On Tax Day, a simple explanation of tax reform’s unpopularity

At NRO, Jim Geraghty gets right to the point on Tax Day:

Gallup: “Half of Americans believe the amount they pay in federal income taxes is too high, while 43% consider it about right and 4% too low.”

Bloomberg news: “More than 45 percent of U.S. households won’t owe federal income taxes for 2010.” (links original)

Because it’s highly unlikely that people already paying no federal income taxes will see those taxes go down, opposition to broad-based tax reform is probably always going to start in the mid- to high 40s. I’d like to see a poll about tax reform conducted only among those who actually pay federal income taxes.

Relatedly, from The Hill: “Tax advisers: Prepare to pay higher rates in the future.” It seems these tax advisers don’t buy the idea that politicians are going to reform the tax code to broaden and simplify the tax base and then flatten and lower rates. Or, maybe tax advisers just don’t like the idea of a simpler, flatter tax code…

– By Kyle Wingfield

Find me on Facebook or follow me on Twitter

50 comments Add your comment

A Frank Zappa

April 18th, 2011
10:56 am

Perhaps more people are finally starting to wise up to the GOP’s idea of “tax reform” after having reviewed Paul Ryan’s plan to pave the road to prosperity for the wealthiest with the bodies of everyone below them.

carlosgvv

April 18th, 2011
11:13 am

Over the years, Americans have increasingly come to believe that the politicians are wasteing most of their tax money on useless wars and pork. So, it’s no wonder we don’t want to pay anymore taxes than we have to. Politicians have nobody to blame but themselves.

arnold

April 18th, 2011
11:22 am

I don’t mind paying taxes. :-) However, I believe the future of this country is the children and I would like to see more spent on public education. Public education covers all children.

that's goofy

April 18th, 2011
11:50 am

I don’t mind the amount as much as I mind where it goes. I didn’t like my tax money going to bail out Wall Street, GM and Chrysler. I object to corporations exploiting tax loopholes while sending jobs to other countries. Not crazy about paying for a war in Iraq nor do I want to fund a ground war in Libya either.

hazel

April 18th, 2011
11:52 am

People who don’t owe tax at the end of the year still pay taxes. It is as if three was nothing being taken out of their check.

hazel

April 18th, 2011
11:52 am

there, not three

1961_Boomer

April 18th, 2011
12:00 pm

In a nutshell: 45% of people pay no federal income taxes. PERIOD. Another hidden fact is that a majority of those people actually receive REFUNDABLE TAX CREDITS! Not only do they not pay, but they actually receive a kickback from the government! Those people think taxes are just about right, and continue to demand more services and kickbacks for the taxes that they don’t have to pay. They are happy to vote for politicians that promise pie-in-the-sky (e.g. Obamacare) because THEY DON’T PAY. If they did pay, their votes would be completely different. If they did pay, they would think “how much is this going to cost me” every time some politician proposes some grand new program. If YOU (the reader) are not thinking “how much is this going to cost me”, it is because YOU are a moocher and not a producer.

Tax reform at the national level… much like the recent attempts at the state level… means higher taxes for the middle class who pay taxes (as you said… those with incomes starting in the high 40k).

True tax reform means EVERYBODY PAYS. True tax reform means that the tax laws contain NO deductions and NO refundable tax credits. True tax reform means that we stop using tax policy for the purpose of social engineering. We establish reasonable rates and eliminate ALL loopholes and deductions. Any proposal that does not address these issues is just more social engineering.

jm

April 18th, 2011
12:20 pm

Our country is broken.

Logical Dude

April 18th, 2011
12:25 pm

Kyle says: Or, maybe tax advisers just don’t like the idea of a simpler, flatter tax code…

So you see why trying to get any simplification through Congress is nigh impossible!
How many tax advisors will be out of a job if taxes can be done simply at home, even by the wealthy who use elaborate loopholes to reduce their tax burden?

Ragnar Danneskjöld

April 18th, 2011
12:33 pm

Good afternoon all. There is little question that those who pay little or no taxes favor raising the taxes on those who do pay taxes. That intellectual hypocrisy is what makes attractive the slightly-tongue-in-cheek proposal by Dr. Walter E Williams to Constitutionally reset voting rights in this country, to one vote per $5,000 Federal income taxes paid. Those who pay nothing need not contribute to election of those who will spend the money.

