kyle, 2:18 pm

Please know that I appreciate your allowing me to post my concerns, in full, regarding the Charter School Constitutional Amendment on your blog, today.

You made a completely valid suggestion to me, regarding the length of my post. I had considered its length before I posted, and I had almost divided my thoughts into two different posts, as a result – one post of my current thoughts and the second post, of my prior thoughts. I decided to go ahead and place all my thoughts in one post, if I was going to end up communicating all, anyway. I realized that my thoughts will only reach a few readers, but I was content with that.

Your suggestion is well-taken, however, regarding my future posts on your blog. I will certainly honor your request to me, regarding the length of my posts. Thank you again for allowing my full post, above, to be published, today. Best to you.

@@

September 6th, 2012
3:06 pm

Does anybody know who said this:

White children and black children learn differently. White children are left-brain object oriented; and black children are right-brain subject oriented. White children are “logical and analytical.” Black children are “creative and intuitive.”

It certainly wasn’t me!!!

I happen to think children of all races learn differently these days. I attribute it to environmental impact (social & physical).

Charter schools accommodate those differences.

There’s little opportunity for a tailor-made education in the government’s school system.

Del

September 6th, 2012
3:10 pm

@@,

Pretty well stated.

@@

September 6th, 2012
3:27 pm

Getalife:

You know me too well @@

YES I DO!!!

Based on what I’ve seen of Mary Elizabeth’s demeanor here, I almost certain she’s not one to dance nekkid for your viewing pleasure.

Del:

I’ve learned a lot in my years in special education. No two kids are alike. What works for one child almost NEVER works for another child.

Individualism rules our day. No cookie cut-outs where I teach.

Real Athens

September 6th, 2012
3:36 pm

What do Jeb Bush and Condoleeza Rice have in common?

“No Child Left Behind”

One of the biggest con games going on at the moment is the sustained attack on the U.S. public school system. It’s being perpetrated by predatory entrepreneurs (disguised as “concerned citizens” and “education reformers”) hoping to persuade the parents of school-age children that the only way their kids are going to get a decent education is by paying for something that they’e already guaranteed in their state constitutions will be provided by their tax dollars.

The profit impulse fueling this drive is understandable. All it takes is a cursory look at the economic landscape to see why these speculators are drooling at the prospect of privatizing education. Millions of students pulling up stakes, bailing out of the public school system, and enrolling in private or charter schools? Are you kidding? Just think of the money and business it would generate. Lok at the corporations at the forefront of this “movement”.

The thing about private schools is that they’re far less regulated than public schools. In fact, they’re largely unregulated. Take California, for example. In order to teach in a California public school (elementary, intermediate or high school), you must have both a college degree and a teaching credential. The private schools require neither.

Not only can you teach in a private without a credential or degree, but private teachers earn significantly less than their public counterparts. Less education, less certification, less salary. The obvious question: Which institution—private or public—is going to attract the better instructor?

Would we ever choose a medical doctor with those startling deficiencies?

Yet, free enterprise hounds continue to extol the virtues of privatization, pretending it’s the cure for what ails us.

md

September 6th, 2012
3:38 pm

“The same political forces that want to give citizens “Vouchercare” for Medicare (and thereby, in essence, dismantle Medicare as we know it)”

Mary….how can you expect people to take that long winded post seriously when you haven’t even done your homework on the medicare issue??

Ryan’s revised plan calls for a CHOICE……either a voucher or stay in the traditional plan…….it’s folks like you that pass on the talking point that distort the reality………please tell us you didn’t fall for the 77,000 horse bit too.

@@

September 6th, 2012
3:42 pm

Whoa!

Democratic Disinformation from Charlotte

And there’s a boatload of it too!!!!!

Longer than Mary Elizabeth’s post.

(IW&SH)

http://factcheck.org/2012/09/democratic-disinformation-from-charlotte/

Real Athens

September 6th, 2012
3:43 pm

Paul Ryan has never had a job that wasn’t a “family” business. Therefore he has no skin in the Medicare/Social Security game. He’s a 7 term congressman (at his age). He’s been suckling at the government teat for nearly half his life.

md

September 6th, 2012
3:45 pm

As for education…….my plan would tie it to every bit of assistance offered by these united states. We use tax dollars to provide the initial opportunity that is education, the keys to the kingdom of knowledge. Yet, 1/3 make the choice (yes, for various reeasons but a choice none the less) to drop out. More often than not, this choice leads right back to other assistance programs……and we give it to them.

When welfare was reformed (and not quite like Bill made it appear last night), the assistance was tied to work……and it worked. The same should be done with education……if one chooses to drop out, then assistance should be conditional on choosing to drop back in……for the betterment of the individual AND society at large.

Enabling is the disease, not the cure………..

@@

September 6th, 2012
3:51 pm

Real Athens:

Paul Ryan has never had a job that wasn’t a “family” business. Therefore he has no skin in the Medicare/Social Security game. He’s a 7 term congressman (at his age). He’s been suckling at the government teat for nearly half his life.

Not altogether accurate, but couldn’t the same be said for Barack Obama?

Aye-UP!!!!

Heck! Obama never even had a job where his hands got dirty.

getalife

September 6th, 2012
4:00 pm

“As for education…….my plan”

Are you running md?

Stevie Ray...Clowns to my Left and Jokers to my Right here I am....

September 6th, 2012
4:01 pm

Kyle,

Seems to me that our pool of students should be offered two choices. A traditional college prep option and a vocational option. I feel we should stop comparing ourselves to nations that have only a fraction of kids in unwanted or otherwise poor family conditions…often through no fault of the single parent who is working 3-11 trying to take care of family. In fact, many of these transcient kids see the last adult of the day at 3pm when the busdriver drops the kid off…

A material % of school aged kids have no need for a traditional, college entrance exam focused education….let’s invest in an alternative cirriculum that best fits the needs of those kids and betters chances of employment..

