Parents show they know best about their kids’ education

It’s one thing to argue that parents know what’s best for their children’s education. It’s another thing — a refreshing, affirming, wonderful thing — to watch them prove it.

For the past week, moms and dads have been doing just that at redistricting hearings for Atlanta Public Schools. I’d heard friends from other neighborhoods talk about their meetings and, Wednesday night, dropped by North Atlanta High School to see it myself. I wasn’t disappointed.

First, “dropped by” is the wrong way to put it. After seeing cars stream out of one parking lot that was already full, I reversed course and turned down a side street … only to find the curbs lined and another parking lot packed. I finally joined others in a parking deck at the church across the road. Suffice it to say, anyone who thinks folks in Buckhead don’t care about public schools is sorely mistaken.

I found one of the last empty seats in the auditorium — eventually, there was a line of parents waiting outside for seats to free up — and settled in for the hearing. The agenda: a slideshow by demographers, followed by public comments.

Now, when you write about politics for a living, you become accustomed to a certain Way Things Are Done at these hearings: one speaker rising patiently after another to make a few points in a calm, level voice. I’ve even heard someone running such a meeting threaten to have security remove people who make audible, even barely, their opinion of things said.

The tie-dyed T-shirts some parents wore, and the matching, pre-printed signs others carried, should have given away the game Wednesday. It seems there’s nothing like feeling ignored to make people scrap the Way Things Are Done.

When one of the demographers mentioned the move of one neighborhood out of its current school zone, the bloc of parents from that school shook their signs at him. When he made a point that parents from another school didn’t exactly appreciate, they booed him.

But what struck me wasn’t that these parents were being rude or churlish (and there actually were few such disruptions on the whole). As the evening went on, it became quite clear that they were so bold because they knew at least as much about the data — school sizes, building capacities, projected enrollment growth — as the experts on the stage who produced them.

More than that, they clearly had given great thought to the guiding principles APS laid out for this project. They could point to ones that hadn’t been met and explain persuasively why some principles should be prioritized over others.

They knew from experience what it had taken to bring the rigorous International Baccalaureate curriculum to all the schools in the cluster. They knew what it would mean if some students were thrown out of it while a new middle school ramped up to adopt it — and the disadvantage dealt to students from outside the cluster who might be thrown into it halfway through their school years.

They knew these things in a way the experts didn’t. Not because the experts were dense or flippant about these matters; clearly, they were competent at and invested in the work they were doing.

The problem wasn’t what the experts didn’t know, but what they, as a limited number of people removed from the daily lives of these schools and students and parents, couldn’t know.

It is ever thus in systems of government. And that’s another good thing to be reminded of.

– By Kyle Wingfield

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151 comments Add your comment

Linda

February 3rd, 2012
6:33 pm

Kyle, have a great Super Bowl weekend.

Mary Elizabeth

February 3rd, 2012
7:04 pm

What an uplifting story to start the weekend. It does the heart good to read about so many parents so actively involved in their schools and care so fervently about what will happen in the lives of their children. I miss those days – both as a parent and as a teacher.

It is inspiring to read such a well-written piece about democracy at work, firsthand – working just as our Founding Fathers intended.

“. . .and that the government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth.” A. Lincoln

Thank you, Kyle. I hope you have a nice weekend.

Linda

February 3rd, 2012
7:41 pm

Here comes the progressives! Isn’t it funny that the only time Mary Elizabeth comes on Kyle’s blog is when there’s talk of placing education into the hands of parents? What a sweet demeanor she has!

GodHatesTrash, Superstar

February 3rd, 2012
8:01 pm

Alas, it seems like certain members of Kyle’s Klavern of Konservative Krazies are always here, with their repetitive drivel and Fox-fed idiotic mantras and memes…

Michael H. Smith

February 3rd, 2012
8:19 pm

Funny thing is the founding fathers never intended that we have a democracy. They even made it a point to write exactly what form of government every state in this union would have and it wasn’t a democracy.

