T-SPLOST’s fate on the line next week in Fulton and DeKalb

Next Tuesday, Fulton and DeKalb voters may decide the fate of next year’s T-SPLOST referendum.

They’ll do so by voting to keep or eliminate a 1 percent sales tax for education. If they pass it, the counties expected to provide the bulk of “yes” votes next year for the transportation sales tax might not provide quite as many of them. Cherokee, Gwinnett and Henry are also considering other SPLOSTs, or special-purpose local-option sales taxes, and Cobb voters narrowly approved an extension of their tax earlier this year. But Fulton and DeKalb are more crucial to T-SPLOST supporters’ hopes.

Drop the penny for education, and adding a penny back for transportation may have a fighting chance. Keep it — and the penny for sewer infrastructure in Atlanta, to be reconsidered in March — and the sales tax rate will reach 9 percent in Atlanta and 8 percent in Fulton and DeKalb outside the capital city.

That prospect might explain why elected officials chose to lard up the T-SPLOST project list with expensive transit items for those two counties. The Beltline, the Clifton Corridor, a MARTA extension of some sort along I-20 east, and even the initial phase of the Cobb/U.S. 41 rail line — which would probably connect Atlantic Station to the MARTA backbone, and all but one mile of which would lie in Fulton — ensure that the T-SPLOST list is Fulton- and DeKalb-heavy. It better be, if residents of those counties are going to raise their sales taxes to levels that rival Florida and Tennessee — states without income taxes.

If I were going to bet, I’d say next week’s SPLOSTs pass and the transportation tax fails. Consumers have been paying an extra 1 percent for education construction for years, and they’re used to seeing the results in the form of new school buildings. To the degree that they weigh educational needs vs. transportation needs, they may be less likely to favor the latter since much of the proceeds would be spent well beyond the route of their daily commute. I’m not sure how many voters will anticipate next year’s vote and make a direct comparison, but I’d argue all such taxes should appear on the ballot together so that the direct comparison and the implications are evident.

Few T-SPLOST supporters have been as forthright as Atlanta Mayor Kasim Reed, who has come out and said the education SPLOST should be voted down to make way for the transportation tax. Most of them seem to be content to lie low and hope for the best, whether or not that also includes an education tax extension.

Hope, however, is usually not much of a plan.

– By Kyle Wingfield

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83 comments Add your comment

Road Scholar

November 2nd, 2011
6:21 am

Kyle, you are probably right with your “bet” but after getting a property tax millage rate increase recently in Dekalb, I’m thinking of voting NO on the school splost. The school property tax portion is now greater than the tax to run the county. My taxes went up about $500. I do not know of a list of projects that are tied to the school splost; at least I know what we are getting for the TSplost.

Waheema

November 2nd, 2011
6:26 am

I am opposing both SPLOSTS, not becasue I am opposed to taxes on principle but because the leadership is out of touch and needs a wake up call. Our power at the ballot box is all we have to keep their attention.

frugal voter

November 2nd, 2011
6:26 am

Why is it a given that transportation improvements can only be financed through a one percent sales tax? Our State Legislators shirked their responsibility by placing the onus on the citizenry, informed or not, to determine whether or not to pay for the needed improvements. And in that determination give credence to the political quid pro quo for each facet.
When you have interests in Douglas County requesting improvements at Fulton County’s I20/I285 interchange, you have regional interests that can only be approved through the appeasement of the citizens in another part of the region, i.e. South DeKalb’s desire for rail to the Stonecrest Mall area. Or worse, Beltline funding.
I do not contest the need or validity of any of these projects. I do not even travel to those parts of the region. However, it does not mean I am ignorant of the need for improvements outside of my world. How many voters can say the same?
I am a proponent of increasing the gas tax in the State of Georgia. Then if I do travel to those parts of the region unknown to me I will pay for the convenience through the purchase of the gas that got me there. The purchase of a soda or television should not result in subsidizing road improvements. This will only increase tax free internet purchases by the citizens of Georgia.

Streetracer

November 2nd, 2011
6:51 am

I seem to remember from high school civics that the primary functions of local and state governments were public safety, infrastructure, and education. If that is true, seems to me that basic tax revenues should be used for those functions and special taxes levied (voted on) for the other stuff governments are spending for.

Ayn Rant

November 2nd, 2011
6:52 am

Yeh, let’s not go giddy at the prospect of too much progress! Who needs both schools and transportation? Great nations are built on flag-flying, slogan chanting, and political hype, not on universities, highways, railways, and ports.

