Trade deadline special: Salty an afterthought in Teixeira deal

The real two keys in the Mark Teixeira trade: shortstop Elvis Andrus, left, and pitcher Neftali Feliz. (Texas Rangers photo)

As it turns out, these are the two real keys for Texas in the Mark Teixeira trade with the Braves: shortstop Elvis Andrus, left, and pitcher Neftali Feliz. (Texas Rangers photo)

I noticed something interesting — and fairly unusual for sports fans — in the two blogs I posted Monday about the Braves — the first asking you if the Braves should be buyers or sellers at the trade deadline, and the second being the column off the team’s current hot streak but circling around the same subject.

Many (if not most) of you commented that the Braves should not be buyers if it meant giving up more prospects in a trade. I’m guessing most fans are gun shy from past prospect-for-veteran deals that didn’t work out. I’m also guessing most of that fear stems from the Mark Teixeira trade. The deal two years ago — the last major move of the John Schuerholz regime — sent Jarrod Saltalamacchia and four other minor-leaguers (that’s how most stories presented it) to Texas for Teixeira and Ron Mahay. Some thought the deal made the team a World Series contender. Instead, they missed the playoffs both seasons Teixeira played here — he lost a lot of “clutch” points in this town — and was traded before the deadline last season.

The deal has been viewed as a colossal failure. But you know what? It’s not quite the overwhelming disaster you might think. Certainly, the key prospect in that trade is not what we would’ve thought. Here’s a rundown of the five players who went to the Rangers:

Jarrod Saltalamacchia: He homered off of John Smoltz Monday night but on the whole he’s been fairly average. He’s hitting .245 this season and .256 in his career. Worst of all, he has struck out 88 times in 245 at-bats, which ranks ninth in the American League and averages out to once every 2.78 at-bats. Wait. Isn’t the Rangers’ hitting coach the celebrated Rudy Jamarillo? You mean, sometimes it’s not the hitting coach’s fault?

Elvis Andrus: The rookie shortstop is hitting only .249. Given his speed (17 stolen bases), he could be a huge weapon if he improves his on-base percentage (.313). While he’s still considered to have vast potential, he has been erratic defensively with 12 errors, tied for the second most in the majors among shortstops. (In case you’re wondering, Yunel Escobar is right behind him with 11.)

Neftali Feliz: This is the kid who may end up hurting the Braves’ most of all. The pitcher has a 100 mph fastball and was ranked as the No. 10 prospect coming into the season by Baseball America. Feliz has mostly started in the minors, but the Rangers recently turned him into a reliever with the expectation of calling him up soon. His earned run average as a reliever is 0.84 in eight appearances with Triple-A Oklahoma City (11 strikeouts, one walk in 10 2/3 innings). Overall this season in his first year in Triple-A, Feliz is 4-5 with a 3.41ERA and 66 strikeouts in 71 1/3 innings.

Matt Harrison: He’s on the disabled list for the second time this season. In 11 starts, he’s 4-5 with a 6.11 ERA. Career: 13-8, 5.76

Beau Jones: Another pitcher who’s in his fifth year in the minors and mostly has bounced back and forth between Single-A and Double-A. Not listed as one of the Rangers’ top 10 prospects.

So I’m guessing right about now, you’d pass on Salty but would take back Feliz.

Your thoughts?

51 comments Add your comment

Sir Stealth

July 21st, 2009
11:37 am

These are very good points. With McCann and Escobar as centerpieces of our team and Salty not living up to the hype, the only player we sent off that would really be a big asset for the Braves going forward is Feliz. The deal didn’t work out, but you have to go for it sometimes. And it was really our pitching that ended up letting us down, not Tex.

GTDhoo

July 21st, 2009
11:41 am

Salty was expendable because of Mac. I’d like to have Andrus and Feliz back though. Andrus has a lot of upside and is still pretty young. The fact is, Texeira didn’t do anything. He didn’t help, he just waited out his time here so he could land the mammoth contract with the Yankees. I’d gladly take all of those players back, or at least use them to make a more productive trade.

Angus

July 21st, 2009
11:49 am

It’s baseball.

Failing to hit only 70% of the time = success.

A 4.50 ERA = success (at least by the definition of a quality start).

Getting it right on prospects 10% of the time = success (pulled that number out of my….hat – feel free to dispute).