The Tax Fact Man Cometh

April 18th, 2011
12:50 pm

The bottom 50% (under $33k) of income earners pay 2.5% of all household IRS taxes. The top 5% (over $160k) pay 60%. The top 10% (over $110k) pay 70%. The middle 40% (between $35k-$110k) pay 27%.

The moonbat liberal left thinks that just taxing the top few percent more will solve our debt crisis. Uhm, nope, you can tax the top 5% at 100% and it wouldn’t even put a dent in the Obamabudget. But since when did liberals ever care about facts and how to run the economy. Just read on….

“The Obama administration moved swiftly Monday to downplay ratings agency Standard & Poor’s downgrade of its U.S. credit outlook, calling the decision a political judgment that should not be taken too seriously.

“The Obama administration moved swiftly Monday to downplay ratings agency Standard & Poor’s downgrade of its U.S. credit outlook, calling the decision a political judgment that should not be taken too seriously.

The timing of S&P’s announcement was unwelcome for the White House, coming just as President Obama tried to regain the initiative on the deficit debate in Washington.

Last week Obama laid out his plan to reduce the budget deficit by $4 trillion over 12 years, trying to give markets confidence that he was serious about tackling U.S. fiscal woes.

House Republican leader Eric Cantor on Monday called the S&P downgrade “a wake-up call” against those seeking to “blindly increase” the U.S. debt limit.

S&P downgraded the outlook for the United States to negative, saying it believes there is a risk U.S. policymakers would not reach agreement on how to address the country’s long-term fiscal pressures by 2013.

So much for market confidence.”

griftdrift

April 18th, 2011
1:13 pm

So many numbers. What to believe. What to believe.

I paid 15% in taxes. I make significantly more than the 15% bracket. So sadly, I don’t fit into either Kyle’s 45% that pay nothing or other people’s grouping of pay too much. Strange.

Until you stop using American’s ignorance of how taxes actually work and what they actually pay, I can’t take your class warfare rhetoric seriously.

Jefferson

April 18th, 2011
2:07 pm

People who work for a living complain about their pay, people who make too much money complain about taxes.

Future World

April 18th, 2011
2:18 pm

Ever since the Koch brothers had their way with us and shifted more of the tax burden down on those of us that just barely make ends meet, I’ve been forced to use less Georgia Pacific toilet paper, amongst other things that they made billions on from former sales to us little people. I hope they’re happy now that we have been forced to turn to used telephone books now that Sears no longer sends out free catalogs. Change is good though because we don’t need to worry about our road being filled with potholes since we cannot afford to drive an automobile. We just share this one computer with its internet access between fifty of us in the neighborhood like they do over in India. I hear their Caste system is what best describes our new way of life here in the USA where all roads have been replaced with a single path to prosperity.

Freedom Lover

April 18th, 2011
3:29 pm

Republicans and Democrats alike (with the exception of Ron and Rand Paul) are addicted to government waste and spending. Spending will never decrease so taxes can never really go down. Taxes will never get simple as the current tax code allows for social engineering, market manipulation, giving away favors, pitting one group against another, and everything else that politicians love. As well, far too many CPA’s have way too big a lobby to every allow taxes to be so simple that everyone could do them without an expensive tax preparation service. The only group without a serious lobby in washinton are the productive taxpaying citizens. The parasites have an entire city (DC) working on their behalf.

CJ

April 18th, 2011
3:51 pm

I find it hard to sympathize with the argument that a large swath of households pay no federal income taxes. A growing number of people are falling into poverty. Still recovering from a deep recession, millions of Americans are still unemployed or underemployed. With state and municipalities raising taxes all over the country, more families are paying disproportionate shares of their incomes in sales taxes, fees, payroll taxes, and other forms of regressive taxation (i.e., the lower the income, the higher the percentage of income paid in such taxes).

The growing number of families without a federal income tax burden isn’t, in and of itself, a problem. It’s a symptom.

1961_Boomer

April 18th, 2011
5:20 pm

I find it hard to sympathize with the argument that a large swath of households pay no federal income taxes. …. other drivel deleted….