@@

September 6th, 2012
4:01 pm

I’m bettin’ you left-wingers weren’t eager to check out the facts s-o-o-o-o-o…one at a time.

■ The keynote speaker and others claimed the Republican presidential nominee, Mitt Romney, would raise taxes on the “middle class.” He has promised he won’t. Democrats base their claim on a study that doesn’t necessarily lead to that conclusion.

@@

September 6th, 2012
4:02 pm

■ The keynote speaker, San Antonio Mayor Julian Castro, also said there have been 4.5 million “new jobs” under Obama. The fact is the economy has regained only 4 million of the 4.3 million jobs lost since Obama took office.

Stevie Ray...Clowns to my Left and Jokers to my Right here I am....

September 6th, 2012
4:02 pm

MD,

Couldn’t agree more with you comment about enabling…I feel that a vast majority of entitlements are simply enablers the keep folks betrothen to gov’t, creating the lowest of expectations..

@@

September 6th, 2012
4:03 pm

■ Castro also insisted Romney and Ryan would “gut” Pell Grants for lower-income college students. Actually, the Ryan budget calls only for “limiting the growth” of spending for the program, and Ryan has said the maximum grant of $5,550 would not be decreased.

md

September 6th, 2012
4:03 pm

“Are you running md?”

Yep…..it’s called the opinion plan…..and you are free to vote for it or agin it…….

@@

September 6th, 2012
4:03 pm

■ A Democratic governor said Romney “left his state 47th out of 50 in job growth.” Actually, Massachusetts went from 50th in job creation during Romney’s first year to 28th in his final year.

@@

September 6th, 2012
4:04 pm

■ Two advocates of equal-pay legislation said women make 77 cents for every dollar men earn. That’s true on average, but the gap for women doing the same work as men is much less, and not entirely or even mostly the result of job discrimination.

@@

September 6th, 2012
4:05 pm

■ A union president accused Romney of seeking “a government bailout” for “his company.” Not really. In fact, Romney negotiated a favorable but routine settlement with bank regulators on behalf of a former company, the one he had left to form his own Bain Capital firm. No taxpayer funds were involved.

Stevie Ray...Clowns to my Left and Jokers to my Right here I am....

September 6th, 2012
4:05 pm

@@,

They all lie…but i appreciate your first point which falls into the category of fear mongering…telling the middle class that Romney will raise there taxes is dishonest conjecture…both parties making victims out of voting blocks but the DEMS take the cake…

getalife

September 6th, 2012
4:06 pm

md,

You sounded like a politician :)

@@

September 6th, 2012
4:06 pm

■ Multiple speakers repeated a claim that the Ryan/Romney Medicare plan would cost seniors $6,400 a year. That’s a figure that applied to Ryan’s 2011 budget plan, but his current proposal (the one Romney embraces) is far more generous. The Congressional Budget Office says it “may” lead to higher costs for beneficiaries, but it can’t estimate how much.

@@

September 6th, 2012
4:06 pm

■ In prepared remarks released to reporters, Rep. James Clyburn engaged in partisan myth-making with the claim “Democrats created Social Security” while Republicans “cursed the darkness.” History records strong bipartisan support in both House and Senate for the measure President Roosevelt signed in 1935.

@@

September 6th, 2012
4:08 pm

Those ^^^ are just the highlights.

I’d say Democrats are fast and loose like Mizzzzzzz Fluke, the convention’s #1 drama queen.

schnirt

md

September 6th, 2012
4:09 pm

“A Democratic governor said Romney “left his state 47th out of 50 in job growth.””

After hearing that fellow speak, I had to wonder out loud (to my better half) if he knew there were people out there that knew MA had full employment, making him look like the clown.

It’s a wee bit hard to be at the top of a list for growing jobs when everyone already has one…….

Stevie Ray...Clowns to my Left and Jokers to my Right here I am....

September 6th, 2012
4:09 pm

Here’s another @@….prior to passing the HC loser legislation, industry leaders upon review advised Pelosi (BO really had no real hand in making this happen and in fact pissed Pelosi off when he call for a summit..) that the average family premium compared to norm would increase $20,700 over next 7 years…..Pelosi quickly introduced a bill to eliminate anti-trust exemption….the industry was silenced and the rest is history..

getalife

September 6th, 2012
4:10 pm

@@.

Fact check President Clinton’s speech next.

@@

September 6th, 2012
4:10 pm

I must say…when I saw Mizzzzz Fluke speak, it was almost as though she was tryin’ to gedder some last night. Perhaps the DNC provided the protection she so desperately needs.

md

September 6th, 2012
4:10 pm

Well get, it’s all about getting your vote if my plan ever has a chance :)

@@

September 6th, 2012
4:12 pm

Getalife:

There’s evidence that Bill stretched something or some things last night.

getalife

September 6th, 2012
4:14 pm

Education is a tough issue and tough issues make it to the President’s desk.

w tried no child left behind and it failed.

President Obama’s turn so lets see what he proposes but there are teachers on this blog and we should listen to them too.

getalife

September 6th, 2012
4:15 pm

Oops and md’s plan too :)

getalife

September 6th, 2012
4:17 pm

@@,

Probably.

Are you looking for a perfect politician that never lies?

Let me know if you find one :)

md

September 6th, 2012
4:17 pm

“Fact check President Clinton’s speech next.”

Where do you want to start? Maybe the part where he never mentioned that he vetoed the welfare reform bill twice before signing it?

