Deal gets mostly good marks in first session as governor

Last year — back when Sonny Perdue was still the governor and Sen. Tim Golden of Valdosta was still a Democrat — Golden had this to say about filling a billion-dollar gap in the budget, the thorniest matter before the Legislature at that time:

“That takes a strong governor, quite frankly, to come in and lead that effort.”

In the just-ended 2011 legislative session, Golden’s year-old comment rang true once again.

On two of this year’s headline issues, repairing the HOPE scholarship and filling another budget hole, Gov. Nathan Deal engaged early and often, to strong effect. On others, less so — and it showed.

Regarding HOPE, Deal forced legislators’ hand by declaring from the outset that he would not use tax revenues to augment falling lottery receipts. Given that there wasn’t enough lottery money to fulfill the HOPE promises that have prevailed for nearly two decades, something had to be done.

While Deal was out front for much of the process of reforming HOPE, by all accounts he pursued a collaborative effort that included legislators from both parties. Ultimately, they produced as good a plan as Georgians could expect under the circumstances.

The budget wasn’t exactly a cinch this year: Although revenues stabilized, those gains were offset by the end of federal stimulus funding.

For months, Gold Dome watchers used words like “bad” to describe last year’s budget battle — and “bloodbath” to forecast what lay in store for this year. And “bad” was bad enough — because of a pitched battle over a cigarette tax hike that failed, and a hospital bed tax that later passed — to spawn the leadership squabbles that plagued the Senate this year.

Yet, the predicted fiscal carnage never arrived. Deal’s budget, devoid of tax hikes and despite a leaner package of the pet projects funded by state bonds that are popular with many legislators, sailed through with relative ease.

That’s the good news.

On the other side of the ledger are the session-long fights to reform both the tax code, which ended without a bill, and our illegal-immigration laws, which led to a contentious bill.

First, let’s stipulate that governors walk a fine line between taking an active role and intruding on the legislative branch. This year’s session indicated Deal is reluctant to be viewed as overly active.

That’s not necessarily a bad thing: In Georgia, the governor already holds sway over a wide range of matters and ought not try to micromanage legislators.

And let’s further stipulate that a contentious legislative process isn’t always a bad thing. Illegal immigration, in particular, is such a passionate issue for so many people that a short-circuited debate was not in the state’s best interests.

That said, tax reform and illegal immigration were issues that Deal championed as a candidate. Yes, on each issue there was a bill-drafting process already under way when Deal was inaugurated. But it would have been natural for him, by way of fulfilling campaign pledges, to inject himself into those processes.

He didn’t, and it was especially disappointing to see tax reform fall flat — for now; lawmakers pledge to revisit it later.

Leadership in the House, for both Republicans (Speaker David Ralston) and Democrats (Rep. Stacey Abrams), was solid this session. But if the Senate can’t get its act together between now and next year, Deal may have to reconsider just how often he can take a wait-and-see approach.

– By Kyle Wingfield

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55 comments Add your comment

Jefferson

April 15th, 2011
9:07 pm

Kyle, I’ll bet you a nickle and loan you the nickle to bet with, that when Deal leaves office his financial troubles (couple of mil or more in debt) will be long gone on the salary cut he took and perks (wink, wink) as if he won a 90% hope scholarship.

td

April 15th, 2011
9:08 pm

Not a bad session at all. At least the legislature knew enough to take down a bad tax reform bill instead of pushing it through. The immigration reform bill may be held up in court but it is clearly sending a message and one never knows what the court may rule. I agree with you about HOPE. The one thing I wish would not have been pulled was the Presidential Qualifications bill (No I am not a birther, I believe Obama is a citizen). I do take the Constitution very seriously and him playing games with this issue makes me angry.

td

April 15th, 2011
9:14 pm

Jefferson

April 15th, 2011
9:07 pm

First get you facts straight. Deal served long enough that he is drawing a congressional pension plus the salary as Governor, Social security, maybe a pension from when he was a Judge, blind trust business and rental property and has a rent free place to live so he is probably clearing 2 x’s the amount he did prior to the election. Second, all of his debt will be clear as soon as he sales the two properties. If you o not think he can be debt free without “crooked dealings” within 4 years then you are an idiot.

freda

April 15th, 2011
9:29 pm

the fix is in when kyle grades deal

I Report (-: You Whine )-: Thee Magnificent!!! mmm, mmmm, mmmmm! Just sayin...