You don’t have to sympathize with FACT. Families without an income tax burden IS a problem. As long as they can vote to open up the pocketbooks of other people, it IS (in and of itself) a problem. Regressive taxation, in and of itself, is NOT a problem. What IS a problem is that globalization have pushed jobs overseas to areas with no regulation, no rules. What IS a problem is that we have lost our manufacturing base. What IS a problem is that it costs so much to produce in America now that companies simply find lower cost alternatives where they can pay paltry wages and pollute at will.

The jobs are not coming back until the third world gets fed up with working ever harder for no gain, only to have their air and water polluted to the point of bad health. That time is a LONG way off.

Somehow, we have to figure out how to make stuff cheaply and safely HERE, in America, so that we can stop using the tax code to prop up those folks who have been displaced by third world workers.

Ryn Aand

April 18th, 2011
5:30 pm

So the top 10 percent pay 70 percent of the taxes? Oh, really? When I went to the CPA last week, there were all sorts of deductions for selling stock, etc. And you can also reroute all sorts of goodies through corporations.

If taxes were really such a burden on the top 10 percent, why don’t hear them complaining?

Jefferson

April 18th, 2011
5:37 pm

Its not the taxes you pay that matters, it what you have left to live on that matters… live, don’t cry.

CJ

April 18th, 2011
5:43 pm

On the one hand, 1961_Boomer, you write that “As long as they can vote to open up the pocketbooks of other people, it IS (in and of itself) a problem.” Then you immediately contradict yourself by writing, “Regressive taxation, in and of itself, is NOT a problem.”

What is vote for regressive taxation? A vote to “open up the pocketbooks of other people.”

With the reduction/elimination of federal, state, and local taxes on inheritances, capital gains, dividend income, corporate profits, property, plus loopholes that allow those primarily with higher incomes to avoid paying taxes, more and more of the overall tax burden is being shifted to the poor and middle class, including those who have little to no federal income tax liability. Such transfer, by the way, is entirely deliberate.

And how do our representatives get away with this shifting of the tax burden? By having the media focus almost exclusively on federal income taxes rather than comparing the overall tax burden—federal, state, and local—of households at various income levels. It’s cherry-picking, and you fell for the scam.

Road Scholar

April 18th, 2011
6:06 pm

1961; so the bottom 40 % pay no taxes and also get tax credits. As reported on another blog, those 40% have an average income less than $20K! Can you live on $20K per year? They also pay state, sales, gas, etc taxes whether they drive or ride a bus!

Oh and where are all those jobs from the tax cuts for the wealthy and business? Don’t they make more use out of what the government does? Roads, Transportation, schools? Not just for their family but for their business and its prosperity?

I Report (-: You Whine )-: Thee Magnificent!!! mmm, mmmm, mmmmm! Just sayin...

April 18th, 2011
6:14 pm

Vice President Biden and wife Jill reported $379,178 of income and paid $86,626 in total federal taxes for 2010. They contributed $5,350 to charity.

Wow, 5000 smackers to help the needy, I guess he was too busy giving away your money to come off of any of his.

Michael H. Smith

April 18th, 2011
6:35 pm

Firstly, liberals, or is that Bolsheviks, this might change the approach you use when blathering on about “raising taxes” on the “evil rich”:

For Super Rich, Taxes Keep Falling

ABC News’ Kevin Dolak reports:

With just one day left for Americans to file their tax returns, the super wealthy can look forward to paying significantly less than they would have two decades ago: Since 1992, the average federal income tax actually paid by the wealthiest 400 households in the country has fallen from 26 percent to 17 percent.

But why, if the top income tax rate in the U.S. is 35 percent, are the very, very wealthy paying such a small percent of their income into taxes? Short answer: tax breaks. There are built-in tax breaks in every bracket that everyone can take advantage of, including breaks for having children, paying a mortgage and furthering education.

According to Washington, D.C.-based think tank Tax Policy Center, the number of tax breaks is so high that this year it is estimated that 45 percent of households will not pay any taxes whatsoever.

Roberton Williams explained to The Associated Press the conundrum that leads to these tax-free households.

“It’s the fact that we are using the tax code both to collect revenue, which is its primary purpose, and to deliver these spending benefits that we run into the situation where so many people are paying no taxes,” Williams said…

- Secondly, the focus should be on closing the loopholes and eliminating deductions

Geithner said he thinks the deficit can be reduced without raising taxes on the middle class, by ending tax loopholes and deductions that primarily go to wealthier Americans who itemize their tax returns.