Back then, he was the only democrat in favor of the welfare to work plan and he made it sound like the dems crafted the whole thing……..had he not had a gop congress.

@@

September 6th, 2012
4:18 pm

Stevie:

They all lie…

I’ll give ‘ya that.

What I so detest about the Democrats is their dramatic appeal to emotions. It’s as if they know their supporters brains aren’t engaged.

md

September 6th, 2012
4:20 pm

Wonder if Ms Fluke would be in favor of supporting my recreational desires and have the taxpayers buy me some gas for my boat…………

@@

September 6th, 2012
4:24 pm

Getalife:

Are you looking for a perfect politician

NOPE! Perfection escapes us all.

You do remember that I was a Giuliani fan. When the left attacked him on his personal life, he said “If you’re looking for perfection, don’t vote for me.”

When the left attacked Newt for his multiple marriages, my response?

“I’m not looking for a husband.”

getalife

September 6th, 2012
4:27 pm

Sounds like Rice may want the Department of Education job if romney wins.

I don’t think any bushies should be in office because they failed last time.

md,

He said he worked with Republicans to get it done and emphasized cooperation.

Our President got little gop cooperation in his first term and forced to work around congress.

I think all the deflection of blame to our President gets a horrible congress a free pass and that must end.

We must hold this congress accountable for their failures.

@@

September 6th, 2012
4:27 pm

I’m off to get my dog some food. He’s been a picky eater of late.

getalife

September 6th, 2012
4:35 pm

“When the left attacked Newt for his multiple marriages, my response?

“I’m not looking for a husband.”

It was not his marriages, it was the cheating on his wife while trying to impeach our President for the same thing.

He was in the meeting to form the plan to get our President after a collapse.

The newt is a horrible person and a worse American.

Linda

September 6th, 2012
4:41 pm

The Republican National Convention had one empty chair.
The Democratic National Convention has blown the Republicans out of the water in this respect by 74,000.

http://i236.photobucket.com/albums/ff202/jrgdds/BOAEmptyChair.jpg

The first question is: what water? The Democrats would have been praying for rain tonight, but, oops, they omitted God. They were against Him before they were for Him.

The second question is: who knew Obama had kenophobia? (fear of open or empty spaces)

another voice

September 6th, 2012
4:50 pm

…let parents choose where to spend the tax dollars already allocated for their children’s education…

This is misleading if not untrue. The state constitutional ammendment would allow the state to usurp the ability and power of the local school board to decide how tax money is to be spent for education at the local level. And how, pray tell, are parents choosing where to spend the tax dollars already allocated for their children’s education when an unelected state commission/panel is making those decisions?

Rafe Hollister, suffering through Oblamer's ineptocracy

September 6th, 2012
5:01 pm

I believe it was Finn, sorry if I’m wrong, but back on page 1, this person said the GOP frequently uses absentee ballots to commit voter fraud. Usual untruth from a lib, most voter fraud is committed by the dems. Case in point.

http://www.fox16.com/news/local/story/Ark-lawmaker-pleads-guilty-to-election-charge/qjc8PtXwfkC8frDCgwLNrg.cspx

md

September 6th, 2012
5:03 pm

“He said he worked with Republicans to get it done and emphasized cooperation.”

He had me laughing again when he was doing his cooperation routine and then went directly into his blame the other side routine…….pure vaudeville.

Of course it’s all relative as the House has passed numerous bills only to languish in the Senate…..but ole Bill doesn’t see or want to acknowledge that aspect of the UN-cooperation…..

They BOTH suck

September 6th, 2012
5:05 pm

Rafe

Let me guess, you were going to post this one but you became busy, right?

Anytime

Glad I could be of assistance. Don’t mention it

http://news.yahoo.com/indiana-election-chief-found-guilty-voter-fraud-073551102.html

INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — Indiana’s top elections official could lose his job and his freedom after jurors convicted him of multiple voter fraud-related charges on Saturday, leaving in flux the fate of one of the state’s most powerful positions.

Republican Secretary of State Charlie White has held on to his office for more than a year despite being accused of lying about his address on voter registration forms.

They BOTH suck

September 6th, 2012
5:09 pm

And if you were too busy to post that one, one can assume that you were too busy to post the following:

http://www.washingtonpost.com/local/dc-politics/ex-ehrlich-campaign-manager-schurick-convicted-in-robocall-case/2011/12/06/gIQA6rNsaO_story.html

Like Fox, I know you strive to be “fair and balanced”………

What else can I help you with today?

hahahahahahah

:-)

Hillbilly D

September 6th, 2012
5:16 pm

@@ if’n you drop back in

There’s no such thing as a picky eatin’ dog. Let him eat what you put out or do without. He’ll eat it or go find something somewhere else, when he gets hungry enough. You’re enabling him. (IWH)

@@

September 6th, 2012
5:34 pm

Hillbilly:

He’s very old. His favorite dish is roadkill…that, and anything italian.

Problem is he’s so crippled up, he can’t go huntin’ like he once did.

I used to have to call refuse control anytime I spotted something dead near my house. “Please come and get it before he does.”

Disgusting, I know. He’s a country dog fo sho!!! A sweet, humble, lovable mutt of the highest caliber.

I LUV HIM!

Lil' Barry Bailout - Vote American

September 6th, 2012
5:35 pm

Ed Advocate: I still don’t understand why some Republican’s are supporting GA’s charter school amendment. It creates new unnecessary state government, diminishes local control, and is 100% unfunded
————————-

Self interest. Isn’t that what you libtards used to criticize Americans for not doing when they voted for Republicans?