Just think how we’ll miss all those pennies a 1% rise in sales tax would cost us. There goes extra fries with our Big Macs!

Will the last Democrat in Georgia please turn off the lights?.....

November 2nd, 2011
6:52 am

The I-85 HOT lane debacle has done more to harm the T-SPLOST than any of those local E-SPLOSTs for education possibly ever could.

Before the HOT lanes on I-85 were activated, the T-SPLOST had modest support in Gwinnett, polling at around 50 percent.

After the activation of the HOT lanes and the resulting traffic jams on Interstates 85, 285, 985, GA 316 and surface streets alike, support for the T-SPLOST referendum has severely diminished, with support tanking the most amongst angry rush hour motorists whose peak-hour commute times to and from work have significantly lengthened and even doubled in many cases.

Nickie

November 2nd, 2011
7:03 am

“will the last Democrat…”, you are right. The HOT lanes did in the T-SPLOSH. I don’t live in Gwinnett or even go there more than once a year but after seeing how that money was spend and its consequences I have no faith in GA DOT’s ability to plan for transportation needs. I was a bit “on the fence” about voting for the T-SPLOSH but not any more. The 6 voters in our immediate family have all decided to vote “No”.

Churchill's MOM.....Ron Paul for President

November 2nd, 2011
7:04 am

I’ll be voting NO on waste & corruotion. The Beltline is just a bail out for politically connected developers.. How can any one trust the current MARTA mismanagement with billions of dollars?

No!

November 2nd, 2011
7:07 am

I’m voting no on both–taxes are too high and the money just goes to connected developers and builders for unneeded projects. Enough is enough—the party’s over.

Jack

November 2nd, 2011
7:25 am

I apologize for going off topic this morning but I am interested in your response to an observation about Herman Cain.

This current incident relating to him is a great example why long campaigns and better than short ones. Over the lifetime of a presidential campaign, almost every candidate ends up in a situation where he/she has “think on his/her feet” to make important decisions and to face this in front of a hostile press (it is unlikely that the next President can limit his/her worldwide press exposure to Fox News).

This allows voters an opportunity to observe these decision making skills. After all, if a candidate has trouble with campaign decisions, it does not bode well for making the more difficult decisions as the leader of the free world.

So, here is the concern. Wouldn’t you think that anyone who is to be serious candidate for President would have sat down with his advisors to discuss and anticipate concerns that opponents were likely to raise? If not, what does this say about the vision of the candidate? If so, how could the Cain campaign have discussed this possible concern and then the candidate appear to have such a limited memory of the concern?

It is my understanding that Mr. Cain and his campaign was contacted by Politico as far back as 10 days before this story broke in order to give Mr. Cain an opportunity to prepare a response to these allegations. Again, the candidate’s first response was one that would have lead someone to believe he had been blind sided by these allegations.

I don’t think “blame the press” or “play the race card” will work with a worldwide audience when you are the leader of the free world.

Finally, the campaigns handling of this matter, including the painful, slowly evolving acknowledgements, seems to be a poorly thought-out process.

It Mr. Cain’s response to this matter is indicative of his thinking process and vision, then I cannot imagine anyone other than the “true believers” being comfortable with this type of thinking in the Oval Office.

If the Republican Party wants to regain the Oval Office, they have a candidate who can do that – Mitt Romney.

If the Republican Party wants to simply make a protest statement of “purity of thought”, they have a number of candidates who can do that, staring with Herman Cain and Rick Perry.

Really?

November 2nd, 2011
7:31 am

Really @Jack? You should apologize. Not only is it off topic, it’s extraordinarily lonnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnng. There is adult ADHD medications you might look into or perhaps you had one too many cups of coffee

Will the last Democrat in Georgia please turn off the lights?.....

November 2nd, 2011
7:32 am

Nickie

November 2nd, 2011
7:03 am

Your sentiments reflect exactly what a lot of voters in Gwinnett and throughout Metro Atlanta are thinking. Why would anyone vote to pay more in taxes to make their commutes much WORSE than they were before?

BACK TO the T-SPLOST SUBJECT

November 2nd, 2011
7:42 am

I’m going to vote no. The State has found a way to make the common people pay for their own demise. We paid for the HOV lane that turned into a toll lane. We paid for a genius idea of Ga-400. We’ll pay for the road to be build and then after it’s paid for we’ll close the toll. NOT! SO VOTE NO! If you want to OCCUPY SOMETHING OCCUPY THE EXPRESS LANE!