April 15th, 2011
9:49 pm

PAUL RYAN: As far as a debt limit, you know, we’re just gonna have to forget about the president ’cause he’s out campaigning — giving us this kind of demagoguery and this kind of rhetoric — and we’re gonna have to work with our colleagues, Democrat colleagues here in Congress, act like adults and try and get a solution to that particular problem which we intend on doing.

Compared to the United States of America, Georgia is being led by the second coming of George Washington.

Just sayin…

Ragnar Danneskjöld

April 16th, 2011
12:27 am

Experience shows. For all of Mr. Deal’s alleged defects, he has been around the block and knows something about reining in spending. Imagine Georgia’s condition were it led by one with no more executive experience than as a “community organizer.”

Foghorn Leghorn

April 16th, 2011
1:49 am

Well now, that’s because the good citizens of Georgia never met a scoundrel they didn’t like, I says. So, there ya go.

Michael H. Smith

April 16th, 2011
5:12 am

Q: What would Democrats do differently?

A: To govern responsibly you’ve got to look at your revenue and your expenditures and balance the two. That takes a strong governor quite frankly, to come in and lead that effort. … There are better ways and more responsible ways of governing, and I think you balance out your revenues and your expenditures. Same thing with expenditures. If the programs are not producing or doing what they were intended to do, you ought to eliminate them.

~

To govern responsibly you’ve got to look at your revenue and your expenditures and balance the two.

Producing a balanced budget isn’t a multiply choice between responsible or irresponsible, your revenue and your expenditures absolutely have to be in balance. The State has to balance the budget by “LAW”.

That takes a strong governor quite frankly, to come in and lead that effort.

It does not take a “strong governor” to balance the budget. However it does take a “wise and politically skillful governor” to work with the various members of the Assembly, without making too many “political enemies” therein of the “political friends” you’ll need later, to eliminate the unnecessary elements and fund the priorities correctly within the means of the limited revenues available to the State to produce a balanced budget. Quite frankly, that is the better and more responsible ways to do what must be done in an effort to “lead”. Forget this load of hooey about “Strong” and “Tough”. Those are code words that speak pure political double talk to elect a “Lord” not a “Leader”.

We don’t need another, “King Roy”.

Road Scholar

April 16th, 2011
6:13 am

So, when Gov Deal selectively injects himself into legislation, it’s OK, but when President Obama does it it isn’t? It’s poor leadership!?Sometimes you just have to let legislators “cut their fingers off” when they are making sausage! As for the deficit reduction…How do you eat a whale?… One bite at a time!

I have to say that I was impressed by Gov Deal. While the legislature was messy, he didn’t get anything on himself!

Ole GA Boy

April 16th, 2011
8:34 am

Maybe all of you can pretend that Deal and the legislature came out clean as a chicken bone in a dog pound. I’m not forgetting the effort to shift even more of the tax burden to the lower and middle classes, and my monthly power bill reminds of the shaft job we got in the forced financing of Southern Company’s nuclear power plants without the benefit of ownership. Of course the Republicans who populate this blog, including its originator, are going to be happy about Deal’s stewardship. After all, their boy’s in office. But this, “See, he didn’t steal anything yet” won’t fly with me.

Will

April 16th, 2011
9:01 am

As one who leans to the left, I agree with you, Governor Deal has had a good session.

You may recall that I pointed out that Nathan Deal was a pragmatic poliician who switched parties because he could keep winning as a republican but not as a democrat. He wasnot, and is not, a philosopical warrior.

Because of the lack of vision and leadership from the Miller, Barnes and Perdue years, HOPE was allowed to expand (got rid of the income cap) in order to expand this vote getting popular program and then allowed to get to the point it was because no one either saw the problem coming or did see the problem coming but did not want to risk votes to fix it. The problem was dropped in Governor Deal’s lap and he fixed it. He fixed it with the help of democrats when he could have fixed it with never even speaking to a democrat.

