Too many Georgia Republicans are voting like liberals

Republicans in the Georgia Legislature sure are voting like conservatives this year.

April Fools!

In reality, on the state’s most pressing issues they are making it hard to tell the difference between them and the liberals.

First, there are the education bills, such as extending school vouchers to foster kids and military families, that won’t even get a vote in the Senate. Too many Republicans were afraid in an election year to vote for a modest but important way to spread educational freedom to more Georgians. What, were Democrats going to attack them for helping foster kids?

Then there’s the watering down of an already meager slate of tax cuts focused on creating jobs for the unemployed. A capital gains tax cut in the package won’t kick in until the state has $1 billion in its reserves. But the point of such a policy is to spur growth, not follow it. Even liberals can vote for a good-times tax cut.

Granted, this year’s budget is a bear. Revenues still sag, and squeals rise each time the budget ax drops. But instead of remaking the bureaucracy to fit the bleakness we’ll face for some years to come, lawmakers are trying to work around the edges and get out of town.

Consider the parade of tax and fee hikes designed to raise hundreds of millions of dollars without anyone noticing. It seems legislators think government is small enough but don’t want to tell voters that, or ask everyone to pay more.

So, we get a tax hike on jet fuel and a “voluntary” online sales tax projected to raise $30 million (both in HB 1221), as well as a $10 tax on vehicles to fund trauma centers (SR 277). And the big one: a $169 million tax on hospitals (HB 307).

House leaders say the hospital tax is the least bad solution for Medicaid funding, citing the hospitals’ own preference for the tax over other options.

The hospitals prefer the tax because they will recoup much of what they pay: The state would spend the proceeds on Medicaid, qualifying for federal matching funds that flow back to many of the hospitals.

This indeed will minimize health-spending cuts and the state tax burden on Georgians. But where will these federal dollars come from? Right: us.

The House did well in moving to create a special council to suggest ways to fix the state tax code (HB 1405). But they’re adding complexity to the tax code in the meantime, making the council members’ job harder.

Lawmakers are also boosting state fees by some $100 million (HB 1055). The argument is that the fees are paid by the recipients of a given service but don’t cover the true cost of providing it.

In principle, I agree. A service not paid for by the recipient is subsidized by taxpayers. Here’s the catch: What is the “true cost” of these services? Who determines it and ensures that it’s as low as possible?

In other words, who’s keeping government waste in check? Not Republicans. Otherwise, they’d have passed HB 236.

That bill would mandate regular reviews of nonconstitutional state entities to ensure they work as intended, and merge or shutter those that don’t. It is the necessary complement to fixing the tax code.

Yet the bill fell Friday by a 77-81 count, including 17 Republicans who voted no. (Fourteen of the 17 did, however, vote to regulate tanning salons.)

HB 236 is the kind of bill that Republicans, the alleged party of small government, are supposed to vote for. Period. Its rejection is a blot on their record.

It doesn’t have to be a permanent blemish. The Senate has passed bills to review individual state agencies, and the House could add the bulk of HB 236 to one of those bills and pass it.

Doing so — and fixing some of the other mistakes listed above — before the 2010 session ends is a must. There’s no point in electing Republicans who vote like liberals.

122 comments Add your comment

MrAttitude

March 31st, 2010
7:52 pm

Dems, Repubs – politicians are like wrestlers. They put on a good show for the public and once the lights are off, they are good friends.

jt

March 31st, 2010
8:07 pm

The lessor of two evils is still evil.

The THIRD party is the answer.

Don’t be scairt.

joan1

March 31st, 2010
8:54 pm

Give us the name of the Republicans who voted no, and we can put them on the ouster list.

Tyler Durden

March 31st, 2010
8:56 pm

No small amount of hostility in play here, but the real surprise is how unoriginal your argument unfolds. Something happens that you disagree with; the offenders are acting like liberals. They don’t do something you wanted them to; must be because they’re afraid of liberals. Their resolve on an issue is less than rabid; the mean old Democrats must’ve bullied them out of their own opinion.

Rather than trotting out the same old dogmatic reaction, maybe consider that the virtues they extoll (being in the GOP) are- GASP- different than what they intend to do to stay in power. A little less naivete and a little more objective processing might loosen up the ol’ ‘ALL DEMS BAD: ALL NON-DEMS GOOD’ zombie act.