GUNGA DIN

November 2nd, 2011
7:46 am

I’ll vote NO to both until the waste is cut from the budget. the school system is too top heavy with high paid administrators that do nothing to further the students education. GDOT has proved it can’t be trusted with the failure to stop GA 400 tolls as promised and the disaster that is the HOT lane. also, they overspend on projects with too many added embellishments to a simple road upgrade.

not no but he ll no!

November 2nd, 2011
7:46 am

I hope the T-Splost is DOA in Gwinnett. We already have been shown we can’t trust the politicians to do what they say they will with the tax money, and we have idiot liars in charge, like the disgraced Gena Evans who is still denying there are even issues with the crappy HOT lane idea . And remember, once a tax/ toll passes, it NEVER goes away (see Ga 400)….and besides, Gwinnett gets virtually nothing done internally out of the new proposed tax….I’ll be at my poll at 7 a.m. to say NO !!!!

Mike

November 2nd, 2011
7:49 am

Are you people that ignorant? There are no HOT lane or toll projects on the T-SPLOST list!! You really think voting it down is going to stop them from building more HOT lanes? A lot of the road projects on the T-SPLOST list have no funding in the immediate future, so if you vote no and expect any improvements you better get used to more tolls. A 1% sales tax for transportation is a small price to pay and metro Atlanta needs to do something because our infrastructure sucks. If we vote this down we will be another 10 years behind and will say to our politicians “we don’t care about infrastructure”. You think they are going to bring up another vote or find another way to pay for improvements? HA, I don’t think so… not the idiots you people vote into office.

Mike

November 2nd, 2011
7:52 am

These projects are on the list… GA 400/285 interchange re-build – the current outdated interchange backs up traffic both ways on 400 and 285. They are also rebuilding some of the ramps on Spaghetti Junction… specifically the ramp from 285 to 85 north which has ALWAYS caused massive backups on 285 (has nothing to do with HOT lanes and you people know it). Those two projects alone would help relieve a great deal of traffic, but you fools will vote this down because you are ignorant, and have no idea what’s even on the project list.

BACK TO the T-SPLOST SUBJECT

November 2nd, 2011
7:57 am

@ MIKE
I’m all for moving forward out of the dirt road era that this state is in. The politicians of this state have to find other ways of budgeting for improvements. The word Budget has a meaning and if has nothing to to do with loading projects on the backs of the people. This is a way for us to tell them to do their jobs. I’d love to take a high speed rail somewhere. Oh wait they had money for that and couldn’t budget to break ground. Now they risk losing the federal dollars supplied to build it. Now they’ll build a Grand Central Station…. to no where! sounds familiar?

BACK TO the T-SPLOST SUBJECT

November 2nd, 2011
8:00 am

@MIKE
Ah yes I know that and I’m angry and so are the many other commuters. I vote no til i feel better. I’m ignorant.

Kookooo

November 2nd, 2011
8:03 am

You always hit a wall of traffic at 316 on 85 in the morning and crawled to 285… it’s no different with the HOT lanes anymore. In the afternoon… traffic from Chamblee Tucker/285 to Indian Trail, then it eases up. Outside the first week of the HOT lanes, traffic on 85 hasn’t been much different. I think all of you are “koo koo” crazy…

I'm one "fool" voting NO!

November 2nd, 2011
8:04 am

Mike, your name calling aside, yes, we “fools” do know the bill of goods being sold. There are some local minor benefits for Gwinnett in the SPLOST, but is it worth the added tax burden to me and my family for god knows how long if we pass this mess, where the vast majority of alleged benefit is in regions the vast majority of us will seldom if ever travel? That is the measure to weigh your vote against. And you are partially right, a failure of the vote will result in us being held hostage with the easy excuse from our politicos “stop complaining about the potholes, you should have passed the tax…” And don’t worry, if it fails it will be put obe ever ballot in the future till it does pass…Gwinnett has done this before when a education SPOLST failed…we were threatned with double seesions, overcrowding, and the black plague (well maybe not the plague) for our children if we did not come to our senses and vote in the tax…well we did, and my kids are still in trailers…..