Lil' Barry Bailout - Vote American

September 6th, 2012
5:37 pm

Mikey D.: Ah yes, the “small government and local control” republicans pushing once again for an expansion of power at the capitol. I guess hypocrisy is a virtue.
—————–

Parental choice IS the ultimate local control. Glad to hear you’ll be supporting the amendment!

@@

September 6th, 2012
5:43 pm

It diminishes local control?

In my county, that’s a good thing. Our citizens just elected Victor Hill for Sheriff as if one term wasn’t enough embarrassment to last a lifetime.

Write-in Garland Watkins for Sheriff in November. That’s spelled G-a-r-l-a-n-d W-a-t-k-i-n-s. Misspellings won’t count (stoopid rule)

That’s G-a-r-l-a-n-d W-a-t-k-i-n-s for Sheriff!

Hillbilly D

September 6th, 2012
5:51 pm

@@

I guess it is hard to find Italian roadkill around your neck of the woods. (IW&SH)

Lil' Barry Bailout - Vote American

September 6th, 2012
5:54 pm

I used to oppose the amendment but now I’m going to vote for it just to annoy the moron libtards.

Rafe Hollister, suffering through Oblamer's ineptocracy

September 6th, 2012
5:54 pm

TBS

Not my job to find things that prove the case made by some other poster. I made my case, that it is not only the GOP that uses absentee ballots to cheat. But it is only the GOP that wants voter ID and voter reform. They must be getting beat at the cheating game.

@@

September 6th, 2012
5:56 pm

Forgot to add…

I LUV HIM!

But I never let him lick me in the face.

Have you ever smelled a squished armadillo? There’s nothing so foul.

My husband ran over one with the lawnmower. He thought the blades would clear it. Slung that critter all over the place. It was in the Cajun’s yard. We take turns cutting the road.

Anyhoo, the Cajun stops to get his mail and threw up from the stench. He calls with “Who the h3ll ran over that thing?”

“twern’t me” I say.

Nobody wants to move it. I’ve been cutting around that carcaus for three weeks. It still stinks!!!!

My dog hasn’t touched it. It smells too bad even for him.

Where are the buzzards when ‘ya need ‘em?

Rafe Hollister, suffering through Oblamer's ineptocracy

September 6th, 2012
5:59 pm

I am voting for it as well. I don’t like the state control, but it seems the Boards of Education are opposed to giving people a choice, so we do as we must.

I wish we could get government out of education. Let government still collect the money, but return it to the students, in the form of an education coupon, to be cashed in wherever they wish.

Hillbilly D

September 6th, 2012
6:01 pm

Have you ever smelled a squished armadillo?

Why on Earth would I do that??

I live north of the armadillo line, at least so far. All our possums go without armor up here.

Did you know armadillos can carry leprosy? I was reading about that just the other day.

We got plenty of buzzards. As long I don’t see dozens circling over me at once, it don’t really bother me.

They BOTH suck

September 6th, 2012
6:01 pm

Rafe

It is a two way street, however based on the wording of your original post that I replied to, you are too blind to see that.

But carry on with your usual cherry picking blather

Rafe Hollister, suffering through Oblamer's ineptocracy

September 6th, 2012
6:03 pm

A dead armadillo makes a great cover scent, for a deer hunter. Deer walk right up to you, they can’t smell anything else. The problem is, can you stay on your stand with that kind of smell around.

Rafe Hollister, suffering through Oblamer's ineptocracy

September 6th, 2012
6:06 pm

TBS

And you go on pretending you are the practical middle of the road thoughtful thinker. If that makes you happy, I am as well, as I know the truth.

Linda

September 6th, 2012
6:08 pm

@@, Armadillos carry leprosy.

They BOTH suck

September 6th, 2012
6:09 pm

Rafe

You have yet to prove your assertion from 5:01. You provide a link but that doesn’t prove what you stated.

Is it that you do not have the proof or the ability to back it up with unbiased truth?

Even you know that answer

Good day now

They BOTH suck

September 6th, 2012
6:14 pm

Rafe

Guess you can’t prove what you said. Who didn’t know that?

Nothing new for one who doesn’t have much more than talking points that are fed for him to regurgitate.

Just Saying..

September 6th, 2012
6:16 pm

“Makes for a pretty slow news day over at Fox.”

They could always Out another SEAL team member…

@@

September 6th, 2012
6:17 pm

I know about the leprosy. That’s why I’ve been taking a wide berth when cutting the grass. Maybe that’s why refuse control hasn’t picked it up yet.

Maybe I could dig a hole and roll it in. I’ll wear a hazmat suit.

(ISH)

Lil' Barry Bailout - Vote American

September 6th, 2012
6:18 pm

W.H. Retweets: ‘WORKING PEEPS SLAVES 2 WALL ST!’

http://www.weeklystandard.com/blogs/wh-retweets-working-peeps-slaves-2-wall-st_651837.html
——————-

Democrats are beyond retarded.

Just Saying..

September 6th, 2012
6:22 pm

“PRIORITIES: FOOTBALL DOMINATES CLINTON IN TV RATINGS”

Whiner, untroubled by facts, as usual…

I Report (-: You Whine )-: mmm, mmmm, mmmmm! Just sayin...

September 6th, 2012
6:44 pm

■ So when’s the big liar supposed to speak?

@@

September 6th, 2012
6:53 pm

FIRE’s Seven Best Colleges for Free Speech 2012

PHILADELPHIA, September 5, 2012—With students heading back to campus and high school seniors beginning their college applications, the Foundation for Individual Rights in Education (FIRE) is pleased to announce its 2012 list of the nation’s best colleges and universities for freedom of speech today on The Huffington Post.