Article 4 Section 4 of the U.S. Constitution

The United States shall guarantee to every State in this Union a Republican Form of Government, and shall protect each of them against Invasion; and on Application of the Legislature, or of the Executive (when the Legislature cannot be convened) against domestic Violence.

When Ben Franklin was asked by someone standing outside of the meeting when the constitution was being drawn up… What have we Dr. Franklin, a Monarchy or a Republic? To which Franklin replied… You have a Republic; if you can keep it.

Helps to read the Declaration, the Constitution, the Federalist papers and other very important historic documents rather than pass along inaccurate statements or be taken in by them when they’ve been made.

Michael H. Smith

February 3rd, 2012
8:24 pm

Clause 1: Republican government

The United States shall guarantee to every State in this Union a Republican Form of Government, . . .
This clause, sometimes referred to as the Guarantee Clause, has historically been a part of the debate about the rights of citizens vis-a-vis state governments. The Constitution offers no explanation as to what constitutes a republican government; however, the Federalist Papers give us an insight as to the intent of the Founders. A republican form of government is distinguished from a pure democracy, which the Founding Fathers wanted to avoid; as James Madison wrote in Federalist No. 10, “Hence it is that such [pure] democracies have ever been spectacles of turbulence and contention; have ever been found incompatible with personal security or the rights of property; and have in general been as short in their lives as they have been violent in their deaths.”

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Article_Four_of_the_United_States_Constitution#Clause_1:_Republican_government

Linda

February 3rd, 2012
8:30 pm

Mr. Trash@8:01, Obviously, you are referring to me since I am the only contributor to the blog, so far. Are you a progressive or do you even know what progressives are?

When you mention Fox, are you referring to channel 5 or Fox News or the Fox business channel? When was the last time you watched a CEO or an owner of a business explain the woes of the economy on any business channel? Are all CEOs & business owners idiots, even those who have succeeded without bailouts?

If it’s alright with you, may I still watch the FOX Business Network? I have no choice when MSNBC is broadcasting prison shows.

Linda

February 3rd, 2012
8:55 pm

Michael, read my comment to you on the previous blog.

GodHatesTrash, Superstar

February 3rd, 2012
9:01 pm

Well, young Linda, you are not the only Konservative Krazy on this blog, but the shoe certainly fits you.

Your 8:30 PM post is the special kind of barrage of blithering idiocy I’ve come to associate with you. Five stupid questions, one right after the other, all of them nonsensical.

I think you should turn off the TV entirely. You’re a Fox zombie – your never-properly-functioning brain, exposed to the slime and ooze of Fox News and hate radio, has turned to – well, let’s just say “the former senator from Pennsylvania”.

So – in answer to stupid question #5 – it’s not OK with me – turn the TV off. Take your meds. Get professional help (although there’s not much they can do about stupid…)

Michael H. Smith

February 3rd, 2012
9:09 pm

“Hence it is that such [pure] democracies have ever been spectacles of turbulence and contention; have ever been found incompatible with personal security or the rights of property; and have in general been as short in their lives as they have been violent in their deaths.”

Linda, knowing that you listen to Boortz, did the words I’ve emboldened stand out when you read them?

Madison said, rights of property are incompatible in democracies.

Also to the first tenet of the Communist Manifesto, rights of property are incompatible.

First Plank: Abolition of property in land and the application of all rents of land to public purposes.

http://www.criminalgovernment.com/docs/planks.html

Now isn’t that special how these progressive are always calling this country a democracy and try constantly to incorrectly make others believe that we are a democracy?

I Report (-: You Whine )-: mmm, mmmm, mmmmm! Just sayin...

February 3rd, 2012
9:12 pm

If you want to perpetuate ignorance, anti American foolishness, a stupid seething hatred of the very financial institutions that have provided you and your country with everything we have, a sullen clownish view of energy production, a robotic lockstep illiteracy derived from government propaganda fed from the lib media, laziness, idleness, perversion and rote shallowness, then sure, send your kid to an Atlanta Public School.