He has work with Atlanta’s Mayor when he doesn’t need a single voter who voted for Atlanta’s Mayor.

He has been complimentary of, and dependent upon (relative to the need to depend on any democrat) of the impressive minority leader of the House.

He signaled loud and clear that tax reform that cannot explain if this will be a tax increase or decrease and cannot explain the impact on potential state revenue is not the tax reform he was thinking of.

He is as cool to funding private school (regardless of their discriminatory practices) with public tax dollars as any republican governor can be.

I told you last year that I knew that Governor Deal would have to run far to the right to win the republican primary but that he would govern closer to the center. He has.

I knew he would not flinch in signing the anti-immigration legislation that would surely pass and, although I think this is little more than a wedge issue to inflame the right for the purpose of gaining votes, this is not a surprise.

Many of my fellow lefties are living in the fantasy world where democrats will re-take the Gold Dome. Don’t get me wrong – if the election were held tomorrow, I still would vote for former Governor Barnes but Governor Deal is showing signs of being the best that lefties such as myself can expect for the foreseeable future in the Governor’s Office.

With the exception of the anti-immigratiion law, almost all of the legislation from the most radical of the republican legislators either failed or was inconsequential. It was not the worst session that I feared.

Mid Ga Retiree

April 16th, 2011
9:06 am

I am glad that the legislature took a step back to look at tax reform a little closer. When is the last time they stepped back to take a breath rather than ram a bad bill down our throats? I don’t want to pay a single penny more in taxes UNLESS, any tax increase goes only to pay down our debt, not increase existing programs or create new ones. Before anyone thinks about raising taxes, let’s first figure out what we’re spending our money on, and what we can do without. Then, cut the fluff and fund the rest.

USMC

April 16th, 2011
9:11 am

I voted for Karen Handel but I have to say that Governor Deal has really impressed me so far.
I like the way he has crossed the aisle WITHOUT compromising his beliefs and standards. He invites all parties into discussions while not bending to ridiculous ideas.

that's goofy

April 16th, 2011
9:34 am

I like him better than Sonny.

retired early

April 16th, 2011
11:26 am

The biggest winners in the Deal budget is special interest. They managed to keep their tax exemptions. I am not surprised by this, by including it in the tax overhaul they managed to avoid dealing with it as a single issue…no new taxes. The state desperately needs that extra money.
So, Deal gets a good grade from most of you because basically, he did not “do anything”.
This is good news for the GOP who really have one agenda…lower taxes, cut spending and let the private sector control everything.
Government by the people, for the people is the concept that we can accomplish much more as a group to solve problems like education, transportation, health care, than we could possibly do individually. A political party that has no vision or desire to lead us to a better quality of life is wasting our time while in office. Georgia will continue to fall behind with do nothing leadership like we have seen the last 8 plus years. So, you all give he a “A”. I say we have wasted 8+ years and he deserves an “F”.

Michael H. Smith

April 16th, 2011
11:31 am

@ – Mid Ga Retiree

We might be reading off the same page, though, it’s doubtful as to how much fluff remains in the State government. A wait and see attitude could truly be for the best before undertaking State tax reform, depending on what eventually happens in Washington D.C. between the Ryan plan and what the Democrats propose, (obumer hasn’t a clue past borrow and spend more money, grow the federal government in every conceivable way and raise taxes). But, if after many cuts have been made to reduce the deficit and cutting down the size of the federal government drastically, if thereafter any taxes are in fact increased, I’m with you 100 plus percent on that money paying down the debt – and absolutely nothing else!

retired early

April 16th, 2011
12:04 pm

Mid Ga Retiree

Apparently you are not aware of the fact that Ga ranks 49th in taxes per citizen. In fact, we collect $600 less per citizen that the next lowest Southeastern state. We have the lowest ratio of numbers of state government employees for our population.
Atlanta has the 2 rd longest commute time in the country…our public schools rank almost “dead last”…and you would only go along with any increase in revenue if it went to “paying down the debt”.
This is not the Feds…Ga does not have a “debt”. I just hope the citizens of this state finally wake up and see the fruits of the GOP leadership….. stagnation .

td

April 16th, 2011
12:11 pm

retired early

April 16th, 2011
11:26 am

“This is good news for the GOP who really have one agenda…lower taxes, cut spending and let the private sector control everything.”