FIRE commends James Madison University, The College of William & Mary, the University of Mississippi, Mississippi State University, the University of Tennessee-Knoxville, the University of Virginia, and the University of Pennsylvania for protecting free speech on campus and maintaining policies that honor freedom of expression.

What say our Huffers?

And THAT’S what I like about the South!!!!

If ‘ya can’t stand the heat, get out of the kitchen.

Real Athens

September 6th, 2012
7:13 pm

“”The reason I got involved in public service, by and large, if I had to credit one thinker, one person, it would be Ayn Rand .” That’s freshly minted GOP vice-presidential candidate Paul Ryan talking — statements he would eventually recant — at a party celebrating what would have been the prolific author’s 100th birthday…”

mike

September 6th, 2012
7:22 pm

I think it’s no wonder that you Republicans are obsessing over the smell of dead Armadillos. The symbolism is remarkable.

For. you see, your party is the dead Armadillo. And, boy does it stink!

A carryover from times past. Living in the past. Obsessed with past.

George W. Bush was fluke. A mistake. A mistake that the American public will likely never make again. At least not in the next 25 years.

The posters are real thin here tonight. The realization that the Republican Party has become marginalized has finally sunk in.

You did it to yourselves. Your Teapartiers shot your party in the foot. And, now, you face decades of isolation. Decades of hoping for another chance. It won’t be forthcoming.

CDog

September 6th, 2012
7:22 pm

I am for school choice, but I am not sure charter schools represent true school choice. They seem basically like public schools without the low-end kids. I think they actually hurt private schools. I would rather see a $5000 per child tuition tax credit.

@@

September 6th, 2012
7:51 pm

Real Athens:

Ayn Rand was a student of Aristotle, as was St. Thomas Acquinas. Although Rand despised Christianity, she held great respect for the philosophy of Thomas Acquinas.

AND

“Since material goods are produced by the mind and effort of individual men, and are needed to sustain their lives, if the producer does not own the result of his effort, he does not own his life.”–Ayn Rand

“There is surely often more violence in burning a man’s property than doing him physical injury.”–Ghandi

“You can govern us only so long as we remain the governed.”–Gandhi

“I believe and everybody must grant that no Government can exist for a single moment without the cooperation of the people, willing or forced, and if people withdraw their cooperation in every detail, the Government will come to a standstill.”–Gandhi

Ayn Rand is a “A Riddle Wrapped in a Mystery Inside an Enigma, but perhaps there is a key. That key is…”

individual freedom is in the best interest of all.

^^^ I took the liberty.

schnirt

Del

September 6th, 2012
7:56 pm

It’s amusing for me to see the obvious name changers from our friends on left who come to Kyles blog. Exceptions are getalife and they both suck who have the courage to come on this blog posting under their known handles. I’m sort of a newbe or boot in Marine Corps jargon on Kyles blog so maybe my observation isn’t anything unusual to the regulars.

Finn Mccool

September 6th, 2012
8:01 pm

Gabby Gifffords moments had more truth than an hour of Paul Ryan.

Finn Mccool

September 6th, 2012
8:04 pm

Paul Ryan

A guy who goes on a national show, knowing it will be reviewed, and lies out his butkus – not about the economy, not about jobs – about his WORKOUT time??????????????????

You folks CAN NOT elect that guy to your second family. Sure, Biden isn’t wearing his class A scout uniform, but he isn’t a compulsive liar.

Linda

September 6th, 2012
8:04 pm

mike@7:22, Thank you for all your glowing compliments. You might think that Republicans are living in the past, but what we are actually doing is refusing to forget our history, history that is no longer taught in our public schools, the history of our country & the reasons that it was founded. Republicans, unlike liberals, applaud our military who are willing to lay down their lives for our Constitution, our military who has a collective sense of honor, integrity & character. Republicans love government much more than Democrats, but Republicans love the government that was laid out in the Constitution, not the government that Democrats inspire to take us to. It’s the Democrats, specifically the progressives, who want to take America back to the past, of socialism or Marxism, a type of government that has never worked anywhere in the entire world over the course of history.

The posters are thin tonight because the subject is charter schools, a topic that tends to be less popular than national politics. Kyle expects commenters to stay on topic.

As to the topic at hand, there is nothing that frustrates progressives any more than changing the education system “as we know it.” One of their fundamental objectives is to dumb down American children using the school system to do so. You are proof that it’s working.

The Tea Party emerged in the spring of 2009 when the Democrats passed the most expensive spending bill in the history of the world when there was NO MONEY & a national debt of over $10 trillion dollars. This bill added almost a trillion dollars to the debt, which is now over $16 trillion. Maybe you don’t care for our children or the next generation, but surely you care about our national security. The Pentagon claims that our debt is our greatest threat, now & in the future.

Del

September 6th, 2012
8:04 pm

Finn, kind of apples and oranges wouldn’t you agree?

Del

September 6th, 2012
8:07 pm

Biden, the buffoon of the Dem party is coming up what time?

Rafe Hollister, suffering through Oblamer's ineptocracy

September 6th, 2012
8:12 pm

TBS

You are insufferable. Finn or someone made the charge that the GOP uses absentee ballots to fraudulently steal elections. He provided no proof, no links, just more BS.

I pointed out that the Dims did it recently. I provided a link. The poster never posted a link to a GOP charge of absentee ballot misuse. Did you, mister objective, middle of the roader attack that poster.

No, because you are just another left wing sycophant in love with the Mistake. Let me know the next time you challenge the validity of some left wing poster or what they say. I do not expect that to happen. You can flag a false flag if you choose, but you are not fooling anyone.

I have explained that I am going to post things that back up my opinion. I have no interest in muddling in the middle. Be a man, take a side. If you think both parties suck, then you have nothing to say to those of us who have taken a side, move on, start a new party or support one of the fringe candidates.