Agreed Sir Stealth, the biggest cloud on the Teixeira years was the injury-plagued, starting pitching. Who knows what could’ve been had our staff been intact?

Joshhh...

July 21st, 2009
12:29 pm

Great Article!

I’m pretty glad to see that they’ve all been about average, I think too many fans freaked out over that trade but now looking at the stats it’s not THAT bad.

Escobar is stronger than Andrus & I think he’ll start cutting those errors down very soon.

By the way I loved the hitting coach part!

The_Superhoo

July 21st, 2009
12:45 pm

Yep only Feliz do I want back.

PS, I wasn’t able to read this page on Internet Explorer; I had to open it on my Blackberry. It needs to be debugged right after the Salty bullet.

BugKiller

July 21st, 2009
12:53 pm

What I find the MOST questionable, if even reprehensible, is the penchant for the Braves to just GIVE AWAY pitchers who throw 100mph.

If there is ONE lesson to be taken from all those October failures (besides the fact that Bobby Cox is an overrated dunce in the dugout), is that pitchers who NIBBLE do not win in October (Game 6 notwithstanding).

POWER PITCHERS win in October.

Guys who GO AFTER batters win in October. John Smoltz. Curt Schilling. Randy Johnson.

Look at the October winning percentages of Maddux and Glavine. They’re terrible.

And yet, the Braves seem absolutely okay in giving away Adam Wainwright and Neftali Feliz.

It’s RIDICULOUS!!!

shortstop

July 21st, 2009
12:56 pm

http://espn.go.com/mlb/stats/fielding/_/position/ss/sort/rangeFactor/order/true

thats the difference between escobar and andrus. Andrus has by far the best range in the major leagues. He gets to balls no other SS does, he turns hits into outs. So you might want andrus back as well.

Jeff Schultz

July 21st, 2009
1:01 pm

Thanks all for comments.

The Super Hoo: Sorry to you and ALL EXPLORER users. The issue should be fixed now.

Bank Walker, Texas Ranger

July 21st, 2009
1:14 pm

I can’t believe a 20 year old short stop has 12 errors. Yeah he wasn’t that good. Give me a break, at 20 he not suppose to hit that great and he is going to have a few errors. He has got speed to burn and can get to many more balls than Yunel(which by the way increases the number of errors) That should have been enough along with Harrison and the stiff in A ball for this pathetic trade. Just to give you an idea of his talent, MLB rated him the 21 best prospect in baseball at tne end of 2008…..Tommy Hanson was 24. By the way Feliz was the 9th best prospect and he is only 20. Also Harrison is only 23. So to try and water down this trade, don’t try and use stats from the rookie year.

TurnThePage

July 21st, 2009
1:19 pm

I think the thing that bothers me most about those players Mr. Schultz just mentioned is that Atlanta doesn’t have them. That sounds odd, but I would a whole lot rather Atlanta have those players at their disposal than to have had Mark Texiera for a season and a half. I know it’s all hindsight, but I didn’t like the trade when it happened and I certainly don’t like it now. Tex is a fine first baseman but as we all learned, he isn’t a player that will carry your team to the pennant. Texiera was all the problem during his tenure in Atlanta. They didn’t have the pitching that they have even now. I just think there is no coincidence that Atlanta built their dynasty of the nineties just about solely through their system and when they moved to shuttling prospects to other teams for difference makers, it hasn’t panned out at all. Maybe they should, say, go back to building through their system. Chipper Jones all but conceded that the Braves are building for next season. If that’s the case, why trade off players at all. I say stay with what you have. This team will play respectable baseball the rest of the way, you call up the youngsters later on and get a real good feel for how they will play next season.

The_Superhoo

July 21st, 2009
1:20 pm

Huzzah! It’s fixed! Thanks Jeff!

Smack

July 21st, 2009
1:20 pm

The real hard part is Feliz was a throw in. Harrison was battling injury at the time of the trade and Texas wanted more insurance in the deal, i.e. another arm. As it was told afterwards, the Rangers threatened to walk away without that extra arm, Feliz was it. Can you imagine what it would have been like in 3 years to have Hanson, JJ and Feliz at the top of the rotation. It would have the reincarnation of The Big Three. John was trying to save his legacy and get back to the post season, it failed and the trade went down as a catistrophic failure!