There is a role for government. It is a small and limited role. The private sector can not do everything but neither can the government take the responsibility to ensure that everyone has food, clothing, health insurance, cars, cell phones, Internet service, cable TV, housing and a happy life. The individual is going to have to become more responsible for their own lives and stop depending on the government to take care of them.

” to solve problems like education, transportation, health care,”

Well please tell us your solutions for the above?

I will submit to you that the government will never solve the education problem. Children are not going learn until the parents stress the importance of education and ensure their own children are properly motivated to achieve in the classroom. It is not the governments role to motivate children to learn, it is not the governments role to ensure the outcomes of the educational experience. Matter of fact all the government is doing in taking these roles is dragging down the best and brightest and not spending enough time with the average student to help make them an exceptional student.

Transportation: If you mean building more roads then that will be addressed by local voters next year. If you mean mass transit then no it has been proven that it only viable in the most densely populated areas (NY city, Chicago) and is not an option most conservatives will support in metro Atlanta.

Health care: The government should not provide health care for its citizens. It does have a role to make sure the markets are not closed to anyone and to make sure there are no impediments in the way for a complete open market. Competition is what will drive down cost more than anything and I will submit that Medicaid and Medicare (government controlled programs) have done more to raise the cost of health care then any other thing.

td

April 16th, 2011
12:17 pm

retired early

April 16th, 2011
12:04 pm

“public schools rank almost “dead last””

And the state of Georgia spends more money per pupil than almost every country ahead of our national average. So is higher taxes and more money the answer to education? I gave you my solution in a earlier post to the education problems. What is your solution?

Michael H. Smith

April 16th, 2011
12:19 pm

I just hope a few johnny come lately liberal socialist Democrats in this State finally fess up to long standing problems like education (that can’t be ranked by SAT scores), transportation and water that have been left over from a 100 year rule and rein of the totalitarian Democrats that didn’t just happen in last 8 years of Republican control, which can’t be simply resolved by throwing more tax dollars at them.

Michael H. Smith

April 16th, 2011
12:25 pm

@ td

To further add: The U.S. ranks 3rd among the nations of the world in spending on education and only achieves a 14th place ranking in education results.

Evidence that the problems with education in this country are not due to a lack of money be spent on it.

Michael H. Smith

April 16th, 2011
12:31 pm

@ – td

The answer to the education problem in this State has already been given in Warren County, GA.
Everybody got involved, they did it with less money, not more, and the student body was predominately poor and minority.

Michael H. Smith

April 16th, 2011
12:43 pm

Correction: located in Warrenton, GA

Warren County Middle School, Warrenton, Georgia

March 22, 2011

Warren County Middle School Achieves Significant Test Score Gains

Warren County Middle School implemented Yearly ProgressPro™ in 2006 to help students meet rigorous new state performance standards. Since then, the Title I school has improved student learning and achieved significant gains on the Georgia Criterion-Referenced Competency Tests. From 2006 to 2008, the percentage of students passing the state tests in English language arts/reading increased from 79 percent to 86 percent; in mathematics, the percentage jumped from 48 percent to 74 percent.

http://www.ctb.com/ctb.com/control/assetDetailsViewAction?articleId=183&assetType=customerstory&currentPage=1&p=library

td

April 16th, 2011
12:54 pm

Michael H. Smith

April 16th, 2011
12:31 pm
@ – td

The answer to the education problem in this State has already been given in Warren County, GA.
Everybody got involved, they did it with less money, not more, and the student body was predominately poor and minority.

Amen brother. I went to a round table discussion of all the candidates for State School board Superintendent last October and heard two things that are so true.