After all, look how well the state has been served by a GOP-led government lately…

One tired American teacher

March 31st, 2010
9:18 pm

Time for a change. Drive all of these monkeys out. Problem is most of these so-called Republicans (AKA converted Democrats like Perdue and Deal) have no opposition. Time for some of us to put our action where our mouth is and run against these leeches.

Kyle Wingfield

March 31st, 2010
9:27 pm

Yes, Tyler, it would surely be more sophisticated to say, “Hey, all politicians say one thing and do another” and shrug it off. After all, there’s no value in holding them accountable.

I am curious how a column criticizing Republicans amounts to an “‘ALL DEMS BAD: ALL NON-DEMS GOOD’ zombie act.” But maybe I’m just too native to understand.

Michael H. Smith

March 31st, 2010
9:34 pm

Gotta give it to you Kyle, setting of firecrackers in your own house is usually ill advised but I agree with your frustrations completely. Those same shared frustrations is what gave birth to the Tea Party movement, in fact.

Allow yours truly to embellish on this one item: Got your ears on Elli Phunts?

House leaders say the hospital tax is the least bad solution for Medicaid funding, citing the hospitals’ own preference for the tax over other options.

The hospitals prefer the tax because they will recoup much of what they pay: The state would spend the proceeds on Medicaid, qualifying for federal matching funds that flow back to many of the hospitals.

So, its the Hospitals that say it is the least bad solution, aye?

Let’s give another solution a try Republicans and see what the voter’s reactions will be.

Before forcing the people who pay their Hospital bills to pay more to make up the short fall from those who don’t pay their fair share, or often “pay nothing” like illegal aliens that work for companies cheating the State out of tax money, why not choose to enforce the tax laws already on the books and go after these companies that employ illegal aliens and make them phony-up the costs of paying for their illegal alien’s unpaid hospital and doctor bills,
including costs incurred at all county health departments that provide services to them?

Can you hear us now? I mean, we can talk louder?

Alot louder!

Gator Nation

March 31st, 2010
9:36 pm

Good lord kyle,

I have read a couple of your columns and thought you may have some sense. But I was wrong. Your a total idiot. You don’t back up any of your arguments with supportive facts or data. There is absolutely no data supported correlation between your beloved capital gains tax cut and job growth or number of jobs produced. Please do some research before you make your knee-jerk assumptions.

Michael H. Smith

March 31st, 2010
9:46 pm

I think you just received a – very nastily stated – challenge, Kyle. It shouldn’t take you long to defeat or dispel the beneficial glories of the wonderful progressive tax.

Daedalus

March 31st, 2010
9:59 pm

If the Georgia Republicans were voting like liberals they would have at least passed something like a transportation bill. At the very least they could have given MARTA some relief from the 50/50 funding split for a couple of years in a clean bill that wasn’t weighed down with tax increases or would not kick-in until after a state-wide vote a couple of years down the road. That would not have cost the state a dime and would have had some immediate impacts and could have gone into effect very quickly.

Instead they did nothing on transportation. Again. I’d say they were acting like Republicans — which means that nothing will happen on transportation (or water or any other infrastructure issue) again.

CJ

March 31st, 2010
10:09 pm

A capital gains tax cut in the package won’t kick in until the state has $1 billion in its reserves. But the point of such a policy is to spur growth, not follow it.

Capital gains tax cuts do not spur long-term growth. They simply result, ultimately, in shifting the tax burden from those who receive most of their income from their investments to those who receive most of their income from working for a living. Both investors and workers benefit from roads, highways, ports, education, and other government services. But according to Republicans, only the workers should have to pay for such services.

The irony is that the Republican Party’s obsession with shifting more of the tax burden from heirs and investors to workers ultimately leads to reduced long-term demand (or reduced growth in the long-term demand), therefore, harming the big investors they’re trying to help (and our retirement accounts). As this recent recession has demonstrated, it doesn’t matter how low capital gains taxes are, when demand falls, investments suffer.

JDW

March 31st, 2010
10:31 pm

Kyle, the Georgia Legislature reminds me of a bunch of lost puppies in the wilderness. I can’t remember the last time a bill any bill that made sense came out of that bunch. We sit here today with state economy in shambles, traffic choking our productivity, and water looming as an issue that will put a lid on any opportunity for growth we have and I can’t think of a single bill that moves the ball on any substantive issue. Meanwhile Governor Curly is having a hissy fit over Federal legislation that he doesn’t like, which BTW he has NO CHANCE of altering via legal action but is willing to spend political capital, time, and other resources to pursue. It looks an awful lot like a three ring circus downtown with lobbyists lined up to buy tickets.