Mike

July 21st, 2009
1:23 pm

Most of the more “sophisticated” analysis of the deal (Baseball America, Baseball Prospectus, etc.) at the time it happened pegged Feliz as the key to the deal with Andrus and Salty ranking 2a and 2b. That still hasn’t changed. Anyone who understands a think about defense knows that 12 errors in 90 games means little in a vacuum – and especially when taken in the context of how many balls Andrus gets to. He is already in the discussion of the best defensive shortstop in the game and his likely ceiling remains Omar Vizquel with more gap power. Feliz will be a stud (assuming he’s healthy) and catchers typically take some time to develop so there’s time for Salty. Jones and Harrison were never viewed as more than organizational soldiers – which can still be valuable as trade fodder especially when they are pitchers. So they could have been used much more wisely than towards one year of Tex. This trade was brutal at the time and remains brutal today.

TurnThePage

July 21st, 2009
1:26 pm

Bank Walker, I don’t know how you get that Andrus is not “supposed” to hit at twenty. If you used the same rationale, no one would have ever had anything to say about Jordan Schafer’s play. No one would ever expect that Tommy Hanson would pitch as well as he is. The point is that if Texas has him in the big leagues, they do expect him to hit. Will he improve as he matures? It is likely and I think is expected but I don’t agree with your take on that.

shortstop

July 21st, 2009
1:33 pm

Jordan Schafer was hitting 204… and had 67 ks in 50 games while andrus only has 41 and hes been playing all season. Schafer was overmatched. Andrus was hitting 270 two weeks ago his currently in a slump.

scott

July 21st, 2009
1:34 pm

i especially agree with you on a tangent comment you make regarding the Texas hitting coach. . . I am really sick of people ripping on Pendelton (sp) as being the problem with the Braves hitters present and past and their lack of consistency/power (A Jones, Francour, Schaefer, etc).

Give me a freaking break already. People need to pay less attention to Kincaid at 680 The Fan and think for themselves. TP can tell a hitter the mechanics of what they are or are not doing like they used to do about as well as anyone, and he knows when not to mess with a player’s basic approach, and when to do so when the player needs to make the much ballyhooed “major league adjustments” early in their careers. If Frenchie was too stubborn to listen, it ain’t TP’s fault.

Did Andruw Jones tear it up in LA after he left here? Not exactly. So was TP’s coaching approach responsible for Andruw’s hot/cold career pattern? I dont think so. Andruw is just Andruw. Frenchie is just Frenchie. Coaches are only as good as the talent on the bench and the brain cells (or lack thereof) between the ears of the talent.

Rick in Big D

July 21st, 2009
1:35 pm

Can not forget that we did Casey Kotchman in the trade for Tex plus a pitcher who was with the Braves in Spring Training. Casey has been great

Ed-Covington

July 21st, 2009
1:36 pm

The whole point of acquiring Tex was to offset the lack of quality starting pitching, which was evident before the trade was made. Tex did not fail, except in the “clutch”; JS did in making the trade at all. The ABraves have a .105 hitter, Norton, on their bench and Ross as their back-up catcher. The point is that now the ABraves have neither the prospects, Tex, nor a play-off berth in the years Tex was here. The trade was a huge failure any way you look at it.

shortstop

July 21st, 2009
1:37 pm

kasey kotchman is lyle overbay… congratulations you have 4 hrs from your first baseman… what a joke.

Supes

July 21st, 2009
1:42 pm

Jeff, good blog.

I think it’s about time the AJC took the other side of this issue b/c fans have been throwing John S. under the bus for a while now looking back at this trade.

Salty was never going to start here. McCann is our catcher. Rangers also tried him at 1B (for those who wanna raise that point), and he turned out to be a BUTCHER there defensively.

Elvis A. was never going to start here over Yunel. Now, you can argue, that you could have MOVED over Elvis A. to 2B possibly? That’s about it. He could develop his game a bit more, or he could be just an average SS. Verdict is still out.

Matt Harrison – No way does he EVER crack the ATL Braves rotation. We are 6-7 deep. Yes I know we’ve had to acquire a bunch of starters this past off-season, so people can say (well if we would have kept Harrison we wouldn’t have needed Kawakami, etc). The point is, Harrison is NOTHING more than average at best. His record and high ERA speak for themselves

Neftaly Feliz – He is now projected as an 8th inning guy, or possibly a closer? That is the one guy that we COULD use, esp. given that Gonzo and Soriano are both FA after this season.