You can have your very own little trashman.

Michael H. Smith

February 3rd, 2012
9:28 pm

I read your comment, both of them. By the way the comment at 3 was a good one, though I understood what the real debate was about, my some what off topic statement had a different purpose to serve. I’m glad to see the breast cancer funding was restored,(even though we are in agreement about Planed Parenthood and its’ founder) you’re correct it had nothing to do with abortion just as this Presidential race should not focus on abortion or religion, when the focus of debate should be… THE ECONOMY STUPID – PART 3 Marxism – v – Capitalism(Constitutionally regulated)

Linda

February 3rd, 2012
9:42 pm

Mr. Trash@9:01, When you made your inappropriate comment, I was the only conservative on this blog. Liar!
I’m not young. Wish I was! Only with maturity do we learn how ridiculous the liberal agenda really is.
The liberal mantra also incorrectly assumes conservatives listen to conservative radio talk shows. Absurd! At least conservatives drive cars in which we can actually listen to the radio, unlike radical liberal environmentalists who drive electric cars, afraid to turn on the radio lest the battery dies dead.
Couldn’t you answer at least one of 5 questions?

Linda

February 3rd, 2012
9:45 pm

Michael@9:09, I don’t listen to the radio. Will talk to you more tomorrow.

GodHatesTrash, Superstar

February 3rd, 2012
10:49 pm

Now now, don’t call me a liar. You’re not near as special as you’d like to think – Kyle’s Konservative Klavern is, like the devil, legion – hundreds of little twisted spirits flinging their poo like chimps. Whiners, haters, bellyachers, babies all.

And little lady, I did answer silly question #5. Turn off the TV – throw it out – it’s made your poor brain even weaker.

The Arabs and Iranians are happy that you drive that big ol’ Duhmerican car/truck of yourn, and thank you for your financial support.

native

February 3rd, 2012
11:28 pm

Enter your comments here

native

February 3rd, 2012
11:31 pm

@I Report
Come out you troll.
What is your real name?
You spew this sh*t behind your veil. Who are you?
What qualification do you have?

native

February 3rd, 2012
11:43 pm

This is actually a very important issue. I am adamant that my neighborhood remains in its current schools.
We sent three daughters to Grady from midtown. Now one is starting her PHD in engineering, another has finished her physics major at an ivy and begun her major in IT and the third is a second year senior at UGA.
Intown schools matter.

Ayn Rant

February 4th, 2012
6:55 am

Kyle, the parents at the meeting you cite perhaps understood the problems better than the “experts”, but would they ever be able to agree on solutions? It’s easy to find fault, but difficult to devise solutions, and nearly impossible to get agreement.

Our “republic” is defined by our Constitution. It is nation in which individual liberty is respected, and the powers of government and the people, collectively, are specifically limited. Thus, we are “democratic” only to the extent of the powers allowed government; the government must not act, and the people do not get to vote, on the right of any citizen to do as he pleases, so long as he does not harm others.

Churchill's MOM.....Ron Paul for President

February 4th, 2012
6:59 am

My Husband & I control our children’s education, we write a tuition check. I don’t understand why people have more children than they can afford to send to good schools.

Will

February 4th, 2012
7:41 am

On the surface, “Parent’s Know Best” certainly sounds like a winning argument. But’s let’s look a little deeper.

When I was growing up, white parents in Georgia knew it was in the best interest of their children to maintain a segregated public education system in Georgia. These parents sent legislators to Atlanta, in part, to better ensure this segregated system of education was maintained. The legislators did not disappoint.

Today, some of the children or grandchildren of these earlier parents have learned that Charter Schools may be another avenue of returning to a segregated school system. Le’t take a look at Greene County as an example. A charter school in the Lake Oconee area of the county meets the need of parents who want a free public education but who do not want their children to go to the largely nonwhite public school system in Greene. What’s that you say, Charter Schools cannot deny a student based on race. Sure, just like the “Freedom of Choice” scheme was put in place in the 1960s as a smoke screen to avoid a desegregated public school system in Georgia.