Michael H. Smith

March 31st, 2010
10:46 pm

As this recent recession has demonstrated, it doesn’t matter how low capital gains taxes are, when demand falls, investments suffer.

Nice overly simplified try but not true. A simpler correct version: Jobs cannot be created without investments. Demand follows jobs, jobs follow investments and investments follow the best yield of return on money. Capital gains taxes reduce the yields and rates of return on money. Despite the IRS labels, money that is working through investment “earns money”. In fact, more money is earned by money being invested than is ever earned by a worker’s paycheck.

96 SC

April 1st, 2010
12:01 am

Hopefully “THE CONFEDERATE MUSEUM” will end its ANNUAL CIRCUS under the Gold Dome soon

CJ

April 1st, 2010
12:26 am

…more money is earned by money being invested than is ever earned by a worker’s paycheck…

Terrific. So let the gains on those investments be taxed at the same rates as income from setting your alarm and going to work every day.

“Labor is prior to, and independent of, capital. Capital is only the fruit of labor, and could never have existed if Labor had not first existed. Labor is superior to capital, and deserves much the higher consideration.” — Abraham Lincoln

Martin

April 1st, 2010
12:42 am

So Tyler says Kyle should show less “naivete” and Kyle apparently thinks he’s been called too “native”…. hahahahahaha that’s rich!

Karl Marx

April 1st, 2010
6:30 am

Republicrats, Demicans, RINO it does not matter what you call them we have few true conservatives in the state legislature. Most of the “Republicans” were turn coat Democrats afraid of losing their jobs. None of them are friends to the taxpayers of Georgia.

DeborahinAthens

April 1st, 2010
6:45 am

Enter your comments here

Churchill's MOM

April 1st, 2010
6:58 am

Wow diappointment.. I thought this was going to be about our BIG SPENDING, BIG GOVERNMENT, PRO AMNESTY Senators, Johnny Isakson and Saxby “What’s in ir for ME” Chambliss.

DeborahinAthens

April 1st, 2010
7:02 am

You have to love the Republicans! A lifelong Republican (I voted for Nixon twice), who is a fiscal conservative, I didn’t vote for George W. Bush because of what the idiot did in Texas. And I will most likely never vote again for a Republican. George W. Bush slashed taxes about a low as they can go. I love having the capital gains rate at 10 and 15% because I have most of my money invested. But you cannot run the country that I want to live in on this revenue. When Bush ran the second time, I told everyone that would listen (in Georgia, not many) that he would turn this country into a banana republic. If Kyle goes through the Bush administration year by year and looks at the jobs that were “created” he will find a woeful record. The last two years of his administration, we began to see a sharp increase in unemployment that, until 2007, had be a benign 5.7%. No Republican anywhere can prove that cutting taxes increases jobs. If you look at the past 100-200 years, every time there has been a major stock market crash, with the economic messes that surround that type of event, a Republican has been at the helm. When you are in financial straits, whether you are a family, a company, or a government, you can only do two things. Spend less and earn more. It will not kill any of us to go back to the tax rates that we had when Clinton was president. I want my grandkids to go to good schools, I want my roads paved, I want a strong military (whose soldiers have all the resources they need on the battlefield, and all the support when their broken bodies come home). Now, as to school vouchers. No Republican can prove that a voucher system works to the advantage of anyone other than those that can make up the difference between the voucher and the price of private school. You suck all the money from the public schools which will get worse and worse. The private schools will not take every student–only those that are the best and wealthiest. The kids whose parents can’t cough up the difference will be stuck in ever worsening schools. There is NO other scenario! There are only so many private schools, people! Crunch the numbers yourself. So those ding-bat right wing nut jobs that keep regurgitating the school voucher arguments–prove your numbers to us! Anyone can spout out words like Kyle this morning. Proving them is another thing. Kyle, show us numbers where jobs increased when taxes were low, and show us numbers where private schools that were flooded with potential students took in everyone because they had a voucher. The voucher program is a terrible idea with catastrophic consequences.