The other guy B. Jones will be nothing but a career long minor league journeyman.

So while it SUCKS that we have NOTHING to show for the trade…Texiera is a yankee and Ron Mahay bolted for the FA dollars,

ONLY 1 of those 5 players could have possibly had a future with the ATL Braves big league club.

Case closed

:)

shortstop

July 21st, 2009
1:45 pm

feliz is going to be a stater. He is moved to the bullpen to get him in the big leagues early… like david price.

shortstop

July 21st, 2009
1:47 pm

your right about harrison tho.. theres no way hed ever make the braves rotation as yo have it now… but you might have spent some money on hitting instead of buying 3 pitchers this offseason. Andrus would have eventually moved escobar but Andrus would not have made the majors until next season if hes in ATL

Bank Walker, Texas Ranger

July 21st, 2009
1:47 pm

Turn the Page, Texas is happy with his average and his play, Schultz is the one who thinks he is a bust. No team expects a kid of 19 or 20 to hit at the major leaque level, if they did then Heyward and Freeman would both be with the Braves now. I think at 20, he is doing great. I would love to see him here. My point is he is only going to get better. How many 20 year olds do you know starting in the big leagues. Not many. And he would have been a great fit at SS, Yunel eventually at 3B or 2B. Here would have been our prospects rating at the end of last year by MLB 3. Hayward, 9. Feliz, 21. Andrus, 24. Hanson and 38. Freeman. The Braves were set for 2010 or 2011. We are talking WS contenders instead of a .500 team.

Kevrock/Smarty Jones

July 21st, 2009
1:49 pm

Great Homework Shultzie!

The one we might miss is Feliz BUT we traded one like him a few years back to Milwaukee for Kolb (Major disaster) Cappellen was his name. I know I might have mispelled it but I he had a heater too at 100 mph but I think he is out of the league. SO who knows and we will see.

Bank Walker, Texas Ranger

July 21st, 2009
1:55 pm

Supes, with the love Cox has for Yunel, I wouldn’t doubt Andrus wouldn’t be starting now. And an average short stop, well thats what we have now. Yunel will be a better hitter but he will never be the defensive player Elvis will be. Elvis didn’t get his rating based on his bat. And Feliz will not be a setup man come ‘10 or ‘11. I agree Salty would not have played here but he, Jones and Harrison are all we had to give for Tex.

chris from md

July 21st, 2009
1:58 pm

Jeff,

I had the exact same thought today. Way too much has been made of how we got robbed on this trade.

I think Wren is a legitimate GM of the year candidate if the Braves make the playoffs. Do we realize that the entire outfield, pitching rotation (outside of JJ) and bullpen (outside of Gonzo, if you consider the injuries to Soriano and Moylan last year) is entirely rebuilt from last year?

Chris from MD

Hunk Erdown

July 21st, 2009
2:00 pm

Brian

July 21st, 2009
2:02 pm

Saltalamacchia is still young and has a chance to be very good.

I believe you’re a little off on Andrus. He’s only 20 years old, and while he’s not been good offensively, he wasn’t expected to be. And he has been nothing short of a revelation on defense for the Rangers. His ultimate zone rating, which accounts for errors as well as range, is second only to Jack Wilson in the majors. He commits more errors because he gets to more balls.

Supes

July 21st, 2009
2:09 pm

Feliz is not starter material from some of the things I’ve read on the ESPN “insider blogs”.

Maybe they try him on as a starter, but scouts also say the he maybe better suited for a 8th inning set up man (initially) and then a closer. A guy throwing 100mph, if he can learn an off-speed pitch, and learn control (throw strikes) can be a devastating closer.

People are you really trying to compare Elvis A. and Yunel E? Yunel is a top 3 SS in the NL RIGHT NOW!

Just damn, I don’t care of Cox likes Yunel, Elvis isn’t half the PLAYER Yunel is right now.

In the future, who knows. But right now, there is no way Elvis A. would start over Yunel.

You are all aware that Yunel has the 2nd HIGHEST ave. hitting with RISP in all of baseball, right?

Blue Fox

July 21st, 2009
2:11 pm

Braves should have kept Salty, placed him at first base and left Tex in Texas while letting the other prospects develop. Worst trade of JS’s term, without a doubt.