So, are all charter schools simply a smoke screen to return to a segregated school system. Of course not, no more so than all private schools in Georgia are segregation academies. But just as many segregation academies began in the last 1960s in order to avoid a desegregated public education, some charter schools are motivated by the same immoral factor.

The bottom line is, most often, “parents know best” for their children but “best” is defined in many different ways. I don’t believe a racially, economically or sexually segregated school is “best”. You may disagree.

Lil' Barry Bailout (Revised Downward)

February 4th, 2012
8:11 am

Obozo’ a real ANUS–American in Name only US citizen.

bob

February 4th, 2012
8:19 am

Will, maybe the charter parents in Greene county feel that the parents of others do not have the same respect for education as they do. And if you loook at our society in general, blacks seem to be doing as much segregating as whites. I have no problem with segregation if we segregate those that want to learn from those that could care less.

carlosgvv

February 4th, 2012
8:21 am

These parents may know what’s best for their children’s education. But, in turning out to attend these meetings, they show little or no knowledge of Georgia politics. The decisions have already been made and these redistricting hearings are nothing but window dressing designed to fool the masses into thinking they actually have a say in what happens.

Observer

February 4th, 2012
8:39 am

And once again, IB supporters divide a community and stamp their feet to keep their precious progressive kommissar wannabees from having their indoctrination interrupted.

http://www.truthaboutib.com

GT

February 4th, 2012
9:00 am

Conservatives have adopted the behavior of union hall, cheap seat bullies. The Republican debates, the Congress and the local neighborhood school meetings are one way or the highway, no compromise and loud, proud, rude and crude. What they lack in brains they make up for in stupidity. I truly wish these people would concern themselves with education, maybe get some themselves. Nothing would strengthen the middle class quicker and better, the problem being as the education comes, many will bolt the conservative side of the isle to a more open minded approach, where fear is replaced with thought. If Gingrich has not damaged the conservative cause enough education will finish it off.

Where were these people during the cheating scandal? A educated concern parent knows his child is not getting the education the grade says he or she is getting. If I came home with a A in math, my father ,a Tech grad, would line me up on a blackboard and drill me. If he was unhappy with the knowledge he would go see the teacher and want to know what they were teaching and why. No crowded auditorium of bullies just a one on one. Blaming the system is a cope out, running in a mob is for cowards, being personally responsible for who you are and not blaming another organization or individual is what an education is for. The American obesity problem parallels this dumbing down of the masses and the civility of these fat dumb people is the price we pay.

Michael H. Smith

February 4th, 2012
9:11 am

Free the children from the government “public school” education monopoly. Let the education tax dollars follow the students to the school of their and their parent’s choice.

Know why we must fight for the taxpayer/public funded freedom of school choice and what it is we are truly fighting against.

Tenth Plank of the Communist Manifesto: Free education for all children in public schools. Abolition of children’s factory labor in its present form. Combination of education with industrial production.

http://www.criminalgovernment.com/docs/planks.html

Restore our Republican form of Government.

GT

February 4th, 2012
9:40 am

Michael nature has a way of curing itself. The Communist we feared most of our lives, was a dysfunctional force. The masses were not particularly educated, they couldn’t afford the intellectual freedom, they had to hide the truth from the masses and the dumber the masses the easier hiding the truth was. You are seeing the same thing with the Republican Party, more specific the tea party. The party wants to appeal to the Sarah Palin, superficial sector of the masses. The bigger that mob is the more votes, but when you make obvious misdirected predictions of the fate of America, like a preacher predicting the end of the world, some of those believers realize the emperor has no clothes. Very much like a Russian getting tired of potatoes and thinking something in this world is better, your crowd may get tire of wrestling and reality tv. God has made the human a curious lot, and some of the smarter ones wander out of the cave, you see it happening as we speak in the tea party and thus in the Republican Party which is not the party of Regan or Lincoln, but a knock off hijacked by special interest, not unlike the communist. Anytime you see a group of people guided by fear you need to think what motivates that fear and who profits from the fear.