Churchill's MOM

April 1st, 2010
7:02 am

Good read from my local paper, where have the real Conservatives gone?

http://www.onlineathens.com/stories/040110/nat_598687091.shtml

midtownguy

April 1st, 2010
7:36 am

There are no liberals in Georgia, even the liberals are not liberals. The term “southern liberal” is akin to the term “liberal Southern Baptist.” They are only liberal in comparison to the arch conservatives surrounding them.

Ragnar Danneskjöld

April 1st, 2010
7:40 am

Good morning all. Great essay, thanks Kyle. Should have called it “Profiles in Courage” except I fear most would not get the joke.

kitty

April 1st, 2010
7:59 am

Thanks for the honest article. Frankly, what has turned me off most about the GOP is the hypocrisy. Say one thing and do the opposite. Doesn’t that make them liberals? Actions speak louder than words. I just can not stand hypocrisy and the GOP is awash in it…national and local. No moral courage to stand up for their values at all. All about the votes and what amazes me is how gullible people are to actually believe them.

get out much?

April 1st, 2010
8:22 am

And this surprises you how? It is amazing how “liberal” a politician gets when it is time to defend their pork, I mean project.

Gerald

April 1st, 2010
8:36 am

Neoconservatism is a failed, outdated economic and political ideology. First of all, cutting taxes only works if you cut spending. Show me the GOP leader that has made real cuts in spending, whether a president, congressional leader, governor of a large state, or mayor of a large city. They don’t exist. They only made small cuts in programs that their constituencies didn’t support, while often increasing spending for their own constituencies. Ronald Reagan and Rudy Giuliani are prime examples of both.

Also, cutting taxes only provides temporary economic growth in certain economic and political conditions. It does not create lasting economic growth. In order to do that, you need to address underlying economic problems. For instance, cutting taxes isn’t going to magically reduce oil prices or replace the jobs lost to automation and outsourcing. Also, just reducing spending often eliminates the very spending that spurs job growth. If you don’t want to spend on social welfare programs, fine. But it was government spending that built Hoover Dam, transcontinental railroads, the interstate highway system, and expanded telephone service and electricity to rural areas. It was government spending for NASA, the Energy and Defense Departments etc. that created a lot of the technological innovations, everything from velcro to DVDs to the Internet. You neoconservatives would have everyone believe that the private sector did all that, and it isn’t true.

We have to be honest: a lot of neoconservatism was simply reactions to Great Society programs and civil rights legislation. The “less spending” that they wanted was on Great Society programs, and the “smaller government” was for the civil rights and integration measures. That’s fine, people are free to support or oppose whatever they want. The problem was taking opposition to Great Society and civil rights and pretending that it could be this comprehensive, long term governing philosophy. It isn’t.

There is a difference between opposing universal healthcare – a legitimate conservative position – and opposing badly needed public transportation projects. There is a difference between adopting the long failed liberal education agenda and claiming that school choice will fix everything. All 30 years of neoconservatism has produced is a GOP that not only doesn’t know how to govern, but has no interest in it. A group of people who would rather spend five hours talking about the pronouncements of the founding fathers (as if they were prophets from the Bible whose views we need to believe and adhere to lest we perish or something) than spend 30 minutes figuring out how the metro Atlanta area is going to get water. A group of people who has spent the last 25 years sitting on their hands on MARTA and Grady Hospital simply because they don’t like or much care for the demographics that those vital public institutions serve.

And you want to talk about vouchers for military service personnel and foster kids … why don’t these wealthy, hard working, innovative, successful conservatives with good values (which you all are, because that is what the conservative talk shows, political rallies and blogs claim … conservatives are the only ones who generate wealth and tax revenue that everyone else leeches off of) just pass a hat around to create a private scholarship fund? You know, what the United Negro College Fund has been doing for more than 65 years? Why sit around and wait on big government to write the checks? Government is the problem, not the solution right? Yep, that’s another problem with neoconservatism … it isn’t even internally consistent.

It will be great for the conservative movement and the country when the neocon movement that was nothing but a reaction to the Great Society and civil rights laws moves off the scene and we get some people with a real interest in the hard work of governing and can articulate a consistent, realistic workable philosophy that is honest about economics and history, people who are honest enough to admit that if we had left it up to the “private sector”, tens of millions of people wouldn’t have electrical or phone service, or for that matter computers which were invented for the Department of Defense.