BugKiller

July 21st, 2009
2:16 pm

What I find the MOST questionable, if even reprehensible, is the penchant for the Braves to just GIVE AWAY pithttp://img.coxnewsweb.com/C/06/98/03/image_7503986.gifchers who throw 100mph. It’s really mind-blowing when you think about it.

If there is one lesson to be taken from all those October failures (besides the fact that Bobby Cox is an overrated dunce in the dugout), is that pitchers who NIBBLE do not win in October (Game 6 notwithstanding).

POWER PITCHERS win in October.

Guys who GO AFTER batters win in October. John Smoltz. Curt Schilling. Randy Johnson.

Look at the October winning percentages of Maddux and Glavine. They’re terrible.

And yet, the Braves seem absolutely okay in giving away Adam Wainwright and Neftali Feliz.

It’s RIDICULOUS!!!

Bank Walker, Texas Ranger

July 21st, 2009
2:18 pm

And the third most errors with limited range

Bank Walker, Texas Ranger

July 21st, 2009
2:23 pm

Good point Brian and Supes, the Rangers moved a Gold Glove short stop, Michael Young to 3rd Base to make room for Elvis. If he is better than Young then I know he would replace Mr. Hustle, Yunel unless the Braves place a premium on mental errors.

Dreamscape

July 21st, 2009
2:31 pm

Supes, Salty wasn’t tried at first. Texas just traded their starting first baseman, which left open a spot. I didn’t know who it should be easy to expect a player who has never played at first until he reached Atlanta to be great at the position. Tomorrow, I think the Braves should start Escobar on the mound because obviously, moving to a position has no learning curve. While Salty has struggled with Texas, I’d much rather him not hitting homers than Kotchman. Salty at least has time on his side. And even if Salty was traded, maybe the Braves would have gotten something for the pitching staff, the real weakness of that team.

As for errors and shortstops…it never ceases to amaze me how fans think errors is the be-all, end-all of defensive stats. First, it’s a very easy to manipulate system in which the scorer has the power to decide if that ball should have an error or not. Second, how hard is to understand that if you get to more balls, especially ones that other players at your position would not be capable of, you increase your chances to make errors. Andrus has some of the best range in the game and he has always played young for his level and that continues now. At 20, you are looking for defense and hope the kid is mature enough to learn from failure. To expect a kid to jump AAA, like both Andrus and Schafer did, and perform at a league average level is foolish. Hitters are especially prone to this struggle because in AAAA, they see pitchers who know they can’t live off their fastball and will introduce young batters to junk pitches. At that point, young hitters are used to 20-somethings who think they can just bring their fastball and the secondary pitch and that’s it. The Aaron Smalls and Brad Woodall’s of the world serve a vital purpose in preparing young hitters by throwing circle changeups, long sweeping curves, and simply changing speeds on their fastball.

Matt Harrison had good value at the time, but I’m not too concerned about that. Neither was I concerned with Beau Jones. But Feliz was routinely included has having the best fastball in the system and five year projections had him as a member of the starting staff. He’s getting some bullpen time now, but only because the Rangers want him to be on their team now. His future is as a starter, though he could go Papelbon and become too valuable out of the pen.

To look at this deal as anything other than a complete failure lacks much merit. It was Schuerholz’s last ditched effort to save face on the streak. It failed and many knew that it would. Anyone who thought that Teix was going to be around come 2009 was taking a vacation from reality. Anyone who thought the Braves could simply slug their way to a championship was already on the same vacation. The Braves needed starting pitching then and it took them a year and a half before they understood that.

Supes

July 21st, 2009
2:46 pm

Supes, Salty wasn’t tried at first. Texas just traded their starting first baseman, which left open a spot. I didn’t know who it should be easy to expect a player who has never played at first until he reached Atlanta to be great at the position. Tomorrow, I think the Braves should start Escobar on the mound because obviously, moving to a position has no learning curve. While Salty has struggled with Texas, I’d much rather him not hitting homers than Kotchman. Salty at least has time on his side. And even if Salty was traded, maybe the Braves would have gotten something for the pitching staff, the real weakness of that team.

******************

OMG, that maybe the most ignorant statement of all. I watched several games when Salty was traded that the Rangers played him at 1B! I distinctly remember it was against the Twins at the MetroDome and he was a complete BUTCHER at 1B.