“Those benefits, even like the mortgage interest deduction that lets people have two homes, pretty expensive homes … if you target them on the most fortunate Americans, they can afford to take a little bit larger share of the burden,” Geithner said. “They can afford to do that, and it’s the responsible thing to do for the economy.”

So, did the “evil rich” get a tax cut or were their deductions and loopholes increased?

Aren’t we glad the loony leftwing socialist DEMwits will never learn how to frame a winning argument, Kyle?

We agree, simpler is better. Flatten the tax, which means close all loopholes and eliminate all deductions, even eliminate those tax credits that go to people who don’t pay any tax and reduce all brackets for those who actually do pay taxes accordingly: Say around two or maybe three income brackets?

WillieRae

April 18th, 2011
6:45 pm

Tax Reform is democrat double speak for raising taxes on the middle class.

BW

April 18th, 2011
6:45 pm

And by not paying federal taxes you mean the ones who have taxes deducted from their paychecks all year only to be refunded the full amount of federal taxes that they were responsible for? I feel like we do these people, who through tax code, essentially owe no federal taxes a disservice when we should be complaining about a tax code that is full of deductions and exemptions to allow it in the first place.

Michael H. Smith

April 18th, 2011
6:55 pm

@ – WillieRae

Tell ya what there WillieRae, if and this is mighty BIG IF I could guarantee the physical size, scope of power to fit exactly within the Constitution and with the ability of the federal governments so restricted that it shall never run another deficit of any kind precluding for war and natural disasters, THEN I would concede to raising my bracket a few percent.

It would be a matter of protecting my investment and property in this country. Everyone should think in those terms or find some other country to do their mooching and bloodsucking off the producers and providers that keep them alive.

Michael H. Smith

April 18th, 2011
7:00 pm

@ – BW

What did I say Bruce? Don’t try to re-frame my comment.

Flatten the tax, which means close all loopholes and eliminate all deductions, even eliminate those tax credits that go to people who don’t pay any tax and reduce all brackets for those who actually do pay taxes accordingly: Say around two or maybe three income brackets?

And, add my 6:55 to it.

TRUTH

April 18th, 2011
7:26 pm

Being in the upper middle class (I think that’s what my wife and I “USED” to be called), we get slaughtered at tax time. I mean reammed. Return?? Are you kidding me? Then I reqad stories about how GE paid nothing on BILLIONS!! Seriously? Or how the guy that makes millions, gets away with 17%. The language I could use here would get me banned. Incredulously, the Republican Party has convinced many of its base to think that is a good thing. Further, its the fault of the current administration that GE and the others corporations that they get away with paying nothing. NO!!! This affront is brought to you by the makers of the Tea Pary, Neo-Cons, and Trickle Down…wait for it….The Republican Party with special invited guest…Freedomworks, et al.

Don’t know about the rest of those in our situation, but I for one have frakkin’ had it. In a house that we pay monthly on, only to watch its value drop faster than a speeding bullet, (throwing good money to bad), having had to cash in retirement because my position went to “Becky” somewhere in the global market, and then to be slammed by the government because I took some of MY money out to pay my mortgage and maybe get my family someting to eat while I looked for work, taking a job across the country from my family so we can have some sembelance of life, well here is the middle finger salute!! And the Republican Party who has brainwashed most of you into believing that this is about country and fairness to the little guy, I share that salute with you too.

Once upon a time in this country, you could go to school (try that now), work hard, and make a way for you and your family. Now we don’t have retirement, we don’t get raises, yet our healthcare is through the roof, (dental insurance – think about it, you can’t even get your teeth fixed but they take your premium every month), you can’t bargain as a public employee in Wisconsin, the heck you say??

Republican Party, go away, and stay away. Your version of America is not that of the American people but that of the American Corporation. Shamfeful.

Michael H. Smith

April 18th, 2011
7:47 pm

Been there, done that.

Same goes double for those DAMN SOCIALIST DEMOCRATS!

Rafe Hollister

April 18th, 2011
8:03 pm

As Boortz has said for years, the Democrat grand plan is to get as many voters off the tax rolls as possible, to guarantee them a victory in every election. If 51% of voters pay no taxes and are totally dependent on the government, then they will vote for the party who promises them the status quo or better benefits. Us working stiffs, who pay the taxes, will essentially be powerless to change things.