Rafe Hollister, suffering through Oblamer's ineptocracy

September 6th, 2012
8:13 pm

that should be fly a false flag.

Rafe Hollister, suffering through Oblamer's ineptocracy

September 6th, 2012
8:23 pm

Linda
I think you handled Mike pretty well, but let me add this.

America is not going to take lightly a party that 3 times voted against God or Jerusalem.
America listens but does not believe that the Mistake actually created 4.5 million jobs. If so why are there more unemployed people today than when he was sworn in. It doesn’t make sense to anyone with a thinking brain.
Your leader voted three times in Illinois for a bill to allow another doctor to come into a botched late term abortion and watch the child die.
Your leader did not keep most of his promises when he ran in 2008, America remembers!

I could go on all night, but I know I ‘m wasting my time.

Buzzy

September 6th, 2012
8:34 pm

We already pay for a Department of Education in Georgia, and we sure don’t need a so-called independent commission under the control of some legislator. Somehow I think money is behind these Charter Schools. Maybe it’s the companies that sell things to the schools, I don’t know, but something’s up.

They put the Ten Commandments up at the Ga. Dome today and I think that’s probably ok because with the current crowd we have down there, we certainly need them posted on the wall.

I Report (-: You Whine )-: mmm, mmmm, mmmmm! Just sayin...

September 6th, 2012
8:38 pm

The first speaker in the prime, network-broadcast 10:00 hour, was Sandra Fluke. Seriously, the party of Andrew Jackson and Franklin D. Roosevelt and Harry S. Truman chose to showcase someone whose claim to fame is that she demands that somebody else pay for her birth control.

Yeah, seriously.

Linda

September 6th, 2012
8:40 pm

Rafe@8:23, I’ve kept up with Obama’s record. The only time I actually cried was when I read his comments on the floor of the Illinois Senate with his reasoning not to allow a doctor to try to save a baby born alive after a late-term abortion. There are many people living among us who survived late-term abortions, but Obama thinks they have no right to live if the “mother” does not want them.
This make me sick.

yuzeyurbrane

September 6th, 2012
8:45 pm

Kyle at 11 am—sorry it has taken me so long to respond but I have to earn a living, too. You gave a thoughtful response to my early comments but I still disagree. It is rare when you find td and me in essential agreement, but I, too, agree with Superintendent Barge. So, you and Gov. Deal should that you are heading into another T-Splost non-partisan grassroots revolt.
First, I guess we will have to agree to disagree on parent control. I have lived too long to think anything other than what I said–those who set the agenda will control the show. I am a parent who was relatively active in PTA and do see even a group of zealous parents remaining zealous over the long haul nor do I see them having the facts and knowledge necessary to manage a school. Local school boards are not perfect but they worry about elections and they often have many people with education backgrounds. I simply think you are being naive if you think otherwise.
Second, as to billions of dollars being at stake, I do not think that I inaccurately stated the case. The goal is to destroy the traditional public education system. The means is, as Dick Cheney once referred to govt., “starve the beast”. Gut public education funding and then point to the awful very predictable results as proof that “government” schools don’t work. The goal I believe is to have a traditional public school system training mostly poor black kids manual labor skills and a parallel mostly white publicly funded charter school system aimed towards college prep. In other words, essentially a returned to the 1950’s. That will mean most of the state education budget being focused on these state charters. It seems to me that eventually we are talking about billions.
Third, I need more proof on the economic impact on local school systems. You are smart and know that all businesses have fixed and incremental costs. I don’t know what numbers the state charter supporters are basing their assertions on. For example, if a public school system has 1000 students removed from its rolls of 10,000 because they have transferred to state charters that doesn’t mean their costs have been reduced 10%. There are fixed costs like heating and cooling, maintenance, etc. which will remain the same. I would like to see a real analysis but suspect the accuracy of your point about it being a financial windfall for public schools.
Fourth, you have not really addressed my argument that the state charters are not really designed to lift poor kids from failing public schools. Now, I did not raise this issue but am simply responding to a very prominent and often repeated assertion by supporters of state charters. It is like the argument used to pass a law allowing state taxes to be diverted to fund private/parochial school tuitions. But it is simply a lie in both cases. The truth should not be a victim in this debate. Now, you seem to say that it does not matter who education money helps so long as it is done for a cheaper price. You are simply deflecting from defending the assertion of pro state charter school proponents that it will save kids from failing schools. Why not simply admit this is not true and say you want certain kids to be able to go to state charters that are fully funded, have 180 school days per year, small classes and no furloughs? I happen to agree that these are many of the essential standards we should strive for but do not see the equity of giving it to the privileged few only. So, Sup. Barge is correct in saying that he cannot morally agree to the diversion of public funds to the creation of a privileged alternative publicly funded school system while the traditional system has had its funding suffer draconian cuts. He is not willing to consider this until schools are back at 180 days and teacher furloughs are ceased. I agree plus I would add smaller class sizes (which by the way many charter proponents point to as a reason for supporting charters while at the same time arguing that size doesn’t matter in traditional public schools!!).

Del

September 6th, 2012
8:51 pm

Eva Longoria really rained on Obama and the DNC’s parade, unwittingly of course by describing how she brought herself up to success. She spoke about entrepreneurship and how private sector small business create the most jobs. Sadly new business start ups are almost non-existent since Obama became president.

@@

September 6th, 2012
8:56 pm

Del:

I’m sort of a newbe or boot in Marine Corps jargon on Kyles blog so maybe my observation isn’t anything unusual to the regulars.

It’s an evasive tactic. Not sure what they’re trying to avoid though.