Jim Martin (Democrat) said that when his children, were in an Atlanta public school, the school started out with horrible test scores, no pride in the school and a non productive learning environment. He stated that the PTA decided it was unacceptable and a group of about 100 parents got involved in the school. They were in the classrooms, they demanded to be involved in the decision making and they started voluntary learning sessions after school and on the weekends. The school had the highest scores within three years. I did not hear more money or more programs all I heard was parental involvement which made the kids shape up and provided peer pressure on the other parents to make sure their kids had the proper motivation to learn.

Kari Willis (libertarian) Was asked a question about how to make up the achievement gap in the schools. She stated that no matter how many programs were put into the schools, no matter how much money was put into the schools, test scores would not change significantly until until there was a cultural change within the home that made education the most important thing in the home.

carlosgvv

April 16th, 2011
12:58 pm

Now that Deal has done such a great job in his first session, maybe he can push those test score cheating investigators to actually report to the public what they have found. Otherwise, I might just think the powers that be hope we will all just forget about it.

Raise the Bar

April 16th, 2011
1:01 pm

KW: “…let’s stipulate that governors walk a fine line between taking an active role and intruding on the legislative branch. This year’s session indicated Deal is reluctant to be viewed as overly active. That’s not necessarily a bad thing…

Governor Perdue acted similarly. And no, not intruding on the legislative branch isn’t necessarily a bad thing…if you’re a Republican. But if you’re a Democrat, it’s a criminal offense. He’s “not leading”, say the GOP/media about the Democratic president.

Anyway, Georgia has among the highest unemployment rates in the country, among the worst public AND private education systems in the country, among the worst congestion in the country, among the highest bank failure rates, among the highest foreclosure rates, among the highest drops in property values, we still suffer from a long-term water crisis, and we continue to be in a major water dispute with our neighbors. Yet, as far as I can tell, Governor Deal and the legislature have accomplished little to nothing in these areas.

On the other hand, Deal and Republicans appealed to the racist element among us by making it harder to walk outside while looking Hispanic. Still, they’ve done little to nothing to increase the penalties for businesses that hire undocumented workers—the main driver of illegal immigration.

In addition, Deal and the legislature attempted to cut taxes for the wealthiest among us, and to make those tax cuts revenue neutral, they sought to raise taxes on everybody else. Of course, at the county level, most of us are paying higher sales taxes, property taxes, or both, to make up for previous special interest tax cuts that this Governor and this legislature saw fit to maintain.

I pray for that my fellow Georgia voters begin to set the bar higher than KW does because there is no objective measure indicating that Deal should get good marks in his first session as governor.

Michael H. Smith

April 16th, 2011
1:03 pm

td

April 16th, 2011
12:54 pm

And now you know why I’m so adamant as a conservative in supporting a libertarian initiative of “letting the money follow the student school vouchers”. They force parents to get involved, force schools (public, charter or private) to preform better in order to receive funds and remove barriers, like low income and being trapped by geography.

Michael H. Smith

April 16th, 2011
1:10 pm

@ – Raise the Bar

On the other hand, Deal and Republicans appealed to the racist element among us by making it harder to walk outside while looking Hispanic.

This has nothing to do with ethnicity and everything to do with being a LEGAL immigrant.

The law is not anti-immigration, it is anti-illegal immigration.

eatmotacos

April 16th, 2011
1:27 pm

“Deal gets mostly good marks in first session as governor”

As Einstein said, “It’s all relative”. I’m sure that the principals of the poultry processors, onion farmers, rug mills, et al. are all giving him high marks, just like the principals of Oaky Woods Properties, LLC, gave Sonny high marks. These guys are the best return on investment they have ever made.