No More

November 2nd, 2011
8:14 am

For me TSPLOST was DOA and, as others have said, not just because I’m opposed to more taxes. I just don’t want to take it anymore.
I commute 31 miles each way so I understand we need traffic fixes but these projects and the folks who run DOT don’t have my confidence.
How many more bad decisions do you want to be forced on you. We have underutilized assests we the tax payers have already paid for in the HOT lanes and the HOV lanes plus the HOV entrances and exits on 75/85 in the downtown area. If you as a tax paying individual try to use some of your assests you get rewarded with a big fine.
We have the GA 400 toll that was suppose to fund improvements to 400 and expire once the bonds were paid for. Let’s not forget that 40 million of that money purchased property for MARTA (not 400 improvements)in the Lindberg area and the Governor so graciously let the toll “expire” for two weeks and then reinstated it without a vote.
You want to designate some of the revenue to MARTA. What a joke MARTA is. How long has MARTA been in “business” and what does it accomplish? It barely sqeeks outside of the perimeter after all of these years. Admit it. It has been poorly run and at his point is too expensive to maintain much less expand.
You like the Beltline? I’m not opposed to the Beltline but the percentage of the revenue that will be designated to it is way out of proportion to the benefits it will have on traffic. Sorry but I can’t help tie the idea of the Beltline to the trolley that the city is spending millions on to transport folks from the King Center area to Centennial Park. Please quit trying to sell me that one. Especially not right now.
These are just few incidental reasons I have no confidence in the folks running the show.
I couldn’t believe what I was reading when I got my invitaion to purchase the Peach Pass. Gena Evans started by saying these were exciting times. What is so exciting about having to pay for HOT lanes?
Please stop spitting on my shoes and trying to convence me it’s rain!

Jenn

November 2nd, 2011
8:20 am

The complete unwillingness of county residents to vote for the benefit of the metro-area will kill T-SPLOST, and it’s the most ignorant & short-sighted thing they can do. Do nothing to solve transportation, and then sit back & watch watch–companies won’t relocate their headquarters to metro-Atlanta. Those already here will move to areas that actually give a damn about the quality of life for their employees. Start picking your property in Charlotte now–it won’t be long before they take over as capital of the South.

Van Jones

November 2nd, 2011
8:24 am

Oh, one percent is nothing… it’s so small you won’t even notice. Sounds like death by a thousand cuts.

SAWB

November 2nd, 2011
8:27 am

Metro Governments have shown a real lack of responsibility over the last few years from the Gwinnett Commission’s property purchases, the APS cheating, DPS construction contracts, DOT HOT lanes and we could go on and one. Also, the inclusion of ridiculous projects like the Bohemian Beltline and other projects that benefit a very few in the region. At the end of the day unless there are significant changes in the T-SPLOST list and the quality of government I cannot see voting for this tax.

ideasbm

November 2nd, 2011
8:27 am

First of all Cobb County is the one left out of the SPLOST. Why would we vote ourselves a tax to build an almost billion dollar Marta extension that goes about a mile into Cobb and most of the rest of it is in Atlanta. What are the Cobb commission chair and the Kennesaw Mayor smoking. Give it a rest, Cobb will vote it down by over 60%. You can take your area transportation plan and shove it up Reed’s you know what. I guess we will have to be called Racist again in Cobb because we will not pay for something that does not benefit our citizens. The traffic on I-75 South, inside I-285, to downtown is not the problem and never has been. I have been driving that for as long as I-75 has existed and that is not a problem area.

How about a trade?

November 2nd, 2011
8:28 am

tell you what, reduce or eliminate the yearly burden of TAG FEES we pay unendingly on our vehicles, and the idiotic yearly “emissions” tax… I mean, uh “test”…maybe I’ll bite on the sales tax then…..

brad

November 2nd, 2011
8:32 am

Uh, No More, the reason MARTA doesn’t go “outside of the perimeter after all of these years” is that you voted not to join the system. Quit whining.

findog

November 2nd, 2011
8:32 am

The fuel tax was set when the down town connector was three lanes each way with a ditch and guard rails between north and south bound lanes

Low tax, low service has been a staple of Georgia since it was settled as a penal colony by Oglethorpe

This penny tax is just putting lipstick on a pig, we don’t need no more pretty piggies

Jenn

November 2nd, 2011
8:33 am

ideasbm — look at a map. Cobb is fairly built up, especially from Kennesaw into the ATL. Now look at Cherokee County. Lots o’ land. Assuming they’re working in Galleria or even Atlanta proper, how are they going to get there? 575 -> 75 S. You’re looking at now & seeing no benefit. I’m anticipating growth & wondering how the hell we’re going to deal with the influx with zero alternatives. At least once the beginnings of a rail line in Cobb are in place, we can push for an extension. But delaying rail by 10? 15? years? That’s foolish.