To hear them tell it, it’s all the name-calling that takes place over here, ‘YA BIG JARHEAD!!!! ‘YA LEATHERNECK!!!!

Buzzy

September 6th, 2012
9:04 pm

The Republican leaders don’t just want to replace public school teachers with charter school teachers, they want to replace all teachers with piped-in internet education. They’ll pay 5 caretakers to take care of a whole school and just pipe in the content. There is big money in this for the companies that own these internet providers.

Here’s an article about it, and the Republican elite is in it up to their neck in the scheme.

http://www.thenation.com/article/164651/how-online-learning-companies-bought-americas-schools?page=full

Trust me, this is not about the kids, it’s about money. I don’t even think the Republican rank and file knows this is going on.

Del

September 6th, 2012
9:04 pm

@@, Semper Fi…I don’t think I’ll stay up for the “Ones” speech this evening. I’ll learn about it tomorrow. Taps

@@

September 6th, 2012
9:12 pm

Buzzy?

So Bill Gates is in on this conspiracy?

It’ll never happen. Too many parents think of our schools as free babysitting. Just try to change the school hours and watch ‘em holler.

Snow days? They go into panic mode.

Just Saying..

September 6th, 2012
9:16 pm

For the few here who don’t already have all the the answers, a thoughtful article addressing the topic of education directions in the US, in today’s NY Times:

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/09/06/opinion/john-deweys-vision-of-learning-as-freedom.html

They BOTH suck

September 6th, 2012
10:10 pm

Rafe

“most voter fraud is committed by the dems.”

Quit crying and doubling down on nothing. You have not proved your assertion. I mentioned that it was a two way street and showed you were Republicans did it as well.

Unlike yourself, I was much more intelligent than to say one was worse than the other. You were challenged to back up your assertion.

Typical of you, you deflect and side step what you said.

Again, can you back up what you said with unbiased fact?

No you can not or you would not be deflecting and would have already posted the information.

Don’t cry to me because your bs was called out and exposed

Buzzy

September 6th, 2012
10:48 pm

@ @@: Oh, the kids will go to school, but when they get there they will watch teaching content on the internet.

There won’t be near as many middle class teachers in public or charter schools. The schools will just have a few low paid caretakes to keep the kids in line. And don’t forget, teachers spend money in the communities where they work, and they make a middle class salary.

I hope both Democrats and Republicans will read that article above on: How Online Learning Companies Bought America’s Schools.

I am not against computers, I am just against them taking over our schools.

@@

September 6th, 2012
10:54 pm

Ol’ Joe laid it on thick, didn’t he.

“I’m not exaggerating.”

Of course, not, Joe. You’d never do that.

schnirt

So if Joe’s Dad ran a dealership, isn’t it possible Obama would’ve shut him down…depending on where his dealership was located.

Well, yes…YES IT IS!

Auto bailout was not unmitigated success

The path toward reclaiming that money isn’t clear, and there have been other costs, too. Tens of thousands of jobs at car dealerships may have been lost under government directives that General Motors and Chrysler, which received the majority of the auto bailout, shutter dealers to save costs.

“The elimination of thousands of GM and Chrysler dealerships in 2009 was unnecessary,” said Bailey Wood, a spokesman for the National Automobile Dealers Association. “Sadly, this action threatened more than 100,000 jobs.”

Say it ain’t so, Joe.

@@

September 6th, 2012
10:59 pm

Here’s hoping someone didn’t load up those nets with a bunch of inflated condoms instead of balloons.

Sho’ would be funny though.

I’m outta here.

@@

September 6th, 2012
11:01 pm

Oops!

I am not against computers, I am just against them taking over our schools.

They will eventually. It’s progress, don’tcha know.

G’nite.

Michael H. Smith

September 6th, 2012
11:02 pm

Ol Joe ain’t the only one laying it on thick. His boss is one big load of BS.

Kyle will probably blog about tonight’s last DNC pep rally tomorrow so it is better to wait until that time to go after some of the dunkey dung dumped on all Americans.

Hillbilly D

September 6th, 2012
11:08 pm

“The elimination of thousands of GM and Chrysler dealerships in 2009 was unnecessary,” said Bailey Wood, a spokesman for the National Automobile Dealers Association. “Sadly, this action threatened more than 100,000 jobs.”

Yes, it was. As I’ve explained on here before, having spent many years working in car dealerships, most of which are independent franchisees, how closing dealerships would save the manufacturer any money was beyond me. My guess? Some of the really large dealership chains probably used it as a way to weed out some of the little guys, i.e. the competition. It’s the only thing that makes any sense at all.

GM always looked out for the Bill Heard group and we all know how that turned out.

Oh well, time to turn into a punkin’.

Michael H. Smith

September 6th, 2012
11:10 pm

Online classes are going to play a very big role in our education system of the future and rightly so, as one teacher can teach hundreds of students in interactive virtual classrooms as opposed 30 or 40 students by the restrictions of brick and mortar buildings.

Real Athens

September 7th, 2012
2:29 am

@@ @ 7:51 pm

She’s all yours man. She makes me laugh.

Real Athens

September 7th, 2012
2:34 am

Real Athens

September 7th, 2012
2:55 am

A fool says:

“The Pentagon claims that our debt is our greatest threat, now & in the future.”

By all means increase it, this socialism is awesome.

Real Athens

September 7th, 2012
3:01 am

“Online classes are going to play a very big role in our education system of the future and rightly so, as one teacher can teach hundreds of students in interactive virtual classrooms as opposed 30 or 40 students by the restrictions of brick and mortar buildings”.

This is the dumbest idea I’ve ever heard of. For real?