Michael H. Smith

April 18th, 2011
8:05 pm

U.S. Warned on Debt Load

S&P Signals Top Credit Rating Is in Danger, Stoking Political Battle on Deficit

A blunt warning Monday from a credit rating firm about the U.S. government’s mounting debt pushed stock markets lower and intensified political divisions in Washington about how best to tackle growing deficits.

Both the Obama administration and House Republicans scrambled to gain leverage from Standard & Poor’s changing its outlook on U.S. Treasury securities to “negative” from “stable.”

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748704004004576270693061767996.html

I Report (-: You Whine )-: Thee Magnificent!!! mmm, mmmm, mmmmm! Just sayin...

April 18th, 2011
8:42 pm

Hey, I wanted to create the next climate scare and was wondering if “human exhalation” would be taking it too far?

Ed

April 18th, 2011
9:22 pm

If you consider what percent of your middle class income is sheltered from income taxes because of your itemized deductions, versus the portion by those making the “big bucks”, you will realize that flattening and broading the tax means the burden is shifting to YOU! Be very leary of any “tax reform” that takes away your itemized deductions to lower your income tax rate by 1 or 2%. Your itemized deductions probably shelter a whopping percent of your income. To the rich, losing their itemized deductions (IDs) is probably a drop in the bucket to the totality of their income, and they would gladly give up those deductions in exchange for a 1 or 2 % cut on the hundreds of thousands of dollars income (or even millions). You know it because they are heavily lobbying for the change behind the scenes.

lynnie gal

April 18th, 2011
10:42 pm

“I’d like to see a poll about tax reform conducted only among those who actually pay federal income taxes.” Well, well. What a surprise. Here’s a conservative Republican who wants to give the power of speech only to those with the means to pay for it. So, I guess the middle class and the poor don’t get to vote on tax issues, in your book. You, and all your selfish conservatives do not belong in a democracy. Your attitude about disenfranchisement of those of lesser means is disgusting.

ByteMe

April 19th, 2011
12:36 am

Famous bank robber Willie Sutton on why he robbed banks: “Because that’s where the money is.”

ByteMe on why you tax the wealthy more than the poor: “Willie Sutton was a smart man.”

ByteMe

April 19th, 2011
12:38 am

Sutton, by the way, claims he never really said it. Go figure.

Jason Zeller

April 19th, 2011
12:53 am

Engaging and well written article! This tops anything I have read lately on the subject at hand. I wonder if this’ll be posted on Twenty-First Tycoon. Although the site has awesome political, business, technology and real estate news, they could use more stuff like this. http://www.21Tycoon.com

Road Scholar

April 19th, 2011
6:31 am

So none of the whiners want to live on $20K?

Earlybird

April 19th, 2011
7:39 am

Road Scholar – when you talk about the wealthy gaining more than the poor from the use of the roads – don’t you realize that the tax on gasoline is a pay as you go tax?

You state:

Oh and where are all those jobs from the tax cuts for the wealthy and business? Don’t they make more use out of what the government does? Roads, Transportation, schools? Not just for their family but for their business and its prosperity?

You address your own statement here – when their business is succeeding they ARE HIRING!! The number of one man “companies” or “corporations” that are making tons of money without paying another human being to help in this success is very small. GE paid no taxes, but its employees and stockholders paid plenty.

When we agree to work for a certain salary, no one holds a gun to our head. The only party with a gun in this equation is the government. I favor taking the social engineering out of our tax system. This whole comment section from both sides is the best argument I have ever seen for the Fair Tax.

jd

April 19th, 2011
8:36 am

Plenty of people in the bottom 40% pay taxes – may parents among em. The 45% who don’t pay taxes are scattered across all income levels… and then there are those who make $200k or more and pay less than 1%…. And, there are those that get paid by the Govt (GE) billions in credits…

Buzz G

April 19th, 2011
9:00 am

Not only do 45% pay no taxes, but nearly 45,000,000 people now are on food stamps. We are seeing the end of the USA as an economic super power and we are about to become just another socialist wasteland. My grandchildren will never have the opportunity I had because my generation squandered its wealth on feel-good vote buying programs. It has been 40 some years since Lyndon B. Johnson fired up his “Great Society” social welfare (vote buying) programs. And nearly every administration since then has ratcheted the social welfare state up a notch.