So spare me the argument, why does everyone thing that 1B is “like the easiest position to play, hey I know, let’s move Brian McCann to 1B to get his bat in the lineup more often is a topic brought up at the Braves DOB blogs on a weekly basis! For the love of baseball, 1B is not easy and it requires a lot of skill”.

Salty – NOT A 1B baseman. Case closed. Rangers started both Blaylock and Davis (until he got demoted) at 1B over Salty, neither one is considered a DEFENSIVE stud. What does that tell you?

Damn, just damn. Some of you just can’t let go of “prospects” that amount to NOTHING more than just average.

Dreamscape

July 21st, 2009
2:52 pm

No, Salty had a 20 game audition with Texas at first. To say that meant they “tried” him at first is lacking of this little thing called facts. Playing first base does require skill like any other position. Skill that can worked on in winter leagues and in spring training or even the minors. Not skill that can be worked on the fly in the major leagues, which apparently you think must be easy since you were getting on him for his defense at first.

Of course the Rangers started Blalock and Davis over Salty at first. They want Salty to catch. Seriously, reading fundamentals are fun and all…

Bank Walker, Texas Ranger

July 21st, 2009
2:52 pm

Damn Supes, stats don’t lie. Elvis is better, admit it dammit, admit it.

Bank Walker, Texas Ranger

July 21st, 2009
2:56 pm

And for all those telling Jeff “good article” and “way to do your research” you’re a bunch of brown nosing, suck ups.

jeffrey d

July 21st, 2009
3:10 pm

As of right now, the trade hasn’t come back to bite us in the butts yet. Salty’s been below average. Andrus isn’t hitting too well (or fielding apparently…wow). And I’ve never understood why people were so crazy about Harrison. He seems decent at best. Feliz will probably haunt us for awhile though.

But overall I still think it was a good trade. We got a year and a half (or would’ve gotten it) of one of the best hitters/fielders in the game. Putting Tex in the middle of a lineup featuring Chipper, McCann, and Francoeur and Andruw (back when still thought they were good) should have given us one of the best lineups in the game. We got a good lefty reliever too. It might’ve cost a lot but it was a necessary evil.

Good article, Jeff. Way to do your research.

Alan

July 21st, 2009
3:12 pm

Jeff, the picture above says it all. The keys to the trade were Andrus and Feliz, both teenagers at the time and very highly regarded. Salty may have been the “big name” (literally), but he was expendable. As I recall, Harrison also was highly regarded, but injury-prone, which is why Jones (another lefty) was added to the deal. Any way you look at it, the Braves gave up too much for what amounted to less than 1 year from Teixeira and 2 months from Mahay.

bali smith

July 21st, 2009
3:41 pm

i am so tired of the braves getting rid of young talent and picking up players they think will be a quick fix.Tex is a great baseball player but the braves were never going to sign himfor a longterm contract.I hated to see Frenchy leave the Braves…… I know he struck out alot and did not hit liked the Braves hopedhe would this seasonbut geez what an athlete…… now I read where the Braves may trade Escobar it does not make sense to me

UGA 75

July 21st, 2009
3:41 pm

Can’t help but notice you point out that Rudy Jamarillo hasn’t succeeded with a single hitter, on the other hand can you point out a single hitter Terry Pendleton has helped? Andruw and Frenchy were ruined by a so called hitting coach that doesn’t work with hitters strengths, but tries to teach them to hit the way he did. Don Baylor taught hitters to use their individual strengths and improve on that aspect of the game. Andruw isn’t totally back, neither is Frenchy, but both improved after TP’s instructions fade into memories. It is about time that the columnist for the AJC do a comparison between TP, his approach and that of successful hitting coaches. TP is on his way to ruining Nate Mac now. The Braves need a hitting coach that doesn’t do any harm, that would be improvement by subtraction at least.