PinkoNeoConLibertarian

April 1st, 2010
8:44 am

I remember how Wooten was almost giddy with joy when the Republicans took over here in Ga. What most people don’t seem to understand is that elected officials will say anything and do anything to get elected. Once elected they will for the first half of their term, do what their true agenda was in the first place. The second half of their term they will revert to saying and doing anything to get elected in the hopes that the People have forgotten about the first half. Sadly, this strategy and cycle actually works more often than not.

Many voters suffer from extremely short memories and attention spans. That, combined with their steadfast, logic defying, loyalty to the brand of the Party, makes too many voters tabulate strictly for D or R, regardless of the candidate.

Real American

April 1st, 2010
8:47 am

What Tyler said x 2000.

Kyle Wingfield

April 1st, 2010
9:03 am

Argh. Good catch, Martin. That’s what I get for blogging too close to bedtime…

JF McNamara

April 1st, 2010
9:06 am

Governance is a lot harder than idealogical campaigning or writing. They are making the best, and most logical, choices given their circumstances.

Kyle Wingfield

April 1st, 2010
9:14 am

JF, I readily acknowledge this year’s budget is a nightmare. The budgets to come will not be any easier, and possibly harder. I might be willing to give them the benefit of the doubt on the taxes in the short term if they were planning for long-term restructuring — exactly the kind of long-term restructuring that a bill like HB 236 anticipates. When they voted that one down, I had a hard time believing the long-term planning was in place. Furloughs, as some of the GOP leaders themselves have said, are not a sustainable solution. And frankly, it’s not as if this is the first year of the downturn, or that anyone thought it would be a one-year blip.

The tax reform council is a good idea. But without the other side of the coin — the structure to pare down government for the long term to the greatest degree possible — the council will be left to find new ways of raising more money for more spending. That’s not the kind of reform I, or most Georgians, I suspect, want to see.

jconservative

April 1st, 2010
9:20 am

“Too many Georgia Republicans are voting like liberals”

This has been the case for several years. You were not around then, 2002 I believe, but look at the legislation passed by the first two Republican legislatures. Nothing but big government, expand the role of government, more government in our individual lives, than any two legislatures in state history. It was disgusting!

Morrus

April 1st, 2010
9:25 am

Vote out the incumbents and start over

songbird

April 1st, 2010
9:27 am

Tyler nailed it. Also, Gerald. I challenge all of you, especially you Kyle, to tell me one thing of substance that the Republicans have accomplished that improves the quality of life in Georgia since they took over 8 years ago. I bet you can’t name one thing. Traffic is worse, education is worse, water situation would be a crises except for the rain we’ve gotten in the past year. The only things these nitwits have done is pass bills about guns and abortion.

CJ

April 1st, 2010
9:27 am

I readily acknowledge this year’s budget is a nightmare…But without the other side of the coin — the structure to pare down government for the long term to the greatest degree possible — the council will be left to find new ways of raising more money for more spending.

Pare down government? Georgia is cutting into muscle and bone—and the guys in the state house are perfectly fine with it.

The Neil Boortz-addicts under the gold dome have grown to hate “government schools”, and the evidence is all over the AJC—almost daily—that they’re entirely willing to let the Georgia’s public education system sink even further into the abyss. Georgians are gradually returning to a time when only those who can afford a good education can get one. And that’s just fine with the talk radio crowd.

JF McNamara

April 1st, 2010
9:31 am

I agree that furloughs are not sustainable, but they are more palatable than job losses. “Paring down government” is code for “firing people”. In this job market, its probably better to furlough than have them on unemployment with no hope for a new job.

Maybe we need the council. Maybe we don’t. Georgia is one of the more fiscally responsible states already, and they don’t have a problem trimming the fat. I think the long term plan is to batten down the hatches until the situation improves and handle immediate things as they come.

That appears logical, because things won’t stay bad forever. You don’t make rash decisions at the top or bottom of a cycle.

Road Scholar

April 1st, 2010
9:40 am

To expand Songbird’s post, Kyle, where is Gov Perdue’s job program? Waiting on the Feds? I thought that “ststes rights” trumped anything the feds need to do.

Where is a meaningful ethics policy? Stll waiting.

Where is additional transportation funding, which has been shown to create jobs and spur job growth?

Eight years for what?