Michael H. Smith

February 4th, 2012
9:40 am

GT

It is truly unfortunate that the GOP candidates including my guy are caught up in this semantically gamesmanship of being too clever by half. Neither Romney my guy or Gingrich have clearly articulated what should be the conservative plank in regards to what is known as Class Warfare and our rightly expressed socioeconomic concerns for ourselves and every citizen of this country poor, working poor, working or investing rich.

Perhaps Gingrich needs a trampoline to spring-up and shed more than a few pounds, the poor have no such need to exercise for they have no excess! Nor is the government assistance of the safety net acceptable as a hammock no matter how comfortable it is made for the poor, Mr Romney. And they certainly don’t need the redistribution of wealth authored by a Marxist Jerk in the White House that think Karl Marx was the second Jesus Christ, who likens Christian charity and government confiscation as the same in their compassion and in the judgmental eyes of almighty God.

What the poor and the working poor of this country need is more and better opportunities – Not trampolines, safety net made into surreal hammocks or stolen wealth taken from others redistributed among them as fairness.

Mary Elizabeth

February 4th, 2012
9:43 am

Will @ 7:41 am

You have written a very thoughtful post. I agree with you on most of your points, especially regarding the immoral segregation issue of the 1960s, which I well remember. Having observed closely what happened then, and since then, it seems to me that the way to have parents support a larger, more humane vision. than simply what happens to their own children, is to raise the spiritual consciousness of the people (in the larger spiritual context, not based on particular religious dogma). I know that statement will seem too idealistic to some, but it must be attempted or we will all lose, and that is why I consistently write of it.

However, here is one of the reasons expressed for the redistricting, “APS must figure out how to balance enrollment between schools that are as little as 20 percent full and others that are overcrowded.” (AJC, 1/30/12, article by Jaime Sarrio) Redistricting, from that perspective, becomes a legitimate financial issue for the APS.

Nevertheless, to the extent that the views of the more affluent are given more weight than those less affluent simply because of their political power and class status, that becomes as spiritually bereft as was the attempt to segregate children by race in the 1960s. We will simply have moved from race to class inequalities as a society. See the remarks below, also by Mr. Sarrio, in his article.
————————————————-
“Kirkwood residents whose students are zoned to attend Toomer Elementary, said they are frustrated their neighborhood will be divided by the proposed boundaries. They believe the wishes of parents in more affluent neighborhoods are winning out, a sentiment echoed by several speakers at the community meeting.

“I don’t see a lot of other neighborhoods that are split up into thirds, and I think that’s because some neighborhoods get more respect,” said Betsy Quinn, a Kirkwood resident.”
————————————————–
What impresses me is that all parents are voicing their opinions and that there is a strong public debate on the issues involved so that a realistic redistricting can occur for the financial need expressed, and so that a redistricting plan can be implemented that is just and fair for all citizens, and not one that benefits primarily the select, powerful few. All citizens, hopefully, will be moved to support what is best for the “common good” of all children.

I understand that a final decision is going to be made in April. There is plenty of time for more parent input and a continuing fervent public debate on this issue. I hope that that type of debate will continue, and not be one that is limited by “the Way Things Are Done” as Kyle Wingfield so well expressed. That earnest debate is healthy for our state, and nation.

About charter schools. As I read the story, this is not an issue regarding charter schools but of redistricting of present traditional public schools. What I fear with the charter school movement is that it has proponents within (in high places) who are moving in stealthy ways to attempt to create more limited government by dismantling, in large part, traditional “government” public schools for private ones (public charters now, but perhaps private charters tomorrow). One must remember that many African-American citizens are strongly in favor of charter schools. It is a complex issue. I am not against all charter schools, but I think that they must be carefully monitored and controlled by public school officials. I also believe that they must work with local school systems, not against local systems. But the charter school issue is an issue for another thread. I will say, however, as you have indicated, that charter schools could be used to divide people – by class if not by race. We must be on guard against that happening if we want to continue to evolve, in our nation, into one that has the egalitarian vision of all citizens. “All are created equal.” Some, even in educational circles, unfortunately, see others from a hierarchial, power vision, and not from a vision in which all are of equal merit because all are simply human beings. That hierarchial vision is unfortunate, and especially unfortunate when educators see with it. The most evolved educators know what education must be about – enlightenment, ultimately. I am certain the author of the Declaration of Independence would agree.