Michael H. Smith

September 7th, 2012
5:53 am

Then you might want to educate your ears to what reality is saying, because you had best get use to a continuing increase virtual classrooms for real, Real.

Michael H. Smith

September 7th, 2012
6:09 am

Good morning Kyle and the rest, I’m fired up and ready to go as Obama would say.

Unfortunately for the left he clearly didn’t make their case on going… “Forward”.

Skip

September 7th, 2012
6:51 am

Smith is an expert on politicians not making their case.

Michael H. Smith

September 7th, 2012
7:05 am

Jealous, Skip?

Don’t be, obama isn’t much on substance. Kind like you. :)

Michael H. Smith

September 7th, 2012
7:08 am

Oh, and do include bruce wilcox in that last post in regards to the lack of substance.

Del

September 7th, 2012
7:22 am

Caught a re-run of parts of Granholms speech and she was the spitting image of the Dem’s party animal.

Lil' Barry Bailout - Vote American

September 7th, 2012
7:32 am

Obozo must be worried–he had his flag pin on last night!

I Report (-: You Whine )-: mmm, mmmm, mmmmm! Just sayin...

September 7th, 2012
7:32 am

The sheer strangeness of all the talk about abortion, abortion, contraception, contraception. I am old enough to know a wedge issue when I see one, but I’ve never seen a great party build its entire public persona around one.

Well, it isn’t like they’re gonna talk about economic growth.

Del

September 7th, 2012
7:36 am

Finn McCool (The System isn't Broken; It's Fixed)

September 7th, 2012
8:04 am

“In Romney’s world, the cars get the elevator; the workers get the shaft”
~ Gov. Jennifer Granholm

Mary Elizabeth

September 7th, 2012
8:38 am

Jobs report just in.

Unemployment rate dropped from 8.3% to 8.1%. 96,000 jobs added in August.

Del

September 7th, 2012
8:52 am

http://www.foxnews.com/us/2012/09/07/us-economy-adds-6k-jobs-unemployment-rate-falls-to-81-percent/

Only 96,000 jobs added and July, June job growth was revised downward as well. Unemployment drops to 8.1% but because more people have dropped out of the job market. Not good news for the country or for Obama.

Finn McCool (The System isn't Broken; It's Fixed)

September 7th, 2012
8:56 am

Cons, don’t worry. The gay marriage you will be forced into won’t hurt much. You will get used to it.

Lil' Barry Bailout - Vote American

September 7th, 2012
9:20 am

Another month of 8% or higher unemployment. Obozo still hasn’t reduced unemployment below the highest it ever was during Our President Bush’s eight years.

Obozo: Inferior to Our President Bush.

Lil' Barry Bailout - Vote American

September 7th, 2012
9:21 am

Oh, and the 96K jobs added was lower than expected.

Lil' Barry Bailout - Vote American

September 7th, 2012
9:24 am

Unemployment “dropped” because tens of thousands have lost hope, given up, and are riding Obozo’s entitlement wagon.

Shin-a-lite

September 7th, 2012
9:42 am

The job market is even weaker than the official unemployment rate indicates because it misses people who aren’t even looking for jobs. People who are not actively searching for employment aren’t counted as unemployed. And Americans have been dropping out of the labor force in record numbers–claiming disability, staying in school, sitting at home, or simply retiring as the Baby Boom moves into its golden years. The labor force generally grows along with the growth of the overall population. But there’s been a sharp drop in the rate of labor-force participation since 2007, especially in the 16-24 age group. Getting more education is a sensible if expensive alternative to looking for a job in that cohort. As I wrote in this week’s Bloomberg Businessweek cover story, Debt for Life, college attendance this fall is projected to be up 19 percent from the fall of 2007.

http://www.businessweek.com/articles/2012-09-07/weak-jobs-report-shows-obamas-long-road-ahead

Obama and his harvest moon.

Dusty

September 7th, 2012
10:30 am

Well, I’m a bit worried about our younger generation of Americans. First I read this morning that state contract workers who are off in the summer (which is in their contract) have been getting paid unemployment during that time.. Now they are angry in Georgia because the state has decided to stop such foolishness.

Then the Feds are saying “Yes,you are going to pay them (for not working). Georgia says “No we are not! Georgia is noted for its dislike of dictators.

But the next silly incident, was the view of a child being potty trained in the middle of a restaurant. Yep, a little bare bottom toddler, sitting on a potty in the middle of people trying to enjoy a meal. As some said, “This stinks!”

Yep, I’m a bit discouraged. Has good sense left us?

Finn McCool (The System isn't Broken; It's Fixed)

September 7th, 2012
12:33 pm

Kyle, might want to ask your bang whiz IT crew there to update the link to your blog from the AJC home page.

GOP left the country in a mess. They said Obama did not clean it up fast enough. Kick him out and let us back in. (Huh)

September 8th, 2012
10:37 pm

@Lil’ Barry Bailout – Vote American

September 7th, 2012
9:20 am
Another month of 8% or higher unemployment. Obozo still hasn’t reduced unemployment below the highest it ever was during Our President Bush’s eight years.

Obozo: Inferior to Our President Bush.

*******************************************************************

Gallup documents good post-convention JUMP for Obama.

Mitt Romney got what you call a dead-cat bounce coming out of the

2012 Republican Convention.

Yo HATE ain’t working.

heeheeheeheeheehee :)

Christine B

September 11th, 2012
9:00 am

People think this is a good idea when they imagine that the new schools will follow their own ideologies. But what happens when new charter schools are founded by groups you don’t agree with? What if the wealthy Scientology group founded a charter school in your neighborhood? Imagine the religious, ethnic, or political group with which you are most uncomfortable — what if they opened a charter shool in your town?