The Tar and Feathers Party

April 1st, 2010
9:40 am

Still pushing the voucher nonsense Kyle? It is bad enough that I have to pay bloated property taxes to support the worthless public schools (read lazy teachers), but you and woodenhead both now want me to also support private schools via vouchers for you children and grand brats. I propose an end to public education, let all schools be private, and fully paid for by the parents who wish to educate their children. End property taxes NOW!

Cutty

April 1st, 2010
9:41 am

What do liberals or other democrats have to do with the performance of the current Georgia GOP. They’ve done this all on their own, just as you say the national democratic party did with healthcare.

They own most of the problems with the state. Their failure to properly regulate all these fly-by night banks, has helped lead to the most bank closings in the state. Transportation? We did get those on ramps lights. Water? Nothing. Education? I’ll let the facts speak for themselves.

They aren’t governing like liberals, they aren’t governing at all. Just making short-sighted decisions so ‘they can go home.’ If they were truly governing, Sonny’s Go Fish program would’ve been off the books and that money directed to Education. Jus sayin.

Churchill's MOM

April 1st, 2010
9:55 am

Ragnar.. I have some REALLY bad news, Allen Buckley’s wife won’t let him run against Johnny Isakson. Looks like the ball is in your court, I’ll send you a Greyhound bus ticket to come back from the swamp.

Kyle Wingfield

April 1st, 2010
10:05 am

CJ and JF: I wrote just last week about ways to cut hundreds of millions of dollars out of the budget without affecting basic services or necessarily laying people off — things like changes to the way the state provides benefits to employees. The choice is not between eliminating departments wholesale or keeping them as they are — although either of those options might be appropriate in some cases, and HB 236 would have helped to make those determinations and implement any necessary changes.

retiredds

April 1st, 2010
10:17 am

Kyle, this may seem simplistic but when your party has nothing to offer, and they don’t, then they have no choice but to vote as, you say, a liberal. The Republican party in GA promised change when they took over the statehouse and governorship. They have produced very little of benefit to Georgians. One of the reasons they produce so little is that they covet their individual fiefdoms over the general welfare of the entire state.

scrappy

April 1st, 2010
10:50 am

You are really pushing HB236, which I gather mandates regular reviews on gov’t to make sure spending in being spent properly. Yes? Who does this ‘reviewing’? Are they setting up another group of people to watch over the group of people that are supposed to be governing? Isn’t this like “lets have a meeting to prepare for the next meeting” mentality?
If you already know of these ways to make sure gov’t funds are being spent properly why do they need to pass HB236? Surely you are not the only one that knows these things…. although, even though I don’t know you, you seem smarter than most (probably all) of the current GA legislature.

Scooter (the Original)

April 1st, 2010
11:05 am

Read it with me.. re pub li crat.

retiredds

April 1st, 2010
11:17 am

I’ll cite one example, does the $10.00 cost of getting a driver’s license cover the cost of delivering that service? I bet not.

Ragnar Danneskjöld

April 1st, 2010
11:25 am

Dear Mom @ 9:55, that is truly sad new. Thanks for the offer but I have a thumb. (Actually I am planning to fire up the Subaru for a trip home later this month – the Lt JG has his pre-deployment leave scheduled.) Seriously, there must be somebody we can recruit. How about the Marine running as a Libertarian? Could Buckley persuade him to reconsider parties?

Ragnar Danneskjöld

April 1st, 2010
11:27 am

Dear retiredds @ 11:17, what function is served by issuance of a driver’s license? Simply eliminate the traffic laws and the need disappears.

Gator Joe

April 1st, 2010
11:29 am

Kyle,
As a proud Liberal, your use of “voting like Liberals” seems to imply there is something wrong with being a Liberal, or voting like one. Please review the Conservative/Republican record from 2000 to the present, not exactly stellar. We Liberals love this country (as much as any American), serve in the military (I did), and pay taxes (I do). We’re here, and we’re here to stay!

retiredds

April 1st, 2010
11:33 am

Ragnar, I don’t disagree with you on that. But if the state is going to issue one shouldn’t you and I pay the full cost of that? To do otherwise is a subsidy, in my book. And you and I both know there are too many subsidies out there as is. Also I posed two questions for you on Barr’s blog a few minutes ago re: the auto companies.

No More Progressives!

April 1st, 2010
11:35 am

“Too many Georgia Republicans are voting like liberals”

Too many are ACTING like liberals.