Michael H. Smith

February 4th, 2012
9:44 am

I do not fear these communist GT, I despise and oppose their evil with my total being.

Michael H. Smith

February 4th, 2012
9:52 am

bob,

Fact is, “school choice” offers blacks a means to escape the entrapment of inferior schools.

GT

February 4th, 2012
9:55 am

On evil we agree, but like God equips us with a miraculous immune system that fends off mutated germs and foreign invasion of the body, I believe he gave us a brain that does the same for evil, it is up to us to use it.

Michael H. Smith

February 4th, 2012
10:11 am

GT,

You must admit that when a brain has been compromised by the indoctrination process of public schools meant to control behavoir rather than to educate, the normal intellectual immunity of the human brain is rendered incapable of its’ most useful purposes to repel and defend against what it would otherwise reject.

It is up to us to end the forced indoctrination of the government education monopoly by means of offering school choice.

Michael H. Smith

February 4th, 2012
10:15 am

Back later guys and gals. I really do enjoy discussions with you GT and you sharing your insights.

Bye for now

Rafe Hollister

February 4th, 2012
10:30 am

GT
You spoke of how we need not fear the Commies as it proved out that they didn’t educate their citizens well, just enough to make them useful idiots. That my friend is the strategy of the Democratic party. That is why they consistantly support the teachers unions and demand that public schools be “overseen” by the Federal government. They are focused not on developing individuals to their maximum potential, but to developing as many students as possible to a functional state.

I was so frustrated with my own above average children that I could not get the teachers to challenge them and push them. The response I always got was, “I have 30 students to teach, I can’t be conserned with the needs of just a few”.

My fault for trying to keep my children in public schools, I should have given up the second car and the nice home and put them in private school or had my wife quit work and home school. I regret my decision to this day.

GodHatesTrash, Superstar

February 4th, 2012
10:40 am

I don’t agree that Democrats are useful idiots, but Republicans are definitely useLESS idiots, whining moaning, fulminating, crying, and bloviating.

Dusty

February 4th, 2012
11:33 am

Well, it seems that most of the comments here were made by people whose chldren have finished their education.

Mine have finished school too and it was all in public schools and state universities. Their education was supported by their parents, the two of us. They were exposed to “books”, good company, love, and a faith to help them. Thus I believe that parents are the main source of “education for life” in the child’s environment.

We, the parents, want the best there is to offer in schools. Sometimes you cannot get it. But the offset is what parents offer and believe and instill in their children. There is proof of that in some of our historical leaders such as Abraham Lincoln.

I salute parents who work for better schools. They must do that. But they must never forget their own influence and the examples they set for their children. Children “enlarge their minds” at school but they learn the most important issues in life at home.

Rafe Hollister

February 4th, 2012
12:22 pm

Dusty
Well said, without parents all efforts expended by the “state” are largely in vain.

Final point: I think most of us agree that parents know best what kind of education best serves their children. So, we need to turn the education funds, set aside for each child, to the parents and let them spend it as they see fit, with the proviso that it must be spent on education for the child. One size fits all, never works. Competition will improve education.

Puck

February 4th, 2012
12:34 pm

Maybe you should ask yourself, how come the teacher has 30 kids in their classroom?

I Report (-: You Whine )-: mmm, mmmm, mmmmm! Just sayin...