C-Rip

July 21st, 2009
3:47 pm

OK…this column is fairly interesting…though still flawed considering I don’t think you can knock Elvis Andrus on anything yet considering he’s about 3 years old. But I still see this same ridiculous notion that Teixeira was not a “clutch” player in Atlanta….which is pretty much just everyone’s way of projecting their frustration for the Braves not making the playoffs in ‘07 or performing better in ‘08 entirely on him….because absolutely no fact or statistical measure backs up that statement. The facts, Tex played, essentially a full year for Atlanta, here are his numbers:

157 G, 589 ABs, 37 HR, 134 RBI, .295 AVG, .395 OBP, .943 OPS

Here are his numbers “Late and Close” (7th inning or later, game tied or within one run)
2007: 62 ABs, .332 AVG, 3 HR, 12 RBI
2008: 88 ABs, .352 AVG, 8 HR, 25 RBI

For his career:
Late and Close: 533 ABs, 35 HR, 119 RBI, .285 AVG
2 Outs w/runners in scoring position: 437 ABs, 39 HR, 210 RBI, .293 AVG

Across every statistical measure – Teixeira is a clutch performer. So it isn’t far more likely the fault of say….the Braves having outfielders that COMBINED to hit 18 homeruns in ‘08, or the fact that Bob Wickman was the closer in ‘07 (or Gonzalez in ‘08), or that they were relying on the following hacks to make up 3/5s of their starting rotation: Kyle Davies, Chuck James, Mike Hampton, JoJo Reyes, Charlie Morton, Lance Cormier, Mark Redman, Buddy Carlyle…and not Teixeria that the Braves finished poorly?

jeffrey d

July 21st, 2009
3:53 pm

So we’re still gonna pick and choose when we’re going to judge TP? Why not compare McCann’s and Escobar’s minor league and major league numbers? They’ve taken a big step forward since coming to the majors. But that can’t be the work of TP. He obviously only brings down hitters.

Major league baseball players have been hitting for about 15 years by the time they make it to the top. You mean to say you think TP instantly makes everyone forget how to hit? Or maybe you’re just looking for a scapegoat?

the truth...

July 21st, 2009
4:02 pm

yep…the deal was good for the Rangers and them alone….we sucked wind getting Tex just to boost his upcoming free agency. I didn’t like Tex then and don’t like him now…..the trade had to be the worst the Braves have done in my memory (and that goes a long way back)

Anyone who can spin it to say that we got the best of that deal, or that they really only received one player who’ll make a difference needs to go back to Little League and start over…

Who could ever say it is worthwhile to trade so many young talents for one “stud” who will carry a weak team to the promised land…doesn’t work, doesn’t happen and obviously didn’t ….

Anyone remember the Herschel Walker trade? Well read this and ponder how it works for the team giving away the farm….even for a stud like Herschell….and does anyone seriously think Tex is even in the same league impact wise as Herschell was? I doubt it….

I know, different sports, different times….anyway…the deal for Tex sucked….don’t spin it cause it makes you look dumb and dumber….

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Herschel_Walker_trade

Larvell "Sugar Bear" Blanks

July 21st, 2009
4:06 pm

The part of the trade that was predictable for me was the Teixiera part – with Boras as his agent, Tex was destined for a free agent contract search for the highest bidder – and the Braves couldn’t (wouldn’t?) participate – therefore so JS could have one last kick at the can, JS opted for an almost certain no more than 100 games of Tex for all those prospects and whatever they would become – good, bad or in-between. JS more than anyone else should have known what Boras would do at the first opportunity – I have to believe it was JS’ ego and bowtie that prompted him to squander those prospects and be left with nothing but a good glove, Punch and Judy hitter in Kotchman. What a waste!

jeffrey d

July 21st, 2009
5:43 pm

All I’m saying is we got a player who can be a difference maker to help us compete for two postseasons. So far, we didn’t give up anyone who’s done anything significant in the big leagues. I know that that’ll change, but it’s what had to be done.

Matt

July 22nd, 2009
11:17 am

Elvis being bad at defense is your contention, which is evidenced by his 12 errors. You’ve never seen Elvis play, have you? Or, are you an individual who thinks that errors are a good metric to evaluate defense? Either way, what a stupid, stupid way to present Elvis’ value.

Josh

July 22nd, 2009
12:46 pm

And yet Salty is only 23 years old, Elvis 20, and Feliz 20, Harrison 23-24, all still have tremendous upside. Definitely a reason why Texas is even contending this year. While Teixeira is hitting for the Yankees. Horrible deal.

Katie

July 22nd, 2009
2:22 pm

I think Salty and Elvis have been great for Texas this year. Elvis is in a little bit of a slump right now but alot of the players on Texas has had a little slump one time or another
This year. Salty has been great defensivly and has really improved as for his BA that is also the result of a little slump, and even with the slump his BA isn’t half bad.