Fix-It

April 19th, 2011
9:02 am

commoncents

April 19th, 2011
9:27 am

It seems to me that if social programs were phased out, the economy would adjust. If the govt wasn’t subsidizing food stamps and medicine, the food and medicine prices would drop because the farmers and manufacturers still need to make money.

Perhaps then a new lower and flatter tax rate could be used for what tax dollars should be used for: infrastructure and national security

German Shepherd Dawg

April 19th, 2011
9:31 am

This article accurately describes the problem we face: our tax system intentionally redistributes wealth, which is socialistic..

http://www.southernprose.com/blog/

Stanford

April 19th, 2011
9:35 am

The republicans have an uncanny ability to avoid the facts.

What happened to the DEFICIT the republicans are soooooo worried about? The massive tax cuts for the rich have caused the debt. The GOP gave up their CLAIM of fiscal responsibility.

Fair Tax Scam??? This shell game has been debunked many times by ever economist in the country. Kneel Boortz is just another con man looking to make a few million off his brain-dead followers.

Simple – Taxes rates for the rich are the lowest in 50 years. If corporations and the idle rich paid their fair share the rest of us would get a break.

You People Are Suckers

April 19th, 2011
9:37 am

The right wing spin that some huge number of Americans owe no federal income tax is bogus. Just about everybody pays 15% of their income in federal payroll taxes (Make no mistake – it’s 15% even if your employer shows a deduction of only 7.5% since they include “their” half of federal payroll taxes when deciding whether to hire you and how much salary to pay you). As conservatives should know, there is functionally no difference between federal “payroll taxes” and federal “income taxes.” They all go into the same pot, and there is no real “trust fund” for Social Security and Medicare. To the extent there are “trust funds,” the Social Security “trust fund” is full of U.S. Treasury bonds because the federal government has “borrowed” the money to pay for other things, whether it be the military, paying current beneficiaries of federal entitlement programs, etc.

When Kyle, the National Review and other right wing spinners claim that some huge percentage of Americans pay no federal income taxes, they are trying to amp up outrage through intentionally misleading statements. They want you to think that lots of your co-workers go home every two or four weeks with their full paychecks with no federal tax deductions, or have everything they’ve paid refunded to them at tax time. That is simply false. We can have a debate about what the federal income tax rates should be on various income levels, but it should be an honest one, not one started by people with a particular agenda making intentionally misleading statements to warp the outcome of the debate.

I have to give Kyle and company for being good at what they do. I am willing to bet that in this comment thread there is more than one poster expressing outrage about how they pay “federal income taxes” and so many others don’t who in fact fall into Kyle’s category of “people already paying no federal income taxes.” You’re falling for his trap. He wants to use the outrage he creates to get you to vote for politicians who want to raise your federal income taxes so those same politicians can cut the taxes of the people and corporations who fund their campaigns for Congress.

For the record, I’m someone who owns his own business and pays plenty of what Kyle considers “federal income taxes” in addition to those federal income taxes he’s excluding (”federal payroll taxes.”) I agree we ought to debate what the tax rates should be on various income levels, but it should be an honest debate.

German Shepherd Dawg

April 19th, 2011
10:03 am

Stanford,

It must be your name and not the institution where you matriculated, or they’re teaching BS in political science classes these days. Is that even a major anymore? If by “ever economist in the country” you mean Paul Krugman, you are correct. Thomas Sowell or Walter Williams might have a different POV.

The link posted above : http://www.southernprose.com/blog/

The article explains why your mindset is the reason our country is on the brink of destruction. Apparently you are not receptive to reality.

This applies equally to the blogger “You People Are Suckers”, who should say that while looking in the mirror.

German Shepherd Dawg

April 19th, 2011
10:06 am

And its true: Sutton never said the attributed quote, but he is famous for it.

andrew

April 19th, 2011
4:54 pm

http://www.apttax.com/
True tax reform means EVERYBODY PAYS. True tax reform means that the tax laws contain NO deductions and NO refundable tax credits. True tax reform means that we stop using tax policy for the purpose of social engineering.

Vance

April 20th, 2011
7:45 am

I guess the government is using that money for research and technology. But it also has a lot of plans which is like wasting money. I think the government should be careful on what they plan and how should they use the money in getting the economy rather than just giving bail outs.
http://www.garsideaccountants.co.uk/