retired early

April 16th, 2011
1:34 pm

TD

So, government should no provide health care. People with your mindset never consider themselves as part of a larger group. Some in that group are fortunate to enjoy a long healthy life and sufficient income to even leave a nest egg for their children. Some were born with terrible disabling medical problems, never being able to hold a job. Life is not fair…and while it is easy for those fortunate ones to say they are not my problem…your life can change at any time making YOU the “needy one”. Think of it as “insurance”. No one knows what the future will bring, but, collectively,
if we all pull for each other…no one is left to care for themselves… alone. It is truly self centered of you to make that statement.
As far as Education…I did not say throw more money at the problem. It’s the teachers bloated salaries thanks to Zell and every Governor since, that partially caused this budget shortfall.
I want “vision” from our leaders. Public education needs to take a serious look at “virtual classrooms”, using the best and brightest teachers instructing in multiple classrooms…I want video cameras in classrooms identifying problem students, foiling the parents protest, when they are removed to a more “supervised” classroom. The public schools that succeed…have discipline in the classrooms.
The transportation woos in this state had to wait until Sonny’s FINAL YEAR in office to get his attention. Vision….not more of the same.

td

April 16th, 2011
2:16 pm

retired early

April 16th, 2011
1:34 pm

And I guess you think Roy and a Democrat controlled legislature would have done all the things you mentioned?

I do not disagree with the cameras in all of the classrooms. I did not say that the truly needy did not need the help from the government. We do have a responsibility to take care of them. I am sure you and I would disagree with our definitions of the truly needy. For example: 25% of our fellow state residents are receiving Food stamps and 22% receive medicaid. I am sure there are 4, 5 or maybe 6% of those truly can not work, have a true disability and need the assistance of the state. The rest of them are not the responsibility of the state to take care of them.

I Report (-: You Whine )-: Thee Magnificent!!! mmm, mmmm, mmmmm! Just sayin...

April 16th, 2011
4:16 pm

“The governments of Tunisia, Egypt, Libya and Yemen have drastically changed in the last six months,” FBI Assistant Director of Counter-Terrorism Mark Giuliano said Thursday. “They are now led by transitional or interim governments, military regimes, or democratic alliances with no established track record on counterterrorism efforts. Al Qaeda thrives in such conditions and countries of weak governance and political instability — countries in which governments may be sympathetic to their campaign of violence.”

Great.

Michael H. Smith

April 16th, 2011
4:59 pm

Dabir Dalton

April 16th, 2011
11:47 pm

Kyle the only reason that Deal didn’t raise taxes is because his tax reform that would have raised taxes on the middle class failed. He also managed to piss off the church crowd who voted him into office when he stabbed em in the back by trying to do away with the deduction for giving money to one’s church. I rate Deal an F for his first year as Governor.

Fred

April 17th, 2011
9:48 am

“So, government should no provide health care. People with your mindset never consider themselves as part of a larger group.”

That would be correct. I don’t belong to your ‘group” any more than I belong to Hitler’s “group” or Obama’s “group” or a Georgia “group” or a rap “group”, or a “group” of old retired faarts.

What are you? The great decider who dictates what “groups” we have not signed up for, have no interest in, but nevertheless belong to. How do I remove myself from your “group”. I don’t like your “group” and wish to leave it.

In fact, you can stuff your concept of “group” up your old poop….shooter.

saywhat?

April 17th, 2011
11:07 am

“Who is John Galt?”

I know! I know! He’s a fictional character in a second-rate novel that emotionally stunted adolescent males obsess about to the point that nobody in their households can ever find any lotion or kleenex. What do I win?

saywhat?

April 17th, 2011
11:11 am

Fred, please feel free to remove yourself from the “Americans” group as you seem to desire. I can only speak for myself, but I imagine the rest of us are willing to suffer that great loss.

Michael H. Smith

April 17th, 2011
11:41 am

The lemming award.

saywhat?

April 17th, 2011
12:02 pm

Thanks! I can only hope to live up to the name and “think independently” the exact same things in the exact same way as every other believer in Utopian fairy tales.

Michael H. Smith

April 17th, 2011
12:11 pm

@ Fred

It would be safe to assert that ’socialist’ of any type are incapable self-reliance or independent thinking within the confines of statism that binds them therein to the political expression of altruism… which holds that man’s life and work belong to the state—to society, to the group, the gang, the race, the nation—and that the state may dispose of him in any way it pleases for the sake of whatever it deems to be its own tribal, collective good.

saywhat?