Aquagirl

November 2nd, 2011
8:36 am

I guess we will have to be called Racist again in Cobb because we will not pay for something that does not benefit our citizens

Given all the Cobb tags in jammed spots outside your county, plus MARTA parking lots, I think “selfish freeloaders” is more accurate.

Reality Check

November 2nd, 2011
8:41 am

Just vote NO. Far too much money has already been wasted on the failed government school system. We should not be putting more money in. The schools should be closed, sold, or bulldozed. They have caused far too much harm to our society. Its way past time for parents to be fully responsible for the education of their children and for the innovative private sector to be unleashed to show how education is supposed to be handled.

findog

November 2nd, 2011
8:56 am

Did I mention that it takes six years before any of these projects stick a shovel in the ground to get all the permits. What idiot thought it was a good idea to take rail road righ of ways and make parks instead of light rail lines? Belt line and silver commet would both have been great connectors to a real transit system. Why can’t the GT transportation graduates see the bigger picture? Is it because you don’t pay off the Moreland’s of this state without plowing up new ground?

Johns creek

November 2nd, 2011
9:16 am

time to vote no on the education tax to make room for the transportation tax. Kasim Reed is correct in his advice. Education has had its share, now it is time to turn to transportation.

Vashtai

November 2nd, 2011
9:17 am

I was just a kid in Cobb county when MARTA was formed. The reason Cobb didn’t join was because it was thought it would bring black people in. Forty years later and not much has changed.

Tiberius - Your lightning rod of hate!

November 2nd, 2011
9:28 am

Hey, Kyle, we’re not one of the big three, but we ARE one of the big six in the state up here in Forsyth County, and we have a regular SPLOST renewal being voted on next week as well.

And it isn’t looking too good for it due to secrecy issues, project selection and general voter anger in what is arguably the most Republican-friendly county in America.

Woody

November 2nd, 2011
9:30 am

hmmm…. political realities…. 1) the APS cheating scandal and a string of (how shall we say this) ‘insufficient’ superintendents in Dekalb and other counties, all of these weigh heavily in the public perception against sending more money in THAT direction. 2) granted, more HOT lanes are not on the SPLOST, but HOT = the thugs in the legislature who conceived it, coupled with an oblivious DOT that recommended it (or is it the other way around?), so the public won’t be wanting to send more money in THAT direction. 3) are y’all totally clueless? massive numbers of people are out of work! They don’t have money to give away! They do have plenty of time now to go to the polls and vote no for more taxes, especially the kind of tax that hits them at the grocery store! My opinion, the day of the option sales tax is soon to be over. Legislators are gonna have to find another route, legislated gasoline taxes, liquor taxes, cigarette taxes. Probably not property taxes, that’s a losing proposition these days.

Kyle Wingfield

November 2nd, 2011
9:36 am

Tiberius: I only mentioned other SPLOSTs in the 10-country T-SPLOST region. Forsyth is in a different region.

Buzz G

November 2nd, 2011
9:42 am

Just say no. Power to the people.

Cyril

November 2nd, 2011
9:57 am

I can’t honestly say how I’m going to vote on the TSPLOST. I too have reservations about paying for these improvements with a sales tax. However, I’m pretty surprised by people saying xyz county doesn’t get a benefit from it.

The 2 most vocal have been Gwinnett & Cobb today. If I’m not mistaken, the improvements to I-285 @ I-85 interchange could have real impacts on Gwinnett, even if it isn’t in the county. Or if you would prefer an example of a project in the county, I believe the TSPLOST funds a massive Sugarloaf Parkway extension for a couple of hundred million.

In Cobb, yes, the transit line would only get up to the Cumberland area and be primarily in Fulton. However, do you seriously think the people in between Cumberland and Midtown give 2 rats patooties about that project? This is practically a billion dollar project. If you send it all the way to Kennessaw during the 10 years, then it becomes a $2 billion project. The region only has so much money to go around ($6 billion in this TSPLOST, do you really think Cobb should get 1/3 of it all?). This would be a MAJOR first step to getting transit into Cobb and provide a real stepping off point for extending it further. One that Cobb isn’t likely to see again without the TSPLOST.