February 4th, 2012
12:38 pm

The numbers for youth unemployment are even more disturbing. A staggering 23.2 percent of 16- to 19-year-olds in the labor force do not have jobs. A prolonged period of inactivity at that stage of life risks turning these younger adults from unemployed to unemployable.

This does not stop the goons in the lamestream media from cheering their fake numbers.

Or are they happy because obozo destroys America?

killerj

February 4th, 2012
12:57 pm

Could be better,I,m not impressed by a lot of parent,s way of thinking,most just want their kid out of school to get it over with so they don,t have to deal with it anymore,sad day,s for public school,s, finished mine with private school his last year because public school was so back ass with their thinking it pissed me off,total waste of money,plus graduated a full year early.

RaceToTheBottom

February 4th, 2012
1:11 pm

Parents from Morningside, Va-Hi and intown northeast and northwest have it good now because as a percentage not that many inner city type kids (African-American) attend their elementary schools. They can tolerate up to maybe 35% non-white but that’s about it. These parents knew what they were doing when they bought homes in these areas. A little diversity but not too much is good for the schools. However when the kids reach middle school and especially high school many if not most of these parents scramble to do one of two things. Move the kids to private schools or move to a whiter area in north Fulton. It’s all about race. Don’t kid yourselves otherwise.

Dusty

February 4th, 2012
2:07 pm

THank you, Rafe. I think we both believe that parents are the key to good education.

I’m not sure that your idea of giving parents money for education for each child would work. No matter the promises, I’m skeptical that such money would end up for education. Anyway, it is an idea that hasn’t been tried. Maybe we will get to that.

Dusty

February 4th, 2012
2:17 pm

Puck,

Maybe I am wrong, but I don’t believe many teachers have 30 students in one class. You think so?

Thirty well behaved students would not be bad. Probably better than fifteen rowdy ones. But a lot depends on the teacher. A WHOLE lot! But it is an uphill job to teach 30 students. No doubt about that.

Maybe that is why school systems are shifting the borders of their districts around. Trying to equalize the shifting populations of schools is a problem. But nobody wants to move from a school where they have been satisfied. Problem! Problems!

Hillbilly D

February 4th, 2012
2:21 pm

The decisions have already been made and these redistricting hearings are nothing but window dressing designed to fool the masses into thinking they actually have a say in what happens.

That goes for zoning hearings, planning commissions, county commission meetings and most every other kind of meeting, as well.

how come the teacher has 30 kids in their classroom?

Way back when I was going to school, 33 was the norm and sometimes there were more than that. There was discipline in the classroom back then, though, and principals and administrators would back a teacher up. What goes on in the classroom is more important than how many are in it, in my opinion.

Dusty

February 4th, 2012
2:45 pm

Race to the bottom, 1:11

I am afraid that you have cited “race” as the problem for schools and probably most other things.

Diversity is a common thing in American. We said we were all equal and most of us meant it. The pictures of school activities show all shades of skin as they study, debate, play ball, and come up for scholarships. I think that most parents see the value of recognizing the likeness among human beings, i.e. the human spirit. That is the foundation supporting diversity.

What parents want is a school where good bahavior is the norm, no matter the skin color of students. They want an environment where knowledge is taught, not civil behavior. They also hope that the friends of their children know the difference between right and wrong in many things..

You have chosen race as causing a differential. I say behavior and standards make the difference. Maybe I am wrong but I hope not. I think we lose too much if we start sorting out every problem by blaming race as the issue. (I love baseball. Diversity certainly has not hurt that game. The players are out there, one for all and all for one. Doncha just love it?)

Anyway, think about it..

Dusty

February 4th, 2012
3:09 pm

By the way, did anyone see Kyle on CNN this morning at 6:30?

I was sound asleep.

He’s got to get on a later show. 6:30 am!!!!! Has the sun even come up at that hour?

Rafe Hollister

February 4th, 2012
3:30 pm

It is culture not race that determines whether we value education and discipline.

Linda

February 4th, 2012
4:17 pm

Race@1:11, These parents become racist “when their kids reach middle school & especially high school…?”