April 17th, 2011
12:30 pm

definition from the libertarian dictionary-”independent thinking” – thinking only and exactly what Ayn Rand told you to think, and believing it with all your heart, despite the overwhelming evidence it is nonsense.

saywhat?

April 17th, 2011
12:37 pm

Kyle wrote “The budget wasn’t exactly a cinch this year: Although revenues stabilized, those gains were offset by the end of federal stimulus funding.”

Does this indicate an acceptance by Kyle that federal stimulus spending did what it was primarily intended to do, i.e. keep the nation and it’s states somewhat stable until we made it through the worst of the economic downturn? Or was it still the wrong thing to do?

Michael H. Smith

April 17th, 2011
1:07 pm

“Independent thinking” for me is what I think not what you think or what you vainly try to make me think with your non-sense; nor is my independent thinking dependent solely upon what Ayn Rand thought or wrote.

And yes, the obumer stimulus was wrong, produced debt and did not do what it was promised to do. It is not a given fact that the economy has made it through the worst of the downturn. The only true stability business had to rely on was the election of a Republican controlled House that is highly unlikely to raise taxes. The market liked that stability it sensed, which it had been denied previously under the Democrat control unsure of tax increases or regulatory expansion adverse to business and the market has acted accordingly in a positive direction.

saywhat?

April 17th, 2011
1:18 pm

” It is not a given fact that the economy has made it through the worst of the downturn”

Very true. It is certainly possible that the President and the Senate, in the spirit of negotiation, may allow the Republicans to resume damaging the economy in the same manner as 2000-2008, and let them once again drive the car back into the ditch from which it is only starting to emerge.

Michael H. Smith

April 17th, 2011
1:48 pm

Was Ayn Rand a Libertarian? Highly unlikely, nor a pure conservative.

“Rand’s political views, reflected in both her fiction and nonfiction work, emphasize individual rights (including property rights) and laissez-faire capitalism, enforced by a constitutionally limited government.”

“She denounced libertarianism, which she associated with anarchism. She rejected anarchism a naive theory based in subjectivism that could only lead to collectivism in practice.”

However Rand’s so-called “laissez-faire capitalism” was not puritanical either, with its’ dependence on the police powers of the State to interfere with the market when and where it would protect her rights and property. Like many conservatives she adhered to the anti-federalism akin to Jefferson.

Michael H. Smith

April 17th, 2011
1:57 pm

Very true. It is certainly possible that the President and the Senate, in the spirit of negotiation, may allow the Republicans to resume damaging the economy in the same manner as 2000-2008, and let them once again drive the car back into the ditch from which it is only starting to emerge.

Now that the new breed of Tea Party Republicans hold leverage against the old guard Republicans and the liberal socialist obumer Democrats, they may stop the both of them from digging that any ditch deeper. Where now the car and a government track-hoe too are both mired in the economic muck.

killerj

April 17th, 2011
2:05 pm

By by Obozo, “Good Deal”. Go Tea Party.

I Report (-: You Whine )-: Thee Magnificent!!! mmm, mmmm, mmmmm! Just sayin...

April 17th, 2011
3:15 pm

It’s a happy day of celebration at the Urinal-

Cuba marks Bay of Pigs failure
50 years after foiled U.S. effort to topple Castro, event still celebrated. -AJC

Yeah, John F. Kennedy’s failure, morons.

I Report (-: You Whine )-: Thee Magnificent!!! mmm, mmmm, mmmmm! Just sayin...

April 17th, 2011
3:22 pm

Oh, now the AJC is sad and grief stricken-

A senior Iranian military official involved in investigating a mysterious computer worm targeting Iranian nuclear facilities and other industrial sites said Saturday the mal-ware could have caused large-scale accidents and loss of life. -Urinal

Excellent!

Let’s send another one.

catlady

April 17th, 2011
3:54 pm

Deal played “Let’s You and Him Fight” which is not the same as leadership. He threw a lot of middle class folks under the bus, and tried to throw more, while preserving the elite perks for the elite.

I console myself that it could have been worse.