Politi Cal

November 2nd, 2011
10:14 am

I will vote “No,” and if you ask me why I will answer: H.O.T. Lanes. Enough with squeezing the people of every darn dime we have. I’m mad as hel- and I’n not gonna’ take it anymore.

mum

November 2nd, 2011
10:16 am

If you still have children in school in Dekalb County you may want to speak with your PTSA to get a good read on continuing the penny school SPLOST. Even with the mess with the central school administration in Deklab County schools, at least you can see something of where that money went, and if parents pay attention, the waste should not continue. The TSPLOST is a different horse. If they were going the route of expanding rail instead or more roads, I might have been tempted to go “yes” on the TSPLOST, but I fear that the money will go to “friends” of the politicians first, and we’ll be asked for more money in a few years to “finish” the projects.

Jefferson

November 2nd, 2011
10:21 am

If you have a tax problem, simply call the TEA GOP.

Don't Tread

November 2nd, 2011
10:27 am

“Atlanta Mayor Kasim Reed… has come out and said the education SPLOST should be voted down”

If any Republican had said that, we’d be hearing the liberal screeching of how they want to dumb down education, etc. But all I hear is crickets. Wonder why.

Bart Abel

November 2nd, 2011
10:34 am

Georgians have fallen for the scam.

When Georgia politicians claim to support low taxes and small government, what they mean is that they support low taxes and small government for corporations and the wealthy. All those business and special interest tax cuts, credits, and deductions that have been added over the course of the last decade is coming back to haunt us in the form of T-SPLOST and other forms of taxes and fees. This isn’t an accident. It’s by design.

Lower taxes for the wealthy few means higher taxes and fees for the rest of us. Hence lower funds available from the lottery and rapidly growing tuition rates. Hence fewer teachers and larger classes in our schools. Hence Herman Cain’s 999 plan which raises taxes on everybody but the wealthy.. Hence Neil Boortz’s FairTax which raises taxes on the middle class dramatically while cutting taxes for the wealthy. Hence Lexus Lanes. Hence various SPLOST votes throughout metro Atlanta, plus T-SPLOST–regressive taxes that tax the poor and middle class, as a portion of household income, at much higher rates than the wealthy.

Most Georgians, and especially those who align themselves with the Tea Party, have fallen for the scam. Unfortunately, its to their own detriment, and to the detriment of their loved ones and neighbors.

DawgDad

November 2nd, 2011
10:39 am

More, more, more. We MUST have MORE education, MORE transportation – thus we MUST have MORE taxes. More is better, our critical problems MUST be solved and they CANNOT be solved without MORE taxes.

Just what is happening to sales tax percents 1 through 7? And our State Income Tax, and property taxes, and gas taxes. Are we still paying for the MORE education and transportation infrastructure those taxes were to provide for?

Throwing MORE good money at bad government will do nothing but bankrupt and enslave us all.

Junior Samples

November 2nd, 2011
10:40 am

I agree with Jenn on the point that if we don’t do something, we’ll lose to Charlotte (or another neighboring city). Not too long ago they were an up and coming city, about 10 years behind Atlanta. They’ve upped their game while we bicker about transporation. No votes will tell our elected officials we don’t want to spend money on transportation. In the long run it will cost us plenty. If you’re ok with the ideas but not the implementation, talk to your elected officials NOW!

While I am completely in favor of the Beltline (disclaimer: it would benefit me greatly), I do agree that the money allocated to this one project is too much at this time considering the bigger picture. They are very organized, well thought out, and put their plan in motion (themselves) from a grass-roots level. No other project mentioned has support from their local community that rivals it.

Bottom line? Everyone complains about traffic. Time to pony up and fix the problem. If we wait too long, our transporations issues will disappear because our neighboring states will have our jobs and industries.

Junior Samples

November 2nd, 2011
10:47 am

Tread,
I agree with your statement. But given the recent APS scandal, that’s not a popular stance at this time for any politician. Fix the problem, then increase funding.

DawgDad

November 2nd, 2011
10:47 am

Bart – so what is the alternative? Voting for Democrats GUARANTEES we’ll be taxed to death.

Jack

November 2nd, 2011
11:01 am

I like “lard up”. Most of us have been “lard up” by politicians of one sort or another. I’